US ARMY

SHOULDER SLEEVE
INSIGNIA (SSI)
By Pierre-Emmanuel V.
(P-E / Militariabelgium / Collectorofinsignia)

AIR DEFENSE ARTILLERY
FM44-100 : « the
surveillance ».

mission of US Army Air Defense Artillery is to protect the force and selected geopolitical assets from aerial attack, missile attack, and

th

10 Air and Missile Defense Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 10th Air Defense Artillery
Brigade on 5 January 1984.
Color

Woodland

Desert

It was redesignated for the 10th Army Air and Missile Defense Command with the
description updated effective 17 October 2011. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-686)
Scarlet and yellow are the colors associated with Air Defense Artillery. The blue stylized
wings suggest the sky and flight in reference to the air defense function and the arrowheads
denote accuracy and aerial warfare. The X-shape formed by the wings refer to the Roman

ACU

numeral ten, the unit’s numerical designation.

Multicam

st

11 Air Defense Artillery Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 27 May 1980. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-654)
Color

Woodland

ACU

Desert

Scarlet and yellow are the colors associated with Artillery. The mission of air defense is
suggested by the yellow arrowhead, representing incoming aerial weaponry, and the red
arrowhead coming from below to intercept. The combined silhouette of the two arrowheads
simulates the Roman numeral for eleven, the unit’s numerical designation.

Multicam

th

30 Air Defense Artillery Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 30th Artillery Brigade on 12
April 1966.
Color

Woodland

Desert

It was redesignated for the 30th Air Defense Artillery Brigade on 4 April 1972. The insignia
was amended to update the description and symbolism on 14 June 2012 (TIOH Dwg. No. A1-417).
The three arrows are used to allude to missiles and the three main Ryukyu Islands of the
unit’s former home station. The dual band symbolizes a specific area (target), and also
simulates a zero which, in conjunction with the three arrows, suggests the numerical
designation of the organization.

ACU

st

31 Air Defense Artillery Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 23 October 1975. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-590)
Color

Woodland

ACU

Desert

The stylized missile represents the types of weapon systems employed by the Brigade; the
sets of three stars and one star, its numerical designation of “31st;” and the yellow stripes
represent radar beams employed for detection and acquisition. Scarlet and yellow are the
colors used for Artillery.

Multicam

32

nd

Air and Missile Defense Command

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 32d Artillery Brigade on 28
April 1966.
Color

Woodland

Desert

It was redesignated for the 32d Army Air Defense Command on 15 July 1966.
The insignia was redesignated effective 16 October 1998, for the 32d Army Air and Missile
Defense Command. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-418)
ACU

Red and yellow are the colors used for Artillery. The five arrowheads simulating missiles
allude to the air defense mission of the brigade and their placement 3 and 2 refer to the
organization’s numerical designation.

Multicam

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35 Air Defense Artillery Brigade
This insignia was approved on 13 Feb 85. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-705)
Color

Woodland

Scarlet and yellow are the colors associated with the Air Defense Artillery branch. The
ascending arrowhead, apparently meeting and destroying an aircraft in flight, illustrates the
basic mission of the Branch. The three peaks in base and V-shape (for five) allude to the
unit’s numerical designation.

Desert

ACU

th

38 Air Defense Artillery Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 38th Artillery Brigade on 2
June 1961.
Color

Woodland

It was redesignated for the 38th Air Defense Artillery Brigade on 3 April 1972. (TIOH Dwg.
No. A-1-281)
The partition line represents the division of the Korean Peninsula by the DMZ. The gauntlet
represents the protection offered by the Brigade, the lightning bolt the swift retaliation against
any hostile air attack. The colors, red and yellow, are for the Air Defense Artillery.

th

69 Air Defense Artillery Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was authorized on 6 September 1983. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1684)
Color

Woodland

ACU

Desert

The comets allude to flight trajectory and swiftness. The black discs suggest cannon balls.
The comets are placed in a defensive posture referring to the unit’s mission and resemble the
number 69. Their position further suggests the link in defense between Europe and the
United States.

Multicam

th

94 Air and Missile Defense Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was authorized for the 94th Air Defense Artillery Brigade on
29 June 1984.
Color

Woodland

ACU

Desert

It was redesignated for the 94th Army Air and Missile Defense Command effective 16
October 2005. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-693)
Scarlet and yellow are the colors of Artillery. The tower symbolizes a strong defensive
position. The two arrows represent ground-to-air missiles referring to the unit’s mission. The
sea lion, commemorative of the unit’s proud heritage, alludes to World War II service in the
Philippines and the South Pacific.

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107 Air Defense Artillery Brigade
Color

The ‘X’ map symbol for brigades, is also the roman numerical for ten and refers to Virginia as
the tenth state admitted to the Union. The arrowhead rising from the orbit suggests artillery
and the orbit, symbol of dominion, alludes to Virginia as the Dominion state.

th

108 Air Defense Artillery Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 7 December 1983.
683)
Color

Woodland

ACU

Desert

(TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-

Scarlet and yellow are the colors traditionally associated with Air Defense Artillery. The
crenellated configuration of the border indicates a strong defensive position. The blue center
symbolizes the sky and the pheon alludes to the unit’s striking capabilities; thus, the design
elements embody the unit’s mission. They also refer to the unit’s location, Kaiserslautern,
Germany, which derives its name from a local stream (the blue area) and a castle built on the
site in the 12th Century (the crenellated border).

Multicam

th

164 Air Defense Artillery Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 1 October 1988. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1760)
Color

Woodland

ACU

Desert

Red and yellow are the colors traditionally associated with Air Defense Artillery; blue is
symbolic of the skies which are the battlefield of the unit. The arrowhead refers to the unit's
missile systems and the lightning bolt alludes to speed. The rayed sun represents Florida,
the unit's location.

Multicam

th

174 Air Defense Artillery Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 1 September 2008. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-971)
Color

ACU

Multicam

Scarlet and yellow are the colors associated with Air Defense Artillery. The Nike Hercules
missile was the weapon last employed in the ground based air defense of the United States
Homeland and represents the Brigade’s resumption of this mission. The seventeen stars
represent Ohio as the seventeenth state to enter the Union and is home to the unit. The
diverging lightning bolts allude to radar acquisition and speed of response. Red is the color of
valor and yellow/gold is emblematic of excellence. The blue is symbolic of the clear skies that
the Brigade maintains.

678th Air Defense Artillery Brigade
Scarlet and yellow are the colors used for Artillery. The stylized missile represents the type of
weapon systems employed by the Brigade. The three cannon balls denote the weapons
employed in the past. The blue palmetto bunch with the white crescent moon are associated
with the South Carolina state flag and represent the home of the unit.
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 1 September 2015. (TIOH Dwg. No. A1-1103)

rd

263 Air and Missile Defense Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 263rd Air Defense Artillery
Brigade on 14 February 1991.
Color

Woodland

Desert

Woodland

ACU

The insignia was redesignated for the 263rd Army Air and Missile Defense Command on
20 February 2002. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-782)
Scarlet and yellow are the colors traditionally associated with Air Defense Artillery.
Yellow/gold refers to excellence. The missile and cannon, adapted from the branch insignia,
represent firepower and strength. The palmetto and crescent are associated with the South
Carolina State flag and reflect the home of the unit.

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357 Air and Missile Defense Detachment

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 7 May 2009. It was cancelled effective 17
October 2011. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-998)

Color

Scarlet and yellow are associated with Artillery. The three piles represent searchlight beams,
referring to the unit campaign missions in Germany as the 357th Searchlight Detachment
during World War II. The demi-burst represents the destruction of enemy targets by the unit.

ACU

AIRBORNE (ABN)
rd

13 Airborne Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 2 June 1943.
The unicorn is associated, by tradition, with qualities of virtue, courage and strength. The
horn of the unicorn signifies extreme courage. All of such virtues should be cultivated in all
units. It is hoped that these virtues will be conspicuous in the 13th Airborne Division. The
unicorn has been winged to represent its travel in the air as “Airborne.” The blue background
is the color of the Infantry, which is the basic arm of the Division, and also indicates the sky,
which is the distinctive medium of travel for the Division.
Active : 13 Augustus 1943 – 26 February 1946
Campaigns : World War II

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17 Airborne Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 8 February 1943. The airborne tab was
rescinded on 29 January 1947. The airborne tab was restored on 1 March 1949.
The talon represents the seizing and holding ability of an airborne division. The black
background is symbolic of the darkness during which an airborne attack might often be made.
Active : 15 January 1942 – 16 June 1945
Campaigns : World War II

th

18 Airborne Corps

Color

Woodland

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 18th Army Corps on 15
February 1944. It was amended to change the description and add the airborne tab on 1 May
1950.
The insignia was redesignated for the XVIII Airborne Corps on 16 September 1958. (TIOH
Drawing Number A-1-73)
The dragon’s head is representative of cunning, endurance and ferocity against enemies and
is symbolic of the strategy and powerful attack of the Corps.

Desert reversed
var. 2

Desert var. 1

Desert

Active : January 1942 – 15 October 1945
21 May 1951 – Present
Campaigns : World War II
Cold War
War on terrorism (OEF and OIF)

ACU

Multicam

82

nd

Airborne Division

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved for the 82nd Division by the Adjutant General,
American Expeditionary Forces on 21 October 1918 and was confirmed by The Adjutant
General on 8 July 1922.
Color

Woodland

Desert

The insignia was redesignated for the 82d Airborne Division and an “Airborne” tab
authorized on 31 August 1942. Authorization for the tab was rescinded on 29 January 1947
and subsequently restored on 23 December 1948 and announced later on 1 March 1949.
(TIOH Drawing Number A-1-129)
ACU

The double “A” refers to the nickname “All American Division” adopted by the organization in
France during World War I.

Multicam

Active : 25 March 1917 – 27 May 1919
24 June 1921 – Present
Campaigns : World War I
World War II
Cold War
War on terrorism

st

101 Airborne Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 101st Division on 23 May 1923.
It was redesignated for the 101st Airborne Division on 28 August 1942.
Color

Woodland

It was redesignated for the 101st Air Cavalry Division on 5 August 1968.
The insignia was redesignated for the 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile) on 10
September 1968. It was amended to update the description and correct the symbolism on 8
February 2006. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-148)

Desert reversed
variant

Desert

Desert

The design is based on one of the Civil War traditions of the State of Wisconsin, this State
being the territory of the original 101 st Division. The eagle alludes to “Old Abe,” the famous
war eagle carried into combat during the Civil War by the 8 th Wisconsin Infantry Regiment.

ACU

Multicam

rd

173 Airborne Brigade Combat Team
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved on 13 May 1963 for the 173rd Division.
It was amended to correct the dimensions on 29 July 1963.
Color

Woodland

Desert

The insignia was redesignated for the 173rd Airborne Division. It was amended to include
the tab « Airborne » and update the description on 26 April 2000.
It was redesignated for the 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team on 11 October 2006.
(TIOH Drawing Number A-1-310)

ACU

Multicam

The bayonet is used to refer to the brigade being borne by the wing alludes to the brigade's
airborne status. Red, white and blue are the national colors.

ALPHA UNITS
Acquisition Support Center
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the U.S. Army Acquisition
Executive Support Agency on 3 December 1998. It was redesignated retroactive to 1
October 2002, for the U.S. Army Acquisition Support Center. (TIOH Drawing Number
A-1-840)
Black, white and yellow are the colors of the U.S. Army Acquisition Corps emblem. The
Greek "Alpha" and "Omega" are adapted from the organization's emblem and

symbolize the intricate and continuous acquisition process and mission.

Airborne Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved for the Airborne Command on 22 March
1943. The Command was redesignated the Airborne Center effective 1 March 1944.
No official redesignation letter of the insignia was written; however, the manufacturing
drawing for the insignia was revised with the addition of an airborne tab for the Airborne
Center. The Airborne Center was disbanded and the insignia was rescinded on 29
January 1947. On 10 April 1952, the insignia was reinstated as the Airborne
Command for wear by certain claissifed units. The insignia was again rescinded on 21
January 1959.
The glider and parachute represent the airborne mission of the organization.

Allied Forces Headquarters
The insignia was approved on May 14, 1943. It was authorized for wear by members of
Allied Force Headquarters (American and British) and by personnel of separate units
assigned to Headquarters Command or Allied Force Headquarters.
The colors red, white and blue represents the colors of the United States and Britain.
The letters are the abbreviation for Allied Force.

Army Air Forces
The insignia was authorized for wear by AAF Regulation 35-11 dated March 21, 1942.
The use of the insignia was discontinued after the Air Force was established as a
separate Service under the National Security Act of 1947.
The ultramarine disk represents the sky and air, the medium in which the Air Force
operates. The white star with red disk has been the identifying symbol of the U.S. Army
airplane since its inception. The golden wings surmounting the star are an indication of
victorious operations.

Army Broadcasting System
The Shoulder Sleeve Insignia was approved on 14 Feb 1991. (TIOH Drawing Number
A-1-788)
Teal blue and yellow are the colors traditionally associated with branch unassigned
units. Red denotes action and zeal. The polestar symbolizes worldwide capabilities and
scope. The lightning flashes, signifying speed and electronic transmission, form arrows
pointing in the four cardinal directions depicting dissemination of information.

Army Corrections Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 28 September 2007. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-943)
The hexagon indicates the six correctional facilities the Command will manage – Fort
Leavenworth, Fort Lewis, Fort Sill, Fort Knox, Korea, and Germany. The bars allude to

setting the bar of conscience against anger; the demi-spears denote readiness and
alertness. The bars and demi-spears illustrate a portcullis, signifying protection. The
star symbolizes Army Corrections Command’s authority and control to rehabilitate
military offenders in support of the Army and other military departments.

Army Materiel Command
The insignia was originally approved for US Army Materiel Command on 29 Oct 62;
redesignated for US Army Development and Readiness Command (DARCOM) ON
23 Feb 76; and redesignated for US Army Materiel Command on 23 Nov 84. (TIOH
Drawing Number A-1-305)
The lozenge and white areas represent the command and control elements of the
organization with the red area used to represent the Army and the blue area industry.
The white area also alludes to the flow of materiel through the equal and combined
efforts of the Army and industry as directed.

Army National Guard Recruiting and
Retention Force
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 12 October 2007. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-945)
Red, white, and blue are the national colors. The 54 stars denote the existence of the
Army National Guard in all 50 states, 3 territories, and the District of Columbia. The
Minute Man symbolizes the Army National Guard, the oldest component of the United
States Armed Forces. The triangle signifies protection, alluding to the Army National
Guard Recruitment and Retention Forces’ function to provide and maintain military
strength for national defense.

Army National Guard Training Center
Garrison Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 1 November 2011. (TIOH Dwg. No. A1-1066)
The three colors refer to the basic combat arms and also refer to the components of the
“One Army” concept: Active Army, Army Reserve and Army National Guard, reflecting
the association with Training Centers. The central disc with the representation of the
Minute Man statue and the thirteen stars recall the beginnings of our country and its
citizen soldiers.

Army Reserve Careers Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 3 September 2009. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-11013)
The oval shaped insignia alludes to the continuous cycle of support to all Soldiers. The
gold wings with the red details indicate the bloodshed by the Soldiers in the defense of
the nation’s freedom. The Roman cuirass denotes security. The sword symbolizes
military preparedness. The detail in the middle of the blade illustrates the Twin Towers,
signifying the attacks that transformed the Army Reserve to an operational force widely
used in the Global War on Terrorism. The star placed at the base represents ground
zero. It serves to remind us that the foundation of the Army Reserve strength is built
upon its Citizen Warriors.

Army Reserve Command

A shoulder sleeve insignia was originally authorized on 24 June 1991 for the U.S. Army
Reserve Command. On 26 August 1997 the insignia was cancelled and the new
insignia was authorized. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-795)
The two eagles’ heads are in reference to the unit’s motto, “Twice the Citizen,” and their
Reserve mission. The eagle faces in both directions, denoting vigilance and a wideranging scope of ability and expertise. Red, white and blue are the colors of the United
States; gold stands for excellence.

Army Reserve Medical Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia is approved effective 1 October 2005. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-860)
Maroon and white are the colors traditionally used by the Medical Corps. The cross and
rod of Aesculapius, symbols of healing and medicine, symbolize the organization’s
medical mission. The two stars represent the training of medical individuals and medical
units. The black stars edged gold recall the Army logo and military preparedness.

Army Reserve Sustainment Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 7 May 2010.
1025)

(TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-

The shield is adapted from the Army Materiel Command (AMC) and highlights the direct
support to AMC and its subordinate elements. The colors signify the Command’s
missions. Bronze, buff and red indicate the sustainment/support role as well as the tie
to the logistics community. Blue is a nod to the support mission for Defense Contract
Management Agency as well as AMC. The four stars represent strength, experience,
knowledge, and support. The arrow, flaring up from the base, represents the focus to
bring the strength and teamwork of both officers and enlisted to one focus or point to
support the mission of many.

Army Service Force Training Centers
The insignia was approved on September 16, 1944.
The design resembles the shoulder sleeve insignia for the Army Service Force
(currently designated as DA Staff Support) with the exception that blue and white are
used in the composition and is appropriate inasmuch as the organizations for which it is
approved are under the Service Commands. The insignia for all of the Service
Commands are blue and white.

Asymmetric Warfare Group
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 16 October 2006. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-897)
The circle represents the Group’s worldwide operations. Black denotes the unknown
nature of future threats. The arrow alludes to the archer who took the battlefield from
two to three dimensions in early warfare. It also signifies the Indian Wars, one of the

first asymmetric threats the United States Army faced. Red symbolizes aggressive
action. The position of the arrow, pointing forward when worn on the uniform sleeve,
suggests forward vision, thinking, and action.

Central Army Group (USA Element)
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 7 Jan 1980. (TIOH Drawing Number A1-649)
The green of the shield is the traditional European color for ground forces. The lion, in a
defensive striking posture, symbolizes power and courage, and the four points of the
star represent the directions toward peace undertaken by all NATO nations. Black and
silver are symbolic of wisdom and peace.

Civil Affairs & Psychological Operations
Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the US Army Reserve Special
Operations Command on 16 January 1990. It was amended to change the color of the
border on 2 March 1990. It was amended to change the color of the subdued border on
30 April 1990. The insignia was redesignated for the US Army Civil Affairs and
Psychological Operations Command on 19 December 1990. (TIOH Drawing Number A1-774)
The sword represents the military nature and strength of the Command. The flashes
suggest speed and electronic communications. The colors of the insignia reflect the
units within the Command. Purple is traditionally associated with Civil Affairs and dark
green with Psychological Operations and Special Forces. The color gold (yellow)
denotes excellence.

Combined Field Army (ROK-US)
The shoulder sleeve insignia was authorized on 7 Jan 1983.
The light blue identifies the unit’s close connection with the United Nations. The Roman
shield shape refers to the "Shield of Seoul" and the black bar represents the
Demilitarized Zone defining the unit’s mission of defense and maintaining the peace.
The Combined Field Army’s forces are symbolized by the star (US) combined with the
taeguk (ROK).

Corps of Engineers

Corps of Engineers
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the US Army Engineers
Divisions and Districts on 31 October 1977. It was redesignated for the US Army Corps
of Engineers on 11 July 1979. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-617)
The globe refers to the activities of the US Army Corps of Engineers both in the
Continental United States and overseas. The dividers are symbolic of design and
planning and the tower signifies the construction mission. Scarlet and white are the
colors traditionally associated with the Corps of Engineers.

Criminal Investigation Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was authorized for the US Army Criminal Investigation
Command on 12 Nov 71. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-548)
The central star and the lines of the latitude and longitude suggesting a globe, together
with the arrowheads marking the points of a compass, symbolize the basic mission of
the Command: to perform and exercise centralized command, authority, direction and
control of Army criminal investigation activities worldwide. Blue, white and red are the
national colors.

Department of the Army Police
The shoulder sleeve insignia was authorized on 20 August 2001. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-778)
The eagle symbolizes the United States of America. The lightning flashes represent the
fifteen Army Major Commands and signify speedy response and technical resources of
the first rank. Gold denotes excellence and celeste blue represents the Army.

Department of the Army Guard

Department of the Army Staff Support
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved for the War Department Overhead on July
30, 1941. It was redesignated for Headquarters, Services of Supply on March 27, 1942;
redesignated as Army Service Force on March 12, 1943; redesignated Technical and
Administrative Services on June 11, 1946; and redesignated as DA Staff Support on
October 8, 1969. The shoulder sleeve insignia is authorized for all personnel assigned
to Department of the Army Field Operating Agencies (FOA) in accordance with
paragraph 27-16, AR 670-1 unless the FOA has been authorized a SSI within its own
right. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-199)
The design has its origin in the crest of the Coat of Arms of the United States and
involves the use of the national colors of red, white, and blue.

European Civil Affairs Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on October 23, 1944.
Red, white and blue are out national colors. The shape of the insignia and the sword
were symbolic of the SHAEF insignia.

Fires Center of Excellence
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 28 May 2009. (TIOH Drawing Number
A-1-999)
Scarlet and yellow are the colors traditionally associated with Artillery units. The
arrowhead denotes the growth of the two branches in the western plains of the United
States, the first “indirect fire” at Agincourt and the symbol of the pointed tip for Air
Defense Artillery. The stars indicate excellence, the requirements in support of
Warfighting Commanders. The cannon symbolizes the Fires Center of Excellence’s
mission to develop qualified fire warriors and leaders. The crossed lightning bolts signify

the resolution for the future of Field Artillery and Air Defense Artillery branches in the
direction of Electronic Warfare and Directed Energy aspects.

Headquarters Joint Readiness Training
Center & Joint Readiness Training Center
Operations Group
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved on 25 January 1988 for the Joint
Readiness Training Center. It was redesignated for the Joint Readiness Training Center
Operations Group on 30 June 1993, with description and symbolism revised. The
insignia was redesignated for Headquarters Joint Readiness Training Center and Fort
Polk and Joint Readiness Training Center Operations Group and amended to add an
airborne tab on 3 March 2004. It was amended to correct the unit designation on 11
March 2004. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-743)
The unit’s mission of training nonmechanized rapid deployment forces is symbolized by
the bayonet and wings. The bayonet symbolizes military preparedness and the strike
capability of rapid deployment forces which train at the Center. The wings are
emblematic of speed, mobility and joint training with the United States Air Force. The
colors, blue, yellow, and red are traditionally associated with Infantry, Armor and Artillery
and reflect the combined arms character of Joint Readiness Center Operations Group
training. The overall shape is reminiscent of an arch or portal and portrays the
knowledge and education and training provided by the Center as the “doorway” to
enhanced unit proficiency and skill.

Headquarters Company, US Army
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved on 23 Apr 1968 for Headquarters
Company, U.S. Army and Headquarters Company, U.S. Army WAC. It was redesignated
on 7 Feb 1978 for Headquarters Company, U.S. Army.
The pentagonal shape is an allusion to the Pentagon Building, site of Headquarters,
Department of the Army. The United States coat of arms is in full color as on the
Secretary of the Army flag and the blue of the background is from the National Flag and
stands for loyalty and trust. The gold border is symbolic of the quality of leadership
provided by the Army Staff.

Individual Readiness Reserve / Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 14 October 1980. It was amended to
revise the symbolism on 18 August 1987.
The triangular shape is suggestive of the tricorn hat of colonial times and refers to the
individual readiness of the citizens of that period. Red, white and blue, the national
colors, signify the reservists' readiness to defend the nation. The star centered within
the annulet represents the U.S. Army Reserve Personnel Center, which provides the
central management for all Individual Ready Reservists and coordinates their
assignments. The four arrows issuing from the white annulet, simulating a compass,
allude to the worldwide assignment locations of the reservists who participate in the
program. The blue and red divided disc represents their dual status as civilians and
reservists.

Information Systems Engineering
Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 21 July 1989. It was cancelled by
HQDA, G-1 directive on 21 February 2010. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-766)

Orange and white are colors traditionally associated with the Signal Corps, blue
represents loyalty and devotion to duty. The shield shape of the insignia emphasizes
the command structure of the unit; the globe represents the worldwide scope of their
operations and mission. The twin electronic bolts, denoting speed and precision
operations, refer to the Command's two predecessor organizations (Army Material
Command and Combat Development Command). The black sword, symbolizing
constant vigilance and readiness, alludes to the vital contribution that the U.S. Army
Information Systems Engineering Command makes toward total military preparedness.

Installation Management Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 15 August 2002. It was amended to
revise the symbolism on 22 November 2005. It was redesignated effective 1 October
2006, for the Installation Management Command with the symbolism revised. (TIOH
Drawing Number A-1-850)
Scarlet is the color traditionally used by Support units, with which Installation
Management Command (IMCOM) is associated. The heptagon suggests the seven
geographic regions overseen and serviced by the organization. The chain links signify
durability, while the ring denotes continuous service. The combination of the chain links
and ring symbolize the Installation Management Command's continuous worldwide
support to all the soldiers, civilians, their families and units. The swords refer to
teamwork and the focus on preparing and training soldiers for combat - to defend and
protect. Yellow reflects the high honor and values of IMCOM. Green, associated with
the agency's parent organization - Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management represents the IMCOM's stewardship of installations.

Intelligence and Security Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved on 6 Apr 77 and revised to
change the color from teal blue to oriental blue on 27 May 88. (TIOH Drawing Number
A-1-611)
The quartered field alludes to the four primary intelligence functions: collection,
analysis, production and dissemination of intelligence. The lightning bolt signifies
worldwide electrical communications, both friendly and hostile, and the torch stands for
knowledge and vigilance. The double-webbed key is symbolic of security and control.
Gold and silver (yellow and white) denotes achievement and energy; gray and blue
determination and loyalty.

U.S. Army Intelligence Agency
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 25 February 1976 (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1591).
Oriental blue and silver gray are the colors used for Military Intelligence. The rose, an
ancient symbol for secrecy or silence, together with the globe, symbolizes the sub rosa
aspects inherent in the operational activities and worldwide mission of the organization.
The insignia is to be worn with the silver gray area of the rose facing to the front and
one point down.

U.S. Army Intelligence Agency

U.S. Army Foreign Intelligence Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 5 February 1993. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1802).
Oriental blue is the primary color traditionally associated with Military Intelligence units.
Blue represents loyalty and determination; gold is representative of high ideals,
achievement and excellence. White signifies integrity and red stands for courage and
zeal. The keys are symbolic of security, control and authority. The torch alludes to the
unit's mission and implies knowledge, vigilance and guidance.

U.S. Army Intelligence Command
The Sphinx symbolizes silence and wisdom. The sun, standing for light and guidance,
refers to the leadership function of the Command. The rays are seven in number for the
seven Intelligence Corps groups under the Command’s direction. Yellow or gold
signifies successful accomplishment; oriental blue and silver gray are the Army
Intelligence and Security Branch colors.
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the United States Army
Intelligence Corps Command on 2 February 1965. It was redesignated for the United
States Army Intelligence Command on 16 September 1965. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-396)

Joint Forces Command (USA Element)
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 18 Aug 1999.
The design is a duplicate of the United States Joint Forces Command's seal.

Legal Services Agency
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 8 May 1984. (TIOH Drawing Number A1-690)
The colors dark blue and white are the colors of The Judge Advocate General's Corps
and gold is for excellence and achievement. The overall shape of the insignia is that of
a Roman shield, and with the sword is symbolic of the Agency's military connection and
also a reminder of the Romans as early lawmakers. The scale is an ancient symbol of
justice and the globe is in reference to the worldwide legal activities of the Agency.

Maneuver Center of Excellence, Ft
Benning, Georgia
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 24 January 2008. It was amended to
correct the symbolism on 12 February 2008. The insignia was amended to correct the
symbolism on 17 March 2008. It was amended to change the shape and revise the
description and symbolism on 16 September 2009. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-954)
The yellow and blue sections, side by side, embody the Combined Arms Team of
Armor/Cavalry and Infantry Forces. The red five-sided section refers to the Pentagon
and defense. Red is emblematic of valor and sacrifice. The yellow and blue, which
highlight the Maneuver Force of the Army, move forward as a projection from the
Pentagon. The star signifies guidance and the Maneuver Center of Excellence being
the focal point of the center of operations.

Maneuver Support Center of Excellence,

Ft Leonard Wood
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Maneuver Support
Center on 21 November 2008. It was redesignated for the Maneuver Support Center
of Excellence effective 1 October 2009. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-985)
Black denotes power. The four pointed bastioned shape symbolizes Fort Leonard
Wood, the location of the Maneuver Support Center. The chevrons, in the different
colors, illustrate branches that comprise the Center – blue represents the Chemical
Regiment, green suggests the Military Police Regiment, scarlet indicates the Engineer
functions, and purple refers to the Joint Units (Army, Marines, Navy, and Air Force).
The sword represents military readiness.

Military District of Washington
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Military District of
Washington on 26 September 1942. It was redesignated for the United States Army
Military District of Washington on 21 July 1971. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-268)
The functions of the organization are indicated by the double handed sword, symbolic
of protection, over the Washington Monument, representing the area concerned. The
blue represents the Navy and the Infantry; the scarlet the Field Artillery, Coast Artillery
and Engineers; and the green and gold the Military Police.

Manhattan District, Army Service Force
The insignia was approved on August 20, 1945 and cancelled on May 6, 1947.
The shield is blue for the universe; the Army Service Force shoulder sleeve insignia
represents the origin of the command; the interrogation mark, the unknown results and
secrecy surrounding the project of the Manhattan District; culminating in the atomic
fission that stirred the world by its most devastating results.

Military Entrance Processing Command
(DOD)
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 18 Nov 1983 for wear by personnel of
the U.S. Army Element, U.S. Military Entrance Processing Command.
The five corners of the pentagon allude to the five services comprising MEPCOM, the
jointly staffed organization supporting all recruiting departments. The three basic
functions performed in the selective process are represented by the checky background
indicative of the administrative processing and the colors blue and red are symbolic of
the mental and medical aspects. The gold sword represents the high ideals inherent in
the new service member.

Military Intelligence Readiness Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 15 September 2005. (TIOH
Drawing Number A-1-870)
Oriental blue is the color traditionally used by Military Intelligence units. The shape of
the shield pays homage to the First Military Intelligence Reserve unit patch. The globe
denotes the unit’s global mission. The lightning flashes pointing at each corner of the
globe symbolize speed to provide electronic communications. The sword represents
military readiness; with the key-shaped hilt, hand guard and pommel, allude to security
and control.

Military Police Brigade, Hawaii

The shoulder sleeve insignia was authorized 17 Aug 1998. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1838)
Green and yellow are the colors traditionally used by Military Police organizations. The
red lightning flashes denote speed and on the mark accuracy as well as alluding to the
unit’s motto. The spear is a traditional Hawaiian weapon and underscores the unit’s
mission.

CMB Security Transportation Command

Military Surface Deployment &
Distribution Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Military Traffic
Management and Terminal Service on 17 August 1965. It was redesignated for the
Military Traffic Management Command on 10 December 19 74. The insignia was
redesignated effective 1 January 2004, for the Military Surface Deployment and
Distribution Command, with the description updated. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-401)
The green disc represents the "Go" signal used for traffic control of land transport. It is
symbolic of the Command's "Can Do", "Go" attitude in the control of traffic, land
transportation and common-user ocean terminal service. The arrow alludes to the
military auspices of the organization and to the speed with which it accomplishes its
mission. The three prongs represent the three military departments of the Department
of Defense and the joint aspects of its responsibilities and manning.

ARNG Civil Support Teams (WMD)
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 4 September 2007. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-939)
A modified version of the Coat of Arms of the United States, located on the obverse of
the Great Seal, authenticates our country’s unity and our stand on defending the
freedoms of the Homeland. The American eagle is also a symbol of strength and
vigilance. The two stars represent the Adjutant General, the command level in each
State to which these units report. The ten spears represent the Weapons of Mass
Destruction Civil Support Teams (WMD CST) located in the ten response regions of the
United States. The spears also represent the organization’s heightened military
readiness posture and that they are the initial military response to any WMD attacks as
each WMD CST is the first unit sent to assess the situation, provide advice and support
to civil authorities. The azure field represents the unit’s ability to conduct continuous day
and night operations and the red border signifies the resolve to protect and save lives.
The total design signifies the importance of the Teams’ mission to the peace and
security in defense of our country.

ARNG Operational Support Airlift
Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the U.S. Army Operational
Support Airlift Command on 1 Oct 1992. It was redesignated for the Army National
Guard Operational Support Airlift Command on 1 Sep 1994. (TIOH Drawing Number A1-799)
Ultramarine blue is the primary color associated with aviation. The star symbolizes
excellence, authority and command. It is combined with an annulet representing
complete service and total readiness. The pentagon refers to the Command's location

in the National Capital Area. Red, white and blue are our national colors.

National Training Center
The insignia was approved on 23 Apr 1982. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-676)
The colors are adapted from the coat of arms of the National Training Center and refer
to Armor, Infantry and Artillery, the combat arms branches brought together to train as
combined arms teams and task forces at the National Training Center. The arrowheads
signify a concentration of training and education. Though they converge from various
angles, they form a cohesive unit signifying the mission and capabilities of the National
Training Center.

NATO Training Mission-Afghanistan
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 3 November 2010. (TIOH Dwg. No. A1-1040)
The blue and white are NATO colors and the polestar is the NATO emblem. NATO is
North Atlantic Treaty Organization and OTAN is Organisation du traité de l’Atlantique
Nord which is NATO in French. The addition of the darker blue quartering signifies the
Afghanistan national treasure of Lapis Lazuli gems. The yellow border along with the
polestar and the annulet signifies the excellence in the Coalition and Joint Forces.

U.S. Headquarters, International Security
Assistance Force, Joint Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia
(TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-1091).

was

approved

on

6

September

2013

The blue and white are NATO colors and the polestar is the NATO emblem. NATO is
North Atlantic Treaty Organization and OTAN is Organisation du traité de l’Atlantique
Nord which is NATO in French. The addition of the darker blue quartering signifies the
Afghanistan national treasure of Lapis Lazuli gems. The yellow border along with the
polestar and the annulet signifies the excellence in the Coalition and Joint Forces.

U.S. Combined Joint Task ForceOperation Inherent Resolve
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 13 october 2015 (TIOH Dwg. No. A-11105).
The Army's patch features crossed scimitars, a palm wreath and stars. The scimitars,
short swords with curved blades, are meant to symbolize the twin goals of the U.S.-led
coalition: to defeat the Islamic State, also referred to as ISIL, and to restore stability in
the region, according to Army documents. The palm wreath is symbol of honor. While
the stars and the buff-and-blue colors on the patch indicate the three-star command
and the land, air and sea forces involved in the fight. Scimitars and palm wreaths have
appeared on patches from previous periods of war in Iraq.

Multinational Force and Observers

U.S. Army Network Enterprise
Technology Command

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the U.S. Army Strategic
Communications Command on 19 June 1964. It was amended to add the words
“U.S. Army” to the designation on 31 August 1964. It was redesignated for the U.S.
Army Communications Command on 18 October 1973. The insignia was
redesignated for the U.S. Army Information Systems Command on 25 October
1984. It was redesignated for the U.S. Army Signal Command on 13 November
1996. It was redesignated effective 16 September 1997, for the 9th Signal
Command. The insignia was redesignated effective 1 October 2002, for the U.S. Army
Network Enterprise Technology Command. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-323)
The colors orange and white are representative of the Signal Corps. The globe
indicates the worldwide nature of the communications controlled by the command; the
lightning depicts its dynamic and strategic capabilities.

Information and Data Systems Command

Northwest Service Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on March 23, 1943. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-152)
The unit activated on September 2, 1942 and one of the primary missions was the
construction of the Alaska-Canada Highway. The design suggests a winterized
pyramid tend. The star represents the North Star, and the white center suggests the
highway.

Persian Gulf Service Command
The date the insignia was originially approved is not contained in The Institute of
Heraldry files. Correspondence dated May 13, 1944 indicates the insignia drawing may
be declassified. The unclassified drawing was approved on August 29, 1944. (TIOH
Drawing Number A-1-53)
The red scimitar, from the flag of Iran (or Persia) represented the warlike spirit of the
ancient Persians. The white seven pointed star is taken from the flag of the Kingdom of
Iraq. It represents purity and religion of the Middle East. The green color of the shield
denotes the agriculture of Persia in olden days, and also stands for Islam, which is the
religion of both Iran and Iraq. The colors red, green and white are found in the flags of
both countries.

Personnel Assigned to DOD and Joint
Activities
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 28 May 1993. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1806)
Medium blue is the color traditionally associated with the Department of Defense. The
coat of arms of the United States has traditionally been utilized to represent the United
States Army.

Philippine Battalion
The insignia was requested for the lst Philippine Battalion; however the unit was
changed to the lst Philippine Regiment. The authorization approved on August 6,
1942, was for all Philippine Battalions.
The volcano represents the area in which the units were located. The three stars are

taken from the Philippines Coat of Arms which represents the principle islands - Luzon
and Mindanao, and the Visayan Islands.

