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M130 BHF_Physical Activity Supplement_2012

M130 BHF_Physical Activity Supplement_2012

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Physical activity statistics 2012

British Heart Foundation Health Promotion Research Group Department of Public Health, University of Oxford

© British Heart Foundation, July 2012 ISBN 978-1-899088-07-2 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying or otherwise without prior permission of the publishers. NHS workers and teachers may make photocopies for education purposes only, provided that no charge or profit is made for any course or event for which they are used. Published by the British Heart Foundation, Greater London House, 180 Hampstead Road, London, NW1 7AW bhf.org.uk Registered Charity No 225971 Edited by Peter Weissberg, British Heart Foundation Compiled by Nick Townsend, Prachi Bhatnagar, Kremlin Wickramasinghe, Peter Scarborough, Charlie Foster and Mike Rayner, British Heart Foundation Health Promotion Research Group, Department of Public Health, University of Oxford, Old Rd Campus, Headington, Oxford OX3 7LF http://www.publichealth.ox.ac.uk/bhfhprg Suggested citation: Townsend N, Bhatnagar P, Wickramasinghe K, Scarborough P, Foster C, Rayner M (2012). Physical activity statistics 2012. British Heart Foundation: London.

Physical activity statistics 2012

Nick Townsend, Prachi Bhatnagar, Kremlin Wickramasinghe, Peter Scarborough, Charlie Foster and Mike Rayner British Heart Foundation Health Promotion Research Group Department of Public Health, University of Oxford

b Figure 1.2 Figure 3.3 Table 1. 19 20.8.9a.3 Table 2. adults Self-reported and objective activity levels Self-reported versus objectively measured.12 Figures 1.5 Figures 1.3 Figures 2. 25 26.11 Table 1.b Figure 2.2   Physical Activity Statistics. adults.3 . 39 40 41. weekend and weekday Table 2. b Chapter 2 – Daily minutes of physical activity Adults Moderate to vigorous activity Physical activity levels. adults Objectively measured activity.4 Table 1.8 Table 1.6 Table 1. 30 31.b Chapter 3 – International differences Guidelines WHO recommended guidelines for physical activity Europe Regular exercise or sport participation. Figure 1.10 Figures 1.b Figure 1.1 Table 1. adults Physical activity levels by income. 42 43–48 45 46.5a.5a. 32 33–42 35 36. adults Physical activity outside of sport. 21 22 23 24. children Cardiac rehabilitation Physical activity levels before and after cardiac rehabilitation.2 Table 2. adults Table 1. 2012 Contents Foreword Introduction Summary Glossary Chapter 1 – Meeting physical activity guidelines Overall levels in adults Physical activity levels. 27 28 29.1 Figures 2.4 Table 2.2a. 37 38.5 Figure 2. adults. adults Meeting the recommendations.10 Table 1.I.1 Table 3. adults Physical activity levels by ethnic group.7 Table 1. Scotland 2008 to 2010 Meeting the recommendations. England 1997 to 2008 Meeting the recommendations.12a. 2001 to 2011 Children and young people Physical activity levels Regional. adults. ethnic and socioeconomic differences Physical activity levels by region.4 Figures 1.1a. weekend and weekday Children Physical activity levels Physical activity levels by income Physical activity levels. 15 16 17 18.2 Table 3.11a. N.b 5 6 7 8 9–32 14.9 Table 1.1 Table 2.7 Figure 1. 47 48 Table 1.b Figures 1.2 Table 1. adults Objectively measured activity by income. adults Table 3.

adults Knowledge of recommendations. adults Like to do more physical activity.8a Table 6.9b Table 6. children Motivation Like to do more physical activity.1 Figure 5. adults Local environment Physical activity environment most important factors. by region. women Barriers to doing more by income.4 Chapter 6 – Factors influencing physical activity Knowledge Awareness of recommendations. 98 Chapter 5 – Active travel Distance and mode of travel Distance travelled by mode of travel Trips per person per year by mode of travel Households with car or van ownership Active travel to school Walking or cycling to school Travel to school by type of school Table 5.17 Figure 6. men Barriers to doing more by income. men Average time spent on activities. women Participation in different activities. 53 54. children Three hours PE and school sport by school type.1 Table 6. by region.7 Figure 6.1 Table 4.7 Table 6.I.10 Table 6.18 Figure 6.19 Figure 6. children Physical education and school sport Two hours PE and school sport by school year group. 65 66 67 68 69–98 72 73 74 75 76 77 78. children Barriers Barriers to doing more. adults Like to do more physical activity by income. 79 80 81 82. adults Physical activity environment needs improving. children Three hours PE and school sport by sex.20 Figure 6. children Three hours PE and school sport by school year group.9a Figure 6.9a Table 6. women Factors putting off sport.14 Table 6.17 Table 6. 55 56.5 Table 6. adults Satisfied with physical activity environment.2 Table 6.2a Table 4.18 Table 6.10 Figure 6. men Barriers to doing more. 83 84.9b Figure 6.16 Figure 6.8a Figure 6. children Two hours PE and school sport by school type.3 Figure 4. 95 96 97.3 Table 5. adults Occupational physical activity Time spent in occupational activities. N.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   3 Chapter 4 – Types of physical activity Non-occupational physical activity Time spent on different activities. men Time spent in occupational activities. 60 61–68 63 64.1 Figure 6.5 Figure 5.12 Table 6.3 Figure 6.4 Figure 6.19 Table 6.6 Figure 6.16 Table 6. 60 59. by region.11 Figure 6. adults.4 Table 5.2 Figure 5.3 Table 6.13 Table 6. children Like to do more physical activity by income. women Table 4.2 Figure 6.1 Table 5.2 Table 5. adults Knowledge of recommendations.8b Figure 6. 57 58.2a Figure 4.14 Figure 6.2b Figure 4. 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94. children Table 6.4 Figure 4.4 49–60 51 52.12 Figure 6.4b Figure 4.15 Table 6.4 Table 6.5 Figure 6.4a Table 4.13 Figure 6.3 Figure 5.3 Table 4.11 Table 6.8b Table 6.6 Table 6. Encourage physical activity.1 Figure 4. adults Views on parks and play areas in local area. adults Average time spent on activities.2b Table 4.20 .15 Figure 6.

4 Table 7.3a.b Acknowledgements .10a.b Table 7.b 99–127 102.1 Table 7.4a. adults Minutes per day by income.1a. children Regional differences Hours per week by region. 125 126.9 Figures 7.8 Table 7.14 Figures 7.10 Table 7. adults Percentage sedentary time that is television viewing.b Figures 7. 103 104.5a.b Figures 7. 119 120.b Figures 7.14a.13 Table 7.b Figures 7. adults Hours television viewing per week. children Socio-economic differences Minutes per day by income. children Table 7. 127 128 Table 7. children Hours per week by income. by country.3 Table 7. 2012 Contents (Continued) Chapter 7 – Sedentary behaviour Self-reported Prevalence per day.13a. adults Prevalence per day.b Figures 7.9a. adults Percentage sedentary time that is television viewing.6a. children Sedentary behaviours Hours television viewing per week 1999 to 2010. 107 108.6 Figures 7.12 Table 7.2a.11a. 121 122 124. 113 114 115 116. children Average hours per day. 111 112.7 Table 7.b Figures 7.11 Table 7. 117 118.4   Physical Activity Statistics.b Figures 7. adults Average hours per day. children Objectively measured Minutes per day. adults Minutes per day.5 Table 7.b Figures 7. 105 106. 109 110.2 Table 7.

Increases in physical activity are associated with protection against chronic diseases. as well as cost savings for health and social care services. this report is published in the same year that the Olympics are to be held in the UK for the first time in more than 60 years. Additionally. Although there is a lot more to physical activity than competitive sport. British Heart Foundation .British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   5 Foreword This supplement published by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) is the first to focus solely on Physical activity statistics and comes at a pertinent time. and over two thirds believed them to be lower than they were. generating interest in sport and exercise is a positive means through which to encourage individuals to be more active. However. however. and it is important that we encourage children to maintain recommended levels as they move into adolescence and then early adulthood. citing work commitments and a lack of leisure time as the most common barriers to this. It is particularly worrying that objective measures in England suggest that few girls aged 11 to 15 years meet recommended physical activity levels. If we are to increase physical activity levels of the population further. it is imperative that guidance is widely disseminated and understood. Knowledge of guidelines is not the only issue. The numerous benefits that physical activity bring to both the individuals and the population as a whole makes it a key focus in public health within the UK. acknowledging the importance of regular physical activity in reducing risk for a number of chronic conditions. Professor Peter Weissberg Medical Director. There has been evidence of some success in increasing physical activity levels in the UK population over the past decade. Although new guidelines have been produced these must be both disseminated and supported through the creation of environments that encourage physical activity. It is less than a year since the Chief Medical Officers for each UK country released updated recommendations on the amount of physical activity individuals should take. It is also apparent that the amount of physical activity children take decreases as they get older. an improved quality of life through improving physical and mental health. Less than one third of adults in England had heard of the UK Government’s physical activity guidelines. with over 70% of adults saying they would like to do more physical activity. whilst less than one tenth were able to report them accurately. with this proportion declining with age. including cardiovascular disease. statistics presented in this report suggest that less than half of adults in the UK meet UK Government recommendations.

including: –– Trends in coronary heart disease 1961-2011 (2011) –– Coronary Heart Disease Compendium (2010) –– Ethnic Differences in Cardiovascular Disease (2010) –– Stroke Statistics (2009) –– European Cardiovascular Disease Statistics (2008) . where possible objectively measured statistics are also included. Chapter one describes the proportion of people within the UK achieving the Chief Medical Officer’s (CMO) recommendations for weekly physical activity levels. medical researchers and anyone with an interest in physical activity or cardiovascular disease. however.uk/research/statistics. physical education (PE) and sport in schools.org. published in 2006. Physical activity statistics is divided into seven chapters. Chapter three compares physical activity levels in countries of the European Union (EU). Wales and Northern Ireland is rare therefore many of the tables and figures correspond to one country. Chapter six describes the factors that influence physical activity including knowledge. physical activity and obesity statistics. All of the tables and figures presented in Physical activity statistics can also be found on the British Heart Foundation’s Heart statistics website bhf. Chapter four describes the types of physical activity individuals are engaging in. attitude and motivation along with the activity environment. Chapter 7 presents statistics on levels and types of sedentary behaviour. Further copies of this publication can be downloaded from the website. Wherever possible statistics are included for all UK countries. as well as copies of recent publications from the Coronary Heart Disease Statistics series.6   Physical Activity Statistics. Physical activity levels can be measured either through asking people to report how much exercise they do (self-report). Physical activity statistics is designed for health professionals. Scotland. Chapter two describes daily minutes of physical activity for both adults and children. The website is updated on an ongoing basis and contains a wider range of tables and figures than is available in the Coronary Heart Disease Statistics series of publications. with a particular focus on active travel: walking and cycling. Self-report is the most widely used measurement method in UK surveys and so most of the statistics displayed correspond to self-reported physical activity. This website aims to be the most comprehensive and up-to-date source of statistics on cardiovascular disease in the UK. comparing physical activity inside and outside the workplace. obtaining comparable data for England. Chapter five details the means by which people travel. or by objectively measuring the amount of exercise a person is doing using tools such as accelerometers. updating and building on a previous publication Diet. Each chapter contains a set of tables and figures to illustrate key points and a brief review of the data presented. 2012 Introduction This is the first time a supplement of the Coronary Heart Disease Statistics has focused solely on Physical activity statistics.

–– 90% of pupils in English schools participate in at least two hours of physical education and out of hours school sport each week. –– In England 24% of men report moderate to vigorous occupational activity for at least 30 minutes per day compared to 10% of women –– In Great Britain the average distance travelled on foot or by bike by each person per year has decreased from 306 miles in 1975/76 to 221 miles in 2010. –– Large differences were found in the prevalence of individuals reaching recommended levels of physical activity in England when comparing self-report and accelerometry data. –– Women were less active than men in all UK countries with 33% reporting meeting recommended levels in Scotland. –– In England more than two thirds of boys and girls walked or cycled to or from school at least once a week in 2008. . 24% in Wales and 28% in Northern Ireland. the most common form of occupational and non-occupational physical activity was walking. 29% in England. –– Latvia has the highest prevalence of adults engaging in physical activity outside of sport at 44% compared to 37% in the UK and 27% the EU average. –– In adults in England sedentary time decreases into middle age and then increases into older age. –– Both adults and children in England were found to be more sedentary on weekdays than weekend days. –– In England in 2008. –– The most common barriers to doing more physical activity identified by adults in England were work commitments and a lack of leisure time. 37% in Wales and 33 % in Northern Ireland. higher than the EU average of 9% but lower than Ireland which has the highest prevalence with 23%. –– In England both adults and children spent more minutes being moderately to vigorously active on weekdays than on weekend days. compared to 39% in England. –– Only 6% of men and 9% of women in England can correctly define the UK Government recommended physical activity targets. –– 56% of women in England did not spend any time in sports and exercise in 2008. –– The proportion of adults achieving the recommended levels of physical activity increased for England between 1997 and 2008 and in Northern Ireland between 2001 and 2011. The lowest figures are for single-sex girls school. –– 14% of adults in the UK exercise or play sport regularly.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   7 Summary –– 45% of men in Scotland reported meeting recommended levels of physical activity. –– The number of minutes per day adults and children in England spend being moderately to vigorously active declines with age. In Northern Ireland not enough time was the most common barrier.

Active travel – refers to an approach to travel and transport that focuses on physical activity. or burns calories. Equivalised Household Income – is when the total income for a household is adjusted to take the number of people living in that household into account. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) – the collective term for all diseases affecting the circulatory system (heart. Active travel is beneficial for health and accessibility. Tertile – a statistical value that divides a range of data into three equal parts. 2012 Glossary This section provides a definition for some of the terms used throughout Physical activity statistics 2012. Cycling and walking are the most common types of active travel. Accelerometers are used as an objective measure of physical activity or exertion.8   Physical Activity Statistics. Quintile – a statistical value that divides a range of data into five equal parts. arteries. blood vessels). Sedentary behaviour – a cluster of individual behaviours in which sitting or lying is the dominant mode of posture and energy expenditure is very low. Metabolic rate is the rate at which a person uses energy. MET (metabolic equivalent or metabolic equivalent of task) – the ratio of work metabolic rate to a standard resting metabolic rate. 2 or 3 dimensions. . A definition for METs is provided in this glossary. and when replacing journeys by car can also reduce congestion and emissions. 1 MET is considered a resting metabolic rate. Cardiac rehabilitation – is a programme of exercise and information sessions provided for patients with certain conditions. It is useful to present rates as age standardised as it allows for comparisons between populations with very different age structures. Accelerometer – hip mounted motion sensor that measures acceleration in 1. Moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) – defined in the Health Survey for England 2008 as all activity occurring at 3 or more METs. Age standardised rate – a measure of the rate that a population would experience if it had a standard age structure.

. The percentage of women meeting them increased from 21% to 29% over the same period of time.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   9 Men 32% Women 21% Men 39% Women 29% 1997 2008 Percentage of individuals reaching Government recommendations Meeting physical activity guidelines The percentage of men meeting physical activity recommendations increased from 32% to 39% over ten years.

This should involve the use of the major large muscle groups steadily and rhythmically. In the UK the direct financial cost of physical inactivity to the NHS is estimated as £900 million 3. This chapter goes on to compare objectively measured data to self-reported and concludes by describing the proportion of patients achieving recommendations before and after cardiac rehabilitation. To produce the maximum benefit. where possible. Meeting physical activity guidelines People who are physically active are at lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). the WHO estimated that around 6% of global deaths were caused by physical inactivity 1. Wales and Northern Ireland. exercise needs to be regular and aerobic.10   Physical Activity Statistics. Physical activity levels can be measured either through asking people to report how much exercise they do. Recent research from the World Health Organization (WHO) highlighted the importance of physical inactivity as a major risk factor for CHD. . or by objectively measuring the amount of exercise a person is doing. The advantage of accelerometry over self-report is that it provides objective information on the frequency. known as self-report. Between 20% – 35% of cardiovascular diseases could be prevented if more people become more active throughout the life course2. The former method. Results using the self-report method are detailed here for England. Scotland. so that heart rate and breathing increase significantly. a sub-sample of the 2008 Health Survey for England (HSE) was selected to wear accelerometers in order to obtain objective measures of physical activity and sedentary behaviour. and duration of both physical activity and sedentary behaviour. is the most widely used measurement method in UK surveys. intensity. 2012 1. Although physical activity and sedentary levels are normally self-reported. As the fourth leading risk factor for global mortality.

However.1b). therefore. Children and young people Self-reported levels of physical activity in children vary by country of the UK. 75% of boys and 72% of girls reported meeting the recommended levels of activity. for girls in these countries there was a notable decrease after age 10. Scotland. rising from 30% of men in 2001 to 44% in 2010/11 and 26% to 35% in women over the same period of time (Tables 1. In Scotland for children aged 2 to 15. 1. In Wales 53% of boys and 35% of girls aged 11 to 16 were physically active for 60 minutes or more. Figures 1. For the same age group in England however. For England and Wales.5b). Fewer women than men achieved these levels of physical activity with 33% of Scottish women meeting the recommendations and 24% of Welsh women doing so. the Health Survey for England reported that the overall proportion of adults meeting the recommended level of physical activity increased from 32% to 39% in men and from 21% to 29% in women. five days or more per week 6 (Table 1. the 2011 physical activity report from the four home countries’ CMOs did not refer to any targets. The 2010 Scottish Health Survey suggested that the progress towards improving physical activity levels in Scotland has slowed.1. physical activity levels decline with age. with a greater proportion of men meeting the recommendations in the 16 to 24 age group and the fewest in the 75 and above age group. emphasise for the first time the importance of physical activity for people of all ages. Scottish targets were included in the 2011 Physical Activity National Indicator. the flexibility to combine moderate and vigorous intensity activities and reduce sedentary behaviour 2.5a and 1.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   11 Physical activity guidelines Guidelines issued by the four Chief Medical Officers (CMOs) of England. with 45% of men and 33% of women meeting these recommendations in 2010. Figure 1. Data presented in this publication. Increases have been found for both sexes in Northern Ireland.1a and 1. with 45% meeting recommended physical activity levels in 2010.2. The Government’s Strategy Unit published a target for physical activity improvements in England in 2002. Wales and Northern Ireland in 2011. Overall levels in adults The new CMOs’ guidelines on physical activity were published in July 2011. correspond to the 2004 guidelines rather than those from 2011. the same prevalence as in 2008 for both sexes. While the percentage of boys meeting the recommendations shows a varying pattern by age in both England and Scotland.3 and 1. In men. The guidelines also highlight the importance of minimising the amount of time spent being sedentary. Self-reported physical activity levels in UK adults are fairly low. These guidelines recommended 30 minutes of physical activity on at least five days a week for adults 4 and at least one hour of moderate intensity activity a day for children aged 5 to 18 years 5. however in Northern Ireland only a third of men reported meeting the recommendations. however in Scotland activity is reported to be highest in the 25 to 54 age group (Table 1.4). Currently available data were collected in reference to the previous guidelines published in 2004. The guidelines bring different aspects of physical activity together including a life course approach. Men in Scotland exercise the most. . In 2003 the Scottish Health Executive also set a target for physical activity.4. Between 1997 and 2008.5. the pattern appears to be similar. Figures 1. only 32% of boys and 24% of girls did.

6). more people in the highest tertile were meeting recommendations. Due to issues of consent.10). but to take them off when swimming or showering. ethnic and socioeconomic differences Regional variation in adult self-report physical activity levels is not marked. For women.12   Physical Activity Statistics.9a and 1. Irish men and Black Caribbean women had the highest prevalence of meeting the recommendations compared to any other ethnic groups living in England (Table 1. those participants sampled to wear accelerometers were encouraged to wear them at all times including at school. however for women it was those who were in the lowest tertile (Table 1. Figure 1. large differences are apparent. when measured using an accelerometer it was found that only 6% of men and 4% of women met these. however social desirability may lead to over-reporting of physical activity.7. People were asked to wear the accelerometers while awake for seven consecutive days. Of the men. Comparing self-report and objective activity levels While self-report is the most commonly used method to measure physical activity. Figure 1. Differences between highest and lowest quintiles was greater for men (42% compared to 31%) than for women (34% compared to 26%) (Table 1. compliance and faults with the devices only 49% of men and 46% of women from the 4. This pattern was also true of women from these groups. as well as accelerometers. Indian. Pakistani. Thirty nine percent of men and 29% of women in England reported meeting the recommendations.8. as was seen with the self-report data. the Health Survey for England measured physical activity using self-report methods. Of the 1. There were higher percentages of men and women meeting the recommended levels in the highest income quintile compared to the lowest. although there are differences. eligibility.10. Its advantages are that it is easy to collect data from a large number of people at low cost. Both self-report and objective measures found that the levels of physical activity declined with age in both men and women (Table 1. compared to 33% of men in the North East. Certain sections of the population such as the elderly and children may have difficultly accurately recalling their activities. Figures 1. Figure 1. The Health Survey for England 2008 shows a substantial difference in physical activity levels in adults by equivalised household income quintile. 2012 Regional. 44% of men in the South West reported meeting physical activity recommendations. Bangladeshi and Pakistani men had the lowest prevalence of meeting physical activity recommendations (26% and 28%).9b). whereas self-reported data covered sedentary behaviour in leisure time excluding time at school. the highest proportion was reported in South Central at 34%. but are not waterproof and may not accurately record activities such as cycling or rowing. Accelerometers measure frequency. at 11% and 14% respectively. Bangladeshi and Chinese men and women living in England were less likely to meet physical activity recommendations. Accelerometry data by tertile of equivalised household income does not show a clear trend. After accounting for differences in the age-structure of the population in each region of England.707 children aged 4 to 15 selected 43% of boys and 47% of girls provided sufficient data 8. and it is also possible that the respondent may have a different understanding of what ‘moderate intensity’ or ‘exercise’ actually means. For men. while the lowest was 25% for women in the East of England (Table 1. 8 When the prevalence of men and women meeting the recommended levels of physical activity are compared using self-report and accelerometry data. In 2008. For children. This may account for some differences between self-reported and objective data for these age groups.507 adults selected to wear accelerometers provided sufficient data to be included in the analyses of daily average wear.9. however. intensity and duration of physical activity. .7). which are an objective measure of a person’s activity.8). this has the potential to inaccurately measure physical activity prevalence 7. Compared with the general population in 2004.

Start active. Health Improvement and Protection (2011). The Stationery Office: London. 6. Ninety six percent of girls in this age group were measured as having low activity levels (Table 1. Wickramasinghe K.12. smoking. Scarborough P. 10. but no girls aged 11 to 15 exercising to this level. Chief Medical Officers: London. The prevalence of physical activity in girls was even lower. Department of Health: London. Department of Health (2000). J Public Health.12a and 1. physical inactivity.11a and 1. Assessment of Physical Activity by Self-Report: Status.11b). Physical Activity. The 2011 National Audit of Cardiac Rehabilitation found that a greater proportion of patients reached these NSF recommended levels after they had undergone cardiac rehabilitation. Health Behaviour in School – aged Children: initial findings from the 2009/10 survey in Wales. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness.12b). 2. Welsh Assembly Government (2011). Bhatnagar P. alcohol and obesity in the UK: an update to 2006–07 NHS costs. Figures 1. At least five a week: evidence on the impact of physical activity and its relationship to health. doi: 10. 8. The Stationery Office: London. Wales and Northern Ireland. American Alliance for Health. 42% of patients who had a heart attack (MI). Rayner M. In boys aged 4 to 10. Foster C. with the aim of reducing cardiac mortality. Allender S. . Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport. 5. SaelensB (2000). British Heart Foundation (2011). promoting self-management and improving quality of life 9. with 34% of girls aged 4 to 10 meeting the recommended levels. In 2000 the National Service Framework (NSF) for Coronary Heart Disease recommended that at 12 months at least 50% of individuals who had taken part in cardiac rehabilitation should be taking regular physical activity of at least 30 minutes duration on average for five times each week 10.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   13 The Health Survey for England in 2008 also gave a subsample of children aged 4 to 15 years accelerometers to wear. Global Recommendations on Physical Activity for Health. however for boys aged 11 to 15 this was only 7% whilst 75% were classified as having low levels of activity. or an angioplasty (PCI) took part in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) across England. WHO: Geneva. British Heart Foundation: London. Department of Health: London. Limitations. Physical Education. The National Audit of Cardiac Rehabilitation: Annual Statistical Report 2011. and Future Directions. Figures 1. Although a smaller number of patients were sampled 12 months after rehabilitation than 12 weeks (Table 1. 3. Recreation and Dance (AAHPERD). 9. World Health Organization (2010).11. Department of Health (2010). bypass surgery (CABG). The economic burden of ill health due to diet. with 53% achieving these levels 12 weeks after rehabilitation and 49% 12 months after. (2011). Cardiac rehabilitation In 2009-10. Department of Health (2005) Choosing Activity: a physical activity action plan. National Service Framework for Coronary Heart Disease: Modern Standards and Service Models. 51% were meeting the recommended levels of activity for children. Social Research Division: Cardiff.1093/pubmed/fdr033 4. Department of Health. Department of Health (2004). 1. stay active: a report on physical activity from the four home countries. 7. Sallis F.

204 32 31 37 1. . by sex and age. Low activity: lower levels of activity.520 19 27 48 1.411 41 34 25 1. Northern Ireland health Social Wellbeing Survey 2005/06: Topline results. Scotland 2010. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness. England 2008.14   Physical Activity Statistics. Welsh Health Survey 2010. Welsh Assembly: Cardiff.330 28 34 32 1.  ¶  Copyright © 2010.  ¶  Welsh Government(2011).247 7 15 76 1.212 34 39 28 1.305 53 30 16 1. All rights reserved.747 33 67 153 40 60 287 39 61 346 29 71 305 28 72 276 26 74 237 17 83 152 24 33 36 8.084 20 33 47 724 9 23 68 538 16–24 % 25–34 % 35–44 % 45–54 % 55–64 % 65–74 % 75+ % Notes: Meets recommendations: 30 minutes or more of moderate or vigorous activity on at least 5 days a week.472 25 34 35 1.579 28 40 23 919 27 41 24 1. All data are self-reported. The Scottish Executive: Edinburgh.018 37 26 31 7.112 66 22 12 274 61 24 15 420 51 29 20 478 48 25 27 566 34 29 36 555 22 29 50 488 10 20 70 331 29 34 38 7. 2012 Table 1.119 17 30 53 798 6 16 78 785 39 31 30 7. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre.333 31 26 37 1. The Scottish Health Survey 2010: Results.  ¶  Scottish Health Executive (2011).428 32 35 33 1.088 36 39 25 1.210 44 33 23 1.420 48 26 17 882 43 29 19 831 42 29 24 1.  ¶  Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (2007).109 14 17 65 822 33 33 33 4.660 35 33 32 1. The Information Centre: Leeds.361 26 24 45 1.073 28 38 25 1.230 28 34 37 1. Wales 2010 and Northern Ireland 2005/06 Summary physical activity level All adults % England Men Meeting recommendations Some activity Low activity Base Women Meeting recommendations Some activity Low activity Base Scotland Men Meeting recommendations Some activity Low activity Base Women Meeting recommendations Some activity Low activity Base Wales Men Meeting recommendations Some activity Low activity Base Women Meeting recommendations Some activity Low activity Base Northern Ireland Men Meeting recommendations Below recommendations Base Women Meeting recommendations Below recommendations Base 28 72 2. Some activity: 30 minutes or more of moderate or vigorous activity on 1 to 4 days a week. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010).082 41 24 28 1.133 49 32 19 1.1 Self-reported physical activity levels in adults. NISRA: Belfast.498 26 74 254 35 65 428 35 65 501 33 67 417 26 74 335 20 80 312 11 89 251 33 67 1.122 37 39 25 373 42 36 22 564 45 35 19 682 40 36 24 761 30 33 36 699 17 31 52 573 7 17 76 470 45 26 29 3.

by age and country.1a Self-reported percentage of men meeting physical activity recommendations. latest available year 50 40 30 Percentage 20 10 0 England 2008 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 Scotland 2010 55-64 65-74 75 & over Wales 2010 Northern Ireland 2005/06 . latest available year 70 60 50 Percentage 40 30 20 10 0 England 2008 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 Scotland 2010 55-64 65-74 75 & over Wales 2010 Northern Ireland 2005/06 Figure 1.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   15 Figure 1. by age and country.1b Self-reported percentage of women meeting physical activity recommendations.

630 1.123 1. of 30 minutes or more duration on five or more days per week. The Information Centre: Leeds.098 439 1.148 1.279 550 1. 2012 Table 1. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness.220 833 1. ¶  Copyright © 2010.181 455 837 807 378 415 873 243 562 551 276 284 647 32 34 36 37 40 39 49 53 52 56 53 53 41 45 44 46 52 49 37 41 41 41 46 44 32 34 38 37 38 41 23 30 32 32 35 32 12 14 17 18 21 20 7 6 8 8 9 9 16-24 % 25-34 % 35-44 % 45-54 % 55-64 % 65-74 % 75 + % Notes: Adults aged 16 and over.513 806 1.337 560 1.898 7.737 492 875 744 291 649 771 739 1.097 508 1. .260 535 1.278 626 1. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre.210 3.289 1.869 8. by sex and age.2 Self-reported percentage of adults meeting the physical activity recommendations. Activity sessions lasting for less than 30 minutes have been excluded so that data were comparable.818 6.715 8.006 886 364 792 919 916 1. Recommendation: at least moderate intensity.024 446 860 952 740 1.367 545 967 948 482 463 1.095 535 987 1.581 2.279 1.490 1.684 8.371 585 1.16   Physical Activity Statistics.304 621 1.561 6.193 6.573 1. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010). England 1997 to 2008 All adults % Men 1997 1998 2003 2004 2006 2008 Base 1997 1998 2003 2004 2006 2008 Women 1997 1998 2003 2004 2006 2008 Base 1997 1998 2003 2004 2006 2008 4.181 1. All rights reserved.049 1.218 694 1.000 439 907 900 429 430 947 21 21 24 25 28 29 26 28 30 32 33 35 26 28 29 30 36 36 29 28 30 32 35 34 24 25 31 30 34 32 19 18 23 20 27 28 8 9 13 14 16 17 5 3 3 4 4 6 3.484 1.873 5.615 746 1.269 1.146 1.305 1.338 1.

The Scottish Health Survey 2010. Recommendation: 30 minutes or more physical activity in at least 5 days a week.278 3. .122 334 383 373 451 579 564 647 779 682 631 733 761 631 735 699 515 550 573 406 479 470 33 32 33 42 38 37 42 41 42 43 39 45 37 38 40 29 30 30 20 17 17 4 6 7 2. by sex and age.238 4. Source: Scottish Health Executive (2011).British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   17 Table 1.837 3. Scottish Executive: Edinburgh.3 Self-reported percentage of adults meeting the physical activity recommendations. Scotland 2008 to 2010 All adults % Men 2008 2009 2010 Base 2008 2009 2010 Women 2008 2009 2010 Base 2008 2009 2010 3. Activity sessions lasting for less than 10 minutes have been excluded.112 245 272 274 317 406 420 459 550 478 534 600 566 525 574 555 453 517 488 304 359 331 45 43 45 58 61 66 63 54 61 53 50 51 43 43 48 37 37 34 21 21 22 13 11 10 16-24 % 25-34 % 35-44 % 45-54 % 55-64 % 65-74 % 75+ % Notes: Adults aged 16 and over.615 4.

722 2. Social Services and Public Safety (2011).968 1. Includes data from previous years. ¶  The Department of Health. Northern Ireland 2001. Northern Ireland Health and Social Wellbeing Survey 2005/06. Recommendation: at least 30 minutes of moderate or vigorous physical activity in blocks lasting more than 30 minutes in five or more days in a week.498 345 254 476 428 501 501 466 417 357 335 319 312 258 251 26 28 35 27 26 32 35 35 35 31 33 24 26 17 20 7 11 1. Included only 30 minutes of vigorous activity. . bases from this year also not provided. moderate activity or brisk walking per day but not a cumulative combination of these activities.747 250 153 337 278 347 346 351 305 277 276 266 237 140 152 30 33 44 38 33 34 40 36 39 34 29 23 28 20 26 15 17 16-24 % 25-34 % 35-44 % 45-54 % 55-64 % 65-74 % 75+ % Notes: Adults aged 16 and over.4 Self-reported percentage of adults meeting the physical activity recommendations. ¶  Public Health Information & Research Branch: Belfast. First results from the 2010/11 Health Survey Northern Ireland. Data from 2010/11 not available by age group. by sex and age. Source: Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (2007). 2005/06 and 2010/11 All adults % Men 2001 2005/06 2010/11 Base 2001 2005/06 Women 2001 2005/06 2010/11 Base 2001 2005/06 2.18   Physical Activity Statistics. 2012 Table 1.

by sex.4 Self-reported percentage of adults meeting the physical activity recommendations. UK countries 1997 to 2011 50 40 30 Percentage 20 10 0 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 England Men England Women Scotland Men Scotland Women Northern Ireland Men Northern Ireland Women .British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   19 Figure 1.

2012 Table 1.5 Self-reported physical activity levels in children.20   Physical Activity Statistics. . All rights reserved.493 43 30 27 253 32 39 25 240 28 41 30 247 32 43 25 239 34 41 25 249 36 47 18 235 32 45 23 236 33 46 22 243 31 49 20 255 29 50 21 254 29 46 25 260 27 52 21 286 32 43 24 267 32 42 26 229 2 % 3 % 4 % 5 % 6 % 7 % 8 % 9 % 10 % 11 % 12 % 13 % 14 % 15 % All % Scotland Boys Meeting recommendations Base Girls Meeting recommendations Base 72 694 75 811 2-4 % 5-7 % 8-10 % 11-12 % 13-15 % 70 188 70 174 75 190 73 143 85 170 84 132 69 104 74 100 75 159 62 145 Notes: Meets recommendations: 60 minutes or more on all 7 days of the week. England 2008. The Scottish Executive: Edinburgh. Low activity: lower levels of activity. The Scottish Health Survey 2010: Results. Scotland 2010 All % England Boys Meeting recommendations Some activity Low activity Base Girls Meeting recommendations Some activity Low activity Base 24 47 29 3. ¶ Copyright © 2010. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010). Some activity: 30 to 59 minutes on all 7 days of the week. All data are self-reported. by sex and age. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness.545 35 38 27 246 33 42 24 268 28 49 23 229 31 43 26 225 28 44 27 236 28 50 22 254 23 55 23 231 25 49 26 248 27 44 29 296 16 55 29 291 19 50 31 240 20 46 34 259 12 47 41 278 15 40 45 244 32 44 24 3. ¶ Scottish Health Executive (2011). The Information Centre: Leeds.

by sex and age in years. Scotland 2010 90 80 70 60 Percentage 50 40 30 20 10 0 2-4 Boys Girls 5-7 8-10 11-12 13-15 . England 2008 50 45 40 35 30 Percentage 25 20 15 10 5 0 2 Boys 3 Girls 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Figure 1.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   21 Figure 1. by sex and age in years.5a Self-reported percentage of children meeting physical activity recommendations.5b Self-reported percentage of children meeting physical activity recommendations.

see source for details of method. Episodes of activity less than 30 minutes have been excluded. . England 2008 North East North West Yorkshire & the Humber East Midlands West Midlands East of England London South East Coast South Central South West % Men Meets recommendations Some activity Low activity Women Meets recommendations Some activity Low activity Base Men Women 429 523 26 32 41 33 33 34 % % % % % % % % % 39 30 31 29 34 37 40 29 31 26 34 40 38 35 27 27 33 39 38 33 29 25 32 43 38 31 30 27 37 35 38 29 33 29 31 40 38 35 27 34 35 31 41 33 26 30 32 38 44 30 26 32 33 35 965 1. ¶ Copyright © 2010. Some activity: 30 minutes or more of moderate or vigorous activity on 1 to 4 days a week.193 714 906 637 795 676 877 820 939 755 927 532 674 527 620 682 863 Notes: Meets recommendations: 30 minutes or more of moderate or vigorous activity on at least 5 days a week. The Information Centre: Leeds. by sex and strategic health authority. Data are agestandardised to the mid-year 2007 population estimates for England.22   Physical Activity Statistics.6 Self-reported age-standardised physical activity levels among adults. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness. All data are self-reported. All rights reserved. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010). Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. 2012 Table 1. Low activity: lower levels of activity.

310 1. Some activity: 30 minutes or more of moderate or vigorous activity on 1 to 4 days a week.397 854 1.041 1. All data are self-reported.329 1. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness.046 1. The Information Centre: Leeds. Figure 1.7 Self-reported age-standardised physical activity levels in adults. Low activity: lower levels of activity. by sex and quintile of equivalised household income.313 1. England 2008 Highest % Men Meets recommendations Some activity Low activity Women Meets recommendations Some activity Low activity Base Men Women 1.285 1.7 Self-reported age-standardised percentage of adults meeting physical activity recommendations. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. ¶ Copyright © 2010. by sex and quintile of equivalised household income. England 2008 50 40 30 Percentage 20 10 0 Highest Men Women Second Third Fourth Lowest . Episodes of activity less than 30 minutes have been excluded.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   23 Table 1.274 34 37 28 28 38 35 28 34 38 27 32 41 26 29 45 42 35 23 41 37 23 42 29 29 39 28 33 31 23 46 Second % Third % Fourth % Lowest % Notes: Meets recommendations: 30 minutes or more of moderate or vigorous activity on at least 5 days a week.180 1. All rights reserved. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010).

873 % % % % % % % 37 29 34 409 35 30 35 386 30 26 44 549 28 21 51 429 26 23 51 408 30 32 38 348 39 28 33 497 31 30 39 648 29 28 43 467 23 32 45 634 14 34 52 508 11 21 68 477 17 36 47 375 29 38 33 656 Notes: Meets recommendations: 30 minutes or more of moderate or vigorous activity on at least 5 days a week. Some activity: 30 minutes or more of moderate or vigorous activity on 1 to 4 days a week. Low activity: lower levels of activity. The Information Centre: Leeds. . ¶ Copyright © 2010. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre.8 Self-reported physical activity prevalence. Adults aged 16 and over. Episodes of activity less than 30 minutes have been excluded. England 2004 General population Black Caribbean Black African Indian Pakistani Bangladeshi Chinese Irish % Men Meeting recommendations Some activity Low activity Base Women Meeting recommendations Some activity Low activity Base 25 36 39 3. All data are self-reported.818 37 31 32 2. 2012 Table 1.24   Physical Activity Statistics. by sex and ethnic group. All rights reserved. Health Survey for England 2004: Health of Ethnic Minorities. Data are weighted for non-response. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2006).

by sex and ethnic group.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   25 Figure 1.8 Self-reported percentage of adults meeting physical activity recommendations. England 2004 45 40 35 30 Percentage 25 20 15 10 5 0 General population Men Black Caribbean Women Black African Indian Pakistani Bangladeshi Chinese Irish .

132 3.240 1. No days with 30 minutes or more of moderate or vigorous activity.9 Self-reported versus objectively measured physical activity. Adults aged 16 and over.317 1. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre.26   Physical Activity Statistics. Self-reported: Meets recommendations: 30 minutes or more of moderate or vigorous activity on at least 20 occasions in the last 4 weeks (equivalent to at least 5 days per week).723 2. Episodes of less than 30 minutes have been excluded. Low activity: 30 minutes or more of moderate or vigorous activity on fewer than four occasions in the last 4 weeks (less than once per week on average).737 8. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010). All rights reserved. ¶ Copyright © 2010. Low activity: lower levels of activity. The Information Centre: Leeds. Some activity: 30 minutes or more of moderate or vigorous activity on four to 19 occasions (1 to 4 days per week). Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness. . by sex and age.494 4.945 623 682 78 89 353 384 192 209 29 34 38 36 36 28 32 36 32 12 23 65 4 38 58 8 51 41 4 40 56 0 23 76 39 31 30 51 31 18 40 32 28 16 28 56 6 43 50 11 62 27 5 46 49 5 20 75 16-34 % 35-64 % 65+ % Notes: Accelerometry: Meets recommendations: 30 minutes or more of moderate or vigorous activity on at least 5 days the week of accelerometer wear. Some activity: 30 minutes or more of moderate or vigorous activity on 1 to 4 days.520 1. 2012 Table 1. England 2008 All adults % Men Accelerometry Meeting recommendations Some activity Low activity Self-reported Meeting recommendations Some activity Low activity Women Accelerometry Meeting recommendations Some activity Low activity Self-reported Meeting recommendations Some activity Low activity Bases Accelerometry Men Women Self-reported Men Women 6. Data are weighted for non-response.

by age. by age.9a Self-reported versus objectively measured percentage meeting physical activity recommendations in men.9b Self-reported versus objectively measured percentage meeting physical activity recommendations in women. England 2008 40 35 30 25 Percentage 20 15 10 5 0 16-34 Accelerometry Self-report 35-64 65+ .British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   27 Figure 1. England 2008 60 50 40 Percentage 30 20 10 0 16-34 Accelerometry Self-report 35-64 65+ Figure 1.

 ¶ Copyright © 2010. Figure 1. No days with 30 minutes or more of moderate or vigorous activity.28   Physical Activity Statistics. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010). Adults aged 16 and over with 7 days valid accelerometry data. Some activity: 30 minutes or more of moderate or vigorous activity on 1 to 4 days. England 2008 14 12 10 Percentage 8 6 4 2 0 Highest Men Women Middle Lowest . All rights reserved. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. by sex and tertile of equivalised household income.10 Objectively measured physical activity levels. by sex and tertile of equivalised household income. The Information Centre: Leeds. Low activity: lower levels of activity. England 2008 Highest % Men Meets recommendations Some activity Low activity Base Women Meets recommendations Some activity Low activity Base 4 48 48 193 3 36 60 200 6 38 57 172 12 46 43 224 4 49 46 187 9 49 42 120 Middle % Lowest % Notes: Accelerometry: Meets recommendations: 30 minutes or more of moderate or vigorous activity on at least 5 days the week of accelerometer wear. 2012 Table 1.10 Objectively measured percentage meeting physical activity recommendations. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness.

 ¶ Copyright © 2010. Low activity: lower levels of activity. England 2008 All children % Boys Meeting recommendations Some activity Low activity Base Girls Meeting recommendations Some activity Low activity Base 21 18 61 151 34 28 39 90 0 4 96 61 33 20 47 132 51 22 28 74 7 18 75 58 4-10 % 11-15 % Notes: Accelerometry: Meets recommendations: 60 minutes or more of at least moderate activity on all 7 days. .11 Objectively measured physical activity levels in children. The Information Centre: Leeds. by sex and age. Children aged 4 to 15 with 7 days valid accelerometry data. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   29 Table 1. All rights reserved. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010). Some activity: 30-59 minutes on all 7 days.

11a Objectively measured physical activity levels in boys. 2012 Figure 1. England 2008 80 70 60 50 Percentage 40 30 20 10 0 Meeting recommendations 4–10 11–15 Some activity Low activity Figure 1. by age.30   Physical Activity Statistics. by age.11b Objectively measured physical activity levels in girls. England 2008 120 100 80 Percentage 60 40 20 0 Meeting recommendations 4–10 11–15 Some activity Low activity .

901 29 49 23 19 32 49 5.325 25 46 29 32 After % 53 12 months Before % 34 After % 49 Note: In England. . British Heart Foundation: London. Northern Ireland and Wales 2009/10 12 weeks Before % Exercise 5 x 30 minutes/week Exercise Often Sometimes Never Base 18 32 50 16.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   31 Table 1. the National Service Framework for CHD (2000) recommended that at 12 months at least 50% of people who took part in Cardiac Rehabilitation should be taking regular physical activity of at least 30 minutes duration on average for five times each week. England. Source: British Heart Foundation (2011).12 Self-reported patient physical activity outcomes before and after completing cardiac rehabilitation. The National Audit of Cardiac Rehabilitation: Annual Statistical Report 2011.

12b Patient physical activity outcomes before and 12 months after completing cardiac rehabilitation. England.12a Patient physical activity outcomes before and 12 weeks after completing cardiac rehabilitation. 2012 Figure 1. Northern Ireland and Wales 2009/10 60 50 40 Percentage 30 20 10 0 5 x 30 minutes/week Before After Often Sometimes Never . England. Northern Ireland and Wales 2009/10 60 50 40 Percentage 30 20 10 0 5 x 30 minutes/week Before After Often Sometimes Never Figure 1.32   Physical Activity Statistics.

.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   33 Men 33 minutes Women 24 minutes Men 28 minutes Women 21 minutes Weekdays Minutes of MVPA per day Weekend days Daily minutes of physical activity Both men and women spend more time being physically active during weekdays than on weekend days.

Metabolic rate is the rate at which a person uses energy. Patterns in these measures of physical activity are explored by age. Both boys and girls aged 4 to 15 were more active during the week than at the weekend (Table 2. the children in the youngest age group spent the most time being moderate to vigorously active (Table 2. light and moderate to vigorous physical activity differed little between the tertiles (Table 2. they can be subject to measurement error 1. Daily minutes of physical activity This chapter presents findings from the sub-sample of the 2008 Health Survey for England that was selected to wear accelerometers. Advantages of accelerometry over self-report are that as well as providing objective information on physical activity levels. These findings agree with the objectively measured data presented in Chapter 1 (Table 1. 2. as well as comparing between weekdays and weekend days.2a and 2. Both men and women spent marginally more time doing physical activity on the weekdays.34   Physical Activity Statistics.1. they also provide greater precision. sex and socioeconomic status.2.11b). 2008. In Chapter 1 we presented statistics describing the proportion of individuals that reach certain targets of physical activity over defined periods of time. MVPA is defined in the 2008 Health Survey for England as all activity occurring at 3 or more METs. Adults In England. men spent more time doing moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) than women. MET is defined as the ratio of metabolic rate for a specific physical activity to a reference metabolic rate.4). .3 and Figure 2.2b). in order to obtain objective measures of physical activity and sedentary behaviour. Children in the oldest age group (12 to 15 years) spent the most time being sedentary and the least time being moderate to vigorously active during the day. 2012 2.5a and 2. Children The Health Survey for England in 2008 also gave accelerometers to a subsample of children aged 4 to 15 years.11a and 1. or burns calories. Figures 2.3). Objectively measured physical activity in children showed little difference by tertile of equivalised household income.1 and 2. Levels of sedentary behaviour. Figures 2. 31 minutes a day compared to 24. In this chapter we use accelerometry data to describe the average number of minutes individuals spend in physical activity levels defined by METs (metabolic equivalent or metabolic equivalent of task) for both adults and children. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness. The amount of time children spent being sedentary or active varied according to whether it was a weekday or a weekend.11. however. compared to 12 minutes for men aged 75 and above. 1. The amount of time spent in this category did decline with age for both sexes.5. with 1 MET considered as a resting metabolic rate. The Information Centre: Leeds. Physical activity levels were assessed using the average daily minutes being sedentary or active as defined by METs. Figures 1. Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010). however they were also more sedentary during the week (Tables 2. with men aged 16 to 24 years spending 45 minutes in MVPA a day.5b).

by sex and age. The Information Centre: Leeds. to allow comparisons between groups with different average wear time. The data in this table have been adjusted for average accelerometer wear time using regression techniques.5 to below 3 METs. Metabolic Equivalent (MET) is defined as the ratio of work metabolic rate to a standard resting metabolic rate. Copyright © 2010.145 179 221 145 176 170 195 202 249 160 176 114 128 31 24 16-34 45 34 35-44 37 34 45-54 39 25 55-64 31 24 65-74 23 16 75+ 12 9 Notes: Moderate to vigorous physical activity is all activity at 3 or more METs.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   35 Table 2. Moderate to vigorous physical activity: All activity at 3 or more METs.1 Objectively measured average daily minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity.5 METs. England 2008 All adults Men Women Base Men Women 970 1. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. 1 MET is considered a resting metabolic rate obtained during quiet sitting.1 Objectively measured average daily minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity. All rights reserved. Light physical activity: 1. Sedentary: Below 1. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness. England 2008 50 45 40 35 30 Average daily minutes 25 20 15 10 5 0 16-34 Men Women 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75+ . by sex and age. Figure 2. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010).

Sedentary: below 1.5 METs. Light physical activity: 1. Copyright © 2010. The data in this table have been adjusted for average accelerometer wear time using regression techniques.2 Objectively measured average daily physical activity level for weekdays and weekend. The Information Centre: Leeds. England 2008 All adults Men Weekday Sedentary Light physical activity Moderate to vigorous physical activity Base Weekend Sedentary Light physical activity Moderate to vigorous physical activity Base Women Weekday Sedentary Light physical activity Moderate to vigorous physical activity Base Weekend Sedentary Light physical activity Moderate to vigorous physical activity Base 563 216 21 1. . by sex and age. All rights reserved. Moderate to vigorous physical activity: all activity at 3 or more METs. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness.36   Physical Activity Statistics. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre.5 to below 3 METs.145 580 235 35 221 558 261 35 176 561 260 25 195 583 244 24 249 607 227 17 176 663 180 10 128 579 194 28 968 541 218 42 180 543 221 37 145 561 208 32 164 582 191 27 200 599 181 20 163 646 147 8 116 600 218 33 970 587 218 46 179 566 245 37 145 569 244 42 170 591 227 33 202 615 211 24 160 670 164 13 114 16-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75+ Notes: Metabolic Equivalent (MET) is defined as the ratio of work metabolic rate to a standard resting metabolic rate. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010).138 546 224 30 218 512 257 31 174 544 232 24 188 551 227 22 243 587 200 13 179 640 154 7 136 592 235 24 1. 1 MET is considered a resting metabolic rate obtained during quiet sitting. 2012 Table 2. to allow comparisons between groups with different average wear time.

England 2008 700 600 500 Average minutes 400 300 200 100 0 Sedentary Weekday Weekend Light physical activity Moderate to vigorous physical activity Figure 2. by weekdays and weekend days.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   37 Figure 2.2a Objectively measured average daily minutes spent in physical activity level in men. England 2008 700 600 500 Average minutes 400 300 200 100 0 Sedentary Weekday Weekend Light physical activity Moderate to vigorous physical activity . by weekdays and weekend days.2b Objectively measured average daily minutes spent in physical activity level in women.

5 to below 4 METs. England 2008 Average daily minutes spent in each category Boys Sedentary Light physical activity Moderate to vigorous physical activity Base Girls Sedentary Light physical activity Moderate to vigorous physical activity Base 460 250 61 405 398 274 101 112 449 267 55 145 534 209 28 148 427 260 85 365 374 273 124 89 424 270 79 144 484 237 52 132 All children 4-7 8-11 12-15 Notes: Metabolic Equivalent (MET) is defined as the ratio of work metabolic rate to a standard resting metabolic rate. by sex and age. Sedentary: below 1. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness.3 Objectively measured average daily physical activity levels in children. The data in this table have been adjusted for average accelerometer wear time using regression techniques. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. 2012 Table 2. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010). . The Information Centre: Leeds. 1 MET is considered a resting metabolic rate obtained during quiet sitting. to allow comparisons between groups with different average wear time.38   Physical Activity Statistics. All rights reserved. Light physical activity: 1.5 METs. Copyright © 2010. Moderate to vigorous physical activity: all activity at 4 or more METs.

by sex. England 2008 450 400 350 300 Average minutes 250 200 150 100 50 0 Sedentary Boys Girls Light physical activity Moderate to vigorous physical activity .3 Objectively measured daily minutes spent in physical activity level in children.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   39 Figure 2.

England 2008 Average daily minutes spent in each category Boys Sedentary Light physical activity Moderate to vigorous physical activity Base Girls Sedentary Light physical activity Moderate to vigorous physical activity Base 464 243 67 106 463 248 58 126 452 255 59 117 426 256 81 76 424 261 85 146 413 267 93 80 Highest Middle Lowest Notes: Moderate to vigorous physical activity is all activity at 3 or more METs. Moderate to vigorous physical activity: All activity at 4 or more METs. 2012 Table 2. Copyright © 2010. . 1 MET is considered a resting metabolic rate obtained during quiet sitting. by sex and tertile of equivalised household income. The Information Centre: Leeds. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre.5 to below 4 METs. All rights reserved. Metabolic Equivalent (MET) is defined as the ratio of work metabolic rate to a standard resting metabolic rate.40   Physical Activity Statistics. The data in this table have been adjusted for average accelerometer wear time using regression techniques.4 Objectively measured average daily physical activity levels in children. Light physical activity: 1. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010). Sedentary: Below 1. to allow comparisons between groups with different average wear time. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness.5 METs.

to allow comparisons between groups with different average wear time. Moderate to vigorous physical activity: all activity at 4 or more METs. Copyright © 2010. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness. . The Information Centre: Leeds. England 2008 Average daily minutes spent in each category Boys Weekday Sedentary Light physical activity Moderate to vigorous physical activity Base Weekend day Sedentary Light physical activity Moderate to vigorous physical activity Base Girls Weekday Sedentary Light physical activity Moderate to vigorous physical activity Base Weekend day Sedentary Light physical activity Moderate to vigorous physical activity Base 435 248 57 378 375 261 103 106 429 264 47 140 502 219 20 132 467 251 63 405 405 277 99 112 454 268 58 145 542 209 31 148 407 254 79 348 347 267 126 90 400 270 70 130 473 225 43 128 433 262 86 365 382 275 123 89 430 271 81 144 487 239 55 132 All children 4-7 8-11 12-15 Notes: Metabolic Equivalent (MET) is defined as the ratio of work metabolic rate to a standard resting metabolic rate. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010). Light physical activity: 1.5 Average daily physical activity level in children for weekdays and weekend days. All rights reserved. 1 MET is considered a resting metabolic rate obtained during quiet sitting. by sex and age. The data in this table have been adjusted for average accelerometer wear time using regression techniques.5 METs. Sedentary: below 1.5 to below 43 METs.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   41 Table 2. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre.

England 2008 500 450 400 350 300 Average minutes 250 200 150 100 50 0 Sedentary Weekday Weekend Light physical activity Moderate to vigorous physical activity Figure 2.42   Physical Activity Statistics. by weekdays and weekend days. by weekdays and weekend days. England 2008 500 450 400 350 300 Average minutes 250 200 150 100 50 0 Sedentary Weekday Weekend Light physical activity Moderate to vigorous physical activity . 2012 Figure 2.5b Objectively measured average daily minutes spent in physical activity level in girls.5a Objectively measured average daily minutes spent in physical activity level in boys.

Greece and Italy. compared to 14% in the UK and only 3% in Bulgaria. .British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   43 Ireland 23% UK 14% Bulgaria 3% Greece 3% Italy 3% Percentage of adults regularly playing sport International differences Ireland has the highest level of participation in sport in the EU with 23% of adults saying that they exercise or play sport regularly.

This survey also asked respondents about their physical activity outside of sport. A European Commission report on physical activity levels was published in 2010. WHO guidelines The WHO guidelines for physical activity recommend a minimum of 30 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity five days a week.44   Physical Activity Statistics. .1). whilst school-aged children have separate recommendations (Table 3.2). Bulgaria. or at least 20 minutes of vigorous-intensity physical activity three days a week. with only 3% of adults in these countries reporting that they exercised regularly.3). International differences This chapter reports on international guidelines for physical activity and the levels of physical activity in Europe. At 23%. Figure 3. This presented findings from interviews conducted in 27 European Union (EU) states examining the physical activity levels of individuals. Additional recommendations are made for people over 65. with 7% of Italians answering that they regularly engage in physical activity outside of sport compared to 44% of Latvians (Table 3. European physical activity Self-reported rates of regularly exercising or participating in sport varied dramatically by country of the EU. Ireland had the highest reported prevalence of regular exercising or playing sport (Table 3. Marked variation by country was also found for this question. 2012 3. Greece and Italy had the lowest prevalence.2.

and vigorous-intensity periods. Adults aged over 65 School-aged youth As for 18-65 year olds. . EU physical activity guidelines. enjoyable. Source: EU Working Group on Sport & Health (2008). http://ec.eu/sport/news/eu-physical-activity-guidelines_en. The necessary dose of physical activity can be accumulated in bouts of at least 10 minutes and can also consist of a combination of moderate.htm (Accessed December 2011). Activities to increase muscular strength and endurance should be added 2 to 3 days per week. 60 minutes or more of moderate to vigorous physical activity daily. The full dose can be accumulated in bouts of at least 10 minutes.1 WHO recommended guidelines for physical activity Adults aged 18 to 65 A minimum of 30 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity 5 days a week or at least 20 minutes of vigorous-intensity physical activity 3 days a week. in forms that are developmentally appropriate. and involve a variety of activities.europa.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   45 Table 3. but with additional strength training and balance exercises.

htm (Accessed December 2011). .2 Self-reported frequency of exercising or playing sport.46   Physical Activity Statistics.eu/sport/news/eu-physical-activity-guidelines_en. EU countries 2009 Don’t know % Austria Belgium Bulgaria Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Estonia Finland France Germany Greece Hungary Ireland Italy Latvia Lithuania Luxembourg Malta Netherlands Poland Portugal Romania Slovakia Slovenia Spain Sweden United Kingdom EU 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 Never % 59 28 58 46 37 18 41 7 34 31 67 53 26 55 44 44 32 38 28 49 55 49 35 22 42 6 32 39 Seldom % 33 22 28 13 35 18 25 21 18 20 15 24 15 16 29 20 17 14 16 24 11 28 35 26 19 22 22 21 With some regularity % 33 34 10 25 23 49 27 55 35 40 15 18 35 26 19 22 39 31 51 19 24 13 25 39 27 50 32 31 Regularly % 5 16 3 16 5 15 7 17 13 9 3 5 23 3 8 14 12 17 5 6 9 8 5 13 12 22 14 9 Notes: All adults aged 15 and above. http://ec. 2012 Table 3.europa.3 – TNS Opinion & Social. Sport and Physical Activity: Special Eurobarometer 334 / Wave 72. Source: European Commission (2010).

Percentage 10 25 20 15 0 Bulgaria Greece Italy Austria Czech Republic Hungary Slovakia Netherlands Poland Estonia Latvia Romania Germany Portugal EU Luxembourg Spain France Slovenia Lithuania United Kingdom Denmark Belgium Cyprus Finland Malta Sweden Ireland Figure 3.2 Self-reported frequency of regularly exercising or playing sport. EU countries 2009 5 British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   47 .

3 Self-reported frequency of engaging in physical activity outside sport. EU countries 2009 Don’t know % Austria Belgium Bulgaria Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Estonia Finland France Germany Greece Hungary Ireland Italy Latvia Lithuania Luxembourg Malta Netherlands Poland Portugal Romania Slovakia Slovenia Spain Sweden United Kingdom EU 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 4 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 1 Never % 5 19 3 32 13 4 8 4 10 6 27 10 12 33 9 14 7 24 5 17 36 27 8 5 10 2 12 14 Seldom % 26 24 27 17 35 11 15 18 15 16 25 18 13 30 14 19 16 13 11 19 15 26 25 15 19 14 15 20 With some regularity % 54 36 40 31 35 42 37 49 42 50 33 31 41 30 32 26 40 30 41 34 31 24 40 41 38 44 36 38 Regularly % 15 21 25 20 17 43 40 29 33 28 15 41 33 7 44 39 37 32 43 26 17 19 27 39 33 40 37 27 Notes: All adults aged 15 and above. http://ec.htm (Accessed December 2011). Sport and Physical Activity: Special Eurobarometer 334 / Wave 72. Source: European Commission (2010). 2012 Table 3.eu/sport/news/eu-physical-activity-guidelines_en.europa.48   Physical Activity Statistics. .3 – TNS Opinion & Social.

9 hours per week Average hours of walking per week Types of physical activity Men and women spent more time walking than any other activity outside of work. .2 hours per week Women 1.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   49 Men 2.

1).4b.3. Recent research has estimated the energy expenditure of domestic activities. Overall. Physical activity is any bodily movement produced by the skeletal muscles that uses energy. 3. Figure 4. Both men and women reported walking and sports and exercise as the non-occupational activities with the highest number of days participation in the last four weeks. On average men participated in non-occupational physical activity on 14 days during the last four weeks compared to 12. The highest levels of occupational physical activity were reported for the youngest age group for men (16 to 24 years) and above 55 years of age for women. The Information Centre: Leeds.2a). More than 50% of men spent less than one hour per week participating in sports and exercises.2a. Figure 4. Almost 30% of men spent less than one hour in any type of nonoccupational physical activity (Table 4. . walking. Both men (2. allowing us to highlight the potential contribution of these activities to promote health 2. Corey P (1998). with a similar pattern of decreasing participation with increasing age as found with men.3) Occupational physical activity levels Around one in four men (24%) reported moderate to vigorous occupational activity for at least 30 minutes per day compared to one in ten women.50   Physical Activity Statistics. This includes sports.2 hours/week) and women (1.2b. Figure 4. with this declining after the age of 55 years. 2012 4. 9:632–5. WHO: Geneva. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness. Around 23% of men reported that they participate in heavy house work for more than an hour per week. Women aged 25 to 64 spent more time in heavy house work than the younger and older age groups. whilst the most common form of physical activity at work for both men and women was walking (Tables 4. This chapter shows different types of physical activity levels in England categorised by non-occupational and occupational settings. Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010). Global recommendations on physical activity for health. World Health Organization (2011). exercise and other activities such as playing. with this proportion declining with age.4). The majority of women (88%) reported that they did not spend any time in heavy manual/gardening or DIY work and more than half of women (56%) did not spend any time in sports and exercise. Non-occupational physical activity levels The Health Survey for England 2008 examined the number of hours spent on different activities 3. Around two thirds (66%) of women reported some sort of non-occupational physical activity for more than one hour per week which started to decline after 35 years of age (Table 4.2 days for women. The average number of days of physical activity participation declined with age for both men and women (Table 4. Types of physical activity The World Health Organization warns that physical activity should not be mistaken for sport.9 hours/week) spent more hours per week walking than other non-occupational activities. Time spent in heavy house work remained relatively stable across age groups for both men and women. Figure 4. Epidemiology. men reported more hours spent in non-occupational physical activity (6 hours/week) than women (5 hours/week) (Table 4. Occupational activity refers to those performed whilst working. A greater proportion of time at work was spent sitting or standing than anything else. Weller I. 1. doing household chores or gardening 1.1. A similar trend was found with heavy manual gardening and DIY. The impact of excluding non-leisure energy expenditure on the relation between physical activity and mortality in women. More than two thirds of men walked less than one hour per week and the proportion who walked more than one hour per week started to decline after 44 years of age. non-occupational to all those activities performed outside of paid work.2b). 2.4a and 4. Figure 4.

5 1.4 1. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness.369 2.1 920 2.7 1.4 2.3 773 1.4 648 All adults 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75+ Notes: Occupational activities not included.367 1. England 2008 7 6 5 Average hours 4 3 2 1 0 Heavy housework Men Women Heavy manual/ gardening/DIY Walking Sports and exercise Any physical activity .335 1.9 1.0 1.0 6.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   51 Table 4.2 1.6 0.8 999 0.5 1.3 1.7 0.1 5.9 6. The Information Centre: Leeds. by sex.9 2.5 2.5 2.4 0.2 0.7 1.2 5.9 1.6 2.6 0.7 1. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010). Average time based on all participants including those who reported no participation.5 0. Copyright © 2010.0 5.2 0.6 1.3 2.9 5.8 6.9 1.1 Average number of hours spent per week on different activities.8 1.1 1.4 2.5 0.8 1.3 1.9 1.2 1.220 2.7 6.7 3.183 1.1 Time spent on different activities.9 1. Figure 4.2 0.4 2.1 1.3 6.1 1.1 2.1 5.8 2.1 0.0 5.3 947 0.1 1.4 1.6 2.746 0.1 0.9 951 0.5 1.2 1.6 0.7 5.9 0.513 1. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre.219 1.2 874 0.098 0. England 2008 Average number of hours per week Men Heavy housework Heavy manual/ gardening/ DIY Walking Sports and exercise Any physical activity Base Women Heavy housework Heavy manual/ gardening/ DIY Walking Sports and exercise Any physical activity Base 1.5 2.8 0. All rights reserved.6 3.1 0. by sex and age group.3 0.1 0.0 8.0 0.8 7.4 5.

Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. 2012 Table 4.219 16 11 34 39 1. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness. by age. Average time spent per week (at least 10 minutes a day).098 24 13 28 34 1. . Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010).183 28 16 27 28 874 48 15 23 14 648 49 13 25 13 22 13 36 30 32 16 35 18 43 17 25 12 53 13 27 7 67 10 16 7 73 10 13 5 86 4 8 2 59 8 20 12 46 8 32 15 47 11 27 15 54 11 22 13 60 8 19 13 66 7 16 11 77 3 8 11 90 1 5 3 72 7 15 7 86 6 6 2 76 6 13 4 66 9 16 8 66 7 18 10 67 6 17 10 67 7 17 9 80 5 11 4 54 22 19 4 66 18 13 3 48 25 23 4 49 23 24 4 49 23 23 5 54 21 21 5 54 23 18 5 66 19 12 3 16-24 % 25-34 % 35-44 % 45-54 % 55-64 % 65-74 % 75+ % Notes: Occupational activities not included.52   Physical Activity Statistics. Copyright © 2010. All rights reserved. England 2008 Average time spent per week All adults % Heavy housework No time Less than 1 hour 1 to less than 5 hours 5 hours or more Heavy manual/ gardening/ DIY No time Less than 1 hour 1 to less than 5 hours 5 hours or more Walking No time Less than 1 hour 1 to less than 5 hours 5 hours or more Sports and exercise No time Less than 1 hour 1 to less than 5 hours 5 hours or more Any physical activity No time Less than 1 hour 1 to less than 5 hours 5 hours or more Base 18 11 30 40 6.746 9 8 31 52 773 10 9 34 47 951 14 12 33 42 1. The Information Centre: Leeds.2a Average time spent on different activities in men.

2a Percentage of men spending time on different activities.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   53 Figure 4. England 2008 80 70 60 50 Percentage 40 30 20 10 0 Heavy housework Heavy manual/ gardening/DIY 1 to less than 5 hours Walking Sports and exercise Any physical activity No time Less than 1 hour 5 hours or more .

369 21 14 32 34 1.2b Average time spent on different activities in women. Average time spent per week (at least 10 minutes a day). . Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010). All rights reserved. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness. by age.367 32 16 28 24 999 59 16 17 8 947 56 15 23 6 38 19 31 13 45 18 30 8 50 17 27 6 57 15 24 5 62 13 21 4 72 10 14 3 87 6 6 1 67 5 16 11 59 7 22 12 61 6 20 12 59 7 19 14 63 6 18 13 70 4 13 13 80 3 9 9 93 1 3 3 88 4 6 2 96 2 1 0 89 4 5 1 84 6 7 2 84 4 9 3 83 6 8 4 87 5 6 2 95 2 3 1 41 21 28 9 51 22 21 6 33 21 34 12 30 24 35 12 35 22 31 11 37 20 30 12 46 24 22 8 70 16 12 2 16-24 % 25-34 % 35-44 % 45-54 % 55-64 % 65-74 % 75+ % Notes: Occupational activities not included.335 15 13 37 36 920 12 11 39 38 1.54   Physical Activity Statistics. England 2008 Average time spent per week All adults % Heavy housework No time Less than 1 hour 1 to less than 5 hours 5 hours or more Heavy manual/ gardening/ DIY No time Less than 1 hour 1 to less than 5 hours 5 hours or more Walking No time Less than 1 hour 1 to less than 5 hours 5 hours or more Sports and exercise No time Less than 1 hour 1 to less than 5 hours 5 hours or more Any physical activity No time Less than 1 hour 1 to less than 5 hours 5 hours or more Base 21 13 33 33 8.513 15 13 35 36 1. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. The Information Centre: Leeds.220 12 13 35 40 1. 2012 Table 4. Copyright © 2010.

British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   55 Figure 4.2b Percentage of women spending time on different activities. England 2008 100 90 80 70 60 Percentage 50 40 30 20 10 0 Heavy housework Heavy manual/ gardening/DIY 1 to less than 5 hours Walking Sports and exercise Any physical activity No time Less than 1 hour 5 hours or more .

6 0.3 7.2 1.7 1.9 12.7 4.0 9.3 1.4 7.7 3.367 3.9 12.371 4.8 5.5 18.2 1.098 2.2 0.1 953 2.3 Participation in different activities.9 11.9 2.7 0. .5 17.512 3. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010).8 13.220 2.220 4.5 14.56   Physical Activity Statistics. Copyright © 2010.183 2.8 4.9 9.7 874 1.9 8.6 6.1 6.8 13.1 947 2.4 1.3 5.2 8.8 1.5 7.2 14.1 0.6 14. All rights reserved.7 0.3 648 All adults 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75+ Notes: Occupational activities not included.4 1.2 1.1 999 1.6 5.4 3.0 6.5 5.0 1.4 4.3 14. by sex and age.8 6.4 7.9 0.4 0.2 3.4 7.5 0.2 0.9 6. 2012 Table 4. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness.334 2.0 1. Average is based on all participants including those who reported no participation.7 9.3 6.2 1.6 918 4.5 9. England 2008 Average number of days participation in the last 4 weeks Men Heavy housework Heavy manual/ gardening/ DIY Walking Sports and exercise Any physical activity Base Women Heavy housework Heavy manual/ gardening/ DIY Walking Sports and exercise Any physical activity Base 3.7 772 2.4 1.6 3.9 1.8 11.748 1. The Information Centre: Leeds.7 6.5 13.2 1.1 5.4 0.5 4.2 7.3 1.7 2.2 1.

3 Average number of days participating in physical activity in last four weeks. England 2008 20 18 16 14 12 Average days 10 8 6 4 2 0 All adults Men Women 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75+ . by sex and age.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   57 Figure 4.

2012 Table 4.070 26 937 22 767 24 173 57 11 25 6 47 10 32 11 59 11 23 7 55 12 27 6 56 12 26 6 62 12 22 3 69 8 19 4 59 22 19 1 64 16 19 2 59 23 17 2 56 23 20 1 58 22 19 1 59 24 17 0 65 20 15 1 41 7 36 16 36 8 36 20 47 7 32 14 41 6 37 15 40 6 38 17 42 7 37 15 45 8 32 14 14 3 28 56 24 3 30 43 12 2 25 61 13 2 27 58 12 4 27 58 12 2 30 56 19 5 42 33 16-24 % 25-34 % 35-44 % 45-54 % 55-64 % 65-74 % Notes: Based on all participants who reported working in the last four weeks. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. by age. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010).247 30 456 21 844 25 1. . carrying or moving heavy loads No time Less than 1 hour 1 to less than 5 hours 5 hours or more Moderate or vigorous occupational activity at least 30 minutes per day Base 24 4. All rights reserved. Average time spent per week (at least 10 minutes a day).4a Average time spent in occupational activities in men.58   Physical Activity Statistics. The Information Centre: Leeds. Copyright © 2010. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness. England 2008 Average time spent per week All adults % Sitting or standing No time Less than 1 hour 1 to less than 5 hours 5 hours or more Walking around at work No time Less than 1 hour 1 to less than 5 hours 5 hours or more Climbing stairs or ladders No time Less than 1 hour 1 to less than 5 hours 5 hours or more Lifting.

Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010).4b Average time spent in occupational activities in women.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   59 Table 4. carrying or moving heavy loads No time Less than 1 hour 1 to less than 5 hours 5 hours or more Moderate or vigorous occupational activity at least 30 minutes per day Base 11 4. England 2008 Average time spent per week All adults % Sitting or standing No time Less than 1 hour 1 to less than 5 hours 5 hours or more Walking around at work No time Less than 1 hour 1 to less than 5 hours 5 hours or more Climbing stairs or ladders No time Less than 1 hour 1 to less than 5 hours 5 hours or more Lifting.023 13 699 13 151 72 12 14 2 61 16 20 3 75 11 13 2 74 12 13 1 71 12 15 2 77 10 11 2 79 11 10 1 66 23 11 0 66 20 13 0 67 23 10 0 68 20 12 0 62 26 13 0 65 25 10 0 83 13 4 0 40 7 37 16 35 7 35 22 43 9 32 17 42 7 37 13 39 7 40 14 40 8 38 14 50 8 38 6 13 3 34 50 19 5 33 43 10 1 27 62 11 3 35 50 11 3 36 49 15 3 35 46 18 3 54 25 16-24 % 25-34 % 35-44 % 45-54 % 55-64 % 65-74 % Notes: Based on all participants who reported working in the last four weeks. The Information Centre: Leeds. All rights reserved. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. Copyright © 2010.081 12 1. Average time spent per week (at least 10 minutes a day). by age.327 11 550 9 823 12 1. . Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness.

England 2008 35 30 25 Percentage 20 15 10 5 0 All adults Men Women 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 . by sex and age.60   Physical Activity Statistics.4 Percentage of adults engaging in moderate or vigorous occupational activity for at least 30 minutes per day. 2012 Figure 4.

306 miles 1975/76 221 miles 2010 Average distance travelled by foot or bike .British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   61 Active travel Since 1975/76. the average distance we travel by foot or bike in a year has fallen from 306 miles to 221 miles.

Department for Education: London .3 and Figure 5. http://www. An overview of recent evidence. In 2010. Active travel to school The Health Survey for England 2008 reported that more than two thirds of boys and girls walked or cycled to or from school at least once a week. Sustainable Development Commission: London. Participation in active travel to school increased with age for both sexes. The Department for Transport showed that between 1961 and 2009 the number of households with no cars dropped from 69% to 25%.256) were travelled by car either as a driver or passenger compared to 179 miles on foot and 42 miles by bike (Table 5. In 1961.1. Figure 5. rapid urbanisation and transportation systems have led to changes in physical activity patterns among children and adults.3). The programme expects an additional one million journeys a day to be made by foot and bike in summer 2012 2. Almost two thirds of these trips were made by car compared to 21% walking and less than 2% by bicycle (Table 5. on average a person travelled 6. substantial changes in lifestyles. 3.com/making-it-happen/sustainability/ active-travel-programme/ (Accessed Jan 2012).2. Active transport. Sustainable Development Commission (2007) Sustainable transport and active travel. Department for Education (2011). car or van were more popular than active travel among state funded secondary schools and special schools (Tables 5. pupils and their characteristics 2011. london2012. London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games (2011). 2012 5. Walking and cycling were the most popular modes of transport to and from school in state funded primary schools.5). Schools. which refers to any form of human-powered transportation. has declined dramatically in developed countries. Figure 5. Figure 5. The London 2012 Active Travel programme aims to capture the opportunities offered by the London 2012 Olympic Games to encourage more walking and cycling before. This is likely to have contributed to levels of active travel falling dramatically over this time period among children and adults (Table 5.2). This was the lowest number of trips recorded for the last three decades. across the UK. Increasing car use is one of the main reasons for low levels of physical activity and associated health problems in the UK 3. around 70% of households in Great Britain did not have a car or van. In 2010 on average there were 960 trips per person per year in all modes. 1. less than in 1995. 2. Most of these miles (5.62   Physical Activity Statistics.726 miles by all modes. Distance and mode of travel The average number of miles travelled per person per year started to decline after 2007. Walking and cycling for transport can lead to various health benefits 1. A Department for Education survey showed that more than half of school children have participated in some form of active travel each week 4. The number of households with two or more cars has increased consistently since the early 1960s.5. Reversing these low rates of walking and cycling for transportation provides a major opportunity for improving physical activity levels. VicHealth: Melbourne.1).4 and 5. during and after the event. Active travel In recent decades. 4. Garrard J (2009) Active transport: Adults. The London 2012 Active Travel programme. Travelling to school by buses.

072 Notes: Short walks believed to be under-recorded in 2002 and 2003 compared with other years. 1.923 18. ferries.082 35 134 43 225 94 60 321 46 1998/2000 198 40 3.785 6439 24. Base not provided for 1975/1976.500 Average miles 2.660 2. Department for Transport: London.115 35 145 56 224 59 81 413 59 2003 201 37 3. National Travel Survey 1991/2001:update.983 6.682 2.467 7.000 3.500 1.1 Average distance travelled by mode of travel per year. Subject to Crown Copyright.861 7.199 7.000 500 C.623 2. Great Britain 1975/76 to 2010 4. Sources: Department for Transport (2011).208 19.600 51 33 39 258 109 44 292 27 1992/1994 199 38 3205 2030 32 43 42 217 96 50 298 38 1995/1997 200 43 3. Bicycle .641 1.500 A.000 B.726 19.033 34 118 63 233 63 75 466 52 2007 190 40 3. 0 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 A.725 2. National Travel Survey 2010. D.164 21.401 47 16 57 372 54 36 289 13 1985/1986 244 44 2.904 7.490 7.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   63 Table 5.098 41 163 60 230 87 68 384 55 2004 203 39 3. Department for Transport: London Figure 5.063 35 156 67 212 75 67 461 60 2006 201 39 3. All modes Base 255 51 1. Car/van driver B.103 19.989 35 111 67 239 71 71 509 56 2008 193 42 3.317 25.086 33 143 44 218 100 65 401 63 2002 198 36 3.674 2.133 19. light rail.886 7.914 6.660 2. Walk D.425 1.974 38 110 69 243 56 75 495 54 2009 196 46 3.032 38 156 59 219 70 68 433 51 2005 197 36 3.671 6. Great Britain 1975/76 to 2010 1975/1976 Walk Bicycle Car/van driver Car/van passenger Motorcycle/moped Other private vehicles Bus in London Other local bus Non-local bus LT Underground Surface rail Taxi/minicab Other public including air.1 Average distance travelled in miles by mode of travel. Car/van passenger C.000 2.775 19.971 1.981 22.135 16.984 38 148 71 237 56 78 471 56 2010 179 42 3416 1840 30 138 81 226 63 73 506 54 18 22 41 75 46 55 108 61 97 96 83 80 56 77 4. 3. etc.339 1.661 2.192 19.868 7.740 5.103 19. ¶ Department for Transport (2001).494 1.735 6.

861 1998/2000 271 17 434 238 4 8 13 50 2 8 13 13 2 1.983 2009 228 15 395 217 3 9 19 49 1 9 16 11 2 973 19. 2012 Table 5. National Travel Survey 2010.467 2004 246 16 422 229 3 8 16 48 1 7 16 11 2 1.072 Notes: Short walks believed to be under-recorded in 2002 and 2003 compared with other years.053 24.886 2003 246 15 425 232 4 8 15 51 1 8 14 12 3 1.037 19.024 25. Sources: Department for Transport (2011). Great Britain 1975/76 to 2010 1975/1976 Walk Bicycle Car/van driver Car/ van passenger Motorcycle Other private Bus in London Other local bus Non-local bus London Underground Surface rail Taxi/minicab Other public All modes Base 325 30 262 167 9 15 14 93 1 4 11 3 N/A 935 1985/1986 350 25 317 200 9 14 11 72 2 6 12 7 1 1. Department for Transport: London.785 1992/1994 306 18 389 229 5 11 12 54 2 6 11 9 1 1. Other private includes mostly private hire buses and school buses. ¶ Department for Transport (2001).047 16.735 2008 221 16 410 227 4 9 18 47 1 9 18 11 2 992 18.034 19.64   Physical Activity Statistics. . Department for Transport: London.071 21. Base not provided for 1975/1976. National Travel Survey 1991/2001: update.914 2010 210 15 405 213 3 8 21 46 1 8 19 10 2 960 19.044 19.868 2002 244 16 435 239 4 9 15 49 1 9 13 12 2 1.671 1995/1997 292 18 425 239 4 9 13 53 2 7 12 11 1 1.2 Trips per person per year by mode of travel.199 2005 245 14 435 236 4 9 16 46 1 7 16 12 3 1.026 19.086 22. Subject to Crown Copyright.490 2007 216 14 408 218 3 8 17 48 1 8 17 11 2 972 19.904 2006 249 16 430 228 3 8 16 49 1 8 16 10 3 1.

. Bicycle D. Great Britain 1975/76 to 2010 800 700 A. 0 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 A.2 Trips per person per year by mode of travel. Public transport D.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   65 Figure 5. 600 500 Number of trips 400 300 200 B. Car/motorcycle B. 100 C. Walk C.

989 9.3 Percentage of households with car or van ownership. Office for National Statistics: London.924 9.261 9.929 11. Source: Department for Transport. Transport statistics 2005. Great Britain 1961 to 2009 No car or van % 1961 1965 1972 1975 1981 1985 1991 1995 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Notes: Bases for 1961 and 1965 are not available.624 11.278 8.963 9.620 8.66   Physical Activity Statistics.636 8. 69 59 48 44 41 38 32 29 30 28 27 27 27 25 25 25 25 25 One car or van % 29 36 43 45 44 45 44 45 46 44 45 45 45 43 44 43 43 43 Two or more cars or vans % Base 9 11 14 17 23 26 25 29 28 27 29 32 32 32 32 32 11. ¶ Department for Transport (2010). Scottish Executive and Welsh Assembly (2005).910 9.700 9. Department for Transport: London.758 9. Great Britain 1961 to 2009 80 70 60 50 Percentage 40 30 20 10 0 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 No car or van One car or van Two or more cars or vans .3 Percentage of households with car or van ownership. National Travel Survey 2009.453 9. 2012 Table 5.158 8.128 Figure 5.221 8.

847 52 3 536 66 4 1.245 70 2 1.243 65 8 1. by sex and age. The Stationery Office: London.15 % Notes: Participation in active travel on at least one day in the last week.4 Percentage of children walking or cycling to school. by sex and age.849 56 1 526 65 2 1. England 2008 80 70 60 50 Percentage 40 30 20 10 0 All children Boys Girls 2–4 5–10 11–15 .4 Percentage of children walking or cycling to school.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   67 Table 5.10 % 11 .068 2-4 % 5 . England 2008 All children % Boys Walking Cycling Base Girls Walking Cycling Base 65 2 2. Source: Department of Health (2010). Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness.078 63 5 2. Figure 5.

2 0. 2012 Table 5. by type of school.7 3. .2 0. pupils and their characteristics 2011.0 91.2 0.258.8 31.68   Physical Activity Statistics.1 57.0 35.2 1. Source: Department for Education (2011).8 28. Schools. England 2011 All schools % Walk Cycle Car/Van Bus Train Other Base 51.1 1.915 State-funded primary schools % 59.1 0.240 Notes: Participation in active travel on at least one day in the last week.0 2.5 Mode of travel to school.5 1.1 0.137.5 1. Department for Education: London. Special schools includes maintained and non maintained special schools.3 37.6 7.920 Special schools % 3.755 State-funded secondary schools % 42.9 18.7 1.2 3.487.7 0.2 4.3 16.

British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   69 Factors influencing physical activity Over 70% of adults would like to do more physical activity. the most common barriers to this are work commitments and a lack of leisure time. 71% of men and 74% of women said they would like to do more physical activity Men 45% say that work commitments get in the way Women 37% say they don’t have enough leisure time .

compared to 60% of men and 63% of women in the lowest. only 6% of men and 9% of women could correctly define the minimum recommended targets.8a. Less than one third of adults in England (27% of men and 29% of women) thought they knew of these recommendations for physical activity when asked. A lack of money was most likely to be cited as a barrier by the youngest age group (16 to 24 years).4 and 6. for at least 30 minutes a day. 21% of men and 25% of women in the lowest quintile of equivalised household income compared to 7% of men and 6% of women in the highest quintile.8a and 6. Motivational differences were also found between the sexes amongst children. The most commonly cited factor putting adults off sport in Northern Ireland 4 was a lack of time. a similar percentage (34% of men and 29% of women) said they had not heard of them at all. with more girls (74%) than boys (61%) wanting to do more physical activity. with a lack of motivation also cited by 21% of men and 25% of women.9a. with 60% of those aged 65 years and above citing being too old as a factor discouraging them from sport. Barriers to doing physical activity Respondents to the 2007 Health Survey for England were asked to select the main barriers they faced to participating in physical activity. Other factors . Figures 6.8b). 60% in men and 55% in women aged 55 to 64 years. included work commitments (45% men and 34% women) and a lack of leisure time (38% men and 37% women). exercise or sport 1.1 and 6. Factors influencing physical activity This chapter reports on the factors that are associated with physical activity. 6.6 and 6.2).7. with 26% of respondents choosing this from a list of barriers. Where possible patterns in these factors are explored by age.1 and 6.5). motivation in being physically active.2. Motivation to be physically active A slightly greater percentage of women than men surveyed by the 2007 Health Survey for England wanted to do more physical activity than they did at present.8b and 6. Around a quarter (25% men and 23% women) described minimum standards greater than those that were in place. sex. As these data were collected in 2007 they correspond to the Chief Medical Officer’s report 2 published in 2004 and not the more recent guidelines that superseded these in July 2011 3.70   Physical Activity Statistics. The most common barriers identified by adults. Accordingly having more leisure time was the most frequently reported factor that would encourage adults in England to do more physical activity (42% for both men and women). Figures 6.9). Knowledge of government recommendations In 2007 the Health Survey for England focused on knowledge and attitudes about key aspects of lifestyle. at moderate or greater intensity. amongst whom 81% of boys and 87% of girls thought the recommendations for minimum physical activity for children (at least 60 minutes of at least moderate intensity activity on all 7 days) were lower than they were (Tables 6. Figures 6. Women (25%) were more likely to choose caring for children or older people as a reason for not doing more physical activity than men (13%).6 and 6. This could be either in one session or in a number of shorter bouts of activity of 10 minutes or longer 2. When asked to describe the recommendations for people of their age. with this more prominent for adults aged under 54 years. with more boys (64%) and girls (77%) in the lowest quintile saying they wanted to do more physical activity than in the highest quintile (59% of boys and 69% of girls) (Tables 6. This was worse for young people. 2012 6. These included practical and psychological barriers that might prevent people from doing more physical activity. This was lowest amongst the oldest age group. with this most common amongst those aged 25 to 44 (Tables 6. According to the 2004 report adults should be active on at least five days a week. whilst the majority (69% men and 68% women) thought the recommendations were lower than published.4 and 6. with this seen as a greater barrier for those with less money. barriers and facilitators to physical activity and physical education and sport in schools. Figure 6. aged 11 to 15. with this percentage decreasing with age for boys but not girls (Tables 6. Poor health and physical limitations were also more likely to be seen as barriers amongst adults in poorer households whilst the opposite was true of work commitments and a lack of leisure time (Tables 6. These include sections on knowledge and awareness of government recommendations. The opposite was true for children. from suggestions provided in the questionnaire. Differences were also found by socioeconomic status with more men and women in the highest quintile of equivalised household income (80% and 83% respectively) saying they would like to do more physical activity.5. socio-economic status and geographic region. including physical activity 1.7). Older adults were less likely to recognise this as a barrier. 74% to 70% respectively. Self-motivation was also recognised as important with 32% of men and 38% of women saying this would enable them to be more active.

Participation was lowest in single-sex girls schools.3%) and the South East (72. Joint Health Surveys Unit (2008). Adults in the West Midlands (43. 3. The Chief Medical Officer (2004). Department of Health: London. differed by age.6%) and the lowest percentage lived in the North East (63. Marmot Review: London. DfES Publications: Annesley. and sports and leisure facilities. School Sport and Club Links strategy. Figures 6. Health Survey for England 2007: Healthy lifestyles: knowledge. therefore. Department for Children. 4.6% saying that parks and open spaces did. Department of Culture Arts and Leisure (2010).16 and 6.15. Healthy Lives’ published in 2010 identified the importance of the local environment in improving health and encouraging physical activity.17). collected by the Tellus 4 survey in 2009 7. Place Survey England – Headline Table Results 2008 (Revised). Regional differences were found in adult satisfaction with the facilities in their local area. 2. Research and Statistics Branch: Belfast. Over one quarter of adults (28%) said that parks and open spaces were the most important factor in making somewhere a good place to live. The 2008 Place Survey asked adults in England for their opinions on the parks and open spaces. although differences were small. Department of Health: London. Schools and Families: London .20). Department for Children. recommending improvements in the availability of good quality open and green spaces. Physical education and school sport The important role that physical education (PE) and school sport play in school life has been recognised with the setting up of the national PE. compared to 90% of pupils in boys schools and 91% in mixed schools (Tables 6. In subsequent Schools Sports Surveys. Local environment The Marmot Review ‘Fair Society. although older children were less likely to achieve this. although differences across England were small with the highest percentage (49. By 2007/08.2%) and Yorkshire and Humber (43. across the social gradient 5. National Foundation for Educational Research (2010). Schools and Families: London. 9. The Chief Medical Officers (2011). The views of children and young people on parks and play areas in their local area. TNS UK Limited (2008). Participation has risen for all age groups since 2004/05. Marmot M (2010). with 16.11). Fair Society.17.4%) found in the South East. 5.12 to 6. Some regional differences were also found in adults reporting that facilities needed improving. with older children more likely to think these facilities were poor (Tables 6. School Sport and Club Links Strategy. Stay Active: A report on physical activity from the four home countries’ Chief Medical Officers.3%). As before single-sex girls schools achieved the lowest proportion of pupils reaching the new target (Tables 6.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   71 seen as having an impact included ill health and advice to take more physical activity from a doctor or a nurse. Schools sports survey 2007/08. 8. Healthy Lives: Strategic review of health inequalities in England post-2010. 6. in their local area 6. Investment was also provided from 2003 and a Public Service Agreement Target was set in 2004 to enhance the take-up of sporting opportunities by 5 to 16 year olds through PE and school sport 8.18 to 6.20.15). whilst having more money and someone to be physically active with were both recognised as important factors for the youngest age group of adults (Tables 6. By the end of 2007 all maintained schools (21. Tellus4 National Report. along with access to sports facilities.12 to 6. attitudes and behaviour. which included the School Sport Partnership Programme that aimed to increase both the quality and quantity of sporting opportunities for young people 7. 90% of pupils across Years 1 to 11 in schools achieved this two hour level of participation.10 and 6. At least five a week: evidence on the impact of physical activity and its relationship to health. The Stationery Office: London. 7. Communities and Local Government (2009). Start Active. in which 69% of pupils participated in the recommended levels of two hours or more. The greatest percentage of those satisfied with the parks and open spaces lived in London (72. Department for Education and Skills (2003) Learning through PE and Sport – A guide to the PE. Experience of Sport and Physical Activity in Northern Ireland: Findings from the Continuous Household Survey 2008/09. Figures 6.3%) were the least likely to say that they were satisfied with the sports and leisure facilities. These partnerships were set up in a number of phases and were rolled out from 2000 to 2006. schools were asked to provide information about participation in at least three hours of high quality PE and out of hours school sport 9 with increases in the percentage of pupils achieving this new threshold between 2008/09 and 2009/10 for all year groups. Figures 6.16 and 6.3% of adults in England reporting that sports and leisure facilities needed improving and 10.727) in England were arranged into 450 different School Sport Partnerships.18 to 6. In 2007/08 the School Sports Survey 9 surveyed partnership schools and found that overall 90% of pupils in these participated in at least two hours of high quality PE and out of hours school sport in a typical week. 1.

2012 Table 6. All rights reserved. Figure 6. Individuals were asked if they were aware of the government’s guidelines for physical activity. by sex. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. Copyright © 2010.911 Notes: Adults aged 16 to 64 years. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2008). by sex.72   Physical Activity Statistics.1 Awareness of recommendations for physical activity in adults. Health Survey for England 2007: Healthy lifestyles: knowledge. England 2007 45 40 35 30 Percentage 25 20 15 10 5 0 Said they knew recommendations Men Women Heard of recommendations but didn’t know them Had not heard of recommendations . The Information Centre: Leeds. England 2007 Men % Said they knew recommendations Heard of recommendations but didn’t know them Had not heard of recommendations Base 27 39 34 2.349 Women % 29 42 29 2. attitudes and behaviour.1 Awareness of recommendations for physical activity in adults.

689 310 339 390 533 519 655 468 602 457 560 9 23 68 9 22 69 13 21 66 9 24 67 7 25 68 7 22 71 6 25 69 5 32 63 9 22 69 7 23 70 6 24 71 3 25 71 16 – 24 % 25 – 34 % 35 – 44 % 45 – 54 % 55 – 64 % Notes: Adults aged 16 to 64 years. Recommendations for adults in 2007 were that they should be active on at least five days a week. Health Survey for England 2007: Healthy lifestyles: knowledge. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. England 2007 All adults % Men Same as recommendations More than recommendations Less than recommendations Women Same as recommendations More than recommendations Less than recommendations Base Men Women 2. Figure 6. Those adults reported as ‘Less than recommendations’ thought the recommended levels of physical activity were lower than they were.2 Percentage of adults who think the recommended levels of physical activity are lower than described in the guidelines. attitudes and behaviour. for at least 30 minutes a day. by sex and age. those shown are for knowledge of days per week. All rights reserved. Adults were asked what amount of physical activity people of your age should do. by sex and age. Table shows responses to two separate questions for which the bases vary but are of a similar size. Copyright © 2010.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   73 Table 6.2 Knowledge of amount of physical activity in recommendations in adults.144 2. at moderate or greater intensity. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2008). England 2007 80 70 60 50 Percentage 40 30 20 10 0 All adults Men Women 16–24 25–34 35–44 45–54 55–64 . The Information Centre: Leeds.

222 255 221 252 260 285 283 261 236 235 222 10 3 87 12 2 85 12 3 85 12 4 84 9 3 88 7 1 91 10 8 81 11 7 82 13 5 83 11 8 80 7 9 83 10 10 79 11 12 13 14 15 Notes: Children aged 11 to 15 years. England 2007 Age (years) All children Boys Same as recommendations More than recommendations Less than recommendations Girls Same as recommendations More than recommendations Less than recommendations Base Boys Girls 1. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. by sex and age. and children aged 13-15 were asked about ‘young people’. Figure 6.3 Knowledge of amount of physical activity in recommendations in children. Recommendations for children in 2007 were at least 60 minutes of at least moderate intensity activity on all 7 days. attitudes and behaviour. Children aged 11-12 were asked about the amount of physical activity ‘children your age’ should take. Copyright © 2010. The Information Centre: Leeds.288 1. All rights reserved.3 Knowledge of physical activity recommendations in children. by sex and age. England 2007 100 80 60 Percentage 40 20 0 Same as recommendations More than recommendations Less than recommendations Boys Girls . Bases weighted on knowledge of number of days and non-response.74   Physical Activity Statistics. Those children reported as ‘Less than recommendations’ thought the recommended levels of physical activity were lower than they were. those shown are for knowledge of number of days. Bases vary but are of similar sizes. 2012 Table 6. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2008). Health Survey for England 2007: Healthy lifestyles: knowledge.

4 Percentage of adults who would like to do more physical activity.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   75 Table 6. attitudes and behaviour. Less than 10% of total sample were unable to more physical activity. Data are displayed as a percentage of individuals who were able to do more physical activity. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2008). England 2007 90 80 70 60 Percentage 50 40 30 20 10 0 All adults 16 – 24 25 – 34 35 – 44 45 – 54 55 – 64 Men Women . by sex and age. All rights reserved. Copyright © 2010.4 Percentage of adults who would like to do more physical activity. by sex and age.125 2. The Information Centre: Leeds. Figure 6. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. England 2007 All adults % Men Women Base Men Women 2.678 295 326 389 534 518 656 468 602 455 560 71 74 16 – 24 % 70 81 25 – 34 % 78 81 35 – 44 % 76 81 45 – 54 % 69 74 55 – 64 % 60 55 Notes: Adults aged 16 to 64 years. although this was higher for those 55 to 64 years. Health Survey for England 2007: Healthy lifestyles: knowledge.

Health Survey for England 2007: Healthy lifestyles: knowledge. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2008). Copyright © 2010. attitudes and behaviour. by sex and age. The Information Centre: Leeds. England 2007 Age (years) All children % Boys Girls Base Boys Girls 1.226 255 221 248 261 285 283 261 239 236 222 61 74 11 % 65 75 12 % 65 77 13 % 62 70 14 % 60 72 15 % 54 76 Notes: Children aged 11 to 15 years.76   Physical Activity Statistics. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre.5 Percentage of children who would like to do more physical activity. Figure 6. England 2007 90 80 70 60 Percentage 50 40 30 20 10 0 All children Boys Girls 11 12 13 14 15 . All rights reserved. by sex and age.5 Percentage of children who would like to do more physical activity. 2012 Table 6.285 1.

British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   77 Table 6. although this was higher for lower income quintile. The Information Centre: Leeds.6 Percentage of adults who would like to do more physical activity. Data are displayed as a percentage of individuals who were able to do more physical activity. All rights reserved. Copyright © 2010.6 Percentage of adults who would like to do more physical activity. by sex and quintile of equivalised household income. attitudes and behaviour. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. England 2007 90 80 70 60 Percentage 50 40 30 20 10 0 Highest Men Women 2nd 3rd 4th Lowest . Health Survey for England 2007: Healthy lifestyles: knowledge. Figure 6. Less than 10% of total sample were unable to more physical activity. England 2007 Highest % Men Women Base Men Women 542 546 435 483 331 396 233 355 221 385 80 83 2nd % 73 81 3rd % 68 75 4th % 68 71 Lowest % 60 63 Notes: Adults aged 16 to 64 years. by sex and quintile of equivalised household income. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2008).

78   Physical Activity Statistics, 2012

Table 6.7 Percentage of children who would like to do more physical activity, by sex and quintile of equivalised household income, England 2007
Highest % Boys Girls Base Boys Girls 190 166 208 183 230 185 229 210 222 266 59 69 2nd % 58 72 3rd % 66 77 4th % 60 73 Lowest % 64 77

Notes: Children aged 11 to 15 years. Bases weighted for non-response. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2008). Health Survey for England 2007: Healthy lifestyles: knowledge, attitudes and behaviour. The Information Centre: Leeds. Copyright © 2010, Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. All rights reserved.

British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   79

Figure 6.7 Percentage of children who would like to do more physical activity, by sex and quintile of equivalised household income, England 2007
90

80

70

60

Percentage

50

40

30

20

10

0 Highest Boys Girls 2nd 3rd 4th Lowest

80   Physical Activity Statistics, 2012

Table 6.8a Barriers to doing more physical activity, exercise or sport in men, by age, England 2007
All adults % What stops you from doing more than you do now My work commitments Don’t have enough leisure time Caring for children or older people Don’t have enough money Poor health or physical limitations Have no one to exercise with Injuries which prevent me No suitable places to do it in my area Haven’t got the right clothes or equipment Don’t need to do any more Other factors that apply Not motivated to do more Prefer to do other things Not the sporty type Worried about injury Don’t enjoy physical activity Too shy or embarrassed Too old Too overweight Think exercise is a waste of time Base 21 15 14 5 5 4 3 4 0 2,128 21 20 14 4 5 7 0 4 0 297 23 17 13 4 7 5 1 2 0 390 23 13 11 6 4 4 3 5 1 517 22 15 17 7 7 3 4 5 1 467 17 11 15 5 2 2 9 4 0 457 45 38 13 13 10 8 8 5 2 17 36 35 3 23 4 16 5 10 5 19 49 43 18 17 4 10 6 7 4 15 57 45 25 10 7 5 8 4 2 16 47 39 9 10 14 8 12 3 1 16 29 24 4 5 21 5 11 2 1 21 16 – 24 % 25 – 34 % 35 – 44 % 45 – 54 % 55 – 64 %

Notes: Adults aged 16 to 64. Weighted for non-response. Two questions were asked to determine the main barriers adults faced to participating in physical activity: The first question presented a list of primarily practical barriers, the second question listed other factors including psychological barriers. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2008). Health Survey for England 2007: Healthy lifestyles: knowledge, attitudes and behaviour. The Information Centre: Leeds. Copyright © 2010, Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. All rights reserved.

Figure 6.8a Barriers to doing more physical activity, exercise or sport in men, England 2007
A

A My work commitments B Don’t have enough leisure time C Not motivated to do more D Don’t need to do any more E Prefer to do other things F Other

F B

C D

E

The Information Centre: Leeds. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2008).8b Barriers to doing more physical activity. Weighted for non-response. exercise or sport in women.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   81 Table 6. exercise or sport in women. Figure 6. attitudes and behaviour.8b Barriers to doing more physical activity. All rights reserved. the second question listed other factors including psychological barriers. Health Survey for England 2007: Healthy lifestyles: knowledge. Two questions were asked to determine the main barriers adults faced to participating in physical activity: The first question presented a list of primarily practical barriers. Copyright © 2010.674 36 25 27 4 9 21 0 6 0 327 27 13 19 4 7 10 1 6 0 535 26 10 18 6 8 8 1 9 0 656 22 12 24 7 9 7 3 8 0 601 555 16 13 21 5 8 3 5 7 34 37 25 16 13 10 6 5 3 12 35 44 16 34 4 22 4 13 11 5 39 42 34 19 11 9 5 4 3 8 37 42 39 15 10 9 5 4 2 11 39 35 18 9 15 8 8 2 1 14 20 19 12 6 23 5 8 2 1 20 16 – 24 % 25 – 34 % 35 – 44 % 45 – 54 % 55 – 64 % Notes: Adults aged 16 to 64. England 2007 A A Don’t have enough leisure time B My work commitments C Caring for children or older people D Not motivated to do more E Not the sporty type F Other B F C D E . England 2007 All adults % What stops you from doing more than you do now My work commitments Don’t have enough leisure time Caring for children or older people Don’t have enough money Poor health or physical limitations Have no one to exercise with Injuries which prevent me No suitable places to do it in my area Haven’t got the right clothes or equipment Don’t need to do any more Other factors that apply Not motivated to do more Prefer to do other things Not the sporty type Worried about injury Don’t enjoy physical activity Too shy or embarrassed Too old Too overweight Think exercise is a waste of time Base 25 14 21 5 8 10 2 7 0 2. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. by age.

The Information Centre: Leeds. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2008). Health Survey for England 2007: Healthy lifestyles: knowledge. The standard population to which the age distribution of sub-groups was adjusted was the midyear 2006 population estimates for England. Copyright © 2010.82   Physical Activity Statistics. 2012 Table 6. attitudes and behaviour. All rights reserved. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. Weighted for non-response. age-standardised percentages in men. exercise or sport.9a Barriers to doing more physical activity. by quintile of equivalised household income. . England 2007 Highest % What stops you from doing more than you do now My work commitments Don’t have enough leisure time Caring for children or older people Don’t have enough money Poor health or physical limitations Have no one to exercise with Injuries which prevent me No suitable places to do it in my area Haven’t got the right clothes or equipment Don’t need to do any more Other factors that apply Not motivated to do more Prefer to do other things Not the sporty type Worried about injury Don’t enjoy physical activity Too shy or embarrassed Too old Too overweight Think exercise is a waste of time Base 22 16 15 4 6 4 2 3 0 545 21 17 13 6 4 5 2 4 0 435 21 16 13 5 4 4 5 3 0 331 25 16 15 7 7 6 5 7 1 236 18 12 15 8 4 4 4 4 0 220 58 44 14 7 5 7 6 5 1 14 49 41 11 11 8 9 7 5 2 17 42 37 15 18 9 8 9 5 3 20 34 30 13 17 16 9 13 7 5 16 20 25 8 21 24 5 15 4 2 18 2nd % 3rd % 4th % Lowest % Notes: Adults aged 16 to 64 years.

9a Barriers to doing more physical activity.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   83 Figure 6. England 2007 70 60 50 Percentage 40 30 20 10 0 Highest My work commitments 2nd Don’t have enough leisure time 3rd 4th Lowest Poor health or physical limitations Don’t have enough money . exercise or sport. age-standardised percentages in men. by quintile of equivalised household income.

Health Survey for England 2007: Healthy lifestyles: knowledge. exercise or sport. attitudes and behaviour. age-standardised percentages in women. The standard population to which the age distribution of sub-groups was adjusted was the midyear 2006 population estimates for England. England 2007 Highest % What stops you from doing more than you do now My work commitments Don’t have enough leisure time Caring for children or older people Don’t have enough money Poor health or physical limitations Have no one to exercise with Injuries which prevent me No suitable places to do it in my area Haven’t got the right clothes or equipment Don’t need to do any more Other factors that apply Not motivated to do more Prefer to do other things Not the sporty type Worried about injury Don’t enjoy physical activity Too shy or embarrassed Too old Too overweight Think exercise is a waste of time Base Men Women 545 545 435 485 331 394 236 354 220 383 24 17 18 4 7 7 1 4 0 24 16 23 3 9 8 1 6 0 27 17 22 4 9 13 3 9 1 27 14 28 4 8 14 2 8 0 18 11 23 5 8 13 3 11 0 49 45 21 6 9 6 6 2 0 9 41 46 22 13 12 7 4 5 3 10 35 40 32 22 10 13 3 6 3 11 24 33 29 23 17 14 7 5 4 11 17 19 29 25 19 13 6 6 6 16 2nd % 3rd % 4th % Lowest % Notes: Adults aged 16 to 64 years.84   Physical Activity Statistics. All rights reserved. Copyright © 2010. Weighted for non-response. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2008). The Information Centre: Leeds.9b Barriers to doing more physical activity. by quintile of equivalised household income. 2012 Table 6. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. .

British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   85 Figure 6.9b Barriers to doing more physical activity. by quintile of equivalised household income. exercise or sport. age-standardised percentages in women. England 2007 60 50 40 Percentage 30 20 10 0 Highest My work commitments 2nd Don’t have enough leisure time 3rd 4th Lowest Poor health or physical limitations Don’t have enough money .

Figure 6. Respondents were presented with a list of barriers and asked to select factors. Experience of Sport and Physical Activity in Northern Ireland: Findings from the Continuous Household Survey.10 Factors putting adults off sport. Research and Statistics Branch: Belfast.10 Factors putting adults off sport. by age.86   Physical Activity Statistics. Northern Ireland 2008/09 A B A Don’t have enough time B Not fit C Not interested in sport/physical activity D Too old E Restricting medical condition F Other F C D E .083 16 – 24 % 30 16 24 0 5 9 21 11 5 6 11 10 3 1 7 3 4 0 1 266 25 – 34 % 44 17 18 0 6 22 15 17 4 4 9 6 6 2 5 4 2 1 1 470 35 – 44 % 44 18 16 2 11 25 13 21 5 5 7 6 7 2 5 4 2 1 1 605 45 – 54 % 29 22 23 6 16 15 13 17 10 7 10 7 7 5 2 3 2 1 1 523 55 – 64 % 13 24 24 17 27 6 12 7 12 10 8 4 5 9 2 2 1 0 0 493 65+ % 5 27 17 60 22 3 7 1 17 13 6 2 3 7 1 1 1 0 0 726 Notes: Percentages may add up to more than 100 due to multiple responses. Source: Department of Culture Arts and Leisure (2010). Northern Ireland 2008/09 All adults % Don’t have enough time Not fit Not interested in sport/physical activity Too old Restricting medical condition Family commitments Other not specified Too busy at work Get short of breath Get tired easily Not good at sport/physical activity Find sport/physical activity boring Overweight Disability Lack of facilities in area Embarrassed to exercise in front of others Too far or difficult to travel to facilities Embarrassed to change in front of others Language issues Base 26 21 20 19 16 13 12 12 10 8 8 5 5 5 3 3 2 1 1 3. 2012 Table 6.

11 What would encourage adults to do more physical activity. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2008). All rights reserved.11 What would encourage adults to do more physical activity.114 2. Health Survey for England 2007: Healthy lifestyles: knowledge.648 296 324 384 529 516 652 464 595 454 548 42 38 29 23 26 15 8 9 14 2 15 51 51 33 20 47 28 15 13 18 3 8 48 43 25 18 29 20 6 9 11 3 12 49 38 28 22 22 14 7 9 12 2 14 42 35 34 29 22 11 6 10 17 3 16 21 23 27 24 15 7 4 4 13 1 26 42 32 31 28 20 14 10 9 9 4 22 40 35 28 19 31 24 11 11 10 4 25 51 39 31 25 23 21 12 9 6 4 20 51 33 34 30 18 13 10 9 7 3 20 41 30 33 31 16 9 10 9 13 5 20 26 23 29 33 12 6 8 5 12 4 25 16 – 24 % 25 – 34 % 35 – 44 % 45 – 54 % 55 – 64 % Notes: Adults aged 16 to 64. England 2007 A F A More leisure time B Self-motivation C Own ill health D Advice from doctor or a nurse E Having someone to do it with F Other B E C D . Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. Figure 6. England 2007 All adults % Men More leisure time Self-motivation Own ill health Advice from a doctor or a nurse Having someone to do it with Increased income Advice from a family member Family member’s ill health Having physical activity I am capable of Clearer advice from the government Don’t need to do more Women More leisure time Self-motivation Own ill health Advice from a doctor or a nurse Having someone to do it with Increased income Advice from a family member Family member’s ill health Having physical activity I am capable of Clearer advice from the government Don’t need to do more Base Men Women 2. The Information Centre: Leeds. Bases weighted for non-response. Respondents chose from a list of factors presented in the questionnaire.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   87 Table 6. attitudes and behaviour. Copyright © 2010. by sex and age.

12 Percentage of adults saying that sports and leisure facilities or parks and open spaces are the most important factor in making somewhere a good place to live.0 543.8 543.713 22. http://www.8 28.9 12.8 12.4 24.communities.6 29. 2012 Table 6.0 26.713 Parks and open spaces % Notes: When completing the questionnaire. Place Survey England – Headline Table Results 2008 (Revised).0 11. Source: Communities and Local Government (2009). or parks and open spaces are the most important factor in making somewhere a good place to live.6 11. by Government Office Region.88   Physical Activity Statistics.9 26. England 2008 40 35 30 25 Percentage 20 15 10 5 0 London North West South East South West North East Yorkshire and the Humber East of England East Midlands West Midlands England Sport/leisure facilities Parks and open spaces .uk/publications/corporate/statistics/placesurvey2008 (Accessed December 2011). Figure 6.6 12.3 10.7 28.1 25. England 2008 Sport/leisure facilities % Government Office Region North East North West Yorkshire and the Humber East Midlands West Midlands East of England London South East South West England Base 11.9 26.1 11.12 Percentage of adults saying that sports and leisure facilities.1 10.8 12.gov. by Government Office Region. respondents were asked to consider “local area” as the area within 15-20 minutes walking distance from their home. The Place Survey was run between September and December 2008 but designed to reflect the structure of local government from 1st April 2009.6 35.

Place Survey England – Headline Table Results 2008 (Revised). respondents were asked to consider “local area” as the area within 15-20 minutes walking distance from their home.1 71. Figure 6.5 543.13 Percentage of adults very or fairly satisfied with sports and leisure facilities. England 2008 Sport/leisure facilities % Government Office Region North East North West Yorkshire and the Humber East Midlands West Midlands East of England London South East South West England Bases 47.0 72.6 43.8 65.2 65.2 543.0 46.5 49.communities.3 65. http://www.2 45.uk/publications/corporate/statistics/placesurvey2008 (Accessed December 2011).9 68. England 2008 80 70 60 50 Percentage 40 30 20 10 0 London North West South East South West North East Yorkshire and the Humber East of England East Midlands West Midlands England Sport/leisure facilities Parks and open spaces . by Government Office Region.5 46.713 Parks and open spaces % Notes: When completing the questionnaire.4 46. The Place Survey was run between September and December 2008 but designed to reflect the structure of local government from 1st April 2009.4 43.gov. Source: Communities and Local Government (2009).3 44.713 63. or parks and open spaces in local area.6 69.13 Percentage of adults very or fairly satisfied with sports and leisure facilities and parks and open spaces in local area.4 47.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   89 Table 6.2 64. by Government Office Region.3 72.

3 12. by Government Office Region.2 11.6 10.0 14.14 Percentage of adults saying that sports and leisure facilities or parks and open spaces need improving in local area. The Place Survey was run between September and December 2008 but designed to reflect the structure of local government from 1st April 2009.9 19. Place Survey England – Headline Table Results 2008 (Revised).gov.6 15. by Government Office Region.9 15.713 Parks and open spaces % Notes: When completing the questionnaire. England 2008 20 18 16 14 12 Percentage 10 8 6 4 2 0 North West London Yorkshire and the Humber South East North East South West East Midlands West Midlands East of England England Sport/leisure facilities Parks and open spaces .5 8.8 12.communities. Source: Communities and Local Government (2009).uk/publications/corporate/statistics/placesurvey2008 (Accessed December 2011).713 13.3 15.1 9.4 16.1 10. http://www.2 16.2 16. respondents were asked to consider “local area” as the area within 15-20 minutes walking distance from their home.3 543. 2012 Table 6.6 543.3 11.14 Percentage of adults saying that sports and leisure facilities or parks and open spaces need improving in local area.8 18. Figure 6. England 2008 Sport/leisure facilities % Government Office Region North East North West Yorkshire and the Humber East Midlands West Midlands East of England London South East South West England Base 16.90   Physical Activity Statistics.5 9.

Year 8 = 12 to 13 years. Due to rounding. Source: National Foundation for Educational Research (2010). percentages may not sum to 100. Figure 6. Tellus4 National Report. England 2009 Very good Year 6 Year 8 Year 10 24 13 8 Fairly good 43 42 34 Neither good nor poor 14 19 22 Fairly poor 8 11 14 Very poor 7 12 17 Don’t know 4 4 5 Base 95. England 2009 50 45 40 35 30 Percentage 25 20 15 10 5 0 Very good Year 6 Year 8 Fairly good Year 10 Neither good nor poor Fairly poor Very poor Don’t know .001 70. Ages of pupils by year groups: Year 6 = 10 to 11 years.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   91 Table 6.15 Children’s views on the parks and play areas in their local area. by school year group.15 Children and young people’s views on the parks and play areas in their local area.751 87. Schools and Families: London. by school year group. Department for Children. Year 10 = 14 to 15 years.427 Notes: Data come from a single response item.

92   Physical Activity Statistics. sport and health-enhancing physical activities. England 2004/05 to 2007/08 100 80 60 Percentage 40 20 0 Year 1 2004/05 Year 2 2005/06 Year 3 2006/07 Year 4 2007/08 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Year 10 Year 11 . School sport typically takes place out of school hours. 2012 Table 6. School sport includes any activity that requires physical skilfulness and is part of the school’s planned formal.555. Data collected from school sport partnerships. England 2004/05 to 2007/08 2004/05 % Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Year 10 Year 11 All years Base 51 54 64 68 72 74 87 86 81 63 58 69 3.533 2005/06 % 74 77 83 84 87 88 90 89 84 65 60 80 5. Source: TNS UK Limited (2008). understanding. semi-formal. High quality is defined as ‘producing young people with the skills.155 2006/07 % 87 89 91 92 93 94 92 91 86 67 63 86 6.16 Percentage of pupils who participated in at least two hours of high quality physical education and out of hours school sport in a typical week. Schools sports survey 2007/08. Schools and Families: London Figure 6. Department for Children. supervised or led provision.142 2007/08 % 95 96 97 97 97 97 95 93 89 71 66 90 6.056.300.16 Percentage of pupils who participated in at least two hours of high quality physical education and out of hours school sport in a typical week. desire and commitment to continue to improve and achieve in a range of PE. by school year group.747 Notes: Physical education is the planned teaching and learning programme in curriculum time that meets the requirements of the national curriculum.231. in line with their abilities’. by school year group.

British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   93 Table 6. Source: TNS UK Limited (2008).155 2006/07 % 86 65 86 86 6. by school type. School sport includes any activity that requires physical skilfulness and is part of the school’s planned formal.17 Percentage of pupils who participated in at least two hours of high quality physical education and out of hours school sport in a typical week. in line with their abilities’. Schools and Families: London.555. by school type. Figure 6. School sport typically takes place out of school hours. High quality is defined as ‘producing young people with the skills. semi-formal.142 2007/08 % 90 69 91 90 6.300.056. desire and commitment to continue to improve and achieve in a range of PE. Data collected from school sport partnerships.17 Percentage of pupils who participated in at least two hours of high quality physical education and out of hours school sport in a typical week. Schools sports survey 2007/08.533 2005/06 % 83 62 81 80 5. understanding. England 2004/05 to 2007/08 100 90 80 70 60 Percentage 50 40 30 20 10 0 2004/05 Boys only Girls only Mixed 2005/06 All Schools 2006/07 2007/08 . Department for Children. supervised or led provision. England 2004/05 to 2007/08 2004/05 % Boys only Girls only Mixed All Schools Base 80 57 70 69 3.747 Notes: Physical Education is the planned teaching and learning programme in curriculum time that meets the requirements of the national curriculum.231. sport and health-enhancing physical activities.

2012 Table 6. School sport includes any activity that requires physical skilfulness and is part of the school’s planned formal. Department for Education: London. Source: TNS BMRB (2010). desire and commitment to continue to improve and achieve in a range of PE.18 Percentage of pupils who participated in at least three hours of high quality physical education and out of hours school sport in a typical week. by school year group. High quality is defined as ‘producing young people with the skills.565. Data collected from school sport partnerships. England 2008/09 to 2009/10 2008/09 % Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Year 10 Year 11 Year 12 Year 13 All years Base 47 52 55 59 63 65 53 50 44 42 37 21 19 50 6. in line with their abilities’. semi-formal.94   Physical Activity Statistics. Schools sports survey 2009/10.557. School sport typically takes place out of school hours. sport and health-enhancing physical activities.106 Notes: Physical Education is the planned teaching and learning programme in curriculum time that meets the requirements of the national curriculum for physical education. understanding. .890 2009/10 % 57 61 63 66 69 70 59 54 49 45 40 23 21 55 6. supervised or led provision.

England 2008/09 to 2009/10 100 90 80 70 60 Percentage 50 40 30 20 10 0 Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Year 10 Year 11 Year 12 Year 13 All years 2008/09 2009/10 . by school year group.18 Percentage of pupils who participated in at least three hours of high quality physical education and out of hours school sport in a typical week.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   95 Figure 6.

96   Physical Activity Statistics, 2012

Table 6.19 Percentage of pupils who participated in at least three hours of high quality physical education and out of hours school sport in a typical week, by school type, England 2008/09 to 2009/10
2008/09 % Boys only Girls only Mixed All Schools Base 49 33 50 50 6,557,890 2009/10 % 53 37 56 55 6,565,106

Notes: Physical Education is the planned teaching and learning programme in curriculum time that meets the requirements of the national curriculum. High quality is defined as ‘producing young people with the skills, understanding, desire and commitment to continue to improve and achieve in a range of PE, sport and health-enhancing physical activities, in line with their abilities’. School sport includes any activity that requires physical skilfulness and is part of the school’s planned formal, semi-formal, supervised or led provision. School sport typically takes place out of school hours. Data collected from school sport partnerships. Source: TNS BMRB (2010). Schools sports survey 2009/10. Department for Education: London.

Figure 6.19 Percentage of pupils who participated in at least three hours of high quality physical education and out of hours school sport in a typical week, by school type, England 2008/09 to 2009/10
60

50

40

Percentage

30

20

10

0 2008/09 Boys only Girls only Mixed All Schools 2009/10

British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   97

Table 6.20 Percentage of pupils who participated in at least three hours of high quality physical education and out of hours school sport in a typical week, by sex and school year group, England 2009/10
Boys % Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Year 10 Year 11 Year 12 Year 13 All years Base 58 63 65 67 71 73 61 57 53 51 46 29 28 58 6,565,106 Girls % 55 60 61 64 67 68 56 50 44 39 33 17 15 52

Notes: Physical Education is the planned teaching and learning programme in curriculum time that meets the requirements of the national curriculum for physical education. High quality is defined as ‘producing young people with the skills, understanding, desire and commitment to continue to improve and achieve in a range of PE, sport and health-enhancing physical activities, in line with their abilities’. School sport includes any activity that requires physical skilfulness and is part of the school’s planned formal, semi-formal, supervised or led provision. School sport typically takes place out of school hours. Data collected from school sport partnerships. Source: TNS BMRB (2010). Schools sports survey 2009/10. Department for Education: London.

98   Physical Activity Statistics, 2012

Figure 6.20 Percentage of pupils who participated in at least three hours of high quality physical education and out of hours school sport in a typical week, by sex and school year group, England 2009/10
100 90 80 70 60 Percentage 50 40 30 20 10 0
Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Year 10 Year 11 Year 12 Year 13 All years

Boys

Girls

British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   99 Sedentary behaviour Over half of all sedentary time outside of work is spent watching television.6% Weekdays Weekend days Percentage of sedentary time spent watching television . Men 56% Women 56% Men 57.1% Women 56.

4 hours for both) and weekend days (4.6. The greatest differences were found amongst the middle aged. The survey also included a short set of questions asking about time spent sitting down in leisure activities on weekdays and on weekend days. Objectively measured activity levels found that men had longer periods of sedentary time on both weekdays (600 minutes) and weekend days (579 minutes) than women (592 and 563 minutes respectively). Overall a lower percentage of adults reported long bouts of sedentary time on a weekday than on a weekend day.4. Children were also more sedentary on weekdays than weekend days.5 and 7.1 to 7. presenting self-reported and objectively measured data.7.5 and 7. Figures 7. On weekdays total average sedentary time was similar between men and women. Whereas on weekend days men were more likely than women to average six or more hours a day (44% of men and 39% of women). a sub-sample of the 2008 Health Survey for England was selected to wear accelerometers.4. Less than half of adults and children selected to wear accelerometers provided sufficient data to be included in the analysis. Self-reported sedentary behaviour The 2008 Health Survey for England had a primary focus on physical activity and fitness. From this total sedentary time was estimated 8.1 hours for boys and 4.2 hours for girls). Stay Active: a report on physical activity for health from the four home countries’. Time spent being sedentary increased with age. who also reported the lowest overall amounts of sedentary behaviour. Figures 7.1 to 7. This enabled the collection of objective measures of physical activity and sedentary behaviour. provided recommendations on sedentary behaviour for the first time.100   Physical Activity Statistics. the report instead recommended reducing total sedentary time and breaking up extended periods of sitting 1.4b). For children. sedentary time was greater for both men and women on weekdays than on weekend days. Sedentary behaviour Sedentary behaviour is not simply a lack of physical activity but is a cluster of individual behaviours in which sitting or lying is the dominant mode of posture and energy expenditure is very low 1. Research suggests that sedentary behaviour is associated with poor health in all ages independent of the level of overall physical activity 2.3. Types of sedentary behaviour are investigated through temporal trends in the amount of television viewed. Based on the current evidence. . Amongst children. The report states that the available data are not sufficient to suggest a specific quantitative recommendation on daily sedentary time for health.6). The Chief Medical Officers’ report ‘Start Active. Spending large amounts of time being sedentary may increase the risk of some adverse health outcomes. sex and socio-economic status. whereas self-reported data covered sedentary behaviour in leisure time excluding time at school.6.5. This chapter reports on the prevalence of sedentary behaviour in the population and examines patterns in sedentary behaviour by age. Suggesting a limit to the amount of time people spend being sedentary for extended periods. average sedentary time (excluding time at school) was similar for boys and girls on both weekdays (3. Objectively measured sedentary behaviour Although physical activity and sedentary levels are normally self-reported. those participants sampled to wear accelerometers were encouraged to wear them at all times including at school. Thus providing a smaller sample size than self-reported levels 8 (See Chapter 1 for details). As with self-reported levels sedentary time decreased into middle age and increased into older age. This may account for some differences between self-reported and objective data for these age groups 8 (Tables 7. 2012 7. along with data on how much sedentary behaviour is made up with watching television. whilst girls were found to be more sedentary than boys at all ages. launched in July 2011. Older children were also more likely to report long periods of sedentary behaviour (Tables 7. even among people who are active at the recommended levels 1. In contrast to self-reported levels however.

13a to 7. London: Department of Health. although this varies by age and sex. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness. Stay Active: A report on physical activity from the four home countries’ Chief Medical Officers. Applied Physiology. 289:1785-1791. Stamatakis E. Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010). Freedman D. Of all the UK countries Wales demonstrates the highest average television viewing. The number of hours of television viewed by individuals in the UK increases with age. Department of Health: London. The Information Centre: Leeds. Temporal trends also show an increase in the average hours of television viewing since 2008 for most ages and both sexes. Saunders TJ et al (2010). Tremblay MS. Sedentary behaviour recommendations for early childhood. 2008. 5. The same was true for children. in transit and in leisure time. Start Active. at home. Colditz G. Boys in the South West Strategic Health Authority (SHA) and girls in the South Central SHA reported the lowest amounts of sedentary time. Physical activity. Figures 7. Hu F. talk. Sedentary Behaviour and Obesity Expert Working Group (2010) Sedentary Behaviour and Obesity: Review of the Current Scientific Evidence. Conversely.10). Data from the 2008 Health Survey for England suggests that watching television accounts for more than half of all sedentary time for adults of all ages. (2008). Howard RA. 8. 6. Sedentary behaviours Sedentary behaviours are multi-faceted and might include behaviours at work or school. 2. with this also lower amongst boys than girls (Tables 7. 3. (2003). sedentary behaviour. . and the risk of colon and rectal cancer in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Okely AD and Jones RA (2011). Quebec. Journal of the American Medical Association.7 to 7. Television Watching and Other Sedentary Behaviors in Relation to Risk of Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Women. 1. et al.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   101 Socio-economic differences Objectively measured average sedentary time was higher in the highest income tertile (591 minutes for men and 585 minutes for women) than in the middle (573 minutes for men and 567 minutes for women) and lowest (575 minutes for men and 569 minutes for women) tertiles. Typically. although this does not include school based sedentary behaviour (Tables 7. self-reported levels were lowest amongst children in the highest income quintile. Park Y.14b). Nutrition. 7. Physiological and health implications of a sedentary lifestyle. British Journal of Nutrition 101:765-773. Barr RG. (2009). Rennie K. Hirani V. Centre of Excellence for Early Childhood Development : Montreal. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and sedentary behaviours in relation to body mass index-defined and waist circumference-defined obesity. Those in Yorkshire and Humber reported the highest (Table 7. work or listen to music 1.19:939-953. Figure 7.9. and Metabolism 35(6): 725–740. Colley RC. except those in the age group 16 to 24 years. 4. In Tremblay RE. travelling. Amongst children the proportion of sedentary time that is made up by television viewing declines with age. The Chief Medical Officers (2011). after decreases were found between 1999 and 2007. et al. using a computer. Figure 7. and sitting to read.14.11 to 7. Regional differences Within England there was some variation in the self-reported levