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EDRE516 Online Semester 2, 2012

Assignment 1

Assignment cover sheet


Student ID Number/s: S00108601 Student Surname/s:

Given names: Carlos Alvarez

Cruz

Course: Masters of Education (primary) School: ACU Unit code: EDRE516 Due date: 26th October Lecturer-in-Charge: Elizabeth Dowling Unit title: Religious Education Curriculum Date submitted: 26th October Liz Dowling

Assignment Title and/or number: Assignment 2b

DECLARATION OF ORIGINALITY 1. This assignment is submitted in accordance with the Academic Regulations and the Academic Honesty Policy. 2. No part of this assignment has been copied from any other source without acknowledgement of the source. 3. No part of this assignment has been written by any other person, except to the extent of collaboration and/or group work as defined in the unit outline. 4. This assignment has not been recycled, using work substantially the same as work I have completed previously and which has been counted towards satisfactory completion of another unit of study credited towards another qualification, unless the Lecturer-in-Charge has granted prior written consent to do so. 5. I have made and retained a copy of this original assignment. Signature of student(s): Carlos Alvarez Cruz Date: 26/ 10/ 2012

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EDRE516 Online Semester 2, 2012

Assignment 1

Australian Catholic University


School of Religious Education
Student Name: Carlos Alvarez Cruz Student Number: S00108601 Unit Code - Name: EDRE516 Assignment: 2B Due Date: 26th October ASSESSMENT TASK 2 B 25% Short Essay 1250 words

Outline the principles that should guide policy for assessment and reporting of the classroom religion program in a Catholic school. In your response, you should choose those major principles that ought to guide the assessment and reporting of a students achievements in the classroom religion program. Potentially, there are many such principles. You should identify those major factors that should guide policy and practice in this aspect of the curriculum in religious education. In your discussion of the reasons for your choices, you may wish to comment on what your chosen principle is seeking to achieve or remediate in the religious education curriculum. The materials in module 4 of this unit will be the most helpful for you in this task, but you may wish to refer to materials in other modules as well. Criteria Outline of the key principles that guide policy for assessment and reporting of the classroom religion program in a Catholic school. Engagement with the set readings and material gained in class and appropriate reference to school experience. Creatively develops the response that is appropriate to the unit content. Sentence/paragraph construction and sequence Accuracy of In-text referencing and list of references

(1250 words, 25%, due 26th October, 2012, 11.55 pm via LEO)

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THE POLICY FOR ASSESSMENT AND REPORTING IN A CLASSROOM RELIGION PROGRAMME IN A CATHOLIC SCHOOL This essay outlines the key principles that should guide the policy for assessment and reporting in a classroom religion programme in a Catholic school. The focuses of the principles are on assessment for learning and authentic assessment. The essay commences with a definition of these two approaches. The essay then describes the principles that should guide the policy for the assessment of and reporting of a classroom religion program in a Catholic school. Assessment refers to the activities that teachers design in order that students can demonstrate the knowledge, skills and attitudes that they have acquired as a consequence of their involvement with the subject (Marsh, 2008). It can serve a range of purposes including the evaluation of student progress, grading the students, predicting future performance, motivating the learner and evaluating the teaching (Marsh, 2008). Assessment for learning focuses on formative assessment as a means of improving the performance of the student (Grajczonek, 2007; Marsh, 2008). Formative assessment seeks to enable the teacher to make ongoing improvements to the learning strategies used and to signpost to the student their progress (Grajczonek, 2007; Marsh, 2008). The alignment and realignment of teaching strategies in order to better assist the student to achieve the learning outcomes improves the quality of the learning experience. Authentic assessment involves the consideration of the real world context within which the student might be expected to apply the skills, knowledge and abilities that are taught in the subject (Frey et. al., 2012). This is likely to require the use of team activities and the resultant peer assessment (Frey et. al., 2012). It will involve a multiple approach to assessment including self and peer assessment (Frey et. al., 2012; Williams et. al., 1999). Authentic assessment involves realistic activities that are cognitively complex (Frey et. al., 2012). The approach to assessment and reporting should be structured (Grajczonek, 2007). The five step process involves planning the elements that are to be assessed and how they are assessed; the gathering of the information on the progress of the student; the analysis of the information, the recording of the information and the communication of the information through the reporting process (Grajczonek, 2007).

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Assessment practices should seek to allow students to demonstrate their potential to the maximum of their ability (Marsh, 2008; Williams et. al., 1999). Effective assessment practices should empower the learner to self-actualise and demonstrate the knowledge and understanding that they have acquired in the subject (Williams et. al., 1999). Authentic assessment requires that the student demonstrates competence in real-world settings (Cormack et. al., 1998). The outcomes from a classroom religion programme might be evaluated in the context of community action, the presentation of play or performance as part of the learning context or the involvement in discussion of issues with clergy within the classroom The assessment should be linked to the learning objectives and outcomes of the classroom religious programme (Marsh, 2008; Williams et. al., 1999). The assessment should seek to support problem-solving, collaboration and integrated knowledge within the parameters of the curriculum (Williams et. al., 1999). The focus should be on providing the student with the opportunity to demonstrate the values and behaviours that underpin the religious education programme (Fancourt, 2005). The use of multiple approaches and activities in the assessment approach provides the opportunity for the diversity of individuals in the classroom to be able to demonstrate their learning. Assessment should involve a range of stakeholders in the assessment of the student (Williams et. al., 1999). If the student is involved in a community activity, then those stakeholders that interact with the student might participate in the assessment of the student. A presentation to the class might involve the members of the class in the assessment. In order for this to occur it might be necessary to develop explicit assessment criteria that can be easily understood by those people participating in the assessment (Sadler, 2007). There are six key principles provided by Marsh (2008) that should guide assessment. The first is that inaccuracies are inherent in any process of assessment. The second is that assessment must perform a role of providing the teacher with feedback in order that continual improvement can be made to the process of instruction (Marsh 2008). The third is that assessment must guide the instruction (Marsh, 2008). The fourth is that assessment must be fair and equitable to all students (Marsh, 2008). The fifth is that assessment should be broad in the abilities that it measures (Marsh, 2008). The sixth is that the assessment must be relevant to all stakeholders in the learning process (Marsh, 2008).
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Assignment 1

Formative assessment seeks to provide the student with feedback on their progression in order that the learner and teacher can identify the actions that are required so that the student can achieve the required level of competence (Marsh, 2008). It is a means of actively involving the student in the process and promoting self-assessment (Marsh, 2008). Such an approach promotes the assessment strategies that individuals use in order to improve themselves within the real world context. The recording and reporting of authentic assessment requires more than a grade or a mark (Williams et. al., 1999). The reporting process may require approaches such as the self-reflection reports, peer evaluation reports and task completion reports (Tai and Yuen, 2007). These elements provide the opportunity for a more in-depth assessment of the outcomes that have resulted from the religious education programme and the manner in which the student has undergone the necessary changes as a consequence of engaging with the learning material. The broadening of the assessment of the students enables a more detailed and comprehensive report on the progress of the student (Marsh, 2009). In reporting student progress it is important to present the feedback in a fair, timely, confidential and clear manner (Marsh, 2009, p. 285). The criteria and the grading that are used to make the assessment must be made transparent and be credible (Marsh, 2009). The reporting on the student requires that the basis for the judgement is transparent (Marsh, 2009). By providing written feedback in support of the grades, the information contained in the report has more meaning. In conclusion, assessment for learning and authentic assessment, and the resulting reporting, is challenging for teachers. The structured approach to assessment and reporting creates strong linkages between the desired outcomes, the learning process, the mix of formative and summative assessment and the reporting of the information. The aim is to create multiple opportunities for the student to demonstrate their skills and abilities in real-world settings. Activities such as self-assessment, peer assessment and self-reporting that broaden the skills and behaviours that are being assessed enable a more complex and detailed assessment to be made. This approach that requires assessment to be ongoing supports the learning process and provides the student and their parents with detailed feedback on the progress of the student. Assessment supports the student in their achievements and provides feedback to the teacher, the student and
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the parent. The aim is to develop an approach that informs the learning process as much as the outcomes and makes assessment an equally important element in the learning process as the instructional approach. Word Count 2 B: 1192 words

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References Assignment 2 B: Cormack, P., Johnson, B. Peters, J., & Williams, D. (1998). Authentic Assessment: Implications for Teaching and Learning. Canberra: Australian Curriculum Studies Association. Fancourt, N. (2005). Challenges for self-assessment in religious education. British Journal of Religious Education, 27, (2), 115 125. Frey, B.B., Schmitt, V.L. & Allen, J.P. (2012). Defining Authentic Classroom Assessment. Practical Assessment, Research and Evaluation, 17 (2), 1- 18. Grajczonek, J. (2007). An authentic approach to assessment in the Religion program. In M. Ryan & J. Grajczonek, An inspired tradition: Religious education in Catholic primary schools today. Brisbane: Lumino Press. Marsh, C. (2008). Assessment and reporting. In Becoming a teacher 4: Knowledge, skills and issues. Frenchs Forest: Pearson, 261 267. Sadler, D.R. (2007). Perils in the meticulous specification of goals and assessment criteria. Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy and Practice, 14(3), 387-392. Tai, G.X. & Yuen, M.C. (2007). Authentic assessment strategies in problem based learning. Ascilite Paper, Singapore: 983 993. Williams, D., Johnson, B., Peters, J. & Cormack, P. (1999). Assessment: From standardised to authentic approaches. In B. Johnson & A. Reid (Eds.), Contesting the curriculum (pp. 146 160). Katoomba: Social Science Press.

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ASSESSMENT & REPORTING RUBRIC ASSESSMENT 2B Criteria


Outline of the key principles that guide policy for assessment and reporting of the classroom religion program in a Catholic school.

STANDARD A
An excellent preparatory outline of the key principles that guide policy for assessment and reporting of the classroom religion program in a Catholic school is provided. All ideas in the paper are relevant and very well developed. Outstanding evidence of reading and material gained in class and appropriate reference to school context

STANDARD B
The preparatory outline of the key features that guide policy for assessment and reporting of the classroom religion program in a Catholic school is provided and it is mostly clear. The ideas in the paper are usually relevant and well-developed.

STANDARD C
The preparatory outline of the key features that guide policy for assessment and reporting of the classroom religion program in a Catholic school is provided with adequate detail.

STANDARD D
An outline of the key features that guide policy for assessment and reporting of the classroom religion program in a Catholic school is not evident or it is unclear.

Engagement with the set readings and material and appropriate reference to school context Creatively develops the response that is appropriate to the unit content

Draws on a good range of relevant material and experience to inform writing in addition to the prescribed text and some reference to school context Develops the response in a way that is usually appropriate to the unit content. The response is usually accurate and valid but lacks some flair and insight. Sentence/paragraph construction and sequence is creditable. There are some evident errors in the in-text referencing and list of references.

Draws on a satisfactory range of material and experience to inform writing with limited reference to school context Develops the response in a way that is appropriate to the unit content. Some problems with accuracy and validity are evident. Sentence/paragraph construction and sequence is satisfactory. There are more than four errors evident in the in-text referencing and list of references.

Meaning is obscured. Engagement with the readings is minimal or inaccurate.

Creatively develops the response with flair and in a way that is always appropriate to the unit content.

The response has not been developed appropriately.

Sentence/paragraph construction and sequence is accurate Accuracy of In-text referencing and list of references

Sentence/paragraph construction and sequence is outstanding in most respects. In-text referencing and list of references is accurate in all respects.

There are many and/or repeated errors in sentence/paragraph construction. In-text referencing and/or the list of references are inaccurate or erroneous in many respects.

Grade:

Comments:

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