Philippine Combat Headquarters
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Philippine Division on 8
July 1922. It was redesignated for the 12th Infantry Division on 27 November 1946.
The insignia was redesignated for the Philippine Combat Headquarters on 15
December 1947. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-55)
The head of a carabao was the general symbol used to identify Philippine Scout
personnel.

Philippine Command
The insignia was originally approved for the Philippines Department on July 8, 1922. It
was redesignated for the Philippines-Ryukyus Command on August 14, 1947 and
redesignated for the Philippines Command on August 1, 1949. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-54)
The sea lion is from the coat of arms of Spain (Aragon) and suggest the Spanish
heritage as well as the maritime nature of the area where the command was
operational.

Korean Military Advisory Group

Korean Communications Zone
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 21 April 1953. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-197).
The beacon fire is symbolic of the old Korean system of communications. Until 1885
there were five lines of beacon fires around the country by means of which messages
could reach the capital from the most distant points in a few hours. A flaming light is
also a symbol of liberty.

Mission to Moscow
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 6 October 1944.
The design is in the colors of the United States. The triangular shape represents the
wedge driven by the Allied into Germany and its satellites. The word “America” in
Russian characters indicates the alliance between the United States and Union of
Soviet Socialist Republics. The elevated displayed wings of the eagle indicate alertness
and action.

Panama Canal Department
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 16 August 1922. It was cancelled on 2
February 1948.
The design represents the Isthmus of Panama. The colors red and yellow represent the
Spanish heritage of the area.

Panama Canal Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 17 May 1922.
The Isthmus was the gateway through which the wealth of Peru passed to Spain and
the Canal is now the gateway through which passes the commerce of the Atlantic and
the Pacific. The portcullis symbolizes the gate and the red and gold are the old Spanish
colors.

USAE Iceland Defense Force
Due to the secret nature of the unit, no symbolism was recorded.
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Iceland Base Command on
3 September 1941. It was redesignated for the US Army Element, Iceland Defense
Force on 5 April 1954.

Greenland Base Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 15 January 1943.
The three waves suggest the mission of the Command to guard the United States along
the northern ocean frontier and the colors red, white and blue are the National colors.

Kagnew Station-East Africa
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 26 September 1955. (TIOH Dwg. No. A1-193).
The shape of the escutcheon was determined by the Greater Kudu horns. Both the
Kudu and the Gazelle are native to and plentiful in the area surrounding Kagnew, the
Gazelle in particular having become a part of the life of the Station.

Marianas Bonins Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 10 August 1948.
The coconut palm from the seal of Guam is used to show the location of the Command.

Pacific Coastal Frontier
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 9th Coast Artillery District
on 12 July 1941. It was redesignated for the Pacific Coastal Frontier on 25 March 1942.
The design was arbitrarily selected, using the colors associated with the Coast Artillery.

Northwest Service Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on March 23, 1943. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-152)
The unit activated on September 2, 1942 and one of the primary missions was the
construction of the Alaska-Canada Highway. The design suggests a winterized pyramid
tend. The star represents the North Star, and the white center suggests the highway.

Recruiting Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved on 21 Nov 1967. On 6 Dec 1972
the two-piece shoulder sleeve was cancelled and the one-piece insignia was approved.
(TIOH Dwg. No. A -1-555)
The thirteen stars, representing the original states, and the Liberty Bell indicate the U.S.
Army Recruiting Command's role in preservation of liberty and defense of country.

Jungle Expert

U.S. Army Junior ROTC

ROTC Cadet Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved 28 Apr 1986 for the U.S. Army
ROTC Cadet Command and U.S. Army SROTC Cadets. On 28 Jan 1993 the insignia
was amended to add metric measurements and subdued colors. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-720)
The shield symbolizes the Army mission of national defense and is divided into quarters
representing the four traditional military science courses comprising Senior ROTC
curriculum. The sword signifies courage, gallantry, and self-sacrifice intrinsic to the
profession of arms. The lamp denotes the pursuit of knowledge, higher learning, and
the partnership of Army ROTC with American colleges and universities. The Greek
helmet is symbolic of the ancient civilization concept of the warrior scholar. The motto
"LEADERSHIP EXCELLENCE" expresses the ultimate responsibility to the nation.

U.S. Army Warrant Officer Career Center
Soldiers Media Center
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 30 June 2005. (TIOH Drawing Number
A-1-877)
Teal blue is the color traditionally used by branch unassigned units. The lightning
flashes signify speed and power. The arrows signify unit readiness. The combination of
the arrows and lightning flashes illustrate the electronic signals used to transmit
information.

Southeast Asia Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved on October 25, 1943 with the
head facing sinister. It was changed on August 28, 1944 to show the head facing
dexter.
The phoenix is legendary bird burned its self to ashes and rose youthfully alive from the
ashes to live another period. The phoenix represents the growth and reconstruction of
the area.

Space and Missile Defense Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally authorized for U.S. Army Space and
Strategic Defense Command on 21 March 1996 while the organization was a Field
Operating Agency (FOA) of the Chief of Staff. It was redesignated for the U.S. Army
Space and Missile Defense Command effective 1 October 1997 as a result of a
change of name and establishing the unit a Major Army Command. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-826)
Red, white, and blue are our National colors. The eagle, our National symbol, denotes
freedom and constant vigilance. The gridlined sphere symbolizes the worldwide scope

of the command’s mission, while the flashes represent all-encompassing strike
capability and quick response.

U.S. Army Strategic Command

Sustainment Center of Excellence, Fort
Lee, Virginia
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 1 January 2009. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-956)
Red, white, and blue are the national colors. The torch of knowledge symbolizes the
training functions of the Center to transform service members into proficient logistic
leaders and soldiers. Gold/yellow denotes excellence. The five stars represent the five
major elements of Sustainment – maintenance, supply, transportation, human
resources, and financial services.

Training and Doctrine Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Replacement and School
Command on 22 Mar 1943. It was reassigned to the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine
Command on 1 Jul 1973. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-558)
The shoulder sleeve insignia was formerly that of the Replacement and School
Command, World War II, which was charged with the responsibility of training Army
personnel. The three stripes are in the colors of, and refer to, the basic combat arms;
they also refer to the components of the "One Army" concept: Active Army, Army
Reserve and Army National Guard.

US Army Capital Military Assistance
Command
US Africa Command (USA Element)
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 26 November 2007.
Blue alludes to the commitment to the unity and coordination of Africa’s allies to
promote the United States Africa Command mission. The palm fronds indicate Africa’s
hope to achieve unity on the continent and to build a partnership throughout the world.
Red stands for liberation. Green denotes prosperity. The landmasses of Africa
symbolize the continent’s fortitude and the Command’s area of operation.

US Military Assistance Command,
Vietnam
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the U.S. Army Personnel
Serving in Vietnam on 10 February 1966. It was amended to correct the authorization
to wear by U.S. Army Personnel Assigned to the U.S. Military Assistance
Command, Vietnam, retroactive to 10 February 1966 on 22 September 1971. (TIOH

Dwg. No. A-1-309)
Yellow and red the Vietnam colors. The red ground alludes to the infiltration and
aggression from beyond the embattled “wall” (i.e., the Great Wall of China). The
opening in the “wall” through which this infiltration and aggression flow is blocked by the
sword representing United States military aid and support. The “wall” is arched and the
sword pointed upward in reference to the offensive action pushing the aggressors
back.

U.S. Army Military Police Panama
U.S. Northern Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 1 October 2002.
The eagle, taken from the Great Seal, represents the United States. The landmass of
North America highlights the scope of the Northern Command mission. The five stars
refer to the armed forces, which coordinate all mission efforts to protect the country.
The three stars on the continent represent the approximate locations of the terrorist
attacks of September 11th in New York City, Pennsylvania and the Pentagon.

U.S. Pacific Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved for wear by the U.S. Army Element of
Headquarters, United States Army Pacific Command on 2 May 2002. (TIOH Dwg.
No. A-1-848)
The terrestrial map of the Pacific area is the area of operation of the U.S. Pacific
Command. The contrasting colors of gold and black refer to the night and day, around
the clock mission of the U.S. Army Element of the Pacific Command. Red is the color
of zeal and action. The bayonet represents the mission of responding to a crisis and
deterring aggression. The bayonet overlapping the globe highlights the enhancement
of security in this region of the world by this Command. The lightning flash reflects
communications infrastructure and quickness of response.

U.S. Army Transportation Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 7 December 2001.
Brick red and golden yellow are the colors traditionally used by Transportation units.
The sun and demi-globe allude to Illinois, the Prairie State, and the location of the
organization. It also highlights the command's worldwide mission to provide air, land
and sea transportation to the Department of Defense. The spear represents the military
readiness and the command's leadership endeavor in wartime conflict and peacetime
operations. The winged seahorse is adapted from the United States Transportation
Command's badge.

U.S. Army Air Defense Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 10 April 1958.
rescinded/cancelled on 20 January 1975. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-275)

It

was

The arrow, an ancient missile weapon is a symbol of prowess and martial readiness
and a talisman against evil (enemy attack) alluded to by the thunderhead symbolical of
danger threatening and destruction, thunder in itself being an awakener and thus a
reminder of the necessity for constant vigilance. The stylized missile is between two
conventional symbols for radar and radiation beams.

U.S. Army Air Traffic Services Command
The insignia was approved on 31 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-859).
Ultramarine blue and golden orange are the colors traditionally used by Aviation units,
with which the Air Traffic Services Command is associated. The spearhead shape,
adapted from the Special Operation Command insignia, refers to the Area Traffic
Service’s area of tactical missions. It also denotes the forward thrust motion of the
army aviation assets to operate safely and effectively. The phoenix, a mythological
bird, after being consumed by flames arose anew from the ashes; symbolizes the
rebirth of Air Traffic Services into the Command. The terrestrial globe alludes to the
worldwide scope of the Air Traffic Services’ mission and the sphere of influence of the
Air Traffic Services Command. The lightning flash represents Army readiness and the
striking speed of the Command’s signal background.

U.S. Army Alaska
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally authorized for the Alaskan Defense
Command on 24 Mar 1943. It was redesignated for the Alaskan Department on 31 Dec
1943. On 1 Mar 1949 the insignia was redesignated for Headquarters, U. S. Army
Alaska. On 2 Dec 1968 the insignia was amended to delete the word "Headquarters".
The insignia represents the constellation Ursa Major (the Great Bear), which, according
to ancient myth, is the guardian of the North Star (Polaris), depicted by the golden
yellow star.

U.S. Army Berlin
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Berlin Command on 12
Oct 1960. It was redesignated for the U.S. Army, Berlin on 13 Oct 1970.
The shoulder sleeve insignia is that of the U.S. Army, Europe insignia with the addition
of the "Berlin" tab.

US Army Central Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 22 February 1991.
Gold is emblematic of excellence; black suggests dependability and determination. The
upraised sword and shield signify military preparedness and vigilance. The palm
suggests the geographic theater of operations and symbolizes victory.

USA Combined Arms Support Command
and Ft Lee
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 13 June 1991. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-793)
The five major elements of logistics (maintenance, supply, transportation, facilities and
services) are represented by the discs. The four-pointed star alludes to the points of

the compass, symbolizing global logistics application. Blue represents constancy and
devotion; red stands for combat and courage. White stands for integrity and, with blue
and red, represents the United States.

US Army Community and Family Support
Center
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 29 Apr 1985. (TIOH Drawing Number A1-704)
The shoulder sleeve insignia design is an adaptation of the U.S. Army Community and
Family Support Center emblem.

US Army Selective Service

US Army Cyber Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective ` October 2010. It was amended
to correct the unit designation on 22 October 2010. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-1036)
Green alludes to the Army Forces Cyber Command, as a land based organization. The
inner border suggests the containment of threats against the cyberspace infrastructure.
The black background represents space, the unit’s area of operations. The flowing
pattern in the background denotes the shifting electronic energy of the Cyberspace
environment. The terrestrial globe signifies the global electronic reach of the
Command; it is divided from light to dark, to display the Army Forces Cyber Command’s
round the clock operational velocity and the interaction of its cyber responsibilities. The
three spears symbolize the three areas of computer network capabilities - attack,
defend and exploit. The lightning bolt illustrates the ability and swiftness to strike
anywhere.

U.S. Army Cyber School

U.S. Army Cyber Center for Excellence

U.S. Army Cyber Protection Brigade

U.S. Army Computer Systems Command

U.S. Army European Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 21 Mar 1945.
The thirteen stars on the blue field are symbolic of liberation. The eagle forms the letter
"V", representing victory and freedom. The red, white and blue triparted portion of the
shield are our National colors.

USA Field Band
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved on 28 Jun 1951. It was amended
to replace the scroll with an arced tab on 10 Oct 1985.

USA Forces Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved by General Headquarters, AEF,
on 7 February 1919. It was approved by The Adjutant General on 17 June 1922. It was
amended to change the manner of wear so that the blue would be uppermost on 19
July 1941. It was redesignated for Army Ground Forces on 27 March 1942. The insignia
was redesignated for Army Field Forces on 11 May 48. It was redesignated for
Continental Army Command on 9 September 1955. The insignia was redesignated for
US Army Forces Command effective 1 July 1973. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-192)
The design was selected during World War I by General Pershing for wear by all
personnel assigned to General Headquarters, American Expedition Forces (AEF). The
source of the design is a red, white, and blue horizontally striped brassard worn as a
distinguishing mark by staff officers when moving about on duty in congested areas at
the front in World War I. In 1941, the brassard prescribed for General Headquarters,
AEF consisted of three stripes of blue, white and red, the blue uppermost. Therefore,
the insignia was authorized to be worn with the blue uppermost to conform to the
manner of wearing the brassard.

USA Garrison Hawaii
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Hawaiian Department on
10 Jan 1922. It was redesignated for the Central Pacific Base Command on 25 Aug
1944. On 15 Jul 1957 the insignia was redesignated to the U.S. Army, Hawaii. The
shoulder sleeve insignia was reassigned to the U.S. Army Support Command, Hawaii
on 30 Nov 1972 and redesignated for the U.S. Army Garrison, Hawaii on 29 Mar 1994.
The stylized "H" stands for Hawaii. The eight sides of the insignia refer to the eight
islands of the Hawaiian Group. The colors scarlet and yellow are the old royal Hawaiian
colors.

USA Ground Forces Replacement Depots
The Army Ground Forces Replacement Depots were established on each coast of the
United States and became operational in August 1943 with a mission of processing
overseas replacements for the combat arms. The insignia was approved on October 6,
1943.It was discontinued and replaced by the shoulder patch of the Army areas where

the Depot was located following World War II.
The colors are taken from the Army Ground Forces shoulder sleeve insignia.

USA Human Resources Command / USA
Reserve Personnel Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the U.S. Army Reserve
Personnel Center on 8 June 1984. It was redesignated for the U.S. Army Reserve
Personnel Command on 26 November 1997. The insignia was redesignated effective 2
October 2003, for the U.S. Army Human Resources Command with the symbolism
revised. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-692)
The Minuteman symbolizes the citizen-soldier concept of the constitution and principle
foundation of the nation as a democracy. The globe suggests the worldwide mission of
the Human Resources Command. The stars indicate the four components of the Army
(active, guard, reserve and civilian). The colors blue and gold represent excellence and
the high ideals of the Command.

United States Army, Japan
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Army Forces, Far East
Command on 5 September 1952. It was amended to change the name to United States
Army Forces, Far East on 25 February 1953. The insignia was rescinded effective 1
July 1957. The shoulder sleeve insignia was reinstated and redesignated for the United
States Army, Japan on 3 April 1959. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-196)
The unit's location in Japan is symbolized by the representation of Mount Fujiyama, a
world famous symbol of that country.

U.S. Army Mission
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 14 May 1952. (TIOH Drawing Number
A-1-210)
The thirteen stars representing the thirteen colonies and the dark blue alludes to the
unity of the nation. The dark blue is also the national color and refers to the U.S. Army
and the unique responsibility as representatives of the United States to the military
forces of foreign governments.

U.S. Army North
The shoulder sleeve insignia originally approved for Fifth Army on 26 January 1927,
was pentagon shaped with a white background and five red stars formed in a pentagon
shape. The current design was originally approved for Fifth Army on 7 April 1943. It was
redesignated for the Fifth United States Army effective 1 January 1957. The insignia
was redesignated for United States Army North with the description and symbolism
updated on 19 December 2006.
The flag colors of red, white, and blue are self-explanatory. The outlined figure of the
mosque is symbolic of the country in which Fifth Army, the previous designation of the
unit, was originally activated. The letter “A” indicates “Army”, and conforms in general,
to designs used by the First and Third United States Armies.

US Army, North Atlantic Treaty
Organization – NATO
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for U.S. Army Elements of Allied Command Europe on 8
June 1990. It was redesignated for U.S. Army Elements of Supreme Allied Powers Europe on 12 October 2000.
It was again redesignated on 17 May 2001, for the U. S. Army, North Atlantic Treaty Organization. (TIOH Dwg.
No. A-1-779)
Red, white and blue are our National colors; gold is for excellence. The star, adapted from the National flag of
the United States, and the lion, a traditional European symbol, are combined with the sword to emphasize the

Command's allied composition and mission. The star denotes authority and the lion personifies courage and
power. The two halves of the shield, united by the sword, illustrate the unit's defense mission and goals.

U.S. Army Pacific
The insignia was originally approved for the United States Army Forces, Pacific
Ocean Areas on 18 Oct 44; redesignated for United States Army Forces Middle
Pacific on 8 Sep 45; redesignated for United States Army Forces, Pacific Ocean
Areas on 1 Nov 45; redesignated for United States Army Pacific on 4 Dec 47;
redesignated United States Army Western Command effective 23 Mar 79; and
redesignated for the United States Army, Pacific effective 22 Aug 90.
The arrow is representative of the strength and valor of the Armed Forces of the United
States while the location of the Pacific Ocean Areas is indicated by Polaris, the seven
star of Ursa Major, and the constellation of the Southern Cross.

« Golden Knights » Parachute Team
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 1 April 1969. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-516)
The colors black and gold (yellow) are the colors used at the U.S. Military Academy,
known as the finest in its filed, and were adopted by the Golden Knights to symbolize
their being the finest in their field. The parachute canopy is the same design as that
called the “Conquistador” used by the original “STRAC Sport Parachute Team.”
Knights are generally associated with conquering; thus, the knight’s helmet alludes to
conquest and the fact that the Golden Knights have conquered the sky by free fall
parachuting. The sky is represented by the nebuly (a heraldic delineation of clouds)
outline base.

US Army Marksmanship Unit
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on October 24, 2012.
The crossbow is a weapon of historical significance consisting of a bow mounted on a stock and contains the
base elements of marksmanship today: reusable mechanical weapon, projectile and marksman. The golden
yellow color represents the excellence and award-winning performance in competition. The direction of the
arrows pointing outward symbolizes the combat readiness of the unit and their ability to go anywhere to assist.
The convergence of all three weapons at the center of the device signifies precision and accuracy. Teal blue is
the designation color of the unit.

USA Reserve Joint and Special Troops
Support Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the United States Army
Reserve Readiness Command on 14 September 1998. It was redesignated effective 1
May 2009, for the United States Army Reserve Joint and Special Troops Support
Command. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-839)
Red, white and blue are our national colors and reflect the commitment and readiness
to uphold the principles of freedom upon which our country was founded. The upright
sword symbolizes military preparedness; the key and quill underscore the
organization's mission.

USA Reserve Legal Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 16 September 2009. (TIOH Dwg.
No. A-1-1010)
The insignia is a stylized shape alluding to the tri-cornered hat of the Minuteman,
reflecting the fact that the members of the Command are Army Reserve Soldiers. The
Minuteman is the symbol of the United States Army Reserve, representing the citizenSoldiers who volunteered to fight for our nation’s independence and have answered the
call to arms in all subsequent wars, conflicts, and operations. At the center of the

insignia is a fasces, a traditional symbol of legal authority denoting the fact that the
United States Army Reserve Legal Command is the first command organization for
Judge Advocate General’s Corps organizations in the Army Reserve. The rods of the
fasces represent the individual units of the Command, bound together into one
organization. Overlaying the fasces is a pen and sword, symbols inspired by the Judge
Advocate General’s Corp branch insignia. The pen represents the scholarly nature of
the practice of law and the tradition that the Rule of Law is written in order that all
citizens may understand it and have it consistently applied to protect their rights. The
sword represents the military character of the organization. The background of the
insignia is white, used to symbolize the purity of justice and is one of the branch colors
of the Judge Advocate General’s Corps.

USA Star Logo Patch
The Chief of Staff, Army, approved the wear of the patch on the ACU by personnel
assigned to Headquarters Department of the Army (officer and enlisted personnel
assigned to the Army Staff only), U.S. Army Accessions Command (USAAC), U.S.
Army Accessions Support Brigade, Initial Entry Training (IET), and One Station Unit
Training (OSUT). The patch may be worn on the ACU only. For all other classes of
uniforms, soldiers will wear the shoulder sleeve insignia currently prescribed by AR
670-1. The patch was authorized on 16 June 2006. It was amended to further clarify the
wear policy by personnel assigned to HQDA on 21 August 2006. The insignia was
amended to extend (authorize) wear by the Army Recruiting Command's leaders and
recruiters on 25 July 2007. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-887)
The Army of One is about both the individual soldier and the collective strength of the
Army. It represents the soldiers’ pride in making a difference for themselves, their
families, and the nation.

US Army Training Center, Fort Jackson
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 20 February 2007. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-915)
The reversed chevron denotes a “V” signifying “Victory,” which alludes to Fort Jackson’s
historical motto “Victory Starts Here.” The torch symbolizes knowledge and the military
training gained during the transformation from civilian to soldier. Black denotes
constancy. The crossed rifles signify teamwork. The Infantry blue and rifles represent
the principles of ground combat, which provide the foundation for training warriors and
developing military skills.

USA Test and Evaluation Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the TRADOC Test and
Experimentation Command on 24 January 1989. It was redesignated for the U.S.
Army Operational Test and Evaluation Command on 20 November 1990. The
insignia was redesignated effective 1 October 1999, for the United States Army Test
and Evaluation Command. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-759)
The command’s mission, to seek truth through testing and experimentation, is
symbolized by the triangle or fulcrum balancing a bar and sun. The bar and triangle
represent a scale, the sun dignifies the search for knowledge, enlightenment and high
ideals. Yellow is indicative of the precious metal gold, and represents “the worth of
quality assurance of tested products.” Dark blue alludes to the sky and space,
suggesting the possibilities and discoveries of the future. The red sword characterizes
the individual soldier whose combat preparedness is aided by the data and information
products the organization provides. The white is expressive of the command’s search
for the truth and the sterling quality of the products produced.

US Army Trial Defense Service
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 17 August 2006. (TIOH Drawing

Number A-1-896)
The shield-shaped patch reflects the nature of legal defense work. The sword
supporting scales of justice represents the unit’s mission to defend soldiers at courtsmartial and separations boards; seeking justice for all soldiers. The sword also signifies
that Trial Defense Service personnel are soldiers as well as lawyers. The glory, mullet,
and the red border are adapted from the Department of the Army Staff Support patch
previously authorized for wear by the Trial Defense Service, and provides a historical
link to its organizational heritage.

U.S. Army Vietnam
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 10 Feb 1966.
Yellow and red are the colors of Vietnam. The blue center represents the United States,
together with the sword it alludes to the U.S. Military in Vietnam.

US Army Elements Combined Forces
Command - Afghanistan
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 25 August 2005.
The eagle is a traditional national emblem. The mount represents the rugged mountain
terrain of Afghanistan and the white symbolizes the snow capped mountains and the
promotion of regional security and stability.

USAE United States Forces – Afghanistan
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the U.S. Army Element,
Combined Security Transition Command-Afghanistan on 21 May 2008. It was amended
to change the description on 23 June 2008. It was amended to change the symbolism
on 1 October 2008. The insignia was redesignated for the US Army Element, United
States Forces-Afghanistan on 3 December 2008. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-918)
The wheat denotes prosperity for the Islamic Government of Afghanistan. The sword
represents support of security for the combined efforts of the Afghan National Security
Forces, the United States, and Coalition authorities as they bring peace and stability to
the region. The wings device of the new Afghan Air Corps signifies the technological
advances being implemented in modern Afghanistan. The rifles denote defense and
military readiness. The Hindu Kush mountain range is represented by the snow-capped
mountains, emphasizing Afghan sovereignty; the background colors of the National
Flag, black, scarlet, and green, symbolize Afghanistan and the new democracy forming
there.

Combined Joint Interagency Task Force
435
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 26 April 2012. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-11073)
The background colors are from the Afghanistan National Flag and symbolize the new
democracy forming there. The three gold stars represent the partnership along with the
initial command level. The mountain range signifies the Hindu Kush and Afghanistan
sovereignty. The crossed sword and key demonstrates command and control,
guardianship and security for the future of the Afghan people. The scales of justice are
a symbol for growth of the judicial system.

USAE Multi-National Corps-Iraq (MNC-I)
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 14 January 2005. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-863)
Red, white and blue are the national colors. The blue wavy bars allude to the Tigris and
Euphrates Rivers and Iraq’s title of “the land of two rivers,” the area of operation. The
black pheon spear represents military readiness and might. The palm wreath highlights
the service of the Multi-National Corps and soldiers, in Iraq.

USAE Multi-National Force-Iraq (MNF-I)
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 7 January 2005. The insignia was
amended to change the symbolism on 24 February 2005. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1869)
The star represents a vision of unity for the seven peoples of Iraq (Sunni, Shia, Kurd,
Turkoman, Assyrian, Yazidi, Armenian) leading to a more secure, prosperous and free
future for Iraqis. The crossed scimitars of the insignia recall the partnership between
Multinational Forces and Iraqi Security Forces essential to bringing a democratic way of
life to Iraq. The palm fronds symbolize peace and prosperity for a new nation. The
colossal statue of the Mesopotamian human-headed winged bull recalls the rich
heritage of Iraq and underscores strength and protection for the people of Iraq.

USAE North American Aerospace
Defense Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 3 October 2003.
The defense of North American Continent is the responsibility of the Army, Navy, Air
Force and Marine Corps, along with our Canadian allies. Together, they comprise this
unified and bi-national command, NORAD. The Army element of NORAD is highlighted
by the landmass. The wings enfold the globe to symbolize protection and defense by
the unified command. The sword represents armed defense and readiness. The
lightning bolts denote the decisive striking power that NORAD is prepared to use
against any aggressor.

USAE United States Forces Korea
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 18 June 2012. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-1077)

The shield shape reflects the United States Forces Korea’s steadfast commitment to
defend the sovereignty of the Republic of Korea. The abbreviation “USFK” stands for
United States Forces Korea which activated on 1 July 1957. The four stars symbolize
the service and contributions of the United States army, United States Navy, United
States Air Force, and the United States Marine Corps. The stylized American Bald
Eagle represents cohesion and unity among the services. The laurel sprigs and arrows
depict the mission of the United States Forces Korea to defeat aggression if necessary.
Red, white, and blue are the colors of the flag of the United States of America. Red
symbolizes hard work and honor, white represents innocence and purity, and blue
refers to justice and perseverance. Yellow signifies wisdom and intuition.

USAE United States Southern Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 1 August 2003.
The sunburst denotes enlightened promotion of democratic institutions, cooperative
efforts to oppose and overcome transnational threats to the region's stability and
responsibility to protect its environment. The eleven points of the burst and nineteen
radiating gridlines below represent the countries, which comprise the area of
responsibility, in the region of South and Central America and the Caribbean. The
shield signifies protection of the United States civilians, interests and forces committed
to the area, the prevention of terrorist activity and assistance in reducing illicit source

zone activities. Blue represents worldwide capability, light blue indicates coastal
security of the nations within the region. Scarlet denotes sacrifice and courage, gold
symbolizes excellence. The color orange on the sunburst represents Central America,
while the gold of the burst represents South America. The five main points and six
flames of the burst along with nineteen radiating lines below represent the thirty
countries, which make up the area of responsibility region. Ultramarine blue denotes
worldwide capability, light blue signifies coastal security and protection. Gold
symbolizes excellence.

US MARINE CORPS FORMER
WARTIME SERVICE
First Marine Division

Second Marine Division

Third Marine Division

I Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward)

II Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward)

Second Marine Aircraft Wing

Third Marine Aircraft Wing

ARMORED
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1 Armored Corps
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 22 November 1940.
Yellow, blue, and red are the colors of the branches from which armored units were
formed. The tank tread, gun, and lightning flash are symbolic of mobility, power, and
speed. The Corp's designation is annotated by the Roman numeral I.

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5 Armored Corps

Armored Forces

Armor Center

Armor School

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1 Armored Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved without the tab on 22 November
1940. The tab was authorized as a separate item on 21 February 1956. The insignia
was changed to a one-piece insignia on 5 November 1970. (TIOH Drawing Number A1-330)
Yellow, blue, and red are the colors of the branches from which armored units were
formed. The tank tread, gun, and lightning flash are symbolic of mobility, power, and
speed. The Division's designation is in Arabic numerals.

2

nd

Armored Division

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved on 22 November 1940. It was
amended for the addition of a tab on 16 August 1954. The insignia was further

amended to revise the design to make the insignia and tab in one piece on 4 November
1970. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-331)
Yellow, blue and red are the colors of the branches from which armored units were
formed. The tank tread, gun and lightning flash are symbolic of mobility, power and
speed. The division's designation is in an Arabic numeral.

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3 Armored Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved on 22 November 1940. It was
amended for the addition of a tab on 10 August 1955. The insignia was further
amended to revise the design to make the insignia and tab in one piece on 4 November
1970. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-332)
Yellow, blue and red are the colors of the branches from which armored units were
formed. The tank tread, gun and lightning flash are symbolic of mobility, power and
speed. The division's designation is in an Arabic numeral.

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4 Armored Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 22 November 1940. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-333)
Yellow, blue, and red are the colors of the branches from which armored units were
formed. The tank tread, gun, and lightning flash are symbolic of mobility, power, and
speed. The Division's designation is in Arabic numerals.

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5 Armored Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 22 November 1940.
Yellow, blue and red are the colors of the branches from which Armored units were
formed. The tank tread, gun and lightning flash are symbolic of mobility, power and
speed. The Division’s designation is in Arabic numerals.

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6 Armored Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 22 November 1940. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-335)
Yellow, blue and red are the colors of the branches from which Armored units were
formed. The tank tread, gun and lightning flash are symbolic of mobility, power and
speed. The Division’s designation is in Arabic numerals.

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7 Armored Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 22 November 1940. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-336)
Yellow, blue and red are the colors of the branches from which Armored units were
formed. The tank tread, gun and lightning flash are symbolic of mobility, power and
speed. The Division’s designation is in Arabic numerals.

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8 Armored Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 22 November 1940. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-337)
Yellow, blue and red are the colors of the branches from which Armored units were
formed. The tank tread, gun and lightning flash are symbolic of mobility, power and

speed. The Division’s designation is in Arabic numerals.

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9 Armored Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 22 November 1940. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-338)
Yellow, blue and red are the colors of the branches from which Armored units were
formed. The tank tread, gun and lightning flash are symbolic of mobility, power and
speed. The Division’s designation is in Arabic numerals.

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10 Armored Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 22 November 1940. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-339)
Yellow, blue and red are the colors of the branches from which Armored units were
formed. The tank tread, gun and lightning flash are symbolic of mobility, power and
speed. The Division’s designation is in Arabic numerals.

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11 Armored Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 22 November 1940.
Yellow, blue and red are the colors of the branches from which Armored units were
formed. The tank tread, gun and lightning flash are symbolic of mobility, power and
speed. The Division’s designation is in Arabic numerals.

12

nd

Armored Division

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 22 November 1940. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-341)
Yellow, blue and red are the colors of the branches from which Armored units were
formed. The tank tread, gun and lightning flash are symbolic of mobility, power and
speed. The Division’s designation is in Arabic numerals.

rd

13 Armored Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 22 November 1940. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-342)
Yellow, blue and red are the colors of the branches from which Armored units were
formed. The tank tread, gun and lightning flash are symbolic of mobility, power and
speed. The Division’s designation is in Arabic numerals.

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14 Armored Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 22 November 1940. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-343)
Yellow, blue and red are the colors of the branches from which Armored units were
formed. The tank tread, gun and lightning flash are symbolic of mobility, power and
speed. The Division’s designation is in Arabic numerals.

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16 Armored Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 22 November 1940. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-345)
Yellow, blue and red are the colors of the branches from which Armored units were
formed. The tank tread, gun and lightning flash are symbolic of mobility, power and
speed. The Division’s designation is in Arabic numerals.

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19 Armored Division
The specific approval date cannot be validated with the information available. (TIOH
Dwg. No. A-1-348)
Yellow, blue and red are the colors of the branches from which armored units were
formed. The tank tread, gun and lightning flash are symbolic of mobility, power and
speed. The Division’s designation is in Arabic numerals.

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20 Armored Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 30 December 1942. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-349)
Yellow, blue and red are the colors of the branches from which Armored units were
formed. The tank tread, gun and lightning flash are symbolic of mobility, power and
speed. The Division’s designation is in Arabic numerals.

22

nd

Armored Division

The specific approval date cannot be validated with the information available. (TIOH
Dwg. No. A-1-351)
Yellow, blue and red are the colors of the branches from which armored units were
formed. The tank tread, gun and lightning flash are symbolic of mobility, power and
speed. The Division’s designation is in Arabic numerals.

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30 Armored Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 6 April 1955. It was cancelled effective
1 November 1973. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-353)
Yellow, blue and red are the colors of the branches from which armored units were
formed. The tank tread, gun and lightning flash are symbolic of mobility, power and
speed. The Division’s designation is in Arabic numerals.

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49 Armored Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 3 June 1948. It was amended to add a
tab on 8 December 1965. The insignia was further amended to revise the design to
make the insignia and tab in one piece on 1 November 1973. (TIOH Drawing Number
A-1-356)
Yellow, blue and red are the colors of the branches from which armored units were
formed. The tank tread, gun and lightning flash are symbolic of mobility, power and
speed. The division's designation is in Arabic numerals.

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50 Armored Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 14 February 1956. It was amended to
change the description and include a border on 18 February 1965. (TIOH Dwg. No. A1-357)
Yellow, blue and red are the colors of the branches from which armored units were
formed. The tank tread, gun and lightning flash are symbolic of mobility, power and
speed. The Division’s designation is in Arabic numerals.

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5 Armored Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 5th Brigade (Training) on
29 February 1984. It was redesignated for the 5th Armored Brigade on 17 November
1997. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-688)
The flaming torch is symbolic of education and enlightenment. The V-shaped chevron
suggests the number of the Brigade and the repetition of the V-shape illustrates the
basic tenet that all learning is accomplished by repetition. The colors are adapted from
the 89th ARCOM insignia.

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30 Armored Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved on 23 October 1918 for the 30th
Division. It was redesignated for the 30th Infantry Brigade on 20 February 1974. The
insignia was redesignated effective 1 September 2004, with description updated, for the
30th Armored Brigade, North Carolina Army National Guard. (TIOH Drawing Number
A-1-95)
The letters “O H” are the initials of “Old Hickory” and the “XXX” is the Roman notation
for the number of the organization.

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81 Armored Brigade Combat Team
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 81st Infantry Brigade on
27 May 1970. The insignia was redesignated for the 81st Armor Brigade with the
description updated on 11 September 2003. It was redesignated for the 81st Armored
Brigade Combat Team on 18 May 2007. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-539)
The raven represents the fact that all units of this Brigade derive their history and background as Washington
State units. The family crest of George Washington, a raven on a gold cornet, has been traditionally used to form
the crest of Washington State unit insignia. The raven design is a combination of three Northwest Indian tribe
designs of the raven. The head portion comes from the "Haida" Indians. The lower portion has been taken from
the "Kwakiutl" Indians. The beak, eyes and mouth have been taken from the "Nootka" Indians. Most emphasis
has been placed on the "Nootka" Indians as they lived on the Washington coast and the Olympic Peninsula. Both
of the other tribes represented lived, for the most part, on the lower British Columbia coast and in the vicinity of
Vancouver Island.

The raven is one of the most common of Northwest Indian designs, but it represents
one of the most unique types of design and is found only in the Pacific Northwest. The
raven is considered to be of particularly good power in the legends of the Northwest
Indian tribes. According to the legends this bird went into the supernatural world while
the earth was still in darkness and the people could not see. The raven took the sun
and escaped through a hole in the roof of the house of the "supernaturals" while they
slept. Because the raven had to fly through the smoke to get out of the house, it
discolored him black. While flying back to earth, with the supernaturals in chase, the
parts of the sun were broken off forming the stars with the last and largest piece forming
the moon. The raven then threw the sun into the sky where it gave off light and heat to
the earth. The raven saved the Indians from their darkness and gave them light and a
new life. The use of rectangles and squares is based on the extensive use of such
shapes in Indian designs and carvings. Corners were usually rounded to tie the
rectangle into the total design.

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155 Armored Brigade Combat Team
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 155th Armored Brigade
on 21 February 1974. It was redesignated for the 155th Armored Brigade Combat
Team with the description and symbolism updated on 25 July 2007. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-572)
The wavy bend refers to the Mississippi River. The lightning bolt symbolizes the striking
power and shock action of the unit. Yellow and green are colors used for armored units.

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163 Armored Brigade

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 163rd Armored Cavalry
Regiment on 18 April 1968. It was redesignated for the 163rd Armored Brigade with
symbolism revised on 1 February 1989. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-492)
Yellow is the color used for Cavalry and the green diagonal band represents the hills of
Montana, the home state of the unit. The buffalo skull symbolizes Montana's Old West
heritage.

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177 Armored Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 177th Armor Brigade on 9
April 1985. It was amended to correct the unit designation to 177th Armored Brigade
on 9 December 1997. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-707)
Yellow is the color traditionally associated with Armor. Blue and scarlet are the branch
colors for Infantry and Artillery respectively, the other major combat forces in the
Brigade. The spearhead and wedge shape allude to the spearhead tactic employed in
Armor warfare.

2

nd

Armored Cavalry Regiment

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11 Armored Cavalry Regiment
This insignia was approved on 1 May 1967. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-451)
The colors red and white are the traditional Cavalry colors and the rearing black horse
alludes to the “Black Horse” nickname of the 11th Armored Cavalry.

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278 Armored Cavalry Regiment
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 278th Infantry Brigade on
19 March 1974. It was redesignated for the 278th Armored Cavalry Regiment on 19
August 1977. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-573)
The green background with three stars refers to the hickory tree crest of the Tennessee
Army National Guard. The wavy blue three-armed partition represents the coming
together of the Holston and the French Broad Rivers to form the beginning of the
Tennessee River in Knoxville, where the Regiment’s headquarters is located.

ARMY
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1 Army
A black letter "A" was approved as the authorized insignia by the Commanding General, American Expedition
Force, on November 16, 1918 and approved by the War Department on May 27, 1922. The background was
added on November 17, 1950. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-1)

The red and white of the background are the colors used in flags for Armies. The letter "A" represents "Army"
and is also the first letter of the alphabet suggesting "First Army."

2

nd

Army

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 27 May 1922. An Army green background was added on 17
March 1959. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-2)
Red and white are the colors associated with Armies, while the numeral identifies the unit’s designation.

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4 Army
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Fourth Army on 26 January
1927. The insignia was redesignated for Fourth United States Army on 4 October 1957.
(TIOH Drawing Number A-1-4)
The composition of this design alludes to the numerical designation of the organization
and the colors are those associated with "armies."

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6 Army
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Sixth Army on 26 January
1927. The original design was cancelled and a new design approved on 10 January
1945. It was amended to change the background color from olive drab to Army Green
on 6 December 1960. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-6)
The six pointed star is significant of the number “six” and the red letter “A” signifies
“Army.” The red and white colors are the colors of the design approved for
distinguishing flags for the numbered Armies.

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7 Army
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Seventh Army on 23 June
1943. It was amended to change the dimensions on 17 March 2008. The insignia was
redesignated effective 16 July 2009, for United States Army Europe with the symbolism
updated. The redesignation was cancelled and the insignia reinstated for Seventh
Army on 7 July 2009. It was redesignated for United States Army Europe with the
symbolism updated effective 17 April 2010. The redesignation to United States Army
Europe was cancelled and the insignia was designated for Seventh Army for historical
purposes on 21 January 2011. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-7).
The colors blue, yellow, and red allude to the three basic arms. The pyramidal figure is
of a distinctive form with the symbolic letter “A” representing the first letter of the “Army”
while the number of steps on each side represent the numerical designation of the
unit.

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8 Army
The insignia was approved on 10 May 1944. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-361)
Red and white are the colors used to distinguish the flags of Armies. The white cross
pattee divides the octagon into eight areas representing the numerical designation of
the Army.

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9 Army
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 21 September 1944. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-362)

Red and white are the colors associated with armies. The nine-sided figure indicates
the numerical designation of the organization.

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10 Army
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 29 August 1944. It was amended to
revise the description on 11 September 1944. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-363)
The composition of this design alludes to the numerical designation of the organization.

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14 Army
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 7 Jul 1944. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1364)
The acorn is a symbol of strength and the letter "A" is the initial letter of its organization.
The colors are those of the Army distinguishing flag.

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15 Army
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 26 Oct 1944. (TIOH Drawing Number A1-365)
The insignia is in the colors of an army. The division per saltire and the five sides of the
pentagon are suggestive of the numerical designation of the organization while the
letter "A" indicates that the organization is an army.

US Army Africa/Southern European Task
Force
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Southern European Task
Force on 6 December 1955. On 2 April 1958, it was redesignated for the United States
Army Southern European Task Force. The description and symbolism was amended to
delete reference to the tab “SETAF” on 9 February 1962. The insignia was amended to
change the description on 6 December 1998. On 27 February 2001, the shoulder
sleeve insignia was amended to include an airborne tab. The insignia was amended to
delete the airborne tab and add the “”SETAF” tab on 4 September 2008. It was
redesignated for United States Army Africa/Southern European Task Force with the
symbolism revised effective 26 January 2012. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-195)
The lion of St. Mark symbolizes NATO affiliation. The red, white and blue of the
insignia represent the colors of the United States of America.

United States Army Central
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Third Army on 20 December
1922. It was redesignated for Third United States Army on 10 November 1960. The
insignia was redesignated for US Army Central on 29 August 2006. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-3)

US Army Europe (USAREUR)
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Supreme Headquarters,
Allied Expeditionary Forces on 13 December 1944. It was redesignated for

Headquarters, U.S. Forces, European Theater and revised to change the background
color from black to dark blue on 2 August 1945. It was redesignated for the European
Command on 23 June 1947. The insignia was redesignated for United States Army
Europe on 7 November 1952. It was amended to include the specific shade of orange
in the description on 22 July 1970. It was cancelled effective 16 July 2009. The
insignia was reinstated for United States Army Europe on 7 July 2009, revoking the
cancellation. The insignia was cancelled effective 17 April 2010. It was reinstated on
21 January 2011. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-367).
The black shield, changed to dark blue when redesignated for the Headquarters U.S.
Forces, European Theater in 1945, represented the darkness of oppression. The
sword of liberation with rising flames represents justice by which the enemy power will
be broken. Above the sword is a rainbow, emblematic of hope, containing the colors of
the National Flags of the Allies. The sky blue above the rainbow represents a state of
peace and tranquility to be restored to the enslaved people by the United Nations.

US Army South
The insignia was originally approved for the Caribbean Defense Command on 3 May
1944. It was redesignated for the United States Army, Caribbean on 2 February 1948.
The insignia was redesignated for the United States Army Forces Southern Command
on 11 July 1963. It was reassigned for the United States Army South with the
description amended on 1 April 1987. The insignia was amended to correct the
description and symbolism on 28 July 2009. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-311)
The galleon is symbolic of the Caribbean area. This type of ship is usually associated
with the Caribbean area since it predominated during the Spanish regime. The blue
background represents the color of the Caribbean Sea. The cross was the insignia of
Columbus, the first explorer to land in the Caribbean area.

US Army Vietnam
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 10 February 1966. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1408)
Yellow and red are the colors of Vietnam. The blue center represents the United
States, together with the sword it alludes to the U.S. Military in Vietnam.

ARMY GROUPS
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1 Army Group
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 28 March 1944. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1154)
The design contains our national colors of red, white and blue with the representation of the unit’s numeric
designation by the Roman numeral one, which is respresentative of the First United States Army Group.
Active

: 1943 – 14 July 1944

Campaigns

: World War II

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6 Army Group
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 23 October 1944. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1358)
The six elements of the fret are indicative of the numerical designation of the group.

Active

: 29 July 1944 – July 1945

Campaigns : World War II

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Army Group

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 29 July 1944. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-359)
The design of the insignia is that of an inverted pentagonal figure (five sides), simulating
an arrowhead, containing a trapezoid (four sides) divided horizontally red and white,
and an inverted blue isosceles triangle (three sides). Together, the total sides of the
three figures equal twelve, the numerical designation of the group. Red, white and blue
are the national colors.
Active

: 14 July 1944 – 31 July 1945

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15 Army Group
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 29 January 1945. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1360)
The Pompeian red refers to Italy, the country in which the headquarters was formed
during World War II. The shield represents the Allied forces, the blue-and-white waves
are those of the Mediterranean Sea, which the Allied forces had to cross to reach Italy.
Red, blue and white also refers to the national colors.
Active

: July 1943 – July 1945

Campaigns

: World War II

ARMY NATIONAL GUARD
ELEMENT, JOINT FORCE
HEADQUARTERS
Alabama Army National Guard Element,
Joint Force Headquarters
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Alabama Army National Guard on 15 December 1948. The
insignia was redesignated for Headquarters, State Area Command, Alabama Army
National Guard on 15 August 1985. It was redesignated retroactive to 1 October 2003,
for the Alabama Army National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended
to update the description and add a symbolism. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-474)
Cotton is a great element of wealth in the State. As the predominant original settlement
within the State was of English origin, the twists of the wreath are white and red.

Alaska Army National Guard Element,
Joint Forces Headquarters
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Alaska National Guard on 9 April 1954. It was redesignated

for Headquarters, State Area Command, Alaska Army National Guard with the
description amended on 30 December 1983. The insignia was redesignated for the
Alaska Army National Guard Element, Joint Forces Headquarters and amended to
update the description effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-156).
The stars of the most conspicuous constellation in the northern sky symbolize the
allocation of the unit.

Arizona National Guard (old style)

Arkansas Army National Guard Element,
Joint Force Headquarters
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Arkansas National Guard on 16 May 1952. It was
redesignated for Headquarters, State Area Command, Arkansas Army National Guard
on 30 December 1983. The insignia was redesignated for the Arkansas Army National
Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update the description and
add a symbolism effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-157)
The diamond shape, taken from the State flag, signifies that Arkansas is the only
diamond bearing state in the Union. The twenty-five stars on the border show it was
the twenty-fifth state admitted to the union. The wild hogs known as razor-backs were
native to the Arkansas wilderness.

District of Columbia Army National Guard
Element, Joint Force Headquarters
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the District of Columbia
National Guard on 7 June 1948. It was redesignated for Headquarters, District Area
Command, District of Columbia Army National Guard on 30 December 1983. The
insignia was redesignated effective 1 October 2003, for the District of Columbia Army
National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update the
description and add a symbolism. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-477)
The dome of the United States Capitol typifies the District of Columbia and the rising
sun is from the District of Columbia seal. The District lies within the territory of the
original thirteen states whose predominant population was of English origin;
accordingly, the twists of the wreath are white and red.

Illinois Army National Guard Element,
Joint Force Headquarters
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Illinois National Guard on 16 February 1949. It was
redesignated with description amended for the Headquarters, State Area Command,
Illinois Army National Guard on 30 December 1983. The insignia was redesignated
effective 1 October 2003 for the Illinois Army National Guard Element, Joint Force
Headquarters and amended to update the description. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-481)

Massachusetts Army National Guard

Element, Joint Force Headquarters
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Massachusetts National Guard on 5 June 1950. It was
redesignated for Headquarters, State Area Command, Massachusetts Army National
Guard on 30 December 1983. It was redesignated retroactive to 1 October 2003 for the
Massachusetts Army National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended
to update the description and add a symbolism. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-163)
The design is that of the crest of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts which was
adopted 13 December 1780. The right arm, bent at the elbow, is an ancient European
heraldic symbol which is thought to symbolize the arm of God.

Mississippi Army National Guard
Element, Joint Force Headquarters
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Mississippi National Guard on 25 August 1960. It was
redesignated for Headquarters, State Area Command, Mississippi Army National Guard
on 30 December 1983. The insignia was redesignated effective 1 October 2003, for the
Mississippi Army National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to
update the description. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-296)
The magnolia blossom is the State flower of Mississippi and Neptune's trident is
symbolic of the great river, Neptune being known in mythology as the "Father of
Waters." The light blue of the background is for Infantry.

Ohio Army National Guard Element, Joint
Force Headquarters
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, Ohio
National Guard on 30 November 1948. It was amended to include a symbolism on 7 May 1974. The insignia
was redesignated for Headquarters, State Area Command, Ohio Army National Guard on 30 December 1983. It
was redesignated for the Ohio Army National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update
the description effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-172)

The design of the shoulder sleeve insignia is based on the Ohio State Flag.

Oklahoma Army National Guard Element,
Joint Force Headquarters
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment,
Oklahoma National Guard on 9 May 1952. It was redesignated on 30 December 1983, for Headquarters, State
Area Command, Oklahoma Army National Guard. The insignia was redesignated effective 1 October 2003, for
the Oklahoma Army National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update the description
and add a symbolism. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-173)

The shoulder sleeve insignia is adapted from the crest of the Oklahoma Army National
Guard.

Oregon Army National Guard Element,
Joint Force Headquarters
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, Oregon
National Guard on 23 January 1950. It was redesignated with description amended for Headquarters, State
Area Command, Oregon Army National Guard on 30 December 1983. A new design was approved on 26
September 1990. The insignia was amended to revise the symbolism of the design on 10 December 1991. The
insignia was amended to correct the width of the insignia and the color of the crossed bayonets on 3 January

2002. It was redesignated effective 1 October 2003, for the Oregon Army National Guard Element, Joint Force
Headquarters. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-783)

The colors blue and yellow/gold are adapted from the State Flag of Oregon; gold is
emblematic of honor and high achievement, blue denotes loyalty and devotion. The
demi-sun symbolizes the West Coast and the setting sun. The Pacific Ocean and the
mighty Columbia River are represented by blue and the wavy bar. The bayonets
emphasize the Oregon Army National Guard's combat readiness. The Mount Hood
profile is one of the Oregon's most recognizable landmarks.

Oregon Army National Guard Element,
Joint Force Headquarters

South Carolina Army National Guard
Element, Joint Force Headquarters
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, South
Carolina National Guard on 19 March 1952. It was redesignated on 30 December 1983, for Headquarters, State
Area Command, South Carolina Army National Guard. The insignia was redesignated effective 1 October 2003,
for the South Carolina Army National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update the
description and add a symbolism. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-177)

The shoulder sleeve insignia is adapted from the crest of the South Carolina Army
National Guard.

South Dakota Army National Guard
Element, Joint Force Headquarters
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, South
Dakota National Guard on 27 December 1951. It was redesignated for Headquarters, State Area Command,
South Dakota Army National Guard on 30 December 1983. The insignia was redesignated effective 1 October
2003, for the South Dakota Army National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update the
description and add a symbolism. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-178)

The coyote is a native of South Dakota. As the territory was originally a part of the
Louisiana Purchase, the twists of the wreath are yellow and blue.

Tennessee Army National Guard Element,
Joint Force Headquarters
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment,
Tennessee Army National Guard on 29 May 1950. It was amended to add symbolism of the design on 1 April
1974. The insignia was redesignated on 30 December 1983, for Headquarters, State Area Command,
Tennessee Army National Guard. It was redesignated effective 1 October 2003, for the Tennessee Army
National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update the description. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1179)

The hickory tree refers to Andrew Jackson who was known as "Old Hickory" because of
his toughness as a fighter. The three white stars which appear on the State flag allude
to the three grand divisions or areas of the State: East Tennessee, Middle Tennessee
and West Tennessee. The white and red twists of the wreath refer to the English origin
of the original settlers.

Texas ARNG Elements, Joint Force HQs
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, Texas
National Guard on 22 September 1955. It was redesignated for Headquarters, State Area Command, Texas
Army National Guard on 30 December 1983. It was redesignated effective 1 October 2003, for the Texas Army
National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update the description and add a
symbolism. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-180)

The design is an adaptation of the seal of Texas, the “Lone Star State.”

Texas State Guard

Vermont Army National Guard – Obsolete
Vermont Army National Guard Element,
Joint Force Headquarters
The first and current design of the shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Vermont National Guard on 15 February 1952. That design was rescinded and a
new/second design approved on 3 January 1957. This second design was cancelled and the first design
reinstated for Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, Vermont Army National Guard on 26 July 1976. The
insignia was redesignated with its description amended for Headquarters, State Area Command, Vermont Army
National on 30 December 1983. It was redesignated effective 1 October 2003, for the Vermont Army National
Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update the authorizations and description and add a
symbolism. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-182)

The design is based on the historical origins of the Vermont National Guard, as the
Green Mountain Boys, formed in 1764, who wore a sprig of pine in their hats. The
background colors of green and gold (yellow) are the traditional Vermont colors.

Virgin Islands Army National Guard
Element, Joint Force Headquarters
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Virgin Islands Army National Guard on 9 May 1974. It
was redesignated with description amended for Headquarters, Territorial Area Command, Virgin Islands Army
National Guard on 30 December 1983. The insignia was redesignated for the Virgin Islands Army National
Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update the description effective 30 March 2009.
(TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-576)

The light blue and ultramarine blue represent the clear skies and waters of the Virgin
Islands. The three green triangles refer to the principal islands of St. Thomas, St. John
and St. Croix. The golden yellow disk with three radiating beams symbolizes the
originally activated four units (HHD VIARNG, 666th Band, 661st MP Company and 662d
MP Company), refers to the sunlight of the Islands and also forms the initials VI of the
Virgin Islands.

Virginia Army National Guard Element,
Joint Force Headquarters
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, Virginia
National Guard on 23 November 1956. It was redesignated with description amended for Headquarters, State
Area Command, Virginia Army National Guard on 30 December 1983. The insignia was redesignated for the
Virginia Army National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update the description
effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-246)

The scarlet is for bravery and also alludes to the blood of Virginia troops shed in
defense of State and Nation. The color gray and the saltire refer to the Confederacy

and also to unity of strength. The spear severing the chain symbolizes the breaking of
the "chains of tyranny," and the constant readiness of the Virginia Commonwealth to
fight for freedom, the color white referring to purity of purpose.

Wisconsin Army National Guard Element,
Joint Force Headquarters
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment,
Wisconsin National Guard on 2 December 1952. It was redesignated for Headquarters, State Area Command,
Wisconsin Army National Guard on 30 December 1983. The insignia was amended to correct the wording of the
description and symbolism on 7 August 1986. It was redesignated for the Wisconsin Army National Guard
Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update the description effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH
Dwg. No. A-1-185)

The red of the background is one of the National colors. The badger is from the crest of
the State Seal of Wisconsin and alludes to the State nickname "The Badger State."

AVIATION BRIGADE
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1 Aviation Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 2 August 1966. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1431)
Blue and golden orange are the colors of Army Aviation. The gold of the hawk and the
red of the sword handle are the colors of the Republic of Vietnam, and of the shoulder
sleeve insignia of the U.S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam and U.S. Army,
Vietnam, the Commands under which the Aviation Brigade was formed and under
which it first served in armed conflict. The hawk in flight preparing to strike its prey is
symbolic of Army Aviation’s impact on modern ground warfare. The hawk was adopted
as the symbol of the new capabilities of Army Aviation during the initial phase of Air
Assault concept testing in 1963. The crusader’s sword is taken from the shoulder
sleeve insignia of the U.S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam and identifies the
origin and mission of the Aviation Brigade in Vietnam. The rapid and quantum increase
in the Army Aviation units in Vietnam dictated formation of an Aviation Brigade for
command of multiple battalions Army Aviation organizations.

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11 Aviation Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 11th Aviation Brigade on
25 August 1987. It was redesignated effective 16 September 2006, for the 11th Aviation
Command with the description and symbolism updated. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-739)
Ultramarine blue and golden orange are traditional Army Aviation colors. The shoulder
sleeve insignia shape is taken from the first patch worn by the unit’s predecessor, the
11th Air Assault Division (Test). The shield is further indicative of the protection afforded
by the assigned Apache battalions. The eagle, symbolic of Army aviation, represents
the superior flying ability of the Command. It is silver to emphasize high ideals and
meritorious accomplishments of Army aviation units. The arrows on the eagle’s wings
allude to the numerical designation of the Command. Also, they represent speed in
flight and weapons capability of the organization.

12

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Aviation Brigade

The shoulder sleeve insignia was authorized on 9 March 1988. (TIOH Drawing Number
A-1-746)
Ultramarine blue and golden orange are the colors traditionally associated with the
Aviation Corps. The flame signifies the combat mission and quick strike capabilities of
the unit. The twelve tongues allude to the Brigade’s numerical designation. The griffin, a
fabulous creature with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle,
symbolizes courage, alertness and swiftness and reflects the attributes of the Aviation
Brigade.

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16 Aviation Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 3 December 2009. TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-1018)
Ultramarine blue and golden orange the colors traditionally used by Aviation units. The
wings represent the unit’s Aviation mission, while the 16 feathers of each wing denote
the numerical designation of the Brigade. The seven stars of the Big Dipper, part of the
constellation Ursa Major, indicate the night flying capability significant of the unit owning
the night. The dagger implies combat readiness and swift strike capability.

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17 Aviation Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was authorized on 9 Jun 1988. (TIOH Drawing Number A1-752)
Ultramarine blue and golden orange are the colors traditionally associated with Aviation.
The broad sword is adapted from the unit’s distinctive unit insignia and symbolizes
combat readiness and swift strike capability. The sword joined with the wings is
indicative of aviation lifting combat forces into battle as well as the combat capability of
the attack helicopters units within the 17th Aviation Brigade.

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18 Aviation Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 9 October 1987. It was amended to
correct the description to include the airborne tab on 28 January 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No.
A-1-741)
Ultramarine blue and golden orange are the colors associated with Army Aviation. The
wings represent flight, high aspirations and preparedness. The quarrel symbolizes
strike capabilities and aircraft.

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20 Combat Aviation Brigade
Ultramarine blue (azure) represents aviation ; the wings and swords denote swiftness of actions and readiness.
Red and blue signify courage and fidelity, respectively ; white represents dignity and integrity. Together, they
symbolize the United States’ resolve and unity. The outer star refers to the Nation and the inner star to individual
states and citizens. Golden yellow signifies the excellence and high ideals. The black border represents strenght
and solidarity. The twenty feathers refers to the unit’s designation.

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63 Aviation Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 20 July 2007. (TIOH Drawing Number A1-934)
Blue and orange are the colors traditionally associated with the Aviation units. The
Pegasus symbolizes the Brigade’s mission of flight and alludes to the unit’s location,
Kentucky, the horse capital of the world. The arched blue chief suggests the horizon
and the 63d Aviation’s determination to accomplish any mission. The arrowhead with
star signifies readiness and constancy, pointing up indicating the direction to a higher

standard. The two rows of stars, six and three, indicate the number “63,” the Brigade’s
designation.

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66 Aviation Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 66th Aviation Brigade on
19 July 1989. It was redesignated for the 66th Aviation Command on 14 June 2007.
(TIOH Drawing Number A-1-757)
Ultramarine blue and golden orange are the colors associated with U. S. Army Aviation. The lightning bolt and
the falcon underscore the unit's combat mission, to attack and destroy enemy troops and armor from the sky.

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77 Aviation Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 27 July 2006. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1893)
Red, white, and blue are the national colors. Red denotes valor, white suggests purity,
and blue indicates perseverance. The diagonal square alludes to a diamond, the rare
and precious resource that each member of the Brigade brings to the fight. The disc at
the center signifies the location of the Brigade’s origin in the center of the United
States. The four spearheads symbolize the four cardinal indices representing the
Brigade’s willingness to go in any direction to support and defend the constitution.

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78 Aviation Troop Command

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110 Aviation Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 1 March 2005. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-871)
The wings, along with the colors ultramarine blue and golden orange, represent Army
Aviation. White denotes integrity and purpose. The propeller refers again to aviation;
the spear-point symbolizes the attack mission and the airmobile assault of personnel to
battle zones. Together, the spear-point and propeller simulate the numerals “one” and
“ten,” from the Roman numeral “X” for ten, a reference to the brigade’s designation, as
in the “one-tenth.”

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128 Aviation Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 28 August 1990. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1781)
Ultramarine blue and golden orange are colors traditionally associated with U.S. Army
aviation. Blue is symbolic of the sky, the unit’s theater of operations and reflects
perseverance, devotion and loyalty. The division between the blue and orange
suggested flames implying firepower; the pheons represent attack capabilities,
swiftness and sureness in flight of aircraft.

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166 Aviation Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved for the 166th Aviation Brigade on 13 June
2007. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-929)
Ultramarine blue and golden orange are the colors traditionally used by Aviation units.
The wings represent the unit’s Aviation mission. The globe symbolizes the Brigade’s
training impact on the nation’s worldwide deployment; the globe between the wings
signifies the Brigade’s military support against the Global War on Terrorism. The spear
implies combat readiness.

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185 Aviation Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 1 March 2007. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1917)
Ultramarine blue and golden orange are the colors traditionally used by Aviation
units. The wings represent the Brigade as an Aviation unit. The red trident suggests the
185th Aviation Brigade’s aerial firepower.

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449 Aviation Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 16 June 2009. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-11003)
Ultramarine blue and golden orange are traditionally associated with the Aviation
Branch. White denotes integrity and purpose. The wings represent flight; the sword
refers to the numeral “one,” recalling the organization’s ties to the birthplace of powered
flight in North Carolina and the unit motto, “First In Flight.” Together, the lightning
flashes form an aerial axis of advance and with the sword, represent the bold, dynamic
strike capabilities of the Assault Theater Aviation Brigade. The lightning flashes refer
also to the dual nature of the organization, whose focus includes combat capabilities
and defense support to the homeland. The golden orange border signifies strength and
unity.

BATTLEFIELD SURVEILLANCE
BRIGADES
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67 Battlefield Surveillance Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 67th Infantry Brigade on
18 June 1964. It was amended to change the wording of paragraph 2 on 4 December
1964. The insignia was rescinded on 15 July 1988. It was reinstated and redesignated
effective 1 September 2008, for the 67th Battlefield Surveillance Brigade with the
description and symbolism updated. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-324)
Blue and white are the colors used for Infantry, the original unit designation. The byl, a
form of pike carried by foot soldiers, and one of the earliest Infantry weapons,
symbolizes the historical assault and defense traditions of the Infantry.

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71 Battlefield Surveillance Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 29 July 2010. It was amended to
change the symbolism on 22 November 2011. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-1031)
The arrowhead recalls the historical lineage and association as part of the 36th Infantry
Division. The oriental blue is the traditional color of Military Intelligence Corps; the
griffin embodies vigilance, alertness, and courage, referring to the unique Soldiers
assigned this mission. The contrast of the white and black of the griffin’s eye
symbolizes overt and clandestine nature of the Battlefield Surveillance Brigade
mission. The two lightning flashes represent the extraordinary mix of communication,
electronic warfare, and Cavalry, this combined symbology fully represents the speed,
agility, and range of target engagement capabilities of the Battlefield Surveillance
Brigade force structure.

142

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Battlefield Surveillance Brigade

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 3 March 2011. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-11045)

The eight pointed star polygon, symbolic of Helios the Greek God of the Sun, who could
see and hear everything, denotes alertness. The red diagonal cross of the white star
polygon signifies the Alabama State flag, the home state of the Brigade. The crossed
swords suggest the aggressive and protective requirements and the elements of
physical danger inherent in the mission. The following colors represent the branches
that form the Brigade: oriental blue refers to the Military Intelligence functions and
yellow and red indicates the Cavalry capabilities to accomplish its reconnaissance
mission.

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201 Battlefield Surveillance Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 201st Military Intelligence
Brigade on 29 April 1987. It was redesignated effective 16 October 2008, for the 201st
Battlefield Surveillance Brigade with the description updated. (TIOH Drawing Number
A-1-733)
Oriental blue and silver gray are the Military Intelligence branch colors. The two parts
symbolize the responsibility for acquisition and processing of tactical and strategic
intelligence. The sword symbolizes the aggressiveness, and physical danger inherent in
Military Intelligence operations. The lightning bolts refer to the electronic warfare
capabilities of the unit and the commander’s need for accurate and ready intelligence
from all sources.

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219 Battlefield Surveillance Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 1 September 2008. (TIOH Dwg.
No. A-1-959)
The arrow-shaped insignia, adapted from the U.S. Recondo School, highlights the
Recondo/Reconnaissance philosophy of integrity, developing the traits of smart, skilled,
tough, courageous, and confident soldiers. The divided background colors of blue and
red signify the unit’s lineage to the 38th Infantry Division. The black sword outlined in
yellow emphasizes the stealth required for proper intelligence collection, indicating
missions along the forward edge of the battlefield and the Brigade’s readiness to
sustain the tip of the battlefield. The lightning bolts symbolize the three tenants of the
219th Battlefield Surveillance Brigade’s responsibilities of intelligence, surveillance, and
reconnaissance.

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297 Battlefield Surveillance Brigade
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504 Battlefield Surveillance Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 504th Military Intelligence
Brigade on 19 December 1985. It was redesignated effective 16 March 2008, for the
504th Battlefield Surveillance Brigade with the description updated. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-716)
Oriental blue and silver gray are the colors associated with the Military Intelligence
branch. The wings suggest loftiness, or the advantage obtained from clear observation.
The lighting flash alludes to the unit’s ability to respond accurately and quickly in
support of the Commander’s needs for intelligence from all sources. The fleur-de-lis is
both a symbol of intelligence and of the Brigade’s roots in the battles of Northern
France and Central Europe. Yellow (gold) signifies excellence and achievement.

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525 Battlefield Surveillance Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 525th Military Intelligence
Brigade on 30 July 1985. It was redesignated effective 16 March 2008, for the 525th
Battlefield Surveillance Brigade and amended to delete the airborne tab and update the

description. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-698)
Oriental blue and silver gray are the colors traditionally associated with Military
Intelligence. The lightning flash refers to the communication and electronic warfare
functions of the unit. The checkered area alludes to the overt and covert aspects of the
Military Intelligence mission with the black and white colors referring to constant
vigilance day and night.

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560 Battlefield Surveillance Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 1 September 2009. (TIOH Dwg.
No. A-1-987).
The Greek spearhead shaped insignia signifies the weaponry of the earliest elite
warriors in history and highlights the importance of the Brigade’s operations to the
overall war fight as being at the “tip of the spear,” alluding to the motto “TO THE
POINT.” Light blue represents the Infantry capability of the long range surveillance
soldiers. Black denotes the unknown characteristics of the future battlefields. The
striking lightning bolt illustrates the Brigade’s mission of delivering heightened
awareness and understanding to commanders, at all levels in the field. The dagger
symbolizes the sharpness of the technical and tactical proficiency of all soldiers across
the Brigade.

CAVALRY (CAV)
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1 Cavalry Division
Color

Woodland

Desert

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 1st Cavalry Division on 3
January 1921, with several variations in colors of the bend and horse's head to reflect
the subordinate elements of the division. The current design was authorized for wear by
all subordinate elements of the Division on 11 December 1934, and previous
authorization for the variations was cancelled.
The insignia was redesignated for the 1st Air Cavalry Division on 5 August 1968.
It was redesignated for 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) on 10 September 1968.

ACU

Multicam

The insignia was redesignated for the 1st Cavalry Division on 24 May 1971.
The color yellow, the traditional Cavalry color, and the horse's head refer to the
Division's original Cavalry structure. Black, symbolic of iron, alludes to the transition to
tanks and armor. The black diagonal stripe represents a sword baldric and is a mark of
military honor; it also implies movement "up the field" and thus symbolizes aggressive
élan and attack. The one diagonal bend, as well as the one horse's head, also alludes
to the Division's numerical designation.

2

nd

Cavalry Division

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 3 May 1928. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-272)
The shield is yellow, the Cavalry color. The stars are taken from the coat of arms of the
2d Regimental Cavalry which was formerly a unit of the division.

rd

3 Cavalry Division
st

21 Cavalry Division

th

24 Cavalry Division
st

61 Cavalry Division

62

nd

Cavalry Division

rd

63 Cavalry Division
th

64 Cavalry Division
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65 Cavalry Division
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66 Cavalry Division
rd

3 Cavalry Regiment
The insignia was originally approved for the 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment on 12
June 1967. It was redesignated effective 16 November 2011, for the 3rd Cavalry
Regiment with the description updated. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-458)
The device on the disc is similar to the Regiment’s distinctive insignia. The color green
and yellow (gold) trumpet refer to the organization of the Regiment in 1846 as the
Regiment of Mounted Riflemen with uniform facings of green and an insignia consisting
of a gold trumpet. The words “Brave Rifles” are from the accolade given the Regiment
by General Winfield Scott, Commanding General of the Army, for its action at
Chapultepec during the Mexican War and the gray color of the letters and numerical
designation in simulating the color of steel allude to the Regimental Motto “Blood and
Steel” which was derived from the same accolade (“Brave Rifles! Veterans! You have
been baptized in fire and blood and have come out steel.”) The shoulder sleeve
insignia has been worn by the Regiment since 1944, when it was recognized for wear
by General George S. Patton, Commanding General, Third United States Army and
28th Colonel of Regiment, 1938-1940.

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6 Cavalry Regiment

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 6th Cavalry Regiment on
11 August 1922. It was redesignated for the 6th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron
(Mechanized) on 24 July 1944. It was redesignated for the 6th Constabulary
Squadron on 21 January 1948. It was redesignated for the 6th Armored Cavalry
Regiment on 18 March 1949. The insignia was amended to delete the motto on 23 May
1957. The insignia was redesignated for the 6th Cavalry Regiment on 9 September
1974.
The Regiment took part in the eastern campaigns of the Civil War, its outstanding feats
being at Williamsburg, Virginia, 1862, when it assaulted intrenched works, and at
Fairfield, Pennsylvania, 1863. At Fairfield the unit engaged two enemy brigades of
cavalry, completely neutralizing them and saving the supply trains of the Army, but in
the process was literally cut to pieces. This is symbolized by the unicorn, held to
represent the knightly virtues and, in the rampant position, a symbol of fighting
aggressiveness, combined with speed and activity. The shield is blue, the color of the
Federal uniform in the Civil War.

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6 Cavalry Brigade
The insignia was approved 21 Feb 1975. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-582)
The colors red and white are the old guidon colors of Cavalry units and the crossed
sabres are adopted from the former Cavalry branch insignia.

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21 Cavalry Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 11 April 1997. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-831)
The eagle in flight refers to the unit’s heritage as the Combat Aviation Training Brigade
and the Apache Training Brigade. Red and white are the colors designated for cavalry
units.

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116 Cavalry Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 116th Armored Cavalry
Regiment on 9 October 1967. It was redesignated for the 116th Cavalry Brigade,
effective 1 September 1989, with the symbolism revised. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1468)
The wavy band and the snake are taken from the coat of arms of the former organization, the 116th Armored
Cavalry Regiment. The wavy band and snake represent the Snake River, and refer to the home area of the
former organization, the Snake River Valley. The sun alludes to the state of Idaho, noted for the beauty of its
sunrises. The name is taken from Shoshoni Indian words meaning " the sun comes down the mountain" or "it is
morning." The predominant color, yellow, is representative of Armored Cavalry units.

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316 Cavalry Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 14 November 2008. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-983)
The shield shape of the device symbolizes defense and protection of the United States.
The color black and the eight stars represent the Eighth Tank Destroyer Group from
which the unit was formed. The lightning flash denotes speed, mobility, and
effectiveness, the characteristics of the combined forces with which the Brigade
cooperates. The saber refers to Cavalry missions and operations. Scarlet and white
represent Cavalry; gold (yellow) denote excellence.

CHEMICAL BRIGADES
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3 Chemical Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 19 November 2002. It was amended to
change the background color on 29 November 2002. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-853)
The hexagon, suggesting crystalline formation, represents chemistry. The flames and
the colors scarlet and purple allude to the mission of the chemical brigade. The
arrowhead denotes willingness to attack and defend; its triangular form symbolizes the
unit's designation.

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31 Chemical Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 31st Division on 7 March
1919. It was redesignated for the 31st Armored Brigade on 25 February 1974. The
insignia was redesignated effective 30 September 2002, with description updated and a
symbolism added, for the 31st Chemical Brigade. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-96)
The two "D's" stand for the "Dixie Division" from which the brigade descended.

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48 Chemical Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 16 September 2007. (TIOH
Drawing Number A-1-913)
Cobalt blue and yellow are the colors traditionally associated with Chemical units. The
benzene ring is adapted from the branch insignia. The flames suggest the mission of
the Brigade. The sword represents military readiness. The red droplets imply the
method of distributing chemicals. The four droplets and the eight flame licks allude to
the unit’s numerical designation.

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415 Chemical Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 16 March 1988. (TIOH Drawing Number
A-1-747)
Cobalt blue and golden yellow are the colors used for the Army Chemical Corps. The
green dragon symbolizes fire and chemical destruction, whose strength lies in its tail.
The three barbs of the dragon’s tail symbolize the areas of chemical, biological and
nuclear warfare in the unit’s overall mission and capabilities.

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455 Chemical Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 25 August 1999. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1842)
Cobalt blue and yellow are the colors traditionally used Chemical units. The dragon, a
legendary creature, symbolizes the fire and destruction of chemical warfare.

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460 Chemical Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 16 September 1987. (TIOH
Drawing Number A-1-738)
Cobalt blue and golden yellow are the colors associated with the Chemical Corps. The
benzene ring configuration is adapted from the branch insignia of the Chemical Corps.
The three areas represent the chemical states of matter: solid, liquid and vapor; the
sword symbolizes military defense and preparedness.

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464 Chemical Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 20 November 1987. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-742)
Cobalt blue and golden yellow are the colors traditionally associated with the Chemical
Corps. The saltire connotes strength and support. The droplets characterize a common
method of dispersing chemicals. They also recall the unit designation, four blue at top,
six golden yellow in center and four blue at bottom.

CIVIL AFFAIRS (CA)
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85 Civil Affairs Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 362d Civil Affairs Brigade
on 31 august 1976. It was redesignated effective 16 September 2011, for the 85th Civil
Affairs Brigade with the description updated. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-595)
Purple and white are the colors used for Civil Affairs and gold symbolizes achievement.
The swords, symbol of leadership and protection, are sheathed and unsheathed to
symbolize the politico-military authority of the organization. A quill is a symbol of
knowledge and alludes to the issuing and dissemination of all directives. The three
charges on the six-sided hexagon with the two swords allude to the unit’s present
numerical designation.

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95 Civil Affairs Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 15 August 2006. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-805)
Purple and white are the colors traditionally associated with Civil Affair units. The quill
and sword with points down represent the transition from war and conflict to the post
combat phase of military operations. The flame, adapted from the torch of the Civil
Affairs branch insignia, symbolizes guidance and enlightenment. The fire also
underscores the flames of war and how we must make the change to peace and then
defend and enforce the peace. The three stars commemorate the campaign awards for
service in Korea.

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304 Civil Affairs Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 5 Mar 1993. (TIOH Drawing Number A-

1-805)
Purple and white are the colors traditionally associated with Civil Affairs units. Gold
denotes excellence and achievement. The torch and bell symbolize leadership,
guidance and freedom.

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308 Civil Affairs Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 3 February 1993. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1803)
Purple and white are the colors traditionally associated with Civil Affairs units. Gold
denotes excellence and achievement. The three sections of the background reflect the
transition from conflict and the upraised sword symbolizes the Brigade's mission to
defend and enforce the peace.

st

321 Civil Affairs Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was authorized on 4 March 1993. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1804)
Purple and white are the colors traditionally associated with Civil Affairs units. Gold is
symbolic of excellence and achievements. The partly sheathed demi-sword and
scabbard reflect the Brigade's mission, both during and subsequent to hostilities.

322

nd

Civil Affairs Brigade

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 5 March 2008. (TIOH Drawing Number
A-1-960)
Purple and white are the colors associated with Civil Affairs. Yellow/gold denotes high
achievement and excellence. The light blue represents the great Pacific and highlights
the unit’s location at Fort Shafter, Hawaii. The wooden dagger with the shark’s teeth is
a traditional Hawaiian war club. A Puloulou, a wooden staff with a ball attached
wrapped in white cloth, signifies authority and stability. It was placed by the hut and
warned the passer-by that the ground was in possession of the king or chiefs. The two
Hawaiian images symbolize the transition from conflict to peacetime activities,
underscoring the Civil Affairs mission.

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350 Civil Affairs Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 6 October 1999. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1843)
Purple and white are the colors traditionally used by Civil Affairs units. The mountains
or land area is divided by the light blue stylized wave symbolizing the Caribbean and
the organization's home area and theater of operations. The rope annulet ties the two
areas together symbolizing unity and constancy. The sword and olive branch represent
conflict and peacetime operations highlighting the Command's mission.

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351 Civil Affairs Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 11 April 1977. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1612)
Purple and white are the colors used for Civil Affairs units. The simulated wall section at
the top is symbolic of cities and human population and in this instance, along with the
scroll, sword and torch, alludes to the Civil Affairs mission of the Command. Yellow,
synonymous with gold in heraldry, signifies excellence and achievement.

352

nd

Civil Affairs Command

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 25 October 1977. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1615)

Purple and white are the colors used for Civil Affairs units. The sword and scroll,
adapted from the insignia of branch, are symbolic of the unit's basic mission. The cross
bottony refers to the flag of the state of Maryland, where the unit is headquartered.

rd

353 Civil Affairs Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 10 February 1977. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1609)
The quill, sword and civic crown are symbolic of planning, training and readiness
requisite to the United States Army's conduct of civic affairs and military government
operations in countries in which United States Armed Forces are or may employed. The
torch alludes to guidance and the vertical rises or steps simulate the silhouette of the
Manhattan skyline adjoining the home area and location of the organization.

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354 Civil Affairs Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 18 October 1977. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1616)
The sword was suggested by the Civil Affairs insignia of branch. The V-shape,
simulating a ray of light, is symbolic of enlightenment; the white dome represents the
United States Capitol and alludes to the unit's present location in the Washington DC
area. Purple and white are colors used for Civil Affairs units.

th

356 Civil Affairs Brigade

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357 Civil Affairs Brigade

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358 Civil Affairs Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 9 June 1976. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-593)
Purple and white are the colors used for Civil Affairs. Blue and yellow are the colors of
the State of Pennsylvania where the unit is presently located. The globe alludes to the
scope of the organization capabilities. The sword represents military authority and is
sheathed to symbolize support of post combat military operations.

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360 Civil Affairs Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 28 January 1977. It was amended to
include an airborne tab on 23 March 2004. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-610)
Purple and white are the colors used for Civil Affairs units. The annulet or circle, a
symbol for continuity and perfection, together with a chevron representing the gables of
a house and also the military presence, symbolizes with the globe, the worldwide
aspects and mission of organization. Furthermore, the circle in its sum total of 360
degrees alludes not only to the numerical designation, but combined with the chevron
also forms the initials of the organization.

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361 Civil Affairs Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 6 Jan 1977. (TIOH Drawing Number A-

1-607)
The sunburst is symbolic of authority, enlightenment and wisdom. The sun represents
Florida, the "Sunshine State" with blue area representing the Gulf of Mexico and the
Atlantic Ocean alluding to the present location of the organization. Purple and white are
colors used for Civil Affairs units.

rd

363 Civil Affairs Brigade

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364 Civil Affairs Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was authorized on 21 Dec 1976. (TIOH Drawing Number
A-1-606)
The sword and scroll were suggested by the Civil Affairs insignia of branch. The stylized
fir tree represents the forests of Oregon, symbolizing the present location of the
organization. Purple and white are colors used for Civil Affairs units.

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365 Civil Affairs Brigade

CORPS
st

1 Corps
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved by the Adjutant General, American
Expeditionary Forces telegram on 3 December 1918 and approved by the War
Department on 17 June 1922. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-57)
A white circle was used as a corps badge by an organization designated I Corps during
the Civil War. The white circle was selected as the identifying device for the current I
Corps.

2

nd

Corps

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the II Corps on 13 Jan 1919
and officially announced on 27 May 1922. It was redesignated for the II U.S. Army
Corps on 16 Dec 1957. A distinctive unit insignia was not approved for the II U. S. Army
Corps. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-58)

rd

3 Corps
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved by telegram on 3 December 1918. It was
authorized/announced by letter dated 17 June 1922. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-59)
The triangular design represents the numerical designation of the corps. The blue and
white are the authorized colors used in distinguishing flags to represent Corps.

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4 Corps
The shoulder sleeve insignia was authorized for the IV Corps on 28 Dec 1918 and
officially announced on 17 Jun 1922. It was redesignated to the IV U.S. Army Corps on
26 Jan 1959. A distinctive unit insignia was not approved for the IV U. S. Army Corps.

(TIOH Drawing Number A-1-60)

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5 Corps
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 3 December 1918. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-61)
The pentagon represents the number of the Corps, while blue and white are the colors
associated with Corps flags.

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6 Corps
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the VI Corps via telegram on 1
Jan 1919 and officially announced on 21 Jun 1922. The shoulder sleeve insignia was
redesignated for the VI U.S. Army Corps on 21 Jan 1958. A distinctive unit insignia was
not approved for the VI U.S. Army Corps. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-62)

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7 Corps
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 28 Apr 1944. (TIOH Drawing Number A1-63)

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8 Corps
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the VIII Corps by telegram on
18 Dec 1918 and officially announced on 17 Jun 1922. It was redesignated for the VIII
U.S. Army Corps on 19 Dec 1957. A distinctive unit insignia for the VIII U. S. Army
Corps was not approved. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-64)

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10 Corps
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved for the X Corps on 19 Aug 1942. It was
redesignated on 11 Sep 1958 for the X U.S. Army Corps. A distinctive unit insignia was
not approved for the X U.S. Army Corps. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-66)

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11 Corps
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally authorized on 3 Sep 1942 for the XI Corps.
On 24 Feb 1958 the insignia was redesignated for the XI U. S. Army Corps. A
distinctive unit insignia was not approved for the XI U. S. Army Corps. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-67)
The color scheme is that of our National Colors. The total number of dots shown on the
dice is 11 and represents the XI U. S. Army Corps. These dice represent the natural
gamble taken by all combatants in warfare. The number "11" is the so-called natural
winning combination in the game of dice and symbolizes both the natural gamble taken
by the XI U.S. Army Corps and the natural winning team it will become.

12

nd

Corps

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally authorized for the 12th Army Corps on 26
Oct 1923. It was redesignated on 22 Jan 1959 for the XII U.S. Army Corps. A distinctive
unit insignia was not approved for the XII U. S. Army Corps. (TIOH Drawing Number A1-68)
An old Dutch windmill in orange on a blue shield of the outline of the shield on the seal
of the City of New Amsterdam; shield to be approximately 2 1/2 inches (6.35cm) in
height.

rd

13 Corps
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved for the 13th Corps on 7 Jun 1923. It was
redesignated for the XIII U. S. Army Corps on 1 May 1958. A distinctive unit insignia for
the XIII U.S. Army Corps was not approved. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-69)
The four leaf clover is for good luck and as displayed the four leaves make an "I". The
three states in the Corps Area, Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia, are represented
by the triangle and as the original white population of the three was English the triangle
is made red. The three sides of the triangle together with the green "X" make up the
number "13".

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14 Corps
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally authorized 29 Sep 1923 for the XIV Army
Corps. On 21 May 1958 the insignia was redesignated for the XIV U. S. Army Corps. A
distinctive unit insignia was not approved for the XIV U. S. Army Corps. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-70)
The shield is confederate gray and the blue saltire is from the confederate battle flag.
The "X" cross and the number of the points of the caltrap indicate the number 10 + 4 of
the division.

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15 Corps
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally authorized for the XV Corps on 20 Apr
1943. It was redesignated on 14 Feb 1958 for the XV U. S. Army Corps. A distinctive
unit insignia was not approved for the XV U. S. Army Corps. (TIOH Drawing Number A1-71)
The shoulder sleeve insignia is in Corps colors, blue and white.

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16 Corps
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the XVI Corps on 3 Apr 1944.
It was redesignated for the XVI U. S. Army Corps on 21 Jan 1958. A distinctive unit
insignia was not approved for the XVI U. S. Army Corps. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-72)
Blue and white are the Corps colors, while the compass rose is indicative of the
readiness of the personnel of the Corps to serve their country in any part of the world.

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19 USA Corps
The distinctive unit insignia was approved for the XIX Corps on 3 May 1944. It was
amended 9 Mar 1949, to change the wording of the description to conform with the
shoulder sleeve insignia manufactured and worn by the personnel of the XIX Corps
overseas during World War II, the design was a slight variance from the originally
approved design. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-74)
In April 1944, over the signature of General Eisenhower, it was stated that a design "of
American significance" was desired by the Corps Commander of the XIX Corps. The
tomahawk is one of the most American of symbols. The Indian tomahawk was
combined with a peace pipe and was thus ceremonially representative of war or peace.
In the peace ceremony the blade was buried and the peace pipe smoked, while in war it
was used as a weapon rather that as a pipe.

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20 Corps
The shoulder sleeve insignia was authorized on 4 Dec 1943. On 11 Oct 1957 the
insignia was redesignated for the XX U.S. Army Corps. A distinctive unit insignia was
not approved for the XX U. S. Army Corps. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-75)
The colors introduced in this insignia are those of the main arms comprising the Corps,
namely, Infantry, Artillery and Cavalry, while the crampons represent the gripping and
tenacious hold that the Corps will display in its missions; the figures conveying the
impression of the number of the Corps.

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21 Corps
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the XXI Army Corps on 3 Apr
1944. It was redesignated for the XXI U. S. Army Corps, Army Reserve on 11 Oct
1957and on 4 Nov 1957 it was amended to delete the words "Army Reserve." The
insignia was amended on 28 May 1959 to change the background color from olive drab
to Army Green. A distinctive unit insignia was not approved for the XXI U. S. Army
Corps. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-270)
The crossed arrows are representative of the fighting power of the organization, the
acorn is indicative of strength, and the four-leaf clover represents good fortune.

22

nd

Corps

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 6 April 1944.
Blue and white are the Corps colors and the pheon is representative of power and
strength.

rd

23 Corps
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved for the XXIII Corps on 3 April 1944. A
distinctive unit insignia was not approved for the XXIII Corps. (TIOH Drawing Number
A-1-388)
Blue and white are the Corps colors. The arrows are representative of the strength of
the organization and the two divisions of the oval and the three arrows are indicative of
the numerical designation of the organization.

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24 Corps
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 15 August 1944. It was amended to
correct the description on 28 August 1944. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-389)
The design is an arbitrary design and is in the colors of the Corps.

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31 Corps
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 3 August 1944.
The design is blue and white, the colors of the Corps and the three arrow tails give the
impression of all meeting at one point making a perfect score, conveying the impression
of the number of the Corps.

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36 Corps
The shoulder sleeve insignia was authorized on 17 October 1944. A distinctive unit
insignia for was not approved the XXXVI Corps.
The above described insignia is of arbitrary design, the three parts of the trefoil and the
six points of the geometric figure representing the numerical designation of the
organization.

DIVISION
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10 Mountain Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 10th Light Division on 7
January 1944. It was redesignated for the 10th Mountain Division and a mountain tab
was added on 22 November 1944. The authority to wear the mountain tab was
rescinded 29 January 1947. The insignia was redesignated for the 10th Infantry Division
on 14 December 1948. It was amended to change the description and symbolism on 15
November 1984. The insignia was redesignated for the 10th Mountain Division on 13
February 1985 and authority given to wear the mountain tab. (TIOH Drawing Number A1-87)
The blue background and the bayonets are symbolic of infantry while the position of the
bayonets in saltire simulates the numerical designation of the organization.

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11 Air Assault Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 11th Airborne Division on 4
January 1943. The airborne tab was rescinded on 29 January 1947. The airborne tab
was restored on 23 December 1948. The insignia was amended to change the
description on 6 September 1949. It was redesignated for the 11th Air Assault Division
with the airborne tab being replaced by the air assault tab on 19 February 1963. (TIOH
Dwg. No. A-1-89)
The red, white and blue refer to the national colors. The wings represent the airborne
mission and the “11” refers to the numerical designation of the Division.

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70 (Functional) Training Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally authorized for the 70th Division on 15 June
1943.
The Division is known as “The Trailblazer Division” represented by the axe head which
was used in the early days to blaze the trail through the wilderness represented by the
mountain and tree and is representative of the aim of the organization to overcome all
obstacles in the path to its military objective.

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76 Division (Training)
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 23 Jun 1922. (TIOH Drawing Number A1-123)
Red, white and blue are the National colors, while the label, a symbol of cadency,
denotes that the division was one of the first National Army divisions.

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84 Division (Training)
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 84th Division on 15 Apr
1924. It was authorized for the 84th Airborne Division and amended to add the Airborne
tab on 13 Feb 1951. On 6 Sep 1960 the insignia was amended to delete the airborne
tab and redesignated for the 84th Division (Training). (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-131)
The 84th Division, once known as the "Lincoln Division," was organized with personnel
from Indiana, Kentucky and Illinois, states with which President Abraham Lincoln was
associated and where he split rails for fences in his youth.

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91 Training Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 91st Division by telegram
on 8 December 1918 and announced by letter on 23 June 1922. It was rescinded on

25 March 1968. A new insignia was designed and approved on 25 March 1968. On 7
July 1993, the insignia was cancelled and a new shoulder sleeve insignia was approved
for the 91st Division. The shoulder sleeve insignia was redesignated for the 91st
Division (Training Support) effective 1 October 1999. It was redesignated effective 1
October 2009, for the 91st Training Brigade. It was redesignated for the 91st Training
Division effective 18 September 2010. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-488)
The green fir tree is symbolic of readiness and boldness, the color green signifying
fidelity and steadfastness of purpose. The simplicity of the present design recalls
service in World Wars I and II, when the 91st Division wore the distinctive fir tree.

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94 Training Division
The history of the shoulder sleeve insignia authorized for the U.S. Army Regional
Support Command is as follows: a design featuring a Native American with bow and
arrow was authorized for the 94th Division on 21 July 1922. The design was
superseded by approval of the design of a Puritan carrying a blunderbuss on his
shoulder on 6 September 1923. The approval was amended to change the wording of
the description on 22 December 1923. The Puritan design was superseded by design
featuring the Arabic numerals "9" and "4" on 5 September 1942. The "9/4" design was
rescinded (cancelled) on 14 May 1956. The same letter reinstated the Puritan shoulder
sleeve insignia, with a minor change in the design, for the 94th Infantry Division. The
Puritan design was redesignated for the 94th Command Headquarters (Divisional) on
16 October 1963. The Puritan design was authorized for the 94th U.S. Army Reserve
Command on 22 April 1968. The Puritan design was rescinded (cancelled) on 27
November 1991. The same letter reinstated the "9/4" design. The insignia was
redesignated effective 16 July 2003, for the U.S. Army 94th Regional Readiness
Command. The insignia was redesignated effective 16 September 2009, for the 94th
Training Division. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-141)
The insignia represents the numerical designation of the unit.

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95 Training Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 95th Infantry Division on
29 August 1942. It was redesignated for the 95th Division (Training) on 24 June 1968.
It was amended to revise the description on 14 April 1972. The insignia was
redesignated effective 16 September 2009, for the 95th Training Division. (TIOH Dwg.
No. A-1-142)
The colors red, white, and blue are the National colors, the number 9 interlaced with the
Roman numeral V refers to the numerical designation of the Division.

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100 Division (Training)
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 100th Division on 29 May
1923. It was redesignated for the 100th Airborne Division on 12 December 1946. The
airborne tab was rescinded on 29 January 1947. The insignia was amended to add the
airborne tab on 13 June 1951. It was redesignated for the 100th Infantry Division and
amended to delete the airborne tab on 9 August 1956. The insignia was redesignated
for the 100th Division on 7 September 1960. It was redesignated effective 16
September 2009, for the 100th Training Division and amended to add a symbolism.
The insignia was amended to correct the redesignation date to reflect 16 September
2009. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-147)
The blue shield represents Infantry; the numerals indicate the numerical designation of
the Division.

102

nd

Training Division

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 102d Division on 24 March
1924. It was redesignated for the 102d U.S. Army Reserve Command on 22 April
1968. It was redesignated for the 102d Training Division (Maneuver Support) and

amended to update the description and add a symbolism on 19 June 2007. The
insignia was amended to correct the redesignation date to reflect 16 September 2009.
(TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-149)
The letters “O” and “Z” above the arc represent the Ozark mountain area where the
Division was first organized.

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104 Training Division (Leader Training)
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 104th Division on 16
August 1924. It was redesignated for the 104th Division (Training) and amended to
include a border and add symbolism for the design on 5 June 1985. The insignia was
redesignated for the 104th Division (Institutional Training) and amended to update the
description on 15 August 2006. It was redesignated effective 17 October 2007, for the
104th Training Division (Leader Training). (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-151)
The timber wolf represents the heartiness and vigor of life in the western states,
tenacity in pursuit of mission accomplishment and unity of purpose associated with
familial behavior.

ENGINEER
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1 Engineer Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Engineer Amphibian Units on 17 June 1942. It was
redesignated for all Army personnel assigned to the following amphibian units: Amphibian Tank Battalions;
Amphibian Tractor Battalions; Engineer Amphibian Units; Joint Assault Signal Companies; Headquarters Ships
Detachments (Type A); Headquarters Ships Detachment (Type B); Headquarters Section (Army); and Amphibian
Training Command - Pacific Fleet on 10 June 1944. The insignia was redesignated for the 1st Engineer Brigade
and amended to update the description and add a symbolism on 20 July 2007. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-263)

The design was based on the design of the British Combined Operations patch which
was worn by commandos, landing craft personnel, and others.

2

nd

Engineer Brigade

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved as a pocket insignia for the
Engineer Amphibious Command on 23 October 1942. It was redesignated as the
shoulder sleeve insignia for members of Engineer Special Brigades in lieu of the
shoulder sleeve insignia prescribed in paragraph 56a(15), AR 600-40, 31 March 1944,
for members of all amphibian units by directive of Secretary of War-Disposition Form
WDGPA 421, 12 June 1946. (At this time the insignia listed in 1a was worn by members
of the Second Engineer Special Brigade on the left pocket). The insignia was
reassigned as the shoulder sleeve insignia to be worn by the 2d Engineer Special
Brigade on 11 March 1947. It was expanded to include approval for wear by the 409th
Engineer Special Brigade on 20 March 1951. It was authorized for all Engineer Special
Brigades on 26 October 1951. The insignia was redesignated for the Engineer Special
Brigades and Amphibious Support Brigades on 16 June 1953. It was redesignated for
the Engineer Amphibious Support Commands on 20 January 1958. It was amended to
correct the description on 24 February 1958. The insignia was redesignated effective 16
September 2011, for the 2d Engineer Brigade. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-378)
On a white oval within a blue orle is superimposed a red sea horse naiant edged with a
1/8 inch (.32 cm) white border. Attached above the oval is a white arc tab inscribed

"SECOND" in red letters. The overall dimensions are 2 15/16 inches (7.46 cm) in height
and 2 9/16 inches (6.51 cm) in width.

7th Engineer Brigade
Scarlet and white are the colors of the Engineer Corps. The black saltire refers to the
military symbol for Brigades and the gold castle tower is suggested by the branch
insignia of the Corps of Engineers. The seven scarlet and white stripes further allude to
the unit's numerical designation. The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 24 May
1966. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-415)

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9 Engineer Command
The insignia is in the colors of the Air Forces and together with the winged star indicates
connection of the organization with the Air Forces, while the numerals indicate the
numerical designation of the organization. The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved
on 6 June 1945.

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16 Engineer Brigade
The colors scarlet and white are used for Engineers. The two crossed towers, forming a
saltire - a symbol used during the Crusades to reward those who scaled town walls refer to the combat aspects of the Engineers. Furthermore, the saltire, a form of brace,
alludes to engineering support to other components within the organization. The saltire
formed by the two crossed towers simulates an X, the map symbol used for brigades
and also simulates the Roman numeral ten (X) which with the three merlons of each
tower alludes to sixteen (16), the numerical designation of the organization.
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 4 December 1969. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-530)

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18 Engineer Brigade
Scarlet and white are the colors used for the Engineers. The four corners of the
crenelated square allude to their four campaigns in World War II, Normandy, Northern
France, Rhineland and Central Europe. The four sides of the central red square stand
for planning, training, construction and combat support. The sword symbolizes
preparedness in peace and unrelenting fulfillment of Engineer missions in time of war.
The white outer border symbolizes unit integrity.
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 10 February 1966. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-409)

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20 Engineer Brigade
The colors scarlet and white are used for the Corps of Engineers, the castle tower being suggested by the Corps
of Engineers branch insignia and its base pointed in reference to the Brigade's combat requirements. The tower
also represents the Headquarters of the Brigade and the white areas, simulating carpenter squares, grouped
around it allude to the engineer combat and construction groups which it serves, the four areas specifically
referring to the Headquarters basic mission of command, operational planning, operational supervision, and
coordination of activities. The tower and white areas also simulate heavy construction (buildings, compounds,
fortifications, bunkers, revetments, runways, roads, etc.) and on being placed on a square allude to the
establishment of bases, the red border and the red saltire referring to lines of communication. In addition, the
four white areas also resemble the letter "V" for victory (successful accomplishment) and the Roman numeral
five (V) four of which make "20," the numerical designation of the Brigade. A saltire is also the Brigade symbol
used on maps.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 30 June 1967. It was amended to add
the blue and white "Airborne" tab on 14 January 1975. The insignia was amended
effective 16 September 2009, to delete the airborne tab. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1460)

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35 Engineer Brigade

Scarlet and white are the colors associated with the Engineers and the crenellations
also allude to the functions and mission of that Corps. The center device of cross and
annulet is adapted from the shoulder sleeve insignia of the 35th Infantry Division. The
shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 19 Jan 1984. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-687)

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36 Engineer Brigade
Scarlet and white are traditionally associated with Engineers. The seahorse, derived
from the 36th Engineer Regimental badge, recalls the amphibious operations of the
Regiment during World War II. The wavy division line on the shield represents the
missions of bridge-building over many rivers of Europe during the war.
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 36th Engineer Group on 3
June 2005. The shape of the seahorse was changed on 29 November 2005. It was
redesignated for the 36th Engineer Brigade on 25 May 2006. (TIOH Drawing Number
A-1-873)

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111 Engineer Brigade
Red and white are the colors traditionally used by Engineer units. The tower symbolizes
the Brigade's mission. The black diamond signifies military constancy to the nation, in
times of war and peace and the rich coal resources of the state. The powder horn
signifies the 111th Engineer's heritage as "Minuteman for Freedom," also the unit's
motto. The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 5 December 2006. (TIOH
Drawing Number A-1-907)

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130 Engineer Brigade
Scarlet and white are the colors used for Engineer organizations. The bar refers to a
lever, support, fastener or a measuring device and other facets of engineering
operations, the embattlements denoting the military aspects of the Brigade. In
numerology, three is the symbol for completeness. The shoulder sleeve insignia was
approved on 23 September 1969. It was amended to correct the description of the
design on 1 October 1969. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-525)

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168 Engineer Brigade
Red and white are the colors traditionally associated with the Engineer units. The tower
denotes alertness and emphasizes the Brigade's mission. The red and white
background also references the Brigade's past history as an Engineer Group. The
shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 18 June 2008. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1970)

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176 Engineer Brigade
Scarlet is the color traditionally associated with Engineer units. The shield shape
suggests an arrowhead; the pale and chief illustrate the letter "T." The combination of
the images alludes to the 36th Infantry Division with whom elements of the Brigade
served during World War I, World War II, and Operations Iraqi Freedom. The tower
signifies solidity, symbolizing the Brigade's mission. The shoulder sleeve insignia was
approved on 27 May 2009. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-1000)

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194 Engineer Brigade
Scarlet and white are the colors for the Corps of Engineers and a castle turret alludes to
the branch insignia. Scarlet, white, blue and three stars refer to the state flag of
Tennessee. Three stars are also on the Tennessee Army National Guard crest, and are

used to denote the unit's allocation. The saltire and turret symbolize the overall mission
of the organization. The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 30 January 1974.
(TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-571)

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225 Engineer Brigade
Scarlet and white are the colors traditionally used by Engineer units. Gold represents
the Brigade's excellence in fulfilling the mission at peace and time of war. Black,
symbolic of iron, alludes to the unit's transition to armored engineering capabilities. The
white bend suggests a landing strip and denotes the aviation mission of the
predecessor unit. The tower signifies the 225th Engineer's capabilities of heavy
construction. The fleur-de-lis symbolizes the State of Louisiana, the unit's area of
operations. The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 8 November 2007. (TIOH
Drawing Number A-1-948)

372

nd

Engineer Brigade

Scarlet and white are the colors traditionally used by Engineer units. The shield signifies
protection. The tower symbolizes the Engineer Corps and the unit's branch affiliation.
The black bayonet suggests the Brigade's close combat mission. The polestar denotes
the North Star, alluding to the unit's headquarters location in Minnesota. he shoulder
sleeve insignia was approved for 372d Engineer Brigade effective 16 September 2008.
(TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-933)

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411 Engineer Brigade
Scarlet and white are the colors used for the Corps of Engineers. The sawtoothed bar
at center and the right angles are suggestive of the construction mission of the unit. The
X-shape formed by the two right angles refers to the military symbol for a brigade. The
unit's numerical designation is roughly indicated by the four sides of the square, with a
Roman numeral XI formed by the two right angles and the vertical bar at center. The
shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 20 December 1973. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1569)

412

nd

Engineer Command

Scarlet and white are the Engineer's colors. The blue area denotes the Mississippi
Valley affiliation and the crenellated red bars are reminiscent of the Engineer's castle,
alluding to bridges and construction for which the Corps of Engineers is responsible.
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 412th Engineer Brigade on
8 Nov 1967. It was redesignated for the 412th Engineer Command on 5 Feb 1968.
(TIOH Drawing Number A-1-470)

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416 Engineer Command
Scarlet and white are the colors used for the Corps of Engineers; the design simulates
a castle turret suggestive of the Corps of Engineers insignia, while the billets and turret
allude to the unit's mission of coordinating activities of engineering construction and
related work. The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 416th
Engineer Brigade on 20 Apr 1967. It was approved for the 416th Engineer Command
on 1 Apr 1969. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-450)

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420 Engineer Brigade
The colors scarlet and white are used for the Corps of Engineers, the gold symbolizing
the higher level of command of the Brigade. The division of the shield by the white
center lines and gold circle represent the composition of the Brigade of a varying
number of units of different sizes and configurations. The larger gold circle is symbolic
of planning, coordination and supervision functions of the Brigade which organize the
various elements into a working unit. The gold circle in the exact center of the shield
represents the command function of the Brigade from which all brigade functions
radiate. The combination of the circles and the crossed center lines represent the dual

engineering and military mission of the unit by recalling an optical measuring device
and its military application of a weapon sight. The shoulder sleeve insignia was
approved on 18 Dec 1967. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-472)

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555 Engineer Brigade
Scarlet and white represent the Engineer branch and recall the unit's heritage with the
7th Engineer Brigade. White recalls the sands of desert theaters of war and also refers
to the secondary mission of fighting as infantry. The demi-fleur-de-lis refers to the Corps
of Engineers' history in France and recalls the unit's service there during World War II.
Blue represents the various bodies of water bridged as part of mission requirements
and with scarlet and white refers to the United States commitment to combat worldwide
terrorism. The black eagle recalls World War II campaigns in Germany. The ten
embattlements along with the five sides of the device recall the unit's designation, the
555th. Scarlet denotes sacrifice and courage. Black signifies strength and solidarity.
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 555th Engineer Group on
30 July 2004. It was redesignated effective 16 June 2007, for the 555th Engineer
Brigade. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-864)

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926 Engineer Brigade
Scarlet and white are the colors traditionally used by the Engineer Corps. The scarlet
saltire refers to the Cross of St. Andrew of the Alabama State Flag, signifying the unit's
ties with their home state. The four white squares highlight the following primary
missions of the Army Engineers: mobility, countermobility, survivability, and
sustainment. The gold castle tower is adapted from the branch insignia of the Corps of
Engineers. The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 9 November 2006. (TIOH
Dwg. No. A-1-902)

FIELD ARTILLERY
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17 Field Artillery Brigade
Scarlet and yellow are the colors used for Artillery. The thunderbolt and flashes are
symbolic of the awesome firepower of Artillery. Additionally, during World War I the
organization was a part of the 17th Division (Thunderbolt). The shoulder sleeve insignia
was approved on 19 July 1978. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-622)

42

nd

Field Artillery Brigade

Scarlet and yellow are the colors used for Artillery. The diagonal red band, indicative of
a road fraught with action and danger, bearing a gold cannon barrel for distinctive
service, alludes to the unit's origin as Railroad Artillery and the fleur-de-lis refers to their
WWI service in France. The cannon balls represent the three battalions of the regiment
when first formed. The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 16 September
1980. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-658)

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54 Field Artillery Brigade
Scarlet and yellow are the colors traditionally used by Field Artillery. The field piece is
adapted from the Field Artillery insignia of branch. The scarlet indented bar divides the
background into two sections denoting military preparedness on all fronts. The shoulder
sleeve insignia was approved on 29 July 1998. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-837)

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56 Field Artillery Command
Scarlet and gold (yellow) are the colors used for Field Artillery; blue denotes the
assigned infantry support. The destructive power and target capability of the Pershing

missile are suggested by the red disc at center and the upright missile signifies the
readiness of the unit. The lightning flashes refer to the ability of the missile team to act
and strike quickly in event of need. The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally
approved for the 56th Artillery Brigade on 9 June 1971. It was redesignated for the 56th
Field Artillery Brigade on 7 April 1972. The insignia was redesignated effective 17
January 1986 for the 56th Field Artillery Command.

72

nd

Field Artillery Brigade

Scarlet and yellow are the colors associated with Field Artillery. The cannon ball or
black disc centered on the yellow one connotes accuracy of fire. The pheons
(arrowheads) are symbolic of fire power and their configuration with the yellow disc
forms an allusion to the unit's numerical designation, 72. The shoulder sleeve insignia
was approved effective 16 September 1980. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-657)

rd

103 Field Artillery Brigade
Red and yellow are the colors traditionally used for Field Artillery. The cannon barrels
crossed in saltire imply strength and allude to the unit's mission. The anchor has been
adapted from the seal and flag of the State of Rhode Island and identifies the unit's
home location. It also symbolizes the strength and stability of a Field Artillery unit in
action. The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 12 December 1984. (TIOH Dwg.
No. A-1-700)

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113 Field Artillery Brigade
Scarlet and yellow are the colors used for Artillery and recall the predecessor's
designation. The cannon barrel, emblem of leadership, along with stacked gunstones,
refers to readiness and full strength capabilities. The striking hornet represents the
heritage of North Carolina, the home of the organization. The shoulder sleeve insignia
was originally approved for the 113th Field Artillery Brigade on 4 April 1980. It was
redesignated effective 1 September 2008, for the 113th Sustainment Brigade with the
description and symbolism updated. As a result of the 113th Sustainment Brigade being
established as a new unit, the redesignation was cancelled effective 24 June 2010.
(TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-656)

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115 Field Artillery Brigade
Scarlet and yellow are the colors traditionally associated with Field Artillery. The rayed
sun, a symbol of excellence, gives the allusion of a shellburst, and also suggests the
scenic wonders of Wyoming. The bucking bronco expresses the spirit, determination
and heritage of the soldiers of the Wyoming Army National Guard. The shoulder sleeve
insignia was approved on 9 June 1988. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-750)

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118 Field Artillery Brigade
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130 Field Artillery Brigade

Scarlet and yellow are the colors used for Artillery. The cannon and cannonball
symbolize the basic mission of the organization. The sunflower refers to the State of
Kansas, home area of the organization, and alludes to an explosion. The color blue is
indicative of the support provided the Infantry. The shoulder sleeve insignia was
originally approved for the 130th Field Artillery Brigade on 25 Jan 1979 and
subsequently deactivated. It was reinstated on 24 Jun 1997. (TIOH Drawing Number A1-634)

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135 Field Artillery Brigade
Scarlet and yellow are the colors associated with Field Artillery. The mountain
represents the "Ozarks," a distinctive geographic feature of the state. The blue wavy
area symbolizes the two major rivers (Missouri and Mississippi) that have been so vital
in settlement and growth of the state. The howitzer refers to the Field Artillery mission.
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 23 Apr 1979. (TIOH Drawing Number A1-641)

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138 Field Artillery Brigade
Red and yellow are the colors of Field Artillery. The thoroughbred horse's head refers to
the horse racing history of Lexington and is blue alluding to the "Bluegrass State." The
horse resembles a knight chess piece and refers to the Field Artillery mission with the
ability to strike behind enemy lines. The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 26
June 1979. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-643)

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151 Field Artillery Brigade
Scarlet and yellow are the colors used for Artillery. The revolutionary period cannon
barrel and the horseshoe are historic symbols of artillery and refer to the mission of the
modern artillery branch as well. The crescent is adapted from the State Flag and Seal
of South Carolina, the unit's home state. The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on
22 Dec 1978. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-630)

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153 Field Artillery Brigade
Scarlet and yellow are the traditional colors of the Field Artillery branch. The serpent
and the machete are symbolic of the Canal Zone jungles and allude to service in that
area. The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 23 April 1979. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-640)

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196 Field Artillery Brigade
Scarlet and yellow are the colors used for Artillery. The vertical band, known as a
"bend" in heraldry, is an allusion to the bend in the Tennessee River known as
Moccasin Bend which is in Chattanooga, the home of the Brigade headquarters. The
gun barrel represents the basic mission, and the blue disc with the three stars, adapted
from the state flag of Tennessee, further alludes to the home area of the organization.
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 23 January 1979. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1632)

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209 Field Artillery Brigade

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227 Field Artillery Brigade

402

nd

Field Artillery Brigade

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428 Field Artillery Brigade
Scarlet and yellow are used for Artillery. The wheel and cross potent (simulating the
muzzles of guns in action) symbolize the basic mission of the organization. In addition,
the numerical designation of the unit is indicated by the quatrefoil, two colors, and the
eight segments between the spokes of the wheel and cross. The shoulder sleeve
insignia was approved on 23 October 1979. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-628)

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434 Field Artillery Brigade
Scarlet and yellow are the traditional colors of Field Artillery. The alternating red and
yellow squares represent a grid pattern of fire indicating the unit's mission and the three
cannon balls allude to three consecutive hits symbolizing accuracy. The four sections
on either side with three cannon balls in center allude to the unit's numerical
designation. The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 25 January 1979. (TIOH
Drawing Number A-1-636)

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479 Field Artillery Brigade
Scarlet and yellow are the colors traditionally used by Field Artillery. A saltire
symbolizes strength and its shape forms an "X" indicating a target and alluding to the
mission of Field Artillery, while the pellet centered thereon symbolizes "on target
accuracy" or a direct hit. On a map showing deployment forces, an "X" indicates the
presence of a brigade and a "dot" indicates Field Artillery. The design symbolizes the
branch, mission and echelon of the unit. The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on
4 January 1980. It was cancelled effective 17 October 1999, when the brigade was
redesignated as the 4th Brigade, 75th Division. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-650)

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631 Field Artillery Brigade
Scarlet (red) and yellow are the colors associated with Artillery. The trident, an attribute
of Neptune, the Roman God of Waters, alludes to the Indian word "Mississippi," which
means "Father of the Waters." The dragon's head, symbolic of a fire-breathing beast, is
emblematic of Artillery. The six sides of the insignia, three prongs of the trident, and the
single dragon's head refer to the unit's numerical designation. The shoulder sleeve
insignia was authorized on 11 October 1979.

FIELD FORCE

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1 Field Force, Vietnam
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 5 October 1966. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1436)
The crusader's sword (the "Sword of Freedom") was suggested by the shoulder sleeve
insignia previously authorized for the United States Military Assistance Command,
Vietnam, and the United States Army, Vietnam. The one diagonal refers to the
numerical designation of the I Field Force. The sword "piercing" the red area alludes to
the constant probing of enemy territory and positions and the driving back and crushing
of enemy forces. The colors red, white and blue are the national colors of the United
States, and the colors yellow and red, are those of Vietnam. The colors blue, red and
yellow are also those of the three major combat arms: Infantry, Artillery and Armor.
The silhouette of the shield is shaped like a battle-ax to symbolize the smashing power
of the I Field Force and the constant combat readiness of its personnel to engage the
enemy. The battle-ax shape, in itself, is also an additional I Field Force identification.

2

nd

Field Force, Vietnam

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 5 October 1966. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1437)
The shape of the shield and the unsheathed crusader's sword (the "Sword of
Freedom") were suggested by the shoulder sleeve insignia previously authorized for the
United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, and the United States Army,
Vietnam. The stylized blue arrow and sword are used to represent the purpose and
military might of the II Field Force pressing against, sweeping back, and breaking
through enemy forces symbolized by the red areas. The dividing of the red and yellow
areas of the shield into two parts allude to the numerical designation of the II Field
Force, the colors red and yellow also being those of Vietnam. The colors red, white and
blue are the national colors of the United States and further allude to the three major
combat arms: Infantry, Artillery and Armor.

FINANCE
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13 Finance Group
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 14 August 2007. The insignia was
amended to correct the symbolism on 21 August 2007. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1937)
Silver gray and golden yellow are the Finance Corps branch colors. The gray colored
rectilinear shape alludes to the old U.S. Army pay chest. The black and yellow barrulet
represents the rope that tightly secured the pay chest. The keyhole to the chest,
represented by the black star, signifies the security and the management of funds. The
three stars in base highlight the Group’s association with the III Corps. The one lone
star at top and the three stars at base also represent the numerical designation of the
Group. The four stars together plus the diamond underscore their five locations: Fort
Bliss, Carson, Hood, Riley and Sill. The dragon, symbol of power and vigilance,
symbolizes the guarding of the treasure. The diamond is adapted from the Finance
Corps branch insignia. Black is the color of solvency and red is the color of courage and
sacrifice.

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175 Finance Center
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 175th Finance Center on
21 November 1986. It was redesignated for the 175th Finance Command on 27
December 1993, with the description and symbolism revised. The insignia was
redesignated for the 175th Finance Center on 6 December 2005. The insignia was
cancelled per HQDA, G-1 direction and change of policy on 6 December 2007. (TIOH
Drawing Number A-1-728)
Silver gray and golden yellow are colors traditionally associated with the Finance Corps.
The taeguk suggests the unit’s home area. The sword is indicative of support to the
soldier. The golden yellow disc alludes to the bezant, a heraldic symbol for money, and
refers to the unit’s mission.

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266 Finance Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally authorized for the 266th Finance Center on
5 March 1987. It was redesignated for the 266th Finance Command with the
description and symbolism revised effective 1 January 1994. The insignia was
cancelled effective 15 August 2008, when the unit was redesignated to a Center.
(TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-732)
Golden yellow and gray are colors traditionally associated with the Finance Corps. The
association of the organization with Europe is recalled by the demi-lion. The financial
responsibilities of the unit are referred to by the yellow disc, representing money; and
black suggests solvency and fiscal accountability.

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336 Finance Center
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 336th Finance Command
on 23 January 1995. It was redesignated for the 336th Finance Center on 14 June
2007. The insignia was cancelled per HQDA, G-1 direction and change of policy on 6
December 2007. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-816)
Silver gray and golden yellow are the colors traditionally associated with Finance units.
The blue fleur-de-lis reflects the unit's heritage and area of operation while the lozenge
recalls the Finance Corps insignia of branch.

FIRES
th

18 Fires Brigade
Scarlet and yellow are colors traditionally associated with Artillery units as well as the
cannon barrel. The wings are indicative of the mobility, speed and devastating accuracy
of the modern artillery. The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the
18th Field Artillery Brigade on 29 May 1979. It was amended to include the airborne
tab, add metric measurements and revise the description on 21 October 1992. It was
again amended to change the color of the airborne tab on 5 February 2003. The
insignia was redesignated for the 18th Fires Brigade and amended to delete the
airborne tab on 22 March 2007. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-639)

st

41 Fires Brigade
Scarlet and yellow are the colors associated with Field Artillery. The gun tube alludes to
the howitzers and the flashes symbolize speed, accuracy and shock. The shoulder
sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 41st Field Artillery Brigade on 24
November 1981. It was redesignated effective 16 April 2007, for the 41st Fires Brigade
with the description updated. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-672)

th

45 Fires Brigade
Scarlet and yellow are the colors traditionally used by Field Artillery units. The field

piece denotes the Brigade's affiliation and mission while the thunderbird and arrowhead
suggest its heritage and history. The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved
for the 45th Field Artillery Brigade on 25 March 1997. It was redesignated effective 1
September 2008, for the 45th Fires Brigade. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-830)

th

65 Fires Brigade
Scarlet and yellow are the colors traditionally associated with Field Artillery. Blue
denotes the Fires Brigade combat multipliers, the joint sections and mission with the Air
Force and Marine Corps. The lightning bolt represents speed and striking power,
identifying the other elements of the Brigade, both lethal and non-lethal effects. The
cannon signifies the unit's primary mission. The center black disc indicates munitions.
The combination of the white and black disc alludes to the Brigade's past affiliation as I
Corps Artillery. The dice refers to the unit's commitment to accomplish any combat
operations, also depicting the unit's designation "65." The shoulder sleeve insignia was
approved effective 1 September 2009. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-1002)

th

75 Fires Brigade
Scarlet and yellow are the colors traditionally used by Field Artillery. The field piece
symbolizes the unit's firepower capabilities and mission. The lozenge refers to the 75th
Field Artillery's nickname, "Diamond Brigade." The shoulder sleeve insignia was
originally approved for the 75th Field Artillery Brigade on 2 March 1982. The insignia
was redesignated for the 75th Fires Brigade effective 18 September 2006 with the
description and symbolism updated. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-674)

142

nd

Fires Brigade

Scarlet and yellow are the traditional colors of Field Artillery organizations. The diamond
shape and blue background refer to Arkansas, the unit's home state, and the gold
diagonal stripe on the scarlet background, from the coat of arms of the Marquis de la
Fayette, alludes to Fayetteville, Arkansas, the headquarters location. The projectile
indicates the unit's mission and firepower potential. The shoulder sleeve insignia was
approved on 7 September 1978. It was redesignated effective 3 September 2006, for
the 142d Fires Brigade with the description updated. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-624)

th

169 Fires Brigade
Scarlet and yellow are the traditional colors of Field Artillery and the field piece refers to
the organization's mission. The light blue sky and mountain peaks, representing the
Rocky Mountains, refer to the previous home station of the unit at Denver, Colorado.
Yellow further alludes to the historic gold fields of the state, and the red mountains
allude to the state name, Colorado, which is Spanish for "colored red." The shoulder
sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 169th Field Artillery Brigade on 3
January 1979. It was redesignated effective 1 September 2008, for the 169th Fires
Brigade with the description and symbolism updated. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-631)

th

197 Fires Brigade
Red and yellow are the colors traditionally used for Field Artillery. The tied bundle of five
arrows adopted from the New Hampshire State crest refers to the unit's home location
and symbolizes the mission as well. A bundle of arrows was one of the first missiles
used in an artillery mission. The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the
197th Field Artillery Brigade on 23 January 1979. It was redesignated effective 1
September 2008, for the 197th Fires Brigade with the description updated. (TIOH
Drawing Number A-1-633)

th

210 Fires Brigade

Yellow and scarlet are the colors used for Artillery. The black vertical cannon barrel and
the crossed lines, symbolic of a sighting device, suggest accuracy and firepower; the
crescents suggest high trajectory and long distance. The crescents and crosswise
division further allude to the Roman numeral for 210, the unit's numerical designation.
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 210th Field Artillery
Brigade effective 16 September 1980. It was redesignated effective 16 November 2006,
for the 210th Fires Brigade with the description updated. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1651)

212

nd

Fires Brigade

Scarlet and yellow are the colors used for the Field Artillery branch. The crossed lines
of the field refer to target finding and the two decrescents suggest the aerial route of the
artillery projectile; the arrows denote artillery. The Roman numeral designation is
represented by the two C-shaped symbols for 200 and the X-shaped field and two
vertical arrows for 12. The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the
212th Field Artillery Brigade on 28 July 1981. It was redesignated effective 17 July
2011, for the 212th Fires Brigade with the description updated. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1666)

th

214 Fires Brigade
Scarlet and yellow are the colors associated with the artillery branch. The large arrow
symbol of the background suggests a missile firing and thus represents the missile units
of the brigade; the crossed bayonets represent infantry and the cannon barrel refers to
the artillery battalion. The points at top and bottom suggest firepower and accuracy.
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved for the 214th Field Artillery Brigade on 5
April 1982. It was redesignated for the 214th Fires Brigade with the description updated
on 10 October 2006. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-675)

INFANTRY
st

1 Infantry Division
The numeral identifies the Division's designation. The shoulder sleeve insignia was
originally approved for the 1st Division on 31 October 1918, as a red number "1" and
amended on 31 March 1927, to include the background of the insignia in the design. It
was redesignated for the 1st Infantry Division on 19 August 1942. The insignia was
amended to revise the description on 6 October 1972. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-76)

2

nd

Infantry Division

The star has played an important part in our history from the days of the Colonies to the
present time. The Indian signifies the first and original American. These devices were
originally established by the division to use as vehicle markings and to identify the
vehicles as all American. The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally authorized for the
2d Division on 6 November 1918 and officially announced by The Adjutant General
letter dated 21 June 1922. It was amended to correct the description on 7 November
1927. The insignia was redesignated for the 2d Infantry Division effective 1 August
1942, and amended to change the dimensions. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-77)

rd

3 Infantry Division
The three white stripes of the insignia are symbolical of the three major operations in
which the division participated during World War I. The blue field symbolizes the loyalty
of those who placed their lives on the altar of self-sacrifice in defense of the American
ideals of liberty and democracy. This insignia was originally approved by telegram for
the 3d Division on 24 October 1918. It was officially announced on 20 June 1922. The
insignia was amended to correct the wording of the description on 11 October 1922. It
was redesignated for the 3d Infantry Division retroactive to 1 August 1942 and
amended to include the border in the description. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-78)

th

4 Infantry Division
The four leaves allude to the numerical designation of the Division while the word "I-VY"
as pronounced, suggests the characters used in the formation of the Roman numeral
"IV." Ivy leaves are also symbolic of fidelity and tenacity.
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 4th Division on 30 October
1918, without any background specified for the ivy leaf design. The design was
embroidered on a square olive background (color of the uniform). It was redesignated
for the 4th Infantry Division effective 4 August 1943. On 2 July 1958, the design was
changed to reflect the light khaki color background. The insignia was amended to add a
symbolism on 1 April 1969. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-79)

th

5 Infantry Division
The insignia was adopted by the Division upon its arrival in France. The color red was
selected as a compliment to the then Commanding General whose branch of the
service was the Artillery. The "ace of diamonds" was selected from the trade name
"Diamond dye - it never runs." The red diamond represents a well-known problem in
bridge building, it is made up of two adjacent isosceles triangles which made for the
greatest strength. The Division's nickname is "Red Diamond." It is reported that the
Division was latterly known among the Germans opposed to it as the "Red Tigers" and
the "Red Devils." The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for 5th Division
on 20 October 1918. It was amended on 11 October 1922, to correct the wording of the
description. On 25 May 1943, the insignia was redesignated for the 5th Infantry Division
and amended to include the symbolism of the design. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-80)

th

6 Infantry Division
The six-pointed star alludes to the designation of the Division. The shoulder sleeve
insignia was approved on 20 October 1918. It was amended to include a symbolism on
17 July 1985. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-81)

th

7 Infantry Division
The outline of the hourglass alludes to the numerical designation of the division
showing two "7's" inverted, one upright. The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally
approved for the 7th Division by telegram dated 23 October 1918. It was officially
announced by letter dated 21 June 1922. The insignia was redesignated for the 7th
Infantry Division retroactive to 1 January 1973, and amended to include the border by
letter dated 14 April 1964. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-83)

th

8 Infantry Division

The nickname of the division, "Pathfinder," is represented by the arrow while the figure
"8" identifies the division's designation. The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally
approved for the 8th Division on 8 April 1919. The insignia was redesignated for the 8th
Infantry Division retroactive to 15 May 1943 and amended to revise the dimensions of
the design and to provide a border space for overedge stitching on 27 February 1970.
(TIOH Drawing Number A-1-84)

th

9 Infantry Division
The double quatrefoil, which is a heraldic mark of cadency for the ninth son, has been
made red and blue, the designating colors of an Infantry Division headquarters flag; the
white center is in the color of the numerals for divisional flags. The shoulder sleeve
insignia was originally approved for the 9th Division on 18 November 1925. It was
redesignated for the 9th Infantry Division effective 1 August 1942. The insignia was
amended to revise the dimensions of the design to provide for an overedge stitching on
27 February 1970. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-85)

th

14 Infantry Division
The blue is for the Infantry and the saltire produces the effect of a Roman numeral while
the lone sides of the square produce the number of the Division. The shoulder sleeve
insignia was approved on 7 August 1944.

th

17 Infantry Division
The saltire or Saint Andrew's cross produces the effect of a Roman numeral 10 which
placed on the septfoil, a seven lobed figure produces the number of the Division. The
background is made blue and red, the colors of the Infantry Division distinguishing flag.
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 3 August 1944.

rd

23 Infantry Division
The four white stars on the blue field are symbolic of the Southern Cross under which
the organization has served. The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for
the Americal Division on 20 December 1943. It was redesignated for the 23d Infantry
Division on 4 November 1954. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-467)

th

24 Infantry Division
The taro leaf is a well known symbol of Hawaii. The shoulder sleeve insignia was
originally approved for the Hawaiian Division on 9 Sep 1921. It was redesignated for the
24th Infantry Division on 21 Jul 1944. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-256)

th

25 Infantry Division
The taro leaf is indicative of the descent of the 25th Division from the Hawaiian Division,
while the lightning flash is representative of the manner in which the Division performs
its allotted assignments. The shoulder sleeve insignia was authorized on 25 September
1944.

It was amended to authorize wear of the airborne tab by the 4th Brigade Combat Team
only on 29 March 2012. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-92 for Division Patch and TIOH Dwg.
No. A-1-1069 for 4th Brigade Combat Team)

th

28 Infantry Division
The keystone, symbol of the state of Pennsylvania, alludes to the nickname of the
Division. The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 19 October 1918. (TIOH
Drawing Number A-1-231)

th

29 Infantry Division
In 1919, when shoulder sleeve insignia were first authorized, the division was
composed of two masses of men, one from the North and the other from the South.
Therefore, the North is represented by the blue and the South by the gray. The
shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 29th Division by telegram on 21
October 1918. It was reaffirmed by letter dated 17 June 1922. The insignia was
amended to change the description on 4 May 1925. The insignia was redesignated for
the 29th Infantry Division and amended to update the description and include a
symbolism on 16 may 1985. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-94)

th

34 Infantry Division
The patch shape simulates an olla (Mexican water flask) symbolizing the 34th Division's
origin, formation and intensive training site at Camp Cody, New Mexico in Oct 1917.
The bull skull also symbolizes the surrounding dry, desert-like area. Black denotes
durability, firmness and stability and red is for courage and action.
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 34th Division on 28 June
1922. It was redesignated for the 34th Command Headquarters (Divisional), Iowa
National Guard on 16 October 1963. The insignia was redesignated for the 34th Infantry
Division effective 10 February 1991, and amended to add a border and provide a
symbolism for the design. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-99)

th

35 Infantry Division
The Santa Fe cross was a symbol used to mark the old Santa Fe trail, an area where
the unit trained, and was officially designated as an identifying device for the unit by
Headquarters, 35th Division General Orders Number 25, dated March 27, 1918. The
organization is referred to as the Santa Fe Division.
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 35th Division on 29
October 1918. It was officially announced on 8 June 1922. The insignia was
redesignated for the 35th Command Headquarters (Divisional) on 17 October 1963. It
was assigned to the 35th Engineer Brigade on 23 July 1968. It was restored to the 35th
Infantry Division and amended to change the description and add a symbolism on 27
August 1984. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-100)

th

36 Infantry Division
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 36th Infantry Division on
12 November 1918. It was redesignated for the 71st Infantry Brigade on 7 May 1968. It
was redesignated for the 71st Airborne Brigade, Texas Army National Guard on 10
March 1969. The insignia was redesignated effective 1 May 2004, with the description
updated, for the 36th Infantry Division. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-101)

th

38 Infantry Division
The monogram "C Y" alludes to the nickname of the division, the "Cyclone Division."
The shoulder sleeve insignia originally approved by telegram for the 38th Infantry on 30
Oct 1918. It was officially announced on 19 Jun 1922. It was redesignated on 22 Aug
1963 for the 38th Infantry Division. On 25 Jan 1966 the insignia was amended to
correct the wording of the description. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-103)

th

39 Infantry Division
Red, white and blue are our National colors. The Greek letter recalls the Delta of the
Mississippi and with the English "D" the two letters recall the popular name of the
Division. The Secretary of War approved the shoulder sleeve insignia on 8 Feb 1922.
(TIOH Drawing Number A-1-104)

th

40 Infantry Division
The design alludes to California where the division had its origin, while the blue field
alludes to the sky and the Pacific Ocean. The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally
approved for the 40th Division by telegram dated 23 November 1918. It was officially
announced on 27 May 1922. The insignia was amended to include method of war on 17
March 1931. It was redesignated for the 40th Armored Division on 27 July 1954. It was
reinstated and redesignated for the 40th Infantry Brigade on 1 May 1968. It was
redesignated for the 40th Infantry Division on 21 January 1974. The insignia was
amended to add the symbolism on 19 January 1999. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-495)

42

nd

Infantry Division

The 42d Infantry Division is known as the "Rainbow Division" because personnel from
26 states originally formed the Division. The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally
approved by telegram for the 42d Division on 29 October 1918. It was officially
authorized for wear in the United States by the War Department on 27 May 1922. The
insignia was redesignated for the 42d Infantry Division on 8 September 1947. It was
amended to include an Army green border on 24 March 1966. (TIOH Drawing Number
A-1-106)

th

44 Infantry Division
The colors are flag blue and golden orange. These were the colors of the House of
Nassau under which the Dutch settled what is now New York and New Jersey. These
colors were chosen because the Division was formed from units located in this area.
The two "4s" represent the unit's numerical designation. The shoulder sleeve insignia
was approved on 5 October 1921. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-108)

th

46 Infantry Division
The colors, gold and blue, taken from the wreath of the Michigan National Guard State
crest, signify the original white exploration and settlement in the State of Michigan by

the French. The clenched right hand represents the constant preparedness of this
organization to defend the peace. The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 24
March 1949. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-110)

th

47 Infantry Division
The circular background is representative of the shield of Thor - God of Thunder - a god
of strength, the great defender, a victor in battle. The blue is for Infantry from which
came the first units of the National Guard of Minnesota and North Dakota. The red is for
Artillery, the second type arm to be organized in the National Guard of Minnesota and
North Dakota. The white Viking's helmet is symbolic of the Viking warriors; brave and
fearless men of the North of invincible courage, early explorers, valiant and heroic in
war, brilliant organizers of government in peace time. Units of the 47th Infantry Division
come from the two Midwestern states of Minnesota and North Dakota - formerly known
as the Dakota Territory - pioneered, founded, and built by descendents of the Vikings,
loyal sons and daughters of Scandinavian birth. The shoulder sleeve insignia was
approved on 28 March 1949. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-111)

th

48 Infantry Division
The four points of the star alludes to the number "4" and the white and red alternating
segments allude to the number "8." The design therefore, suggests the number of the
Division. The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 16 February 1949. (TIOH Dwg.
No. A-1-112)

th

49 Infantry Division
The shape of the shield has been adopted from the vigilante shield, symbol used by
various vigilante organizations during early California history. The prospector is
reminiscent of the "days of 49" when the discovery of gold in Northern California,
present area of the Division, instigated the gold rush, bringing about the necessity for
vigilante and other organizations, forerunners of the present California Army National
Guard. The colors, red and yellow signify the early Spanish history of the State of
California. Blue and gold (yellow) are the traditional colors of the State of California. The
shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 5 July 1949. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-113)

th

65 Infantry Division
The halberd is a military axe combined with a spear-point, and represents an implement
of warfare to be used for cutting the enemies' resistance.
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 25 May 1943. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-117)

th

66 Infantry Division
The snarling panther suggests the power, aggressiveness and endurance of the
Division. The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 26 August 1943. (TIOH Dwg.
No. A-1-118)

th

69 Infantry Division
The design is a stylized figure which imparts the impression of the number 69, the
numerical designation of the Division. Red, white and blue are our National colors. The
shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 30 April 1943.

th

71 Infantry Division
Red, white and blue are the National colors. The numbers "71" represent the unit's
numerical designation. The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 24 July 1943.

rd

83 Infantry Division
The insignia with monogram represents the area the state from where the majority of
the members were drawn when the division was activated in World War I. The insignia
was originally approved for the 83d Division by telegram from the Adjutant General,
American Expeditionary Forces, 26 December 1918. It was authorized by the War
Department for the 83d Division on 22 June 1922 and redesignated for the 83d Infantry
Division on 2 February 1966. It was authorized for wear by the 83d Army Reserve
Command from 22 April 1968 until the ARCOM was discontinued on 15 September
1996.

92

nd

Infantry Division

The buffalo refers to the nickname of the division. It was inherited from the 367th
Infantry, one of the first units of the division organized. The shoulder sleeve insignia
was approved by telegram on 6 Dec 1918. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-139)

th

106 Infantry Division
The blue background is for the Infantry Division, while the red represents the Artillery
support. The lion's face represents strength and power. The shoulder sleeve insignia
was approved on 18 January 1943. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-152)

st

1 Infantry Brigade
The blue represents Infantry. The figure "1" denotes the numerical designation of the
Brigade. The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 17 August 1959. It was
rescinded on 13 November 1964. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-290)

2

nd

Infantry Brigade

st

11 Infantry Brigade

th

27 Infantry Brigade Combat Team

th

29 Infantry Brigade Combat Team

th

30 Infantry Brigade

32

nd

Infantry Brigade

rd

33 Infantry Brigade Combat Team

th

36 Infantry Brigade

th

37 Infantry Brigade Combat Team

st

41 Infantry Brigade Combat Team

th

43 Infantry Brigade

th

45 Infantry Brigade Combat Team

th

48 Infantry Brigade Combat Team

th

50 Infantry Brigade Combat Team

rd

53 Infantry Brigade

th

58 Infantry Brigade Combat Team

th

76 Infantry Brigade Combat Team

th

79 Infantry Brigade Combat Team

st

81 Infantry Brigade

th

86 Infantry Brigade Combat Team

99th Infantry Battalion
The 99th was a separate unit formed of Norwegian nationals in the United States and
Norwegian Americans. In June 1945 as part of the 474th Regiment these men liberated
their homeland. The patch was designed by Claus Hoie, a member of the unit.

th

99 Battalion Combat Team
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 9 October 1956. It was cancelled on 1
July 1958 (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-242).
Scarlet, blue and yellow are the colors of the various groups that make up a Combat
Team. The lightning flash represents the effective teamwork of the organization. The
abstraction of two parts of a grenade, the safety pin pull ring and the safety lever,
symbolizes the mission of a Combat Team to arm and strike. They also simulate the two
nines in the designation Ninety-ninth Battalion Combat Team.

th

116 Infantry Brigade Combat Team

th

120 Infantry Brigade

th

157 Infantry Brigade

th

158 Infantry Brigade

162

nd

Infantry Brigade

th

165 Infantry Brigade

th

170 Infantry Brigade

171st Infantry Brigade

172

nd

Infantry Brigade

th

174 Infantry Brigade

st

181 Infantry Brigade

th

188 Infantry Brigade

th

189 Infantry Brigade

st

191 Infantry Brigade

192

nd

Infantry Brigade

th

196 Infantry Brigade

th

197 Infantry Brigade

th

198 Infantry Brigade

th

199 Infantry Brigade

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 10 June 1966. (TIOH
Dwg. No. A-1-404)
The colors blue and white are used for Infantry. The spear, an early
Infantry weapon in flames, symbolizes the evolution and firepower of
the modern Infantry.
th

205 Infantry Brigade

th

256 Infantry Brigade Combat Team

th

75 Infantry Regiment
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 75th Infantry Regiment on
19 September 1975. The unit was deactivated on 26 July 1984.
The colors blue, white, red and green represent four of the original six combat teams of
the 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional), commonly referred to as “Merril”s
Maurauders”, which were identified by color. Two colors, khaki and orange, were not
represented in the design. The sun symbol from the Chinese flag represents the unit’s
cooperation with Chinese forces in the China-Burma-India Theater. The white star
represents the Star of Burma, the country in which the Maurauders campaigned during
World War II. The lightning bolt is symbolic of the strike characteristics of the
Maurauders’ behind-the-line activities. The 75th Infantry Regiment was activated in
Okinawa during 1954. Its lineage goes back to the 475 th Infantry Regiment and the
5307th Composite Provisional Unit. The Long Range Reconnaissance Patrol (LRRP)
(Provisional) assigned to the major army commands in the Republic of Vietnam became
the 75th Infantry (Ranger) Regiment.
Campaigns: World War II
Vietnam
Armed Forces Expeditions (Grenada and Panama)

th

474 Infantry Regiment
The 474th was formed in January 1945 from the remnants of the 1st Special Service
Force, the 1st, 3rd, and 4th Ranger Battalions and the 99th Infantry Battalion (which
retained its designation).

INFORMATION OPERATIONS
st

1 Information Operations Command

MANEUVER ENHANCEMENT
BRIGADE
st

1 Maneuver Enhancement Brigade

rd

3 Maneuver Enhancement Brigade

th

4 Maneuver Enhancement Brigade

th

26 Maneuver Enhancement Brigade

92

nd

Maneuver Enhancement Brigade

th

110 Maneuver Enhancement Brigade

th

111 Maneuver Enhancement Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 111th Air Defense
Artillery Brigade on 20 July 1973.
Color

Woodland

ACU

Desert

Multicam

It was redesignated effective 1 February 2008, for the 111th Maneuver Enhancement
Brigade with the description and symbolism updated. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-564)
The modified ancient Indian sun symbol of Zia was suggested by the State Flag of New
Mexico. The barbed sun rays allude to the Brigade’s former mission to provide air
defense for forward combat elements. The horizontal bars also symbolize defense and
control, while the vertical bars allude to 111 further distinguishing the numerical
designation of the Brigade. The colors red and yellow, the national colors of Spain,

refer to the historical Spanish influence in New Mexico. Scarlet and yellow are the
colors used for the Artillery, the previous designation of the unit.

th

130 Maneuver Enhancement Brigade

th

136 Maneuver Enhancement Brigade

st

141 Maneuver Enhancement Brigade

th

149 Maneuver Enhancement Brigade

th

157 Maneuver Enhancement Brigade

th

158 Maneuver Enhancement Brigade

th

196 Maneuver Enhancement Brigade

th

204 Maneuver Enhancement Brigade

th

218 Maneuver Enhancement Brigade

th

226 Maneuver Enhancement Brigade

st

301 Maneuver Enhancement Brigade

302

nd

Maneuver Enhancement Brigade

rd

303 Maneuver Enhancement Brigade

th

404 Maneuver Enhancement Brigade

th

648 Maneuver Enhancement Brigade

MEDICAL AND VETERINARY
st

1 Medical Brigade

2

nd

Medical Brigade

rd

3 Medical Command

th

4 Medical Brigade

th

5 Medical Brigade

th

7 Medical Brigade

th

7 Medical Command

th

8 Medical Brigade

th

18 Medical Command

th

30 Medical Brigade
Maroon and white are the colors traditionally associated with the Medical Corps. The
upright sword symbolizes military preparedness and is entwined by a serpent recalling
the Staff of Aesculapius and a heritage of medical service. The star represents the state
of Texas, where the 30th Medical Regiment was first activated.
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 30th Medical Brigade on
10 December 1993. It was redesignated for the 30th Medical Command on 19 August
2008. The insignia was redesignated for the 30th Medical Brigade effective 16 October
2013. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-810)

32

nd

Medical Brigade

th

44 Medical Brigade

62

nd

Medical Brigade

th

65 Medical Brigade
Maroon, white, and the Caduceus historically are associated with the Army Medical Corps. Gold is emblematic of
excellence and high ideals. The sword is pointing downward to indicate a military unit with a non-combatant
posture. The serpents intertwine the sword blade seven times to represent the six campaign streamers awarded
the unit during World War II, Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, and Central Europe and
one Meritorious Unit streamer embroidered European Theater. The strong and enduring alliance between the
United States and the Republic of Korea is highlighted by the wavy division of the patch in the manner of the
Taeguk, with maroon for red above and blue, below.
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 16 October 2008. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-973)

112

nd

Medical Brigade

th

139 Medical Brigade
The colors maroon and white are for the Medical Branch of the Army. The cross potent stands for the Brigade
and is a device frequently used for medical organizations. The star is a symbol of guidance, referring to the

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved
on 13 January 2014. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-1093)
Brigade’s mission of command, control and supervision.

th

175 Medical Brigade

rd

213 Medical Brigade

th

307 Medical Brigade
The block “O” and trefoil resembling the buckeye seed represents Ohio, known as the
Buckeye State. The anchor is taken from the Columbus coat of arms and alludes to the
city of Columbus and the great lakes region, the home of the organization and its
command. The maroon cross in the color of the Army Medical Department is a symbol
for aid and assistance and reflects the mission of the organization.
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 24 January 2013. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-11084)

th

330 Medical Brigade

332

nd

Medical Brigade

th

338 Medical Brigade

th

426 Medical Brigade

th

804 Medical Brigade

th

807 Medical Brigade

th

818 Medical Brigade

Joint Military Medical Command, US
Army Element
Medical Command Korea

Uniformed Services University of the
Health Sciences
US Army Medical Command

US Army Medical Command Europe

US Army Medical Research and
Development Command

MILITARY INTELLIGENCE
2

nd

Military Intelligence Command

th

66 Military Intelligence Group

st

111 Military Intelligence Brigade
The red and gold sun rays above the Azure (oriental blue) are replicated from the state
flag of Arizona and are symbolic of the current location of the Brigade. The seven gold
sun rays represent the seven southeastern states where the former unit operated along
with the seven intelligence disciplines. The six red sun rays represent the steps
supporting the intelligence process facilitating situational understanding and decision
making. The phoenix silhouette is directly tied to the unit’s insignia. The shape of the
phoenix is symbolic of the continuous process of intelligence directly supporting
operations and is also symbolic of the intelligence warfighting function’s ability to
leverage the intelligence enterprise at every echelon.
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 12 March 2013. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-11086)

th

116 Military Intelligence Brigade
Oriental blue is the primary branch color for Military Intelligence. The yellow triangle
alludes to the Brigade’s aerial surveillance, reconnaissance and target acquisition. The
lightning bolts symbolize the unit’s electronic warfare functions to disseminate
intelligences. The demi-sphere signifies the Brigade’s worldwide capabilities to collect
intelligence in support of Army Unified Land Operations and Joint requirements. The
sword represents the aggressiveness, protection and physical threat apparent in
military intelligence operations.
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 16 October 2015. (TIOH Dwg. No.
A-1-1102)

th

205 Military Intelligence Brigade

th

207 Military Intelligence Brigade

th

300 Military Intelligence Brigade

th

319 Military Intelligence Brigade

th

470 Military Intelligence Brigade

th

500 Military Intelligence Brigade

501 Military Intelligence Brigade

505th Military Intelligence Brigade
Oriental blue is the primary color traditionally used by Military Intelligence units. The sword represents military
readiness; with the key-shaped hilt, hand guard and pommel, allude to control. The key symbolizes security and

support functions. The lightning bolt signifies speed to provide electronic communications. The shape of the
shield pays homage to the Military Intelligence Readiness Command unit patch. The chess knight signifies covert
capabilities.
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 16 September 2015. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-1097)

rd

513 Military Intelligence Brigade

th

650 Military Intelligence Group

th

704 Military Intelligence Brigade

th

706 Military Intelligence Group

th

780 Military Intelligence Brigade

902

nd

Military Intelligence Group

MILITARY POLICE
th

8 Military Police Brigade

st

11 Military Police Brigade

14th Military Police Brigade
th

15 Military Police Brigade

th

16 Military Police Brigade

th

18 Military Police Brigade
Color
Desert

Woodland

ACU

Multicam

42

nd

Military Police Brigade

rd

43 Military Police Brigade
th

46 Military Police Command

th

49 Military Police Brigade

th

89 Military Police Brigade

th

177 Military Police Brigade

th

200 Military Police Command

th

220 Military Police Brigade

th

260 Military Police Command

th

290 Military Police Brigade

th

300 Military Police Brigade

rd

333 Military Police Brigade

MISCELLANEOUS NUMERIC
UNITS

st

1 United States Missile Command
st

1 Space Brigade
st

1 Mission Support Command
th

4 United States Missile Command
th

7 Civil Support Command

9th Mission Support Command

st

51 Command Headquarters
th

75 Training Division

th

78 Training Division

th

79 US Army Reserve Sustainment
Support Command
th

80 Training Command
th

84 Training Command (Leader
Readiness)
th

85 United States Army Reserve Support
Command
th

86 Training Division
th

87 United States Army Reserve Support
Command
th

97 Training Brigade
th

98 Training Division
th

100 Missile Defense Brigade

th

108 Training Command

ORDNANCE
52

nd

Ordnance Group

The shoulder sleeve insignia was authorized on 5 June 1995. (TIOH Drawing Number
A-1-819)
Crimson and yellow are the colors traditionally used by Ordnance units. The bomb and
stylized explosion symbolize the mission and heritage of the 52nd Ordnance Group.

th

59 Ordnance Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 18 April 1980. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1655)
Crimson and yellow are the colors used for Ordnance. The cannon barrels represent
weapons, the disc at center a round of shot or ammunition, and the flames suggest
ordnance repairs. The white area, suggesting a cloud of smoke, alludes to explosives.
The position of the cannon barrels simulating the Roman numeral five, together with the
nine tongues of the flame, alludes to the organization’s numerical designation.

st

71 Ordnance Group
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 21 April 2011. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-11050)
Black represents the asymmetric threat EOD Soldiers are faced with on the battlefield.
The red border represents the EOD Soldiers who have paid the ultimate sacrifice in
service to their nation. The five stars represent the core hazards that EOD is
responsible for mitigating: Explosive, Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear.
The shield represents the foundational mission of the organization, to protect all from

the dangers of unexploded ordnance, improvised explosive devices, and explosive
hazards. The red and gold bomb is the traditional bomb approved for wear in 1942 by
the Bomb Disposal School, the foundation of every EOD Soldier. The bomb symbolizes
the mission and heritage of the EOD Warrior and creates solidarity with EOD soldiers
serving throughout the Army.

th

111 Ordnance Group
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 19 July 2016. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-1114).
The red (crimson) and gold (yellow) refer to the traditional colors of the U.S. Army Ordnance Branch. The bomb
is a common symbol used to identify Explosive Ordnance (EOD) units and illustrates the mission of the Group. It
is topped by three fins, suggesting conventional explosives and biological/chemical and radiological devices. The
gold stripes are analogous to the EOD badge’s lightning bolts and refer to the potential destructive power of
explosive devices. They span the width of the insignia, signifying the Group’s expanse across the United States.
The scarlet arrowhead references the history of its many campaigns, including an assault landing in New
Guinea. The bisection of the oval is reminiscent of the Greek letter theta, indicating an unknown angle,
symbolizing the EOD Soldier’s drive to find solutions to vexing threats.

PERSONNEL AND
REPLACEMENT
st

1 Personnel Command

rd

3 Personnel Command

th

8 Personnel Command

th

10 Personnel Command

QUARTERMASTER
rd

23 Quartermaster Brigade

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 2 July 2010.
1030)

(TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-

The three points of the shield represent the battle honors earned by the unit during the
Korean War. The buff and light blue background is in the Quartermaster branch
colors. The brick red border and bend sinister are taken from the Transportation branch
and refer to the Brigade’s initial designation as the 23rd Truck Corps Regiment. The
dragon is a symbol for Korea where the unit won its battle honors. The dragon is also
the bringer of clouds and rain and therefore, the supplier of food and water. The wheel,
key, and sword are part of the Quartermaster crest and signify the unit’s present branch
designation.

th

49 Quartermaster Group
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 22 June 1998. (TIOH Drawing Number
A-1-836)
Buff and light blue are the colors traditionally used by the Quartermaster Corps. Black
denotes solidity and refers to petroleum; the light blue flash represents speed and quick
response. The vertical stripe symbolizes the flow of fuel and water, while the annulet,
suggesting a wheel (as on the Quartermaster insignia of branch), highlights the
constant movement of supplies and materiel.

th

156 Quartermaster Command

RANGER
75th Ranger Regiment
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 75th Infantry Regiment on 26 July
1984. It was redesignated for the 75th Ranger Regiment on 14 February 1986. (TIOH Dwg.
No. A-1-694)

1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger
Regiment on 26 July 1984. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-695)

2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger
Regiment on 26 July 1984. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-696)

rd

th

3

Battalion, 75 Ranger Regiment

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger
Regiment on 26 July 1984. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-697)

th

th

75 Ranger Special Troops Battalion, 75 Ranger
Regiment
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Special Troops Battalion, 75th
Ranger Regiment on 7 April 2006. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-886)

Ranger Battalions (Obsolete)

REGIMENTAL COMBAT TEAM
th

278 Regimental Combat Team

RESERVE COMMAND
th

7 Army Reserve Command

rd

83 Army Reserve Command

th

120 Army Reserve Command

st

121 Army Reserve Command

122

nd

Army Reserve Command

rd

123 Army Reserve Command

Reserve Personnel Command

Reserve Readiness Command

SCHOOL
Air Defense Artillery Center and School
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Antiaircraft Artillery and
Guided Missile School on 16 August 1956, and redesignated for the Antiaircraft Artillery
and Guided Missile Center on 29 April 1957. It was redesignated on 29 July 1957, for
the U.S. Army Air Defense Center and redesignated for U.S. Army Air Defense Center
and Fort Bliss on 25 November 1967. The insignia was amended to extend
authorization for wear to include personnel assigned to the U.S. Army Air Defense
School on 19 June 1981. The insignia was redesignated for the US Army Air Defense
Center with the description updated on 28 July 2011. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-237)

Scarlet is the traditional Artillery color. Blue denotes the sky into which antiaircraft
artillery missiles are fired. The stylized gold lightning symbolizes the electronic
emanations used in electronic warfare and for missile guidance.

Armor Center
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved on 18 Apr 1958 for wear by
personnel assigned to the Headquarters and Headquarters Group, U.S. Army Armor
Center. It was amended on 6 Nov 1970 to revise the design to make the insignia and
tab one piece. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-274)

Armor School
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved on 21 Oct 1954 for The Armored
School. It was redesignated for The Armor School on 26 Jun 1956. The insignia was
amended on 16 Jul 1957 to change the wording in the description of the tab. On 3 Dec
1964 the insignia was redesignated for the U.S. Army Armor School. The shoulder
sleeve insignia was amended on 5 Nov 1970 to revise the design to make the insignia
and tab one piece. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-397)

Army National Guard Schools
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 27 Oct 1997. (TIOH Drawing Number A1-834)
Blue, yellow and red are adapted from the insignia of Training and Doctrine Command
and reflect the association of the Army National Guard Schools with the organization.
Black denotes solidity and dependability; the silhouetted statue is associated with the
National Guard.

Army War College
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 28 Oct 1955. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-191)
The torch and the colors are taken from the crest of the device for the Army War
College. The stars are from the shield of the device.

Aviation Center and School
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for The Army Aviation School on
14 Mar 1957. It was amended on 25 Apr 1958 to extend authorization for wear to the
staff and faculty members of the schools and assigned student aviators. The insignia
was redesignated on 20 Jul 1964 for the U.S. Army Aviation Center and the U.S. Army
Aviation School. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-250)
Orange and black are the colors of The Army Aviation School. The aviation training
mission of the school is denoted by the connected wings and flaming torch. The wings
symbolize flight, which is taught by the school, and the flaming torch is symbolic of
learning, accomplished by the school.

Aviation Logistics School
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 6 Jun 1985. (TIOH Drawing Number A1-709)
Ultramarine blue and golden orange are the colors of the Army Aviation branch. The

winged sword symbolizes the air defense mission and the lamp refers to learning and
training.

Chaplain Center and School
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 13 Sep 1991. (TIOH Drawing Number A1-796)
Black is the branch color of the Chaplain Corps. Gold is emblematic of excellence and
white denotes purity. The torch signifies knowledge and leadership. The open book
symbolizes the sacred "word" and the divine knowledge and wisdom of religion. The
open book is radiating ten rays suggesting spiritual enlightenment.

Chemical School
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Chemical Corps Training
Command on 7 Nov 1956. It was redesignated for the U.S. Army Chemical Corps
School on 23 Oct 1962. The insignia was cancelled on 13 Aug 1976. On 22 Feb 1980
the insignia was reinstated and redesignated for the U.S. Army Chemical School. (TIOH
Drawing Number A-1-240)
Cobalt blue and yellow are the colors used for the Chemical Corps. The crossed retorts
are taken from the Chemical Corps insignia. The torch signifies knowledge and alludes
to the training in chemical activities.

Command and General Staff College and
Combined Arms Center and Fort
Leavenworth
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Command General Staff
College on 1 Jul 1955. It was amended on 4 Dec 1956, to revise the description. On 30
Oct 1974, authorization for wear of the insignia was extended to personnel assigned to
the U.S. Army Combined Arms Center and Fort Leavenworth. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-189)
The design is based on the shield of the device approved for the school.

Defense Language School (USA Element)
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 30 April 1999. It was amended to
extend wear to the U.S. Army Element, Defense Language Institute English Language
Center on 28 June 2013. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-841)
Red, white and blue are our National colors. The Rosetta Stone symbolizes the
Defense Language Foreign Language Center's mission and is combined with the
griffin's head to underscore the vital role of language and intelligence in total military
preparedness.

Engineer Center and Fort Leonard Wood
and School
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the U.S. Army Engineer
Center and Fort Belvoir on 11 Feb 1959. It was amended on 19 Jun 1981 to extend
authorization for wear to personnel assigned to the U. S. Army Engineer School. The
School was relocated to Fort Leonard Wood, MS on 1 Jun 1988 and the insignia was
redesignated for the U.S. Army Engineer Center and Fort Leonard Wood. It continues
to be authorized for wear by the U. S. Army Engineer School. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-278)
The colors scarlet and white are traditionally used for the Corps of Engineers. The
castle is taken from the Corps of Engineers Insignia. The torch represents the training
mission.

Field Artillery Center and School
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved on 17 Jul 1970 for the U.S. Army
Field Artillery School. It was amended on 9 Jun 1981 to extend authorization for wear to
include personnel assigned to the U.S. Army Field Artillery Center. (TIOH Dwg. No. A1-188)
The ancient field piece is taken from the device of the Field Artillery School, as well as
the colors scarlet and yellow which are for Artillery.

Infantry School
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Infantry School on 23 April
1951. It was redesignated for the U.S. Army Infantry School on 7 August 1964. The
insignia was amended to change the size and provide a border space for overedge
stitching on 10 June 1969. On 30 October 1974, the authorization for wear was
extended to personnel assigned to the U.S. Army Infantry Center and its assigned units.
The insignia was amended to rescind the war extended to the U.S. Army Infantry
Center and its assigned units on 6 November 2009. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-205)
Light blue and white are the current and former Infantry branch colors. The bayonet is
point up with the cutting edge to the left signifying victory and honor.

Intelligence Center and School
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the U.S. Army Intelligence
Center and School on 26 Jul 1972. Effective 1 Oct 1990, authorization for wear of the
insignia was extended to personnel of the U. S. Army Intelligence Center and Fort
Huachuca. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-554)
Oriental blue and silver gray are the colors for the Military Intelligence branch; yellow or
gold signifies achievement. The torch is symbolic of education and the sun represents
light and guidance. The number of rays, seven, is symbolic of wisdom and strength.

John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the U.S. Army Special Warfare
Center on 22 Oct 1962. It was redesignated for the U.S. Army John F. Kennedy for
Special Warfare Center on 3 Aug 1964. On 25 Jul 1969 it was redesignated for the U.S.
Army John F. Kennedy Center for Military Assistance. The insignia was amended on 26
Aug 1981 to extend authorization for wear to personnel assigned to the U. S. Army
Institute for Military Assistance. On 21 Feb 1984 the shoulder sleeve insignia was
redesignated for the U.S. Army John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center. (TIOH Dwg.
No. A-1-304)
The lamp placed in the center of the shield refers to the U.S. Army Special Warfare
Center (predecessor unit). The lamp also alludes to the U.S. Army Special Warfare
School and the three tongues of flames to the three prime areas of instruction for which
the School is responsible: Psychological Operations, Counter Insurgency, and
Unconventional Warfare. The unconventional outline of the lamp, in simulating the
shape of the Greek letter "Psi," refers symbolically to psychology - the traits, feelings,
actions and attributes, collectively, of the mind; the tongues of flame implying the
spoken and written words which are major tools of Psychological Warfare. The three
flame sprouts at the top of the lamp simulate the heraldic delineation "embattled" - to
array for battle. The two crossed arrows refer to the silence and stealth with which our
early frontiersmen fought for the new found freedom in the New World, as well as the
ingenuity, courage and survival by the usage of wasplike, yet devastating, attacks
through the employment of irregular tactics, techniques and logistical support. The
arrow, straight and true, thus characterizes the Special Forces of today. The color black
signifies wisdom and prudence, the white perfection and faith, and the yellow constancy
and inspiration. The black and white also allude to the "degrees" of propaganda used
by Special Warfare units, a "gray degree" resulting from the admixture of black and

white.

Judge Advocate General's Legal Center
and School
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for The Judge Advocate General's
School on 21 January 1972. It was redesignated effective 2 October 2004, for The
Judge Advocate General's Legal Center and School, with the description updated.
(TIOH Drawing Number A-1-550)
The sword, pen and wreath were suggested by The Judge Advocate General's Corps
insignia of branch. The lighted torch symbolizes intellect and leadership and refers to
the School.

Medical Center Department and School
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the U.S. Army Medical
Training Center on 11 February 1959. It was cancelled on 20 July 1973. The insignia
was reinstated and redesignated, with description and symbolism revised, for wear by
personnel of the U.S. Army Medical Department Center and School on 5 January 1993.
(TIOH Drawing Number A-1-279)
Maroon and white are the colors traditionally associated with the Medical Corps. The
serpent is adapted from the Army Medical Service insignia. The torch is representative
of knowledge.

Military Police School
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Provost Marshal General
Center on 17 Jun 1960. It was redesignated for the Provost Marshal General's School
on 23 Oct 1962. On 21 Jul 1965 the insignia was redesignated for the U.S. Army
Military Police School. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-292)
The crossed pistols are taken from the Military Police Corps branch insignia. The torch
signifies knowledge and enlightenment.

Missile and Munitions Center and School
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 7 Nov 1969. The insignia was amended
on 2 May 2002, to extend wear to the U.S. Army Ordnance Center and School. (TIOH
Dwg. No. A-1-528)
Crimson and yellow are the colors used for Ordnance. The torch signifies knowledge
and alludes to training in missiles and munitions.

Ordnance School and Center
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Ordnance Training
Command on 7 Nov 1956. It was redesignated the U.S. Army Ordnance Center and
School on 31 Jan 1968. The shoulder sleeve insignia was canceled at the request of
the Office of the Chief of Ordnance, effective 25 April 2002. The U.S. Army Ordnance
Center and School now wears the shoulder sleeve insignia of the U.S. Army Missile and
Munitions Center and School. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-244)
Crimson and yellow are the colors used for the Ordnance Corps. The flaming bomb is
suggested by and simulates the Ordnance Corps insignia. The torch signifies
knowledge and alludes to the training in ordnance.

Quartermaster Center and School
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Quartermaster Training
Command on 7 Nov 1956. It was redesignated for the U.S. Army Quartermaster Center
and U.S. Army Quartermaster School on 23 Oct 1962. On 24 Nov 1975 the insignia
was amended to change the colors of the insignia. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-243)
Buff and blue are the colors of the Quartermaster Corps. The key and sword are taken
from the Quartermaster Corps insignia. The torch signifies knowledge and alludes to
training in Quartermaster.

School of Music
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the U.S. Army Element,
School of Music on 15 May 1981. It was redesignated for the U.S. Army School of
Music on 17 February 2006. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-664)
Red, white and blue are the national colors. The torch symbolizes training and
instruction; the staff refers to music. The A and B notes represent the initials A and B for
Army Bands.

School of the Americas (Obsolete)
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 30 Dec 1982. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-679)
The colors, galleon, Maltese cross and wave line are taken from the design elements of
the shoulder sleeve insignia authorized the former United States Army Forces Southern
Command. The galleon is symbolic of the Caribbean Area. This type of ship is usually
associated with the Caribbean Area since it predominated during the Spanish regime.
The white background represents exploration of the New World. The Maltese cross was
the insignia of Columbus, the first explorer to land in the Caribbean Area.

Sergeants Major Academy
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 2 Feb 1973. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-559)
The shield is symbolic of confidence, boldness and protection. The wreath and star
simulate, and were suggested by, the insignia of grade associated with that of
command sergeant major; the star is emblematic of guidance and the laurel wreath of
achievement and merit. The torch symbolizes leadership, education and training and
the flame alludes to zeal and action. The color gold signifies excellence and wisdom;
and the color Army green alludes to the all-Army purpose of the Academy; it also is
symbolic of faithfulness and obedience.

Signal Center and Fort Gordon and
School
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the U.S. Army Signal Training
Center on 14 Apr 1959. It was redesignated for the U.S. Army Signal Training
Command on 24 Oct 1960. On 23 Oct 1962 it was redesignated for the U.S. Army
Signal Center and School. The insignia was redesignated on 21 Apr 1975 for the U.S.
Army Signal Center and Fort Gordon. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-277)
The crossed flags are taken from the Signal Corps insignia. The torch signifies
knowledge and alludes to the training in electronics and communications.

Soldier Support Institute
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the U.S. Army Administrative
Schools Center on 10 January 1973. It was redesignated for the U.S. Army
Administration Center on 10 December 1974; redesignated for the U.S. Army Soldier
Support Center on 4 November 1980; and authorized for the U.S. Army Soldier Support
Institute on 1 October 1994. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-557)

The torch is used to symbolize scholarship and leadership. The heneage knot is
representative of the multiple training missions. Silver gray and golden yellow are the
colors of the Finance Corps. Blue and scarlet are colors of the Adjutant General Corps.
Light blue is the color used to represent Defense organizations and indicates the
mission of the organization in training for all military services.

Transportation Center and School
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Transportation Training
Command on 7 November 1956. It was redesignated for the U.S. Army Transportation
Center and the U.S. Army Transportation School on 23 October 1962. (TIOH Dwg. No.
A-1-238)
Brick red and yellow are the colors used for the Transportation Corps. The winged
wheel is taken from the Transportation Corps insignia. The torch signifies knowledge
and alludes to the training in transportation.

U.S. Military Academy Instructor
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved on 26 Nov 1941. It was amended
on 22 Mar 1957. It was amended on 22 May 1957. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-201)

U.S. Military Academy Cadet

Warrant Office Career Center
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 4 September 2008. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-978)
Brown is the color traditionally associated with the Warrant Officer Corps. The cannons
with the blue mine case allude to the Warrant Officer Corps' lineage in the Army Mine
Planter Service as part of the Coast Artillery. The enflamed torch symbolizes
enlightenment and dynamic learning. The three stars signify the three components of
the Army that will gain intensive military guidance from the Center ? Regular Army,
Army National Guard, and Army Reserve.

Western Hemisphere Institute for Security
Cooperation
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 16 Nov 2000. (TIOH Drawing Number A1-845)
Medium blue is the color traditionally used by Department of Defense organizations.
The American continents highlight the Western Hemisphere and represent the
organization's mission to provide education and training to eligible personnel of nations
of the Western Hemisphere. The Maltese cross, the insignia of Columbus who
discovered the Americas, is adapted from the insignia of the previous organization, the
United States Army School of the Americas and denotes the heritage of the Western
Hemisphere for Security Cooperation.

SERVICE COMMANDS

2

nd

Service Command

The 2d Corps Area Service Command Headquarters was located in New York City,
New York, and the Command was responsible for the states of New Jersey and New
York. The 2d Command patch was approved by the Adjutant General Office on 18 Jul
1941. On 7 Jan 1942 the shoulder sleeve insignia was amended to change the color of
the background from olive drab to dark blue.
The design was arbitrarily selected to represent the 2d Corps Area Service Command.
White, being a mixture of all colors, was selected for the reason that Corps Area
Service Commands may be composed of all arms and services. The geometric design
represents the Command's numeric designation.

rd

3 Corps Area Service Command
The 3d Corps Area Service Command Headquarters was located in Baltimore,
Maryland, and the Command was responsible for the states of Delaware, Maryland,
Pennsylvania, Virginia and Washington. D.C. The shoulder sleeve insignia was
originally approved on 17 Jul 1941. It was amended on 14 Oct 1941 to change the color
of the background from olive drab to dark blue.
The design was arbitrarily selected to represent the 3d Corps Area Service Command.
White, being a mixture of all colors, was selected for the reason that Corps Area
Service Commands may be composed of all arms and services. The geometric design
represents the command's numerical designation.

th

4 Service Command
The 4th Service Command Headquarters was located in Atlanta, Georgia, and the
Command was responsible for the states of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, North and
South Carolina, Mississippi and Tennessee. The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally
approved on 18 Jul 1941. It was amended on 14 Oct 1941 to change the background
color from olive drab to dark blue.
The design was arbitrarily selected to represent the 4th Corps Area Service Command.
White, being a mixture of all colors, was selected for the reason that Corps Area
Service Commands may be composed of all arms and services. The geometric design
represents the Command's numeric designation.

th

5 Corps Area Service Command
The 5th Service Command was located in Columbus, Ohio, and the Command was
responsible for the states of Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia. The 5th
Command patch was originally approved on 18 Jul 1941. The shoulder sleeve insignia
was amended on 14 Oct 1941 to change the background from olive drab to dark blue.
The design was arbitrarily selected to represent the 5th Corps Area Service Command.
White, being a mixture of all colors, was selected for the reason that Corps Area
Service Commands may be composed of all arms and services. The geometric design
represents the Command's numeric designation.

th

6 Corps Area Service Command
The 6th Service Command Headquarters was located in Chicago, Illinois and the
Command was responsible for the states of Illinois, Michigan and Wisconsin. The
shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved on 17 Jul 1941. It was amended on 14
Oct 1941 to change the background from olive drab to dark blue.
The design is arbitrarily selected to represent the 6th Corps Area Service Command.
White, being a mixture of all colors, has been selected for the reason that Corps Area
Service Commands may be composed of all arms and services. The geometric design
represents the Command's numeric designation.

th

7 Corps Area Service Command
The 7th Service Command Headquarters was located in Omaha, Nebraska and the
Command was responsible for the states of Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota,
Missouri, Nebraska, North and South Dakota and Wyoming. The shoulder sleeve
insignia was originally approved on 18 Jul 1941. It was amended on 18 Sep 1941 to
change the description. On 14 Oct 1941 the insignia was amended to change the
background color from olive drab to dark blue.
The design is arbitrarily selected to represent the 7th Corps Area Service Command.
White, being a mixture of all colors, has been selected for the reason that Corps Area
Service Commands may be composed of all arms and services. The geometric design
represents the Command's numeric designation.

th

8 Corps Area Service Command
The 8th Service Command Headquarters was originally located in San Antonio, Texas,
but later moved to Dallas, Texas, and was responsible for the states of Arkansas,
Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas. The shoulder sleeve insignia was
originally approved on 18 Jul 1941. It was amended on 14 Oct 1941 to change the
background from olive drab to dark blue.
The design is arbitrarily selected to represent the 8th Corps Area Service Command.
White, being a mixture of all colors, has been selected for the reason that Corps Area
Service Commands may be composed of all arms and services. The geometric design
represents the Command's numeric designation.

th

9 Corps Area Service Command
The 9th Service Command Headquarters was located in Douglas, Utah and was
responsible for the states of Arizona, California, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah
and Washington. The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved on 17 Jul 1941.
It was amended on 14 Oct 1941 to change the background from olive drab to dark blue.
The design is arbitrarily selected to represent the 9th Corps Area Service Command.
White, being a mixture of all colors, has been selected for the reason that Corps Area
Service Commands may be composed of all arms and services. The geometric design
represents the Command's numeric designation.

SIGNAL
st

1 Signal Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 24 July 1968.
The blue lightning streak on target symbolizes the 1st Signal Command's ability to carry
on all functions of its mission with speed and accuracy. The white rings refer to the
emanating effect of transmitting radio waves through space. The single lightning flash
further distinguishes the 1st Signal Command. Orange and white are colors used by the
Signal Corps.

st

1 Signal Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 5 October 1966. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1438)
The orange field of the shield and the yellow border were suggested by the authorized
shoulder sleeve insignia of the Strategic Communications Command of which the 1st
Signal Brigade is a part. The lightning bolt, which also appears on the Strategic
Communications Command shoulder sleeve insignia, is depicted on the distinctive
insignia (badge) of the 1st Signal Brigade. In this instance, the lightning bolt, a symbol
of communication, has been used as a sword blade and attached to a hilt, the sword
thus referring to both the tactical and support mission of the organization. The blue

vertical stripe with “sword” (suggested by the authorized shoulder sleeve insignia for the
United States Army, Vietnam) alludes to the unit’s numerical designation.

nd

2

Signal Brigade

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 6 Mar 1981.
Orange and white are the colors associated with the Signal Corps. The lightning flashes
are an allusion to the basic mission of the organization, and the color blue refers to the
unit's capability to support the combat mission. The two flashes simulate the Roman
numeral II and suggest the unit's numerical designation. The globe alludes to the
worldwide scope of the unit's mission and the unit's affiliation with the U.S. Army
Communications Command.

rd

3 Signal Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 29 August 1979. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1645)
Orange and white are the Signal Corps colors. The star, a reference to Texas, the
"Lone Star State," the place of initial activation, also refers to guidance and
achievement. The flashes are symbolic of the speed of communications and also refer
numerically to the present designation of the Brigade. The color blue is indicative of
support to the Infantry and other combat forces.

th

5 Signal Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 24 October 1994. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1815)
Orange and white are the colors traditionally associated with Signal units. The demidragon alludes to the unit's area of operations in Worms, Germany.

th

6 Signal Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 24 June 1991.
Orange and white are colors traditionally associated with the Signal Corps. The
designation of the Command is reflected by the six sides of the device. The unit's
motto, "Voice of the Desert," is signified by the desert falcon, symbolizing vigilance,
speed and clarity of communications. Blue stands for devotion to duty and loyalty. The
lightning flash represents speed and electronic communication.

th

7 Signal Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 16 March 1970. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1532)
Orange and white are the colors used for the Signal Corps. The blue area alludes to the
troposphere, the lower portion of the atmosphere which extends, more or less, seven
miles above the surface of the earth, the stratosphere forming the atmosphere's upper
portion. The seven steps of the orange area refer to antenna, wave length, frequency,
modulation, selectivity, volume and control and also allude to the numerical designation
(7) of the Brigade. The two electric flashes or impulses symbolize the transmitting and
the receiving of radio and radar signals and communication, the white pointed area
simulating the "bending" or breaking of electric waves (beams) in the troposphere and
the scattering of a portion of them back to earth.

th

7 Signal Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 13 January 2009. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-990)
The eagle embodies the strength, resiliency, and bold character of the Signal soldier.
Gold is emblematic of excellence and a job well done. The seven orange lightning
flashes outlined white stand for the unit's numerical designation in traditional Signal

Corps colors. The blue alludes to the global atmosphere, from the Atlantic to the Pacific,
from the Caribbean Sea to the Bearing Sea, through which communications of the
Command must operate. The small black shield charged with the four pointed star
represents the major global directions, guidance, and the unit's impact to global network
operations from the CONUS Power Projections Platform. Black and white highlight the
night and day, around the clock mission of the unit.

st

11 Signal Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 21 April 1980. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-652)
Orange and white are colors used for the Signal Corps. The globe signifies the
worldwide scope of the unit's mission. The thunderbird, an American Indian symbol of
great power that controls the skies and sees all that occurs on the ground, refers to the
unit's Southwestern heritage. The lightning, issuing from the thunderbird's eye as in
Indian legend, denotes the speed and abilities of electronic communications. The black
thunderbird and white background symbolize the night and day capability of the unit.

th

15 Signal Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 22 December 2009. (TIOH Dwg. No. A1-1019)
The colors orange and white represent the Signal Corps. The yellow lightning bolt
alludes to the speed of communications and support to the war fighter. The lamp of
knowledge symbolizes scholastic activities of the school which the unit serves. The
signal flag is suspended from the baton, which was adopted from a badge originated in
1865 called the "Order of the Signal Corps" and represents the unit's mission to provide
trained soldiers to the Signal Regiment.

st

21 Signal Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 16 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No.
A-1-855)
The Signal colors, white and orange, conjoined by the lightning bolt, represent the
tactical and strategic elements of the mission. The sword refers to readiness and unit
history, the satellite dish denotes future technological activities of the unit. The globe
signifies worldwide capabilities. Golden yellow indicates excellence, black denotes
strength and solidarity. White symbolizes integrity.

nd

22

Signal Brigade

The shoulder sleeve insignia was authorized on 29 June 1981. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1673)
Orange and white are the colors traditionally associated with the Signal Corps. The
flashes symbolize communications and speed; crossed, they represent strength. The
eagle, a symbol of vigilance and swiftness, is adapted from the Frankfurt Coat of Arms
and refers to the unit's location.

th

35 Signal Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 23 May 1980. It was amended to delete
the airborne tab and update the description and symbolism on 11 December 2006.
(TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-653)
Orange and white are the colors traditionally associated with the Signal Corps. The lion,
a symbol of courage and fierceness, is blue in allusion to the unit's former airborne
designation. The lightning flashes symbolize communications, and their position,
saltirewise, implies strength.

rd

53 Signal Brigade
rd

93 Signal Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 10 February 1981. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1667)
The colors blue and white are a reference to the organization which is served by the
unit. Orange and white are the colors traditionally associated with the US Army Signal
Corps and the flashes refer to the signal communications mission of the organization.
The outward points of the star connote signals transmitted and the inward points
connote signals received. The nine points and three flashes allude to the unit's
numerical designation.

th

106 Signal Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 1109th Signal Brigade on
16 May 1989. The insignia was cancelled effective 15 October 1991, and authorized for
the 106th Signal Brigade with description revised on 24 March 1992. (TIOH Dwg. No.
A-1-764)
Orange and white are the colors traditionally associated with the Signal Corps. The two
blue arcs simulate the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and the Isthmus of Panama,
referring to the unit's location and far-reaching mission and capabilities. The swords are
crossed to indicate strength and support, with the blades in the form of lightning flashes
to symbolize electronics and speed, underscoring the vital part of communications in
military preparedness.

nd

142

Signal Brigade

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 142d Signal Brigade on 16
Aug 1978. It was amended to reflect a change in the size of the insignia on 13 Apr
1979.
Orange and white are the branch colors of the Signal Corps. The red saltire is adapted
from the Alabama State flag and refers to the unit's location. The radiating lightning
flashes and arrowheads symbolize the command control, training and logistic support
provided by the unit. The lightning flashes also refer to speed and communications. The
shape of the insignia alludes to an early radio antenna.

th

160 Signal Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 6 March 1981. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-661)
Orange and white are the colors associated with the Signal Corps, and the color blue
refers to the unit's capability to support the combat mission. The yellow flashes are an
allusion to the basic mission of the organization and along with the globe, denoting the
worldwide scope of the unit's mission, they indicate the unit's affiliation with the US
Army Communications Command.

th

187 Signal Brigade

th

228 Signal Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 6 April 1981. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-663)
Orange and white are the colors of the Signal Corps. Blue and white are the colors
associated with Infantry and the South Carolina Army National Guard and refer to the
unit's heritage and war experience. The bayonet suggests the unit's long military history
beginning in 1907 as an infantry unit. The white crescent is taken from the flag of the
unit's home state. The lightning flashes allude to the unit's mission and motto.

st

261 Signal Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for 261st Signal Command on 7
January 1971. It was amended to correct the description on 27 January 1971. The
insignia was redesignated for the 261st U.S. Army Strategic Communications
Command on 19 January 1972. It was redesignated for the 261st Signal Command on
4 December 1974. It was redesignated for the 261st Signal Brigade effective 1
September 1996. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-542)
Orange and white are the colors used by Signal units. Colonial blue and buff were
suggested by the flag of the state of Delaware. The single star alludes to Delaware as
the "first state" to sign the Constitution; it is also used to indicate the capital city of
Dover, the unit's home area. The pattern formed by the conjoined lozenges is indicative
of precise planning and represents the unit's capabilities. The white and orange zig-zag
simulates electric flashes and refers to the technology of a communications system and
the unit's mission.

st

311 Signal Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 22 Mar 1996.
The Phoenix arising from the flame represents rebirth and is indicative of a new
command. The orange demi-globe symbolizes the worldwide capabilities of the
organization. The blue background alludes to the sky and the transmission of voice,
picture and data via satellite.

th

335 Signal Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 30 October 1985. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-715)
Orange and white are the colors associated with the Signal Corps. Dark blue signifies
the atmosphere and the flashes and globe are symbolic of the unit's worldwide
communication capability.

th

359 Signal Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 12 January 1988. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1744)
Orange and white are the colors traditionally associated with Signal units. The flash
symbolizes the unit's mission and connotes speed and accuracy. The blue globe
signifies the unit's worldwide capabilities.

th

505 Signal Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 16 September 2011. (TIOH Dwg.
No. A-1-1048)
Orange and white are the colors traditionally associated with the Signal Corps. The five
sided pentagon, globe and five pointed lightning flash represent the numerals "505."
The globe denotes the Brigade's far reaching mission. The lightning flash symbolizes
the speed of the Brigade's electronic capabilities.

th

516 Signal Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally authorized for the 1106th Signal Brigade
on 11 October 1989. It was cancelled for the 1106th Signal Brigade effective 15
October 1992 and authorized for the 516th Signal Brigade effective 16 October 1992.
(TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-769)
Orange and white are the colors associated with the Signal Corps. Black represents
strength, solidity and twenty-four hour military preparedness. The crossed lightning
flashes are indicative of communications and electronics; they are crossed to symbolize
strength. The flashes form two arrowheads pointing inward, suggesting the processing
of signal communications. The spear reflects the fighting aspect, suggesting the unit’s
aggressiveness and the heritage and home location.

st

1101 Signal Brigade

th

1104 Signal Brigade
th

1107 Signal Brigade
th

1108 Signal Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on July 7, 1995.
Orange and white are the colors traditionally associated with the signal corps. Black
represents strength, solidity, and determination. Black and white allude to day and night
preparedness and operations. The globe indicates the worldwide impact of the unit's
mission. The two flashes converging at center with a horizontal bar suggest a fulcrum or

balance scale, denoting the melding of strategic and tactical communications support
for the war fighter. The peak of the arrow formed by the two flashes symbolizes the
highest standard of operational readiness maintained by the command.

SPECIAL FORCES
st

1 Special Service Force
The lst Special Service Force was activated as a joint Canadian-American unit on July
9, 1942. The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on September 14, 1942. The unit
was disbanded on January 6, 1945.
The arrow represented the heritage of both the United States and Canada.

Special Forces Group (Airborne)
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved on 22 Aug 1955. It was amended
to add an airborne tab on 20 Nov 1958. The insignia was authorized to be worn by
personnel of the U.S. Army Special Forces Command (Airborne) and its subordinate
units not authorized a shoulder sleeve insignia in their own right on 7 Mar 1991. (TIOH
Drawing Number A-1-155)
The arrowhead alludes to the American Indian's basic skills in which Special Forces
personnel are trained to a high degree. The dagger represents the unconventional
nature of Special Forces operations, and the three lightning flashes, their ability to strike
rapidly by air, water or land.

SPECIAL OPERATIONS
Special Operations Command, Africa
(U.S. Army Element)
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 16 January 2009. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-989)
The shield indicates a strong defense and represents the command structure of the
organization, its three sides symbolizing its missions on land, sea, and in the air. The
lion's head symbolizes courage, strength, and determination applied with wisdom and
intelligence. The black dagger recalls the mission and heritage of Special Operations.
Red symbolizes courage, fortitude, and sacrifice; black denotes determination and
constancy.

NATO Special Operations Component
Command – Afghanistan

Special Operations Joint Task Force –
Afghanistan (U.S. Army Element)
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 30 April 2013. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-11088)
The oval shape is representative of the design of the Special Operations Command
seal. Black and gold are the colors used for Special Operations. The black alludes to
special operation activities performed under the cover of darkness. The color yellow
represents the excellence as performed by the Command in the Nation’s defense. The
finial spearhead represents Special Operation Forces being the “tip of the spear” as
they are a leading force in a military thrust of action. The olive branches entwined
around the spear shaft symbolize victory and embodies how these efforts will bear fruit
for the future of the Afghanistan people.

Combined Forces Special Operations
Command – Afghanistan
Above the shoulder sleeve insignia reads the unit’s “Airborne” distinction while the bottom has a scroll reading
“CFSOCC Afghanistan”. The elements of the insignia itself are divided between the US and Afghan flags as a
backdrop illustrating the join efforts shared in CFSOCC by both nations. On top of these flags are several
symbols attributed to CFSOCC-A, a trident for the unit’s three-pronged approach in foreign assistance, wings for
the Airborne qualifications, and a dagger (a common symbolism amongst units with non-conventional missions)
combine to mirror the unique shoulder sleeve insignia of CFSOCC-A.

Joint Special Operations Task Force –
Philippines
Special Operations Command North
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 25 April 2014. It was amended to
change the description on 27 August 2014. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-1094)
The gold spearhead represents Special Operations Command North’s combatant
command relationship to U.S. Special Operations Command. Blue is the prominent
color of the insignia and is indicative of the Command’s patriotism, loyalty, and devotion
to duty. The eight-pointed polestar denotes the North Star which historically has been
used by service members to orientate themselves. The V-42 dagger was the fighting
knife issued to the First Special Force, a joint American/Canadian commando unit
during WWII. The four instances of the dagger represent both the four nations in U.S.
Northern Command’s area of responsibility: United States, Canada, Mexico, and the
Bahamas. The four daggers further denote the four services which make up special
operations. The single larger dagger pointing north is further recognition to the Northern
American geography associated with the Command.

Special Operations Command, Central
(U.S. Army Element)
Proposed patches for SOCCENT. These patches were proposed by SOCCENT during
the Desert Shield / Storm operation by Colonel Jesse Johnson, but were rejected by
CINCCET. Not because of his disdain of Special Operations Forces, but rather that the
normal SOCCENT detachment is not authorized such a shoulder sleeve insignia.
However the patches were made up and widely distributed circa December 1990.

Special Operations Command, Central
(U.S. Army Element)

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 27 October 1995. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-825)
The wings represent airborne and air operations; the trident is for underwater and sea
operations. The lightning flashes represent speed and communications, while the
dagger alludes to Special Forces functions. The shield symbolizes a strong defense
and denotes the command structure of the organization.

Special Operations Command, Europe
(U.S. Army Element)
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 8 Dec 1993. (TIOH Drawing Number A1-809)
The shield represents strength and defense; its three sides emphasize the Command's
multicapabilities: on land, in the water, or in the air. The indented border implies the
hazardous conditions under which the Special Operations Command, Europe operates.
Red symbolizes action, sacrifice and courage; white denotes integrity. The black
dagger, raised to represent military preparedness, is adapted from the Special Forces
insignia and reflects the Command's heritage and association. Black and white allude to
twenty-four hour vigilance in total combat readiness.

Special Operations Command, Joint
Forces Command (U.S. Army Element)
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 5 February 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1854)
Ultramarine blue signifies the air and sea mission, while green denotes ground
missions. The black V-shape area refers to victory and power. The three symbols,
trident, lightning bolt and dagger are adapted from the Special Operations Command,
Atlantic Command, the unit's predecessor. The trident, a symbol of naval prowess,
symbolizes the Navy SEAL Teams and special boat units. The lightning bolt denotes
the Air Force Special Operations, rapid response and aerospace power. The dagger
associated with the Army forces (Special Forces, Rangers, PSYOP and Civil Affairs),
also represents total military preparedness and readiness for deployment. Each symbol
represents the three parts that form the whole of the Special Operation Command Joint
Forces Command.

Special Operations Command, Korea
(U.S. Army Element)
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 18 November 1996. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-829)
Red, white and blue are our National Colors; gold is emblematic of honor and
achievement. The stylized parachute denotes unique quick response capabilities while
the Taeguk represents the Republic of Korea and the unit's theater of operations. The
three lightning bolts are conjoined to symbolize the joint nature of the organization while
highlighting teamwork and cooperation among the Army, Navy and Air Force. They also
underscore the three methods of insertion/exfiltration of forces: land, sea and air. The
black dagger alludes to the specialized capabilities and training of the unit's soldiers.

Special Operations Command, Pacific
(U.S. Army Element)

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 13 May 1997. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-832)
The light blue shield and yellow sunburst denote the unit's area of operations; the black
dagger symbolizes the mission and heritage of Special Operations. The airborne tab
reflects the status of the unit.

Special Operations Command, South
(U.S. Army Element)
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 31 May 1995. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-818)
The parachute represents the Airborne status of the unit and is a primary means of
delivery of forces. The three lightning bolts represent the sea, air, and land mediums
used for rapid deployment of forces. The dagger, a replica of the stiletto issued to the
1st Special Service Force, ties the organization to its U.S. Army Special Operations
forefathers. The wings represent the rotary wing aviation component of the Army. The
trident is representative of the U.S. Army Special Forces surface, sub-surface and small
boat operations.

st

1 Special Operations Command

U.S. Army Special Operations Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 1 December 1989. (TIOH Dwg.
No. A-1-768)
The stylized spearhead alludes to the shoulder sleeve insignia worn by the 1st Special
Service Forces and signifies the heritage and traditions that the US Army Special
Operations Command will perpetuate. The unsheathed black dagger symbolizes total
military preparedness and has long been associated with Army special operation
forces.

U.S. Special Operations Command (U.S.
Army Element)
The emblem was approved by the USSOCOM Commander in Chief on 9 Dec 1987.
The color black represents special operations activities that may be performed under
the cover of darkness. The color gold visualizes the excellent quality of special
operations forces and their intrinsic value to the Nation's defense. The spearhead,
taken from color staffs dating from antiquity, represents the initial force of attack and
symbolizes how special operations forces lead the way to subduing the enemy's
defenses. The three golden rings surrounding the spear are indicative of the forces
assigned from the Army, Air Force and Navy. The four stars represent the four points of
the compass emphasizing the global mission, and the braided cord encircling the shield
emphasizes strength through jointness.

Special Operations Aviation Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 12 April 2013. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-11087)
The Fairbairn Sykes dagger, with upswept red wings forming a spearhead reminiscent

of the 1st Special Service Force, symbolizes the unit’s role as the aviation element of
the U.S. Army Special Operations Command. The Aviation blue (ultramarine blue)
shield with black border reflects 1st Special Operations Command lineage, but also
serves as a constant reminder that the Command is inseparable from Army Aviation
Branch.

STATE AREA COMMAND
Alaska State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Alaska National Guard on 9 April 1954. It was redesignated
for Headquarters, State Area Command, Alaska Army National Guard with the
description amended on 30 December 1983. The insignia was redesignated for the
Alaska Army National Guard Element, Joint Forces Headquarters and amended to
update the description effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-156).
The stars of the most conspicuous constellation in the northern sky symbolize the
allocation of the unit.

Arizona State Area Command
The first design of the shoulder sleeve insignia was approved for the Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Arizona National Guard on 17 February 1956. It was
redesignated with description amended effective 30 December 1983, for Headquarters,
State Area Command, Arizona Army National Guard. This insignia was cancelled and a
new design of the shoulder sleeve insignia was approved for Headquarters, State Area
Command, Arizona Army National Guard on 5 August 1988. It was redesignated for the
Arizona Army National Guard Element, Joint Forces Headquarters and amended to
update the description effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-751)
The background of the shield alludes to the State flag of Arizona and the unit's location.
The white crossed arrows are an Indian symbol of peace and reflect the unit's home
area and heritage. The bayonet symbolizes the unit's commitment and readiness to
fight to defend the nation.

California State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, California National Guard on 21 May 1952. It was
redesignated for Headquarters, State Area Command, California Army National Guard
on 30 December 1983. The insignia was redesignated effective 1 October 2003, for the
California Army National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to
update the description and add a symbolism. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-158)
California is the Sunset State, the Golden Gate Commonwealth. The grizzly bear was
on the flag of the California Republic. As the original settlement within the State was of
Spanish origin, the twists of the wreath are yellow and red.

Colorado State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment and other nondivisional units, Colorado National Guard on 4
November 1955. The insignia was redesignated with description amended for
Headquarters, State Area Command, Colorado Army National Guard on 30 December
1983. It was redesignated effective 1 October 2003, for the Colorado Army National
Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update the description.
(TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-159)

The design is taken from the Colorado State flag.

Connecticut State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Connecticut National Guard on 30 November 1949. It was
redesignated with the description amended for the Headquarters, State Area
Command, Connecticut Army National Guard on 30 December 1983. The insignia was
redesignated for the Connecticut Army National Guard Element, Joint Force
Headquarters and amended to update the description and add a symbolism effective 1
October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-475)
The grapevine appears as the device of Connecticut as early as 1759. As the
predominant population within the state was of English origin, the twists of the wreath
are white and red.

Delaware State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Delaware National Guard on 12 February 1948. It was
redesignated for Headquarters, State Area Command, Delaware Army National Guard
on 30 December 1983. The insignia was redesignated for the Delaware Army National
Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update the description and
add a symbolism effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-476)
The blue griffin's head ''erased'' was the device of Lord De la Warre for whom Delaware
River, Delaware Bay, the colony of Delaware and the State of Delaware were named.
The black, silver (white) edged bar (collar) with three silver (white) discs are from the
coat of arms of William Penn to whom the colony of Delaware was granted in 1682 and
which was under the jurisdiction of the colony of Pennsylvania until 1701 when Penn
agreed to a separate Delaware assembly. (The griffin's head in being torn off from the
rest of the body may, in this instance, be taken as an indication of that event). The
wreath in the red and white colors of England refers to the English colonization of
Delaware.

Florida State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Florida National Guard on 7 March 1949. It was
redesignated for Headquarters, State Area Command, Florida Army National Guard on
30 December 1983. The insignia was redesignated for the Florida Army National Guard
Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update the description effective 1
October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-478)

Georgia State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Georgia Army National Guard on 28 May 1970. The insignia
was redesignated effective 30 December 1983 for Headquarters, State Area Command,
Georgia Army National Guard. It was redesignated for the Georgia Army National
Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update the description
effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-537)
The boar's head on the wreath is an adaptation of the crest authorized for the color
bearing units of the Georgia Army National Guard. The wild boar symbolizes courage
and ferocity. The boar's head from the arms of James Oglethorpe, founder of the
Colony of Georgia, is also an emblem of hospitality. The colors red, white and blue are
the official colors of Georgia.

Guam Territorial Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Guam Army National
Guard on 26 May 1981. It was redesignated for Headquarters and Headquarters
Detachment, Territorial Command, Guam Army National Guard with the description
amended effective 30 December 1983. The insignia was amended to correct the height
of the insignia and update the description on 3 December 2001. It was redesignated for
the Guam Army National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters effective 1 October
2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-668)
The design is based on the coat of arms of Guam, showing land, sea and sky, with an
ancient flying proa (canoe) approaching the beach near the mouth of the Agana River,
and a palm tree in the foreground. The shape of the insignia is that of the sling stones
used by the ancient Chamorros in hunting and fighting.

Hawaii State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Hawaii National Guard on 14 March 1949. It was
redesignated with description amended for Headquarters, State Area Command,
Hawaii National Guard on 30 December 1983. The insignia was amended to correct the
dimensions on 29 September 1997. It was redesignated for the Hawaii Army National
Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A1-479)

Idaho State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Idaho Army National Guard on 28 July 1975. It was
redesignated with description amended for Headquarters, State Area Command, Idaho
Army National Guard on 30 December 1983. The insignia was redesignated for the
Idaho Army National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update
the description and add a symbolism effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1586)
The elk's head to the neck with full antlers is the crest which appeared on the first
territorial seal of Idaho adopted on 5 March 1866.

Indiana State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Indiana National Guard on 17 May 1949. It was
redesignated effective 1 May 1984, with description revised, for Headquarters, State
Area Command, Indiana Army National Guard. The insignia was redesignated for the
Indiana Army National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to
update the description and add a symbolism effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No.
A-1-482)
The design elements are taken from the Indiana state flag. The torch signifies liberty
and enlightenment; the rays around the torch represent their far reaching influence. The
one large star above the torch represents Indiana.

Iowa State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Iowa Army National Guard on 5 July 1968. It was
redesignated for Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment and nondivisional
elements of the Iowa Army National Guard on 21 October 1970. The insignia was

redesignated for Headquarters, State Area Command, Iowa Army National Guard on 30
December 1983. It was redesignated for the Iowa Army National Guard Element, Joint
Force Headquarters and amended to update the description effective 1 October 2003.
(TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-498)
The shape of the insignia is a reference to that of the 34th (Red Bull) Infantry Division
which was worn by Iowa guardsmen for approximately 50 years. The hawk's head on
the gold and blue torse is adapted from the crest of the Iowa Army National Guard.

Kansas State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Kansas National Guard on 22 October 1951. It was
redesignated for all nondivisional units of the Kansas National Guard on 13 June 1956.
The insignia was redesignated for Headquarters, State Area Command, Kansas Army
National Guard on 30 December 1983. It was redesignated effective 1 October 2003,
for the Kansas Army National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended
to update the description and add a symbolism. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-160)
The sunflower is the State flower. The sunflower sets on a field of dark blue
representing the territory as an original portion of the Louisiana Purchase, which made
the future lands of Kansas a part of the United States.

Kentucky State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Kentucky Army National Guard on 7 December 1973. The
insignia was redesignated with the description amended for the Headquarters, State
Area Command, Kentucky Army National Guard on 30 December 1983. It was
redesignated for the Kentucky Army National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters
and amended to update the description effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1566)
Red, white and blue are our national colors. The yellow, red and blue allude to the
combat arms: Armor (Cavalry), Artillery and Infantry. The long rifle is inseparably
associated with the early history of Kentucky prior to and after its admission to the
Union as the fifteenth State.

Louisiana State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment and other nondivisional elements of the Louisiana Army
National Guard on 18 June 1969. It was redesignated for Headquarters, State Area
Command, Louisiana Army National Guard on 30 December 1983. The insignia was
redesignated for the Louisiana Army National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters
and amended to update the description effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1521)
The design is taken from the device used on the Louisiana State Seal and is the crest
approved for the regiments and separate battalions of the Louisiana Army National
Guard. The colors yellow and blue are taken from the Louisiana State Flag.

Maine State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Maine National Guard on 19 August 1949. It was
redesignated for Headquarters, State Area Command, Maine Army National Guard on
30 December 1983. The insignia was redesignated for the Maine Army National Guard
Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update the description effective 1
October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-483)

Maryland State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment on 8 March 1949. It was redesignated with description
amended for Headquarters, State Area Command, Maryland Army National Guard on
30 December 1983. The insignia was redesignated for the Maryland Army National
Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update the description and
add a symbolism effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-484)
The first and fourth quarters of the shield are the arms of the Calvert family and the
second and third quarters are those of the Crossland family which Cecil Calvert
inherited from his grandmother, Alicia, wife of Leonard Calvert, the father of George,
first Lord Baltimore.

Michigan Volunteer Defense Force
Michigan State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Michigan National Guard on 7 March 1949. It was
redesignated on 30 December 1983, for Headquarters, State Area Command, Michigan
Army National Guard. The insignia was redesignated for the Michigan Army National
Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update the description and
add a symbolism effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-485)
The shoulder sleeve insignia is adapted from the crest of the Michigan Army National
Guard. The griffin is a symbol of vigilance and readiness. As the original exploration
and settlement within the State was French, the twists of the wreath are yellow (gold)
and blue.

Minnesota State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Minnesota Army National Guard on 23 April 1970. It was
redesignated with description amended on 30 December 1983, for Headquarters, State
Area Command, Minnesota Army National Guard. The insignia was redesignated for
the Minnesota Army National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended
to update the description and add a symbolism effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg.
No. A-1-535)
The shield is in two colors, blue and white, the colors of the Minnesota State flag. The

white appears as a border around a sky-blue shield and a star in the upper half of the
shield, rays emanating from the star, with a wavy bar across the lower half of the shield.
The star symbolizes the North Star, as Minnesota is widely known as the "North Star
State," with the motto "L'Etoile du Nord" incorporated in the State flag and the State
seal. The white wavy bar across the lower half of the shield symbolizes water, as
Minnesota is known as the "Land of 10,000 Lakes," and the name Minnesota is said to
be derived from the Sioux Indian language and to mean "water tinted like the sky," or
"sky-tinted water."

Missouri State Army Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Missouri National Guard on 30 September 1949. It was
redesignated for Headquarters, State Area Command, Missouri Army National Guard
on 30 December 1983. The insignia was redesignated for the Missouri Army National
Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update the description
effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-486)
The grizzly bear is native in Missouri and has been a portion of the State Seal since
1822. The territory was originally a part of the Louisiana Purchase and the twists of the
wreath are accordingly yellow and blue.

Montana State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Montana National Guard on 27 May 1952. It was
redesignated for all nondivisional units of the Montana National Guard on 2 September
1955. The insignia was redesignated on 30 December 1983, for Headquarters, State
Area Command, Montana Army National Guard. It was redesignated effective 1
October 2003, for the Montana Army National Guard Element, Joint Forces
Headquarters and amended to update the description and add a symbolism. (TIOH
Dwg. No. A-1-164)
The design elements were taken from the Great Seal of the State of Montana. The
mountain peaks allude to "Montana" a Spanish word for mountain.

Nebraska State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Nebraska National Guard on 17 February 1950. It was
redesignated on 30 December 1983, for Headquarters, State Area Command,
Nebraska Army National Guard. The insignia was redesignated for the Nebraska Army
National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update the
description and add a symbolism effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-165)
Nebraska is known as the "Cornhusker State." As the territory was originally a part of
the Louisiana Purchase, the twists of the wreath are yellow and blue.

Nevada State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Nevada National Guard on 21 May 1952. It was
redesignated with description amended on 30 December 1983, for Headquarters, State
Area Command, Nevada Army National Guard. The insignia was redesignated for the
Nevada Army National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to
update the description and add a symbolism effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No.
A-1-166)
The star above a wreath of sagebrush is taken from the state flag. The star suggests
the state of Nevada as does the shape of the patch.

New Hampshire State Area
Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, New Hampshire National Guard on 7 March 1956. It was
redesignated on 30 December 1983, for Headquarters, State Area Command, New
Hampshire Army National Guard. The insignia was redesignated for the New
Hampshire Army National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to
update the description effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-289)
Blue and yellow are the colors of the state flag of New Hampshire. The nine stars
represent New Hampshire as the ninth state to ratify the Constitution thereby making
the Constitution effective. The bundle of five arrows, taken from the New Hampshire
State Seal (1776), represents the five counties of New Hampshire bound together into a
common state government.

New Jersey State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, New Jersey National Guard on 21 September 1955. It was
amended to correct the wording in the description on 7 October 1955. The insignia was
redesignated with description amended effective 30 December 1983, for Headquarters,
State Area Command, New Jersey National Guard. It was redesignated for the New
Jersey Army National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to
update the description and add a symbolism effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No.
A-1-167)
The original settlements in the State were English and Dutch. The coats of arms of both
countries bear lions. The original proprietor was Sir George Carteret whose arms bore
the four red lozenges. As the predominant permanent settlement was of English origin,
the twists of the wreath are white and red.

New Mexico State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, New Mexico National Guard on 7 March 1975. The insignia
was redesignated for Headquarters, State Area Command, New Mexico Army National
Guard on 12 August 1985. It was redesignated for the New Mexico Army National
Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update the description
effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-583)
The colors red and yellow, the official colors of New Mexico, and the Zia Sun Symbol,
the State's official emblem, were taken from the State flag of New Mexico.

New York State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally authorized for Headquarters, State Area
Command, New York Army National Guard on 18 February 1994. It was redesignated
effective 1 October 2003, for the New York Army National Guard Element, Joint Force
Headquarters and amended to update the description. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-811)
New York State is represented by the crown, recalling the crown on the Statue of
Liberty, symbol of the city and state, which emphasizes the traditional freedoms long
associated with New York. The sword represents the National Guard and denotes
readiness. Blue refers to the many waterways and natural water resources of New York
and is taken from the state flag. Red reflects courage; gold is for excellence.

North Carolina State Area

Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, North Carolina National Guard on 22 May 1953. It was
redesignated for Headquarters, State Area Command, North Carolina Army National
Guard with the description amended on 30 December 1983. The insignia was
redesignated for the North Carolina Army National Guard Element, Joint Force
Headquarters and amended to update the description and symbolism effective 1
October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-170)
The insignia is based upon the crest approved for all regiments and separate battalions
of the North Carolina National Guard.

North Dakota State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, North Dakota National Guard on 3 April 1950. It was
redesignated on 30 December 1983, for Headquarters, State Area Command, North
Dakota Army National Guard. The insignia was redesignated for the North Dakota Army
National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update the
description and add a symbolism effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-171)
The three arrows and the bow are from the Seal of the State. The territory was originally
a part of the Louisiana Purchase and the twists of the wreath are accordingly, gold and
blue.

Pennsylvania State Area
Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Pennsylvania National Guard on 6 May 1948. It was
redesignated for Headquarters, State Area Command, Pennsylvania Army National
Guard on 30 December 1983. The insignia was redesignated for the Pennsylvania
Army National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update the
description and add a symbolism effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-175)

Puerto Rico Territorial Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and noncolor
bearing units of the Puerto Rico National Guard on 9 October 1967. It was redesignated
with description amended for Headquarters, State Area Command, Puerto Rico Army
National Guard on 30 December 1983. The insignia was redesignated for the Puerto
Rico Army National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update
the description effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-466)
The white (or silver) cross and red ground refer to the fact that the city of San Juan,
capital of Puerto Rico and the site of the Headquarters Puerto Rico National Guard,
was one of the first Christian communities established in America (1508). The three
wavy blue, white and blue bars symbolize water and in addition to also alluding to San
Juan harbor are used to indicate that Puerto Rico is an island. The two castle towers
allude to the fortress of El Moro which once protected the harbor and now refers to the
constant readiness of the Puerto Rico Army National Guard to defend its homeland and
combat the forces of aggression. The entire design of the cross and towers as well as
the colors red and yellow allude to the Spanish discovery and settlement of Puerto Rico
and its Spanish heritage and culture.

Rhode Island State Area Command

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Headquarters, State Area
Command, Rhode Island Army National Guard on 12 August 1993. It was redesignated
for the Rhode Island Army National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and
amended to update the description effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-176)
The State flag of Rhode Island is white, recalling the white uniforms worn by the state's
soldiers during the Revolutionary War. Blue refers to the importance of the sea to
Rhode Island in all aspects of its civic and commercial history. The sword represents
the National Guard and the U.S. Army. The anchor is adapted from the state flag of
Rhode Island. Red signifies courage and sacrifice and with white and blue, refers to the
flag of the United States.

Utah State Area Command
The first design was approved for Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, Utah
National Guard on 1 February 1956. It was amended to approve the insignia for
Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment and other nondivisional units of the Utah
National Guard. The first design was rescinded (cancelled) and a second design
approved on 5 March 1964. The insignia was redesignated for Headquarters, State
Area Command, Utah Army National Guard and the description amended on 30
December 1983. The third and current design of the shoulder sleeve insignia was
authorized on 10 October 1996. It was redesignated for the Utah Army National Guard
Element, Joint Force Headquarters effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-828)
The militiaman represents a member of the Mormon battalion, predecessor of the
present day Utah Army National Guard. Red, white and blue are our national colors.

Washington State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Washington National Guar on 15 August 1952. It was
redesignated with description amended for Headquarters, State Area Command,
Washington Army National Guard on 30 December 1983. The insignia was
redesignated for the Washington Army National Guard Element, Joint Force
Headquarters and amended to update the description and add a symbolism effective 1
October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-184)
The design is the crest of the coat of arms of George Washington. The State of
Washington is a part of the "Oregon Territory," the American title which was established
in 1846.

West Virginia State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, West Virginia National Guard on 18 September 1950. It was
redesignated with description amended for Headquarters, State Area Command, West
Virginia Army National Guard on 30 December 1983. The insignia was redesignated for
the West Virginia Army National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters effective 1
October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-183)

Wyoming State Area Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and
Headquarters Detachment, Wyoming National Guard on 25 February 1953. It was
redesignated for Headquarters, State Area Command, Wyoming Army National Guard
on 30 December 1983. The insignia was redesignated for the Wyoming Army National
Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update the description
effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-186)

The colors blue and gold refer to the fact that Wyoming was a part of the Louisiana
Purchase and once belonged to France. The horse and rider, having played a vital role
in the settling, development, and defense of the State, are a well-known symbol of
Wyoming.

SUPPORT
2

nd

Support Command

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 2d Support Brigade on 15
February 1966. It was redesignated effective 15 January 1973, for the 2d Support
Command.
The two chevrons, simulating a belt supporting the sword, indicate the numerical
designation of the organization and likewise allude to the unit's basic mission to provide
support to combat troops.

th

9 Support Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 9th Logistical Command
on 16 January 1961. It was redesignated for the 9th Support Command effective 1
November 1994, with the description and symbolism revised. (TIOH Drawing Number
A-1-280)
Red, white and blue represent our National colors. The primary mission of
administration and logistical support for Army duties is suggested by the white star, and
the numerical designation of the command by the nine-sided figure.

th

20 Support Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 5 April 2005. It was amended to change
the description and correct the symbolism on 6 May 2005. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1872)
The stars represent the five mission elements of the Command: Chemical, Biological,
Radiological, Nuclear, High-Yield Explosive Response. The stars also underscore the
command being a multi-component unit in today’s threat environment. The flaming
sword highlights this country’s aggressive stance with the battle against domestic and
international terrorism. Green alludes to the Army as a land force. Black is in honor of
the personnel who died on September 11, 2001, and the War Against Terror.

22

nd

Support Command

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 22d Field Army Support
Command on 18 October 1966. It was redesignated for the 22d Support Command
with the description and symbolism revised effective 16 December 1990. (TIOH Dwg.
No. A-1-439)
The quill is used in heraldry to represent calm, willing performance and was used in
ancient times as symbolizing air, light and knowledge. The arrowhead is representative
of swiftness and in heraldry, symbolizes martial readiness, the symbol most indicative
of the 22d Field Army Support Command, the former unit.

42

nd

Regional Support Group

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 11 June 2007.
The rainbow denotes the Group’s heritage from the 42d Division Support Command.

The tomahawk suggests the military duties implemented and performed by the Group.
The elevated wings signify the enhancement of the mind and the swiftness to render
support.

th

50 Regional Support Group
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 24 February 2009. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-992)
The insignia in the shape of a broad spear tip, symbolizes Florida’s Native American
heritage and the home state of the Group. The bend sinister within the border signifies
the increased role of the unit to protect the people of Florida during times of disaster.
The green and blue background alludes to meeting of land and sea, emphasizing the
Group’s areas of operations. The sun and its radiating rays allude to the eight cardinal
points of the compass, illustrating the global reach and the impact of the soldiers of the
50th Support Group.

rd

63 Regional Support Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 63d Infantry Division on 27
March 1943. It was authorized for the 63d U.S. Army Reserve Command on 22 April
1968. It was reassigned and authorized effective 16 April 1996, for the U.S. Army 63d
Regional Support Command. The insignia was redesignated effective 16 July 2003, for
the U.S. Army 63d Regional Readiness Command. It was redesignated effective 17
September 2008, for the 63d Regional Support Command and amended to add a
symbolism.
The design was inspired by a statement of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Prime
Minister Winston Churchill at the 1943 Casablanca Conference that the "enemy would
bleed and burn in expiation of their crimes against humanity.

st

81 Regional Support Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 81st Division by telegram
on 19 October 1918. On 29 June 1922, it was officially announced. The insignia was
redesignated for the 81st Infantry Division on 11 May 1964, retroactive to 1 August
1942. On 22 April 1968, it was authorized for the 81st U.S. Army Reserve Command.
The insignia was reassigned and authorized effective 16 April 1996, for the U.S. Army
81st Regional Support Command. It was redesignated for the U.S. Army 81st Regional
Readiness Command effective 16 July 2003. The insignia was redesignated effective
17 September 2008, for the 81st Regional Support Command and amended to add a
symbolism. The 81st Division is credited as being the first unit to have a shoulder
sleeve insignia. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-128).
The wildcat is common to the Carolinas from which many of the personnel of the
Division came during World War I.

th

88 Regional Support Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally authorized for the 88th Division by telegram
on 12 November 1918. It was officially announced on 29 June 1922. It was amended to
correct the measurement on 11 October 1922. The insignia was reassigned and
authorized effective 16 April 1996 for the U.S. Army 88th Regional Support Command.
It was redesignated effective 16 July 2003, for the U.S. Army 88th Regional Readiness
Command. The insignia was redesignated effective 17 September 2008, for the 88th
Regional Support Command and amended to add a symbolism.
The four leaf clover, formed by the two figures "8" represents the Dakotas, Minnesota,
Iowa and Illinois from which personnel of the Division originally came. Blue is symbolic
of Infantry.

th

99 Regional Support Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally authorized for the 99th Division on 21 May

1923. It was reassigned and authorized on 22 April 1968, for the 99th U. S. Army
Reserve Command. On 16 April 1996, it was reassigned and authorized for the U.S.
99th Regional Support Command. It was amended to revise the description and add a
symbolism on 6 December 1998. The insignia was redesignated for the U.S. Army 99th
Regional Readiness Command effective 16 July 2003. It was redesignated effective 17
September 2008, for the 99th Regional Support Command.
Black is symbolic of the iron district of Pennsylvania; the band of white and blue
squares is from the arms of William Pitt for whom Pittsburgh was named.

th

124 Regional Support Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 124th U.S. Army Reserve
Command on 7 August 1968. It was reassigned and authorized effective 16 April 1996,
for the U.S. Army 124th Regional Support Command. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-503)
The three stars above the two bars and the colors red and white were suggested by the
coat of arms of George Washington, whose portrait appears on the state flag of
Washington and for whom the state is named. The color green also refers to the state
of Washington which is known as the "Evergreen State," the wedge shape and
surrounding border alluding to the state's abundant forests. The center star is depicted
larger than the other two to emphasize the command and supervision of the
organization.

st

151 Support Group
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 19 July 2016. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-11113).
Scarlet and buff are the colors traditionally associated with Support units. The curved
flaunches denote support. The Native American arrowheads are inspired from the state
flag of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and symbolizes the home state of the
Group. The pile charged with another in the center forms a “V” shape and stands for
Camp Victory, the site of the unit’s deployment in Baghdad and together with the two
stand-alone arrow points form a visual pun of the number One-Five-One.

st

191 Support Group
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 3 April 2012.
1070)

(TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-

The shield denotes continuous protection. The light blue background signifies the
Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean surrounding the Puerto Rican peninsula and the
location of the Group. The image of the El Morro fortress symbolizes security and
vigilance, honoring Puerto Rico and its rich military history. The star conveys
continuous commitment. The border alludes to validity of the Group to accomplish the
mission. Soldier red indicates the unit setting the bar for the global logistical spectrum Quartermaster, Ordnance and Transportation. The color also illustrates the ultimate
sacrifice made by the Puerto Rico soldiers in battles throughout history.

rd

213 Regional Support Group
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 10 April 2007. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-921)
Buff and scarlet are the colors associated with Army Support. The keystone represents
the unit’s home state, Pennsylvania, the Keystone State, and the heart is adapted from
the Group’s hometown symbol, Allentown. The scarlet arrowhead signifies the unit’s
participation in the spearhead attack in the World War II Naples-Foggia Campaign.
Scarlet reflects artillery heritage. The compass rose or star highlights the ability to
provide support in any direction within the Group’s assigned area. The stars
commemorate the participation of wartime service in the Civil War, War with Spain,
World War I, World War II, Korea, and the War on Terrorism. The quad arrow
represents the unit’s mission to provide support to all the varying branches of the Army,
especially the Combat Service.

th

279 Support Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 13 August 2009. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-1012)
Buff and scarlet are the colors traditionally associated with Support units. The saltire is
adapted from the Alabama State flag and denotes the location of the Brigade. The
gridlined globe signifies the Brigade’s responsiveness of support throughout the world.
The quill with the arrow illustrates the contracts written and managed by the Brigade to
meet intricate and continuous acquisition processes required by the Army, also
denoting the unit’s wartime contracting duties. The arrow alludes to the past antiaircraft
capabilities of the Brigade.

st

301 Support Group
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 301st Logistical Command
on 7 March 1952. It was redesignated for the 301st Support Brigade on 19 January
1966. It was cancelled on 30 August 1972. The insignia was reinstated and
redesignated for the 301st Support Group on 25 February 1999. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-132)
The chain is symbolic of a chain of support. The numerical designation of the unit is
represented in the pattern: three links of the chain, the circular border and the one
stripe.

th

347 Regional Support Group
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 12 October 2007.
The compass rose suggests the command and control aspect of the Group. The six
divisions of the background denote the unit’s mission structure – provide/manage
security, internal terrain management, administrative and logistical support, base
operations, and movement control.

st

401 Support Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 11 December 2006. It was cancelled by
HQDA, G-1 directive on 21 February 2010. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-908)
White, red, and blue and the device partitions are modified from the Army Materiel
Command (AMC) shoulder sleeve insignia and carry with it the mission of support and
the flow of materiel to the soldiers. The inverted chevron or point on the bottom
underscores the Brigade being the single point of entry to AMC from the field. Gold is
emblematic of excellence and high ideals. The sword indicates readiness and support
to the soldiers. The theater of operation of the Brigade, Southwest Asia, is highlighted
by the palm fronds. The palm frond is an emblem of victory and success.

402

nd

Support Brigade

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 11 December 2006. It was cancelled by
HQDA, G-1 directive on 21 February 2010. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-906)
White, red, and blue and the device partitions are modified from the Army Materiel
Command (AMC) shoulder sleeve insignia and carry with it the mission of support and
the flow of materiel to the soldiers. The inverted chevron or division of the shield
pointing to base underscores the Brigade being the single point of entry to AMC from
the field. Gold is emblematic of excellence and high ideals. The sword indicates
readiness and support to the soldiers. The theater of operation of the Brigade, Iraq, is
highlighted by the adaptation of the three green stars from the Iraqi Flag.

rd

403 Support Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 16 October 2008. It was cancelled
by HQDA, G-1 directive on 21 February 2010. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-979)

The white, scarlet, and blue background represents the parent command, Army
Materiel Command (AMC). The inverted chevron shape underscores the Brigade being
the single point of entry to AMC in the region of the Far East as the organization
provides logistics support to all units in Korea, Japan, and the Far East. The wavy line
alludes to the colors and partition line of the Taeguk of the Korean Flag. The wavy bar
also represents a wave of the vast Pacific and looking towards the Far East to the rising
sun. The red disc is adapted from the Japanese Flag, “Land of the Rising Sun.” Korea
and Japan are the locations of the Brigade elements. The sword represents readiness
and support to the forward deployed Army units in Asia.

th

404 Support Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 16 October 2008. It was cancelled
by HQDA, G-1 directive on 21 February 2010. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-976)
White, red, and blue and the device partitions are modified from the Army Materiel
Command (AMC) shoulder sleeve insignia and carry with it the mission of support and
the flow of materiel to the soldiers. The inverted chevron shape underscores the
Brigade being the single point of entry to AMC from the field. The sword indicates
readiness and support to the soldiers. The Brigade provides logistics support to all units
in the Far West and Pacific Northwest. The mountain is in the shape of Mount Rainier
and signifies the headquarters at Fort Lewis. The lightning bolt represents the main
tactical unit, the 25th Infantry Division in Hawaii and the Big Dipper highlights the units
stationed in Alaska.

th

405 Support Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 27 October 2008. It was cancelled by
HQDA, G-1 directive on 21 February 2010. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-982)
The white, scarlet, and blue background represents the parent Command, Army
Materiel Command (AMC). The sword symbolizes the constant state of readiness. The
Brigade provides logistics support to all units in the European Theater. The olive branch
and arrows are symbolic of logistics support in both peace and war. The lightning bolts
represent rapid support to the soldiers and units. They come together almost at a point
alluding to an arrow head which underscores the Brigade being the AMC single point of
entry in the region. The contrast of black and white of the device alludes to the night
and day, around the clock mission of the Brigade.

th

406 Support Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 16 October 2007. It was cancelled
by HQDA, G-1 directive on 21 February 2010. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-938)
White, red, and blue and the device partitions are modified from the Army Materiel
Command (AMC) shoulder sleeve insignia and carry with it the mission of support and
the flow of materiel to the soldiers. The inverted chevron pointing to base underscores
the Brigade being the single point of entry to AMC from the field. The sword indicates
readiness and support to the soldiers. The eagle represents speed, action, and loyalty
as well as the Continental United States focus of the unit. The six stars mark the unit as
the 406th.

th

407 Support Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 16 October 2007. It was cancelled
by HQDA, G-1 directive on 21 February 2010. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-941)
White, red, and blue and the device partitions are modified from the Army Materiel
Command (AMC) shoulder sleeve insignia and carry with it the mission of support and
the flow of materiel to the soldiers. The inverted chevron underscores the Brigade being
the single point of entry to AMC from the field. Gold is emblematic of excellence and
high ideals. The sword indicates readiness and support to the soldiers. The single star

represents the star of Texas, where the unit is headquartered, and the North Star as a
symbol of guidance and direction to mission accomplishment in supporting soldiers.

th

408 Support Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 16 September 2007. It was
cancelled by HQDA, G-1 directive on 21 February 2010.(TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-930)
The white, scarlet, and blue background represents the parent command, Army
Materiel Command. The sword symbolizes protecting the Homeland and the constant
state of readiness. Gold is emblematic of excellence and high ideals. The compass rose
stands for the worldwide mission of the organization and also alludes to the desert sun
of Southwest Asia, area of responsibility of the Brigade. The laurel, awarded by the
ancient Greeks to scholars and soldiers, signifies honor and victory.

th

409 Support Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 16 September 2007. It was
cancelled by HQDA, G-1 directive on 21 February 2010. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-932)
White, red, and blue and the device partitions are modified from the Army Materiel
Command shoulder sleeve insignia and carry with it the mission of support and the flow
of materiel to the Warfighters. Gold is emblematic of excellence and high ideals. The
flaming sword, referring to the U.S. Army Europe heritage, represents the Brigade’s
mission to provide contingency contract support to all units assigned in support
operations in the European Theater of Operations. The scarlet grip on the hilt
symbolizes the blood shed of fallen comrades as they performed the craft of
contingency contracting on the battle field and beyond.

th

410 Support Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 16 June 2007. It was cancelled by
HQDA, G-1 directive on 21 February 2010. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-925)
The white, scarlet, and blue background represents the parent command, Army
Materiel Command. The sword symbolizes protecting the Homeland and the constant
state of readiness. The scarlet arrowhead reflects the letter “A” and indicates The
Americas (North and South America). The five stars in chief are for the and the six in
base are for the 6th Army. The total of eleven commemorates September 11th (9-11)
as the unit was formed in response to the Global War on Terrorism.

st

411 Support Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 15 September 2008. It was
cancelled by HQDA, G-1 directive on 21 February 2010. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-950)
White, red, and blue and the device partitions are modified from the Army Materiel
Command (AMC) shoulder sleeve insignia and carry with it the mission of support and
the flow of materiel to the soldiers. The inverted chevron underscores the Contracting
Support Brigade being the single point of entry to AMC from the field. Gold is
emblematic of excellence and high ideals. The flaming sword represents victory and
readiness. The Taeguk highlights the organization basing in Korea as a forward
deployed contracting command. The 411th Support Brigade provides contracting
support to all units in Korea, the Far East, and the Pacific Theater.

412

nd

Support Brigade

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 31 July 2009. It was cancelled by
HQDA, G-1 directive on 21 February 2010. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-1007)
White, scarlet, and blue, plus the configuration of the shield represent the parent
command, Army Materiel Command. The sword symbolizes protecting the Homeland

and the constant state of readiness. The three stars represent the Army’s transformed
contracting structure “Army Contracting Command, Expeditionary Contracting
Command, and Mission Installation Command.” The stretched out golden wings allude
to protection and the type of care the unit is charged to provide in support of
contingency operations. The olive branch and sword signify the war and peace mission
of support.

rd

413 Support Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 11 August 2009. It was cancelled by
HQDA, G-1 directive on 21 February 2010. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-1011)
The white, scarlet, and blue background represents the parent Command, Army
Materiel Command. The sword symbolizes protecting the Homeland and the constant
state of readiness. Gold is emblematic of excellence and high ideals. The alternating
Celeste crescents symbolize the waves of the Pacific Ocean and the areas in Army
Pacific that require the unit’s mission to provide contingency contracting support. The
sun and stylized waves highlight the Brigade’s home base in Hawaii.

th

635 Support Group
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 18 June 2012. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-11076)
The star suggests the command and control aspect of the Group with five major
elements of logistics-maintenance, supply, transportation, facilities, and service. The
color buff represents the support units and the scarlet represents the Thirty-Fifth
Division Artillery, which reorganized to become the 635th Support Group. The blue
represents knowledge, power, integrity, and seriousness of its ability to command. Its
benchmark shape represents its home state of Kansas, the geological center of the
continental 48 states.

th

734 Support Group
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 6 April 2012. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-11072)
The shield illustrates the defender displaying the stylized Mexican flask, is adapted from
the Iowa Army National Guard shoulder sleeve insignia and the hawk’s head and
symbolizes the heritage of the unit and the location of the Group. Solider red denotes
the logistical responsibilities of the unit. The black arrowhead suggests readiness,
alluding to World War II service campaigns and awards.

th

916 Support Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 30 March 2009. (TIOH Drawing Number
A-1-996)
Scarlet and gold (for buff) refer to the branch colors. The support mission and rotational
processing of Aviation personnel are symbolized by the mill-rind. Blue (Bluebird)
represents Army support for troops in the field and their extended family members. The
sword denotes readiness and support to combat operations in the War on Terrorism.
The gold pheon symbolizes decisive action to oppose global terrorism. Gold represents
integrity and excellence.

th

1889 Support Group
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 24 February 2012. (TIOH Dwg. No. A1-1068)
The arrowhead and buffalo skull recalls Montana’s Native American heritage. The buff
border and scarlet interior are the Support branch colors. The two swords of Thomas
Meagher raise the nation’s colors, scarlet and blue, alluding to his famous rally cry. The
inverted red pile creates a smoother, sharper inner arrowhead symbolizing the
determination of the Group.

SUSTAINMENT COMMANDS
st

1 Sustainment Command
The insignia was originally approved for the 1st Logistical Command on 15 May 1952. It
was amended to change the description on 23 January 1968. On 18 February 1971, the
insignia was redesignated for the Headquarters and Headquarters Company and
Special Troops, 1st Field Army Support Command. The insignia was redesignated for
the 1st Field Army Support Command on 4 June 1971. It was redesignated for the 1st
Corps Support Command on 8 September 1972. It was redesignated for the 1st
Support Command on 22 October 1980. The insignia was redesignated for the 1st
Sustainment Command with the description updated on 6 April 2006. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-28).

rd

3 Sustainment Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 3d Logistical Command on
20 May 1952. It was redesignated on 23 September 1974, for the 3d Support
Command. The insignia was redesignated effective 16 September 2007, for the 3d
Sustainment Command with the description updated. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-30)

th

4 Sustainment Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 4th Logistical Command
on 4 August 1964. It was redesignated for the 4th Support Center effective 21
December 1975. It was redesignated for the 4th Materiel Management Center on 16
June 1989. The insignia was amended to correct the authorization for the 4th Materiel
Management Center on 14 August 1989. It was redesignated for the 4th Support Center
on 15 November 2000. The insignia was redesignated for the 4th Sustainment
Command effective 16 October 2008. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-297)
The four arrows allude to the organization's numerical designation and the readiness for
service in "any corner of the globe." Red, white, and blue are the national colors.

th

8 Sustainment Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Eighth Field Army Support
Command on 3 May 1968. It was redesignated for the 8th Sustainment Command on 6
December 2005. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-493)
The pattern of red and white is adapted from the Eighth Army shoulder sleeve insignia
and the manner in which the wedges enclose the star is suggestive of the support
mission. The blue star, symbolic of command, has eight points signifying the
Command's numerical designation.

th

13 Sustainment Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 13th Support Brigade on
11 August 1966. It was redesignated for the 13th Corps Support Command and
amended to revise the symbolism effective 21 June 1975. The insignia was
redesignated for the 13th Support Command on 17 October 1980. It was redesignated
for the 13th Corps Support Command on 10 August 1989. The insignia was
redesignated for the 13th Sustainment Command on 7 March 2006. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-433)

The octagon reinforced by the saltire refers to the unit's mission of supporting the
combat, combat support and combat service support organizations of the Corps. The
star symbolizes the many far reaching missions of the command, and having thirteen
points, the star also alludes to its numerical designation. The octagon is a symbol of
regeneration; it alludes to the combat service support functions of the unit as
consistently renewing the strength and vigor of the Corps.

th

19 Sustainment Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 19th Support Brigade on
21 August 1975. It was redesignated for the 19th Support Command on 14 April 1978
and amended to revise the symbolism. The insignia was redesignated with description
updated for the 19th Sustainment Command on 1 June 2006.
The five-lobed form is an allusion to the Rose of Sharon, national flower of the Republic
of South Korea, where the organization has served continuously since activation. The
colors red and blue, separated by the S-shaped line, are references to the yin yang
symbol found on the South Korean flag. The unit's branch and numerical designation
are further suggested by the S-shape, S being the 19th letter of the alphabet and initial
letter of the word "Support."

st

21 Sustainment Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 1st Support Brigade on 11
February 1966. It was redesignated for the 21st Support Command on 15 October
1976. The insignia was amended to provide an addendum to be worn with a tab
inscribed "AMF (L)" immediately above it by personnel of Headquarters Company,
Allied Command, Europe Mobile Force (Land Component) on 17 February 1984. It was
redesignated retroactive to 16 July 2007, for the 21st Sustainment Command with the
description updated and amended to delete the authorization to wear the "AMF (L) tab.
(TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-410)
The millrind is the iron reinforcement fixed in the center of a millstone to support the
stone as it revolves on its axle when grinding wheat. It is used in heraldry as a symbol
of support. With the additional reference to wheat, the "staff of life," the millrind stands
for the vital and varied support furnished by the organization.

rd

103 Sustainment Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 103d Division on 14
October 1922 and the approval specified the segment at the bottom of the disc to be
the color of the branch of service. On 18 June 1935, the authorization was amended to
standardize the design with the segment at the bottom of the disc to be blue. It was
redesignated for the 103d Command Headquarters (Divisional) on 23 October 1963. It
was redesignated for the 103d Support Command on 29 March 1978. The insignia was
redesignated effective 16 September 1993, for the 103d Infantry Division. It was
redesignated effective 16 September 2006, for the 103d Sustainment Command and
updated to add a symbolism.
The cactus represents the home area of the unit in the Southwest when it was first
organized and is symbolic of the unit's nickname.

th

135 Sustainment Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 16 July 2007. (TIOH Dwg. No. A1-922)
Buff and red are the colors traditionally used by Sustainment units. The saltire, symbolic
of the Saint Andrews Cross on the Alabama state flag, alludes to the unit's home
station. The mill rind, the heraldic symbol for the center of a millstone for grinding
wheat, suggests support.

rd

143 Sustainment Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved 24 October 1968 for the 143d
Transportation Brigade. It was redesignated for the 143d Transportation Command on
16 October 1985, and amended to revise the description and symbolism. The insignia
was redesignated effective 17 September 2007, for the 143d Sustainment Command
with the description and symbolism updated. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-508)
Brick red and golden yellow are the colors used for Transportation units, the previous
designation of the unit. The interlacing represents a strong support and simulates roads
and viaducts, suggesting travel. The arrowheads denote leadership and a determined
direction.

th

167 Sustainment Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 167th Support Brigade on
15 July 1969. It was redesignated for the 167th Support Command on 4 August 1976.
The insignia was redesignated effective 16 September 2006, for the 167th Sustainment
Command with the description updated. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-522)
The red crossbars in the lower section suggest the unit's basic mission of support to
combat units, represented by the crossed swords in the red field above. The red saltire
also refers to the State of Alabama, the unit's home state.

th

184 Sustainment Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 184th Transportation
Command on 2 January 1969. It was redesignated for the 184th Transportation
Brigade on 30 March 1972. The insignia was redesignated effective 1 September
2006, for the 184th Support Command with the description and symbolism updated. It
was amended to correct the unit designation to 184th Sustainment Command on 28
July 2011. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-511)
Brick red is the color used for Transportation, the original unit designation. The white
quatrefoil and the green leaves simulate a magnolia and refer to Mississippi, “The
Magnolia State,” headquarters of the organization. The yellow outer band symbolizes a
wheel and refers to transportation, the former mission of the unit.

th

310 Sustainment Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 310th Logistical
Command on 26 January 1956.
It was redesignated for the 310th Field Army Support Command on 23 August 1968.
The insignia was redesignated for the 310th Support Command (Theater Army Area)
on 10 May 1982.
It was redesignated effective 16 September 2007, for the 310th Sustainment
Command with description updated. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-37)
The four chains linked to the central ring symbolize the control and dispatching of
supplies to various areas of operations.

th

311 Sustainment Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 311th Logistical

Command on 22 March 1955.
It was redesignated for the 311th Support Brigade on 21 March 1968.
The insignia was redesignated for the 311th Support Command (Corps) on 15
January 1980.
It was redesignated for the 311th Sustainment Command with the description updated
on 13 October 2006. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-227)
The three arrows, interwoven and moving in accord around a vital area, represent the
elements and functions of the organization, that of transport, quartering, and supply of
troops.

th

316 Sustainment Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 316th Logistical
Command on 26 October 1954.
It was redesignated for the 316th Sustainment Command with the description and
symbolism updated on 13 November 2006. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-41)
The compass rose alludes to the ability of the Command to move, quarter, and
provision forces at any point of the compass. The fleur-de-lis which traditionally is used
at the north point of the compass, also represents the iris, the State flower of
Tennessee, the birthplace of the unit.

th

364 Sustainment Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 16 September 2009. (TIOH
Drawing Number A-1-993)
Red, white, and blue are the nation’s colors. The heptagon signifies the seven Army
values: loyalty, duty, respect, selfless service, honor, integrity, and personal courage.
Blue suggests the expeditionary nature of the unit, representing the waters of Puget
Sound, located in Washington State, where the Command activated. The soldier red
disc with the blue background alludes to the unit’s Logistical mission of continual
worldwide support. The triquetra, Latin for “three cornered” indicates the three primary
branches of logistics - Transportation, Ordnance, and Quartermaster - which closely
coordinated, will sustain the fight to the end. The arrows denote the Command’s four
functional areas of expertise: Transportation, Maintenance and Munitions, Supply and
Services, and Petroleum and Water.

th

377 Sustainment Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 377th Support Brigade
on 11 May 1966.
It was redesignated for the 377th Corps Support Command on 19 October 1979.
It was redesignated for the 377th Support Command (Theater Army Area) effective
16 July 1981.
The insignia was redesignated with the description updated for the 377th Support
Command on 19 October 2000.
It was redesignated effective 16 September 2007, for the 377th Sustainment
Command. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-420)
The supply and services and maintenance elements of the organization are
represented by the two red chevrons and the arrowheads refer to the combat units
which the organization supports.

st

451 Sustainment Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 26 October 2011. It was amended to

correct the symbolism on 8 November 2011. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-1065)
The chevron denotes the unit’s support role in warfare. The following colors emphasize
the attributes of the Command - red conveys courage, blue signifies loyalty, and white
represents devotion, also indicating the national colors. The stylized arrow symbolizes
the “Transportation Cycle of Logistics,” alluding to the Command’s movement around
the world and back to complete the mission. The sword, point up, illustrates readiness
to engage in the fight.

SUSTAINMENT BRIGADES
st

1 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 14 November 2006. (TIOH Dwg. No. A1-905)
Color

ACU

Multicam

Buff and red are the colors traditionally used by Sustainment units. The reversed
chevron signifies support, also illustrating the letter “V,” which alludes to the motto
“SUSTAIN TO VICTORY.” The red sword symbolizes military readiness and suggests
the number 1, depicting the Brigade’s lineage to the 1st Infantry Division, the Big Red
One.

rd

3 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally authorized for the 3rd Support Brigade on
15 June 2005.
Color

Desert

It was redesignated for the 3rd Sustainment Brigade on 21 April 2006.

ACU

The white and blue diagonal stripes recall the unit’s 3d Infantry Division heritage. The
three arrow heads highlight the brigade’s numerical designation with red being for zeal
and action. The dragon is a symbol of power and vigilance. The Presidential Unit
Citation awarded to the unit during Iraqi Freedom is also represented by the color blue.

Multicam

th

4 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 4th Support Brigade on
21 June 2005. It was amended to change the symbolism on 30 June 2005.
Color

Desert

The insignia was redesignated for the 4th Sustainment Brigade with symbolism
revised on 5 May 2006.

ACU

Multicam

The “W” or the two conjoined reversed chevrons stands for the unit’s unofficial
nickname “Wrangler” and is adapted from their previous shoulder sleeve insignia. The
counterchange of black and buff signifies teamwork and a cohesive unit. The contrast of
these two colors refers to day and night around the clock vigilance. Buff is the primary
color for army support. The ivy leaf is modified from the 4th Infantry Division which the
Brigade supports.

th

7 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the
3 April 1967.

7th Transportation Command

on

It was authorized for wear by personnel of the 7th Transportation Group on 1 March 1984.
It was redesignated for the 7th Sustainment Brigade, with the description and symbolism
updated, effective 17 October 2006. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-448)
Color

Green

Desert var.

Desert var. 2

ACU

Multicam

1

The rays issuing from the center of the shield refer to the receiving and dispersal of
personnel and cargo. The rays are seven in number in reference to the numerical
designation of the organizations. The “rook” is the chess piece for a castle, medieval
stronghold of fighting men and supplies. The name is derived from the Persian word
“rokh”, meaning a soldier, and is used to represent the military troops and equipment
being transferred from one mode of transportation to another at the organization. Blue,
the Infantry color, refers to the organization’s capability of defending itself as Infantry
against hostile ground attack. Brick red and golden yellow are for the Transportation
Corps, the original designation of the unit.

th

10 Sustainment Brigade
Color

Desert

ACU

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 10th Support Brigade on 23
November 2004. It was redesignated for the 10th Sustainment Brigade on 25 April
2006. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-867)
Buff and red are the colors traditionally used by Support. Our national colors, red, white
and blue are also the colors used by the 10th Mountain Division, which the Brigade
supports. The snowy mountain refers to the military mountaineering of the Fort Drum
area. The polestar with its four major directional points represents the worldwide scope
of the Brigade’s logistic support missions of maintenance, supply, medical and
transportation operations. The bayonets are from their previous shoulder sleeve
insignia when they were the 10th Division Support Command and refer to the Roman
numeral “X” for 10.

Multicam

th

15 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 13 January 2006. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1881)
Color

Desert

ACU

Multicam

Black and yellow reflect the colors of the unit’s lineage. The arches, symbols of
support, indicate the vital support provided by the brigade. The stars highlight the five
principle support functions of the brigade, namely: Supply, Maintenance,
Transportation, Field Services and Human Resources. Together, the arches that form
a stylized Roman numeral ten and the five stars represent the numerical designation
(15) of the organization. The horse’s head symbolizes the long history of the unit
tracing back to the days of the horse cavalry.

th

16 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 16 July 2007. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-919)
Color

ACU

Multicam

Scarlet and buff are the colors traditionally associated with Sustainment units. The red
wedge symbolizes support. The embattled chevron, illustrating the merlons and crenels
of a castle, alludes to strong defense. The crossed battle-ax and key denote joint effort
to provide warrior and logistical skills on the battlefield.

th

17 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 1 September 2011. (TIOH Dwg.
No. A-1-1051)
Color
Multicam

ACU

The red border is for logistics and cobalt blue is the State color of Nevada. The silver
ram’s skull refers to the State animal and the importance of silver to the state. The star
is taken from the State flag and is colored white here, which represents the snow on the
Sierra Nevada Mountains.

th

36 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 28 July 2009. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-11008)

Color
Multicam

The phoenix represents renewal and the agility of logistics to adapt to ever changing
conditions, to rise from old to new practices as in the case of support to civil authorities,
such as helping to reestablish operations in the communities of hurricanes Katrina and
Rita. The red refers to Logistics and gold is emblematic of honor and high
achievement. The polestar represents navigation; it was used by the cattle drivers to
navigate north from Texas creating one of the nation’s largest logistics enterprises. It
also represents the Army values that help guide soldiers and leaders of the unit. The
lightning flashes are for quick response. The colors of the background are adapted
from the Texas flag with the wavy white pale symbolizing a river or the flow of logistics
to the warfighter.

ACU

th

38 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 10 December 2008. It was amended to
correct the dimensions on 27 January 2009. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-988)
Color
Multicam

The blue and red shield is derived from the shoulder sleeve insignia of the 38th Infantry
Division, which the unit supports. The scimitar represents service in the Persian Gulf
where the Brigade deployed as a stand-alone unit in support of Operation Iraqi
Freedom. The three gold bars symbolize active Federal service in three wars, World
Wars I and II and the Global War on Terror. The stars represent Indiana, the nineteenth
state in the Union. Red, white, and blue are the traditional colors of the 38th Division, as
well as the flag of the United States. Blue and gold are the colors of the Indiana state
flag and of the shoulder sleeve insignia of the Indiana National Guard State
Headquarters.

ACU

rd

43 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 16 April 2008. (TIOH Dwg. No. A1-935)
Color

Buff and scarlet are the colors traditionally associated with the Support units. The
diagonal stripe suggests protection. The compass rose signifies guidance and the
unit’s capability to deploy worldwide. The stylized mountain range denotes Fort
Carson, Colorado, home of the unit since 1966. The five peaks allude to the five
campaigns fought by the 43d Corps and Area Support Groups, predecessors to the 43d
Sustainment Brigade.

ACU

Multicam

th

45 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 12 January 2006.

Color

Desert

ACU

Multicam

The color scarlet and the yellow lightning bolt recall the unit’s history with the 25th
Infantry Division. The lightning bolt also symbolizes speed and quick response to
provide combat service support. Scarlet, a color used by support units, is the color of
zeal and sacrifice and yellow (gold) is emblematic of high achievement. The compass
rose indicates guidance, leadership and the ability to deploy worldwide. The compass
rose and the Southern Cross Constellation together highlight the organization’s mission
to provide logistics throughout the world.

th

55 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 23 March 2006. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1888)
Color

Desert

The pentagon-shape symbolizes the birth of the unit during the Global War on
Terrorism and the unit’s location not far from the Pentagon. Red, white and blue are the
national colors, whereas red is the color traditionally used by Sustainment units. The “V”

is for the roman numeral “5,” also signifying victory; combined with the pentagon alludes
to the unit designation “55.” The chevron represents support; interlaced with the
inverted chevron suggests the unit’s mission of support and maintaining the victory.

ACU

th

77 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved by telegram for the
23 October 1918. It was officially announced on 31 May 1922.
On 22 April 1968, it was authorized for the
Color

Woodland

77th Division

on

77th U.S. Army Reserve Command.

Desert

The insignia was reassigned and authorized effective 16 April 1996, for the U.S. Army
77th Regional Support Command.
The insignia was redesignated for the U. S. Army
16 July 2003.

77th Regional Readiness Command

It was redesignated effective 18 September 2008, for the
amended to add a symbolism. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-124)

ACU

effective

77th Sustainment Brigade

and

The design alludes to New York City where the Division was raised.

82nd Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 19 March 2008. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1967)
Color

ACU

Red, white, and blue, the national colors, recall the conception and activation of the
Brigade in the 82d Airborne Division and the fifty years of lineage to the Division. The
compass rose denotes the Brigade’s direction of maintaining and protecting the nation’s
security. The lightning bolt represents the power and swiftness of the unit to deploy.
The deployed parachute symbolizes the area of operation that the Brigade supports.

th

89

Sustainment Brigade

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 89th Division on 25
October 1918 by telegram but not officially announced by the War Department until 23
June 1922. It was amended on 21 December 1948, to change the colors and reword
the measurements. The insignia was approved for the 89th U.S. Army Reserve
Command on 26 July 1974. On 16 April 1996, the insignia was reassigned and
approved for the 89th Regional Support Command. It was redesignated effective 16
July 2003, for the US Army 89th Regional Readiness Command. The insignia was
redesignated effective 16 September 2009, for the 89th Sustainment Brigade and
amended to add a symbolism.
Red, white, and blue are the national colors. The stylized “W” which when reversed
becomes an “M,” refers to this Division, known in the past as the “Middle West
Division,” since many of its personnel came from the Midwestern states.

th

90 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 90th Division by telegram
on 25 October 1918. It was officially announced by the War Department on 8 July
1922. It was amended to correct the wording of the description on 11 October 1922.
The insignia was authorized for the 90th U.S. Army Reserve Command on 22 April
1968. It was reassigned and authorized effective 16 April 1996, for the U.S. Army 90th
Regional Support Command. The insignia was redesignated effective 16 July 2003, for
the U.S. Army 90th Regional Readiness Command. It was redesignated effective 17
September 2008, for the 90th Sustainment Brigade. It was amended to correct the
effective date of the redesignation of the insignia for the 90th Sustainment Brigade to 16
September 2008. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-137)
The letters "T" and "O" represent the states of Texas and Oklahoma, from which the

personnel of the 90th Division were originally drawn.

th

96 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 96th Division on 14
February 1927. It was redesignated for the 96th Infantry Division on 1 August 1942. The
insignia was redesignated for the 96th Command Headquarters (Divisional) on 26 July
1963. On 22 April 1968, it was authorized for the 96th U.S. Army Reserve Command. It
was reassigned and authorized for the U.S. Army 96th Regional Support Command on
16 April 1996. The insignia was redesignated for the 96th U.S. Army Regional
Readiness Command effective 16 July 2003. It was redesignated effective 17
September 2008, for the 96th Sustainment Brigade. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-143)
The 96th Division was organized from personnel of Oregon and Washington and was
represented by the two squares. The squares were made white and blue, signifying the
colors used by the United States.

st

101 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 17 November 2009. It was amended to
correct the description on 17 March 2011. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-1005)
Color

ACU

Multicam

The shield is adapted from the 101st Airborne Division, the 101st Sustainment
Brigade’s origin. Black suggests steadfastness and strength. The compass rose and
rope symbolize the global directional support to forces anytime, anywhere under all
conditions. The eagle’s head, adapted from the 101st Airborne Division’s shoulder
sleeve insignia, alludes to the unit’s airborne status when it was founded. The playing
card symbols and the Torii gate allude to the original symbols painted on the 101st
soldiers’ helmets during World War II.

th

108 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 13 November 2006. (TIOH Dwg. No. A1-904)
Color

Desert

ACU

Multicam

Red and buff are the colors traditionally used by Sustainment units. Red, white, and
blue are the national colors. The sides of the pentagon-shape allude to the armed
branches of service: Army, Marines, Air Force, Navy, and Coast Guard. The wheel
signifies the Brigade’s logistical mission and the six spokes denote the subordinate
units within the Brigade. Teamed together they possess the ability to move the “Wheel
of Logistics” in order to sustain the force. The stars represent the original thirteen
colonies and the nation’s heritage. The “Y” suggests the joining point of the Chicago
River and North Branch Rivers, landmarks in Chicago and the location of the 108th
Sustainment Brigade.

th

113 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 22 October 2010. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-11038)
The three bendlets represent Ordnance, Quartermaster, and Transportation, the three
branches that together form the Logistics branch, parent branch of the Sustainment
Brigades. The sword highlights the Warrior Ethos. Buff and red are the colors
traditionally used for Sustainment and Support.

th

224 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 31 July 2008. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1975)
Color

ACU

The dragon symbolizes East Asian culture and recalls the unit’s participation in the

Korean Conflict and the award of the Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation. The
sunburst represents the organization’s origins in the state of California and its service in
protecting Los Angeles residents during the unrest experienced in that city. Yellow
refers to the unit’s lineage to the 40th Infantry Division. Blue recalls World War II
service in the Pacific, scarlet signifies courage and sacrifice.
Multicam

th

230 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 23 January 2007. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1911)
Red and buff are the colors traditionally used by Sustainment units. Red, white, and
blue are the national colors and also the colors of the Tennessee State Flag. The
chevron suggests support, the mission of the Brigade. The sword, pointing up,
symbolizes military readiness. The three stars allude to the three grand divisions of the
state of Tennessee.

th

287 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 19 December 2006. (TIOH Dwg. No. A1-909)
Light blue and crimson refer to the unit’s association with Maintenance, black and white
represent day and night vigilance and capability. The gold color archer symbolizes the
fighting spirit of Kansas and its determination to defend American freedoms. The
compass rose denotes readiness to deploy anywhere in the world, the primary points of
the compass rose refer to mission elements of maintenance, supply, medicine, and
transportation. White denotes integrity and high ideals.

300th Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved for the 300th Sustainment Brigade on 11
December 2007.
Brick red, buff and yellow symbolize the components that are the core of the 300th
Sustainment Brigade, Transportation, Ordnance and Quartermaster. The horse
indicates the unit’s lineage to the 300th Transportation Group.

th

304 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 6 March 2006. The insignia was
amended to correct the symbolism on 17 March 2006.
Color

Desert

ACU

Multicam

Red and buff are the colors traditionally used by Support units. Light blue represents
the sky. The dark blue denotes water. Blue is the color for honor and highlights the
unit’s call to duty. The bridge symbolizes strong support; the seven stones on the top of
the bridge represent the seven Army values: loyalty, duty, respect, selfless service,
honor, integrity and personal courage, paving the way and guiding the unit to success.
The two pillars foretell the unit’s future missions of combined and joint operations. The
three arches allude to the window of the unit’s past. As the 304th Corps Materiel
Management Center, active duty, reserve component and civilians forged a team to
provide materiel management for I-Corps, America’s Corps. The river flows in the
shape of an “S,” representing the triumvirate missions of sustainment, service and
support which govern the task and purpose of the unit. The combined elements form
the bridge, the symbol of the ethos of the 304th Sustainment Brigade. It also signifies
the unit’s willingness to cross any obstacle; land, water and air to accomplish their
mission.

st

321 Sustainment Brigade

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 7 March 2006. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1884)

Color

Desert

ACU

Multicam

Buff and scarlet are the colors associated with US Army Support organizations. Scarlet
is also the color of the Meritorious Unit Commendation which was awarded to the unit
for Southwest Asia service. Scarlet is also the color of zeal and courage. The scarlet
bar or “red stick” echoes the name of the city of Baton Rouge, home of the Brigade. The
compass rose symbolizes leadership, guidance, and the ability to deploy worldwide.
The gold disc on the star alludes to the hot sun of Southwest Asia; the palm branch,
symbol of victory, also refers to Southwest Asia, where the Brigade saw war service.
The dark blue contrasting with the shining compass rose and sun represents day and
night, around the clock vigilance, Blue also symbolizes loyalty and steadfastness.

th

369 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved for the 369th Sustainment Brigade on 7
February 2008.
Color

The chevron, heraldic symbol for support, suggests the unit’s mission. The
palets/vertical bars signify military strength and allude to the three campaigns in Saudi
Arabia, Kuwait, and Iraq. The counterchanged colors of the palets/vertical bars signify
the various transformations of the unit to become the 396 th Sustainment Brigade. The
poplar tree, adapted from the 369th Infantry Battalion’s coat of arms, indicates the
Brigade perpetuating the lineage of the Battalion.

ACU

Multicam

st

371 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 1 September 2007. (TIOH
Drawing Number A-1-923)
Color

Buff and red are the colors traditionally used by the Sustainment units. The wavy band
suggests water, alluding to a “large creek,” the meaning of the name Ohio and the
location of the Brigade. The three stars represent the unit’s campaign credits in World
War I, World War II, and the Global War on Terrorism. The arrowhead signifies the
Brigade’s service in the fight for Luzon during World War II and the motto “Logistic
Warriors.” The polestar denotes the unit’s leadership to guide service members and
deployment capabilities worldwide.

ACU

Multicam

st

501 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 13 October 2006.

Color

The fleur-de-lis and Taeguk signify the unit’s service in France during World War II, just
after D-Day and the Korean War respectively. The chevron is a symbol of the Brigade’s
support mission. The light blue top section refers to the unit’s origin and lineage as a
Quartermaster Battalion. The crossed swords highlight cooperation, strength, and
combat readiness. Scarlet is the color for zeal and sacrifice in battle. The gold/yellow
stands for excellence and high ideals.

ACU

th

518 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 16 September 2010. (TIOH Dwg.
No. A-1-1028)
Color

ACU

Multicam

Buff and scarlet are the colors associated with US Army Sustainment organizations.
The bull is a very powerful and determined beast. It won’t back down and underscores
the unit’s motto of “SUSTAIN THE ATTACK.”

th

528 Sustainment Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 25 March 2009. (TIOH Drawing Number
A-1-997)
Color

The red and dark green background suggests the Brigade’s support to Special
Operations units. The lightning bolts denote combat support, combat service support,
and signal elements of the command and the speed at which these missions are
performed. Yellow/gold embodies the quality and value of the soldiers assigned to the
unit. The parachute symbolizes the Brigade’s airborne capabilities. The black dagger
represents combat readiness and the unit’s association with the United States Army
Special Operations Command.

ACU

Multicam

rd

593 Sustainment Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 16 April 2008. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-916). It was redesignated effective 16 July 2013, for the 593d Sustainment
Command with the symbolism revised. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-916).
Color

ACU

Red, white, and blue are our National colors, with red being emblematic of valor; white,
purity of purpose; and blue, loyalty. Buff and scarlet are the traditional colors of Army
Support. The stars commemorate the five campaigns the 593d participated in, namely
World War II, Vietnam, Desert Storm, Somalia, and Operation Iraqi Freedom. The
massive Mount Rainier dominates the skyline in the Northwest and recalls the Brigade’s
heritage of being stationed at Fort Lewis, Washington, for over 30 years. The spears
overlap to form an “X” on an “I” that alludes to the Roman numeral “IX” or nine. Nine
plus the three spears and five stars signify the number 593, the numeric designation of
the Brigade. The three arrows represent combat readiness and the three core branches
of logistics: Ordnance, Quartermaster, and Transportation, that the 593rd Sustainment
Brigade provides to the War-fighter.

TRANSPORTATION
rd

3 Transportation Command

Color

Desert

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 3d Transportation
Command on 23 October 1969. It was redesignated for the 3rd Transportation Brigade
on 6 September 1972. The insignia was redesignated for the 3d Transportation Agency
effective 16 September 1994, with the description and symbolism revised. It was
redesignated effective 17 September 2004, for the 3d Transportation Command. (TIOH
Drawing Number A-1-526)
Brick red and golden yellow are the colors used for the Transportation Corps. The
segment of railway track symbolizes the unit’s former mission, and the three ties allude
to its numerical designation. The star is symbolic of the command.

ACU var. 1

ACU var. 2

th

4 Transportation Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 4th Transportation
Command on 28 June 1967.
Color

Green

Desert

It was redesignated for the 4th Transportation Brigade on 13 May 1975.
The insignia was redesignated effective 16 February 1981, for the 4th Transportation
Command. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-461)

ACU

Brick red and yellow are the colors used for Transportation. The wheel, a symbol for
movement and the trident, an attribute of Poseidon (God of the Sea in Greek
mythology) allude to the mission of the organization in the movement of vital cargo
across land and waterway.

th

5 Transportation Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 6 April 1967. (TIOH Drawing Number A1-449)
Yellow and brick red are the colors traditionally associated with the Transportation
Corps. The wedge or V-shape indicates the numerical designation of the Command.
The disc represents the wheel, a symbol basic to transportation and the star at its hub
represents the command function.

st

11 Transportation Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 14 January 1969. (TIOH Drawing
Number A-1-513)
The colors brick red and yellow (gold) are used for the Transportation Corps. The
wheel, a basic implement of mobility, and the white and wavy blue area, symbolic of
water, refer to the terminal port function of the organization. The two white and the one
blue areas also allude to the three activations of the unit (initially in the United States
and subsequently in Korea and France), and the two vertical bars simulating wharves
and docks also simulate the numeral “11,” the organization’s numerical designation.

th

124 Transportation Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 1 June 1967. (TIOH Drawing Number A1-454)
Brick red and yellow are the colors used for Transportation. The winged wheel
symbolizes two of the roles of Transportation – air and rail movement.

th

125 Transportation Command
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 7 June 1967. (TIOH Drawing Number A1-456)
Brick red and yellow are the colors used for Transportation. The wheel symbolizes the
basic aspects of movement and with the anchor refers to the organization’s mission in

support of amphibious operations.

th

319 Transportation Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 22 January 1985. It was amended to
include the dimensions of the insignia on 19 February 1985. (TIOH Drawing Number A1-702)
The colors blue, green and white represent sea, land and air, the environment in which
transportation units function. The colors meet at the wheel which indicates the
composite mission of the Brigade. The wheel represents the continuity of the 319th over
the years, it also represents movement and thus refers to the 319th’s motto “ACCENT
ON ACTION.” The shield is the same shape as the shield in the Transportation Corps
branch insignia. Brick red and golden yellow are the colors of the Transportation Corps.

th

336 Transportation Group
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 7 June 2007. (TIOH Drawing Number A1-928)
The shield denotes guardianship, indicating the protection needed to accomplish each
mission. Brick red and golden yellow are the colors traditionally associated with
Transportation units. The arrows allude to the tradition of the red ball express from
World War II. Dark red symbolizes the blood shed of those that sacrificed their lives for
the cause, mission and country, for which they fought. The stars represent the original
13 colonies of the United States.

th

425 Transportation Brigade
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 425th Transportation
Command on 8 May 1967. It was redesignated for the 425th Transportation Brigade on
25 February 1972. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-453)
Brick red and golden yellow are colors used for Transportation. The yellow rim with
diagonal bands joined by a ring in the center simulates a steering wheel and refers to
the motor transport mission of the organization. The yellow intersecting bands are also
indicative of highways. Together with the black rectangles which denote the movement
of cargo and personnel by highway transport it depicts the Brigade’s coordination and
control of highway transportation with special reference to continuous intersectional and
other line haul operations.

TABS
Airborne Tabs

Honor Guard Tab For Selected Units
Honor Guard Tab For The Old Guard, 3d

Infantry Regiment
President's Hundred Tab
Governors’ Twenty tab
Ranger Tab

Recon Tab (unofficial)
Sniper Tab (unofficial)
Mountain Tab
Sapper Tab
Setaf tab
Special Forces Tab
The US Army Band
USAREUR Band
US Army Field Band
5th Army Band Tab
10th Mountain Division Band Tab
23rd Army Band Tab
29th Army Band Tab
34th Army Band Tab
36th Infantry Division Band Tab
38th Infantry Division Band Tab
40th Army Band Tab

43rd Army Band Tab
44th Army Band Tab
62nd Army Band Tab
67th Army Band Tab
73rd Army Band Tab
78th Army Band Tab
85th Army Band Tab
88th Army Band Tab
94th Army Band Tab
100th Army Band Tab
101st Army Band Tab
108th Army Band Tab
122nd Army Band Tab
126th Army Band Tab
129th Army Band Tab
132nd ARMY BAND
133rd Army Band Tab
144th Army Band Tab
151st Army Band Tab
156th Army Band Tab
188th Army Band Tab
191st Army Band Tab
198th Army Band Tab
204th Army Band Tab
208th Army Band Tab
215th Army Band Tab
248th Army Band Tab

300th Army Band Tab
312nd Army Band Tab
313rd Army Band Tab
319th Army Band Tab
323rd Army Band Tab
338th Army Band Tab
380th Army Band Tab
392nd Army Band Tab
th

395 Army Band Tab
451st Army Band Tab
484th Army Band Tab
Maneuver Center of Excellence Band Tab
Materiel Command Band Tab
Signal Corps Band Tab
Training and Doctrine Command Band
Tab

Army National Guard Honor Guard Tab

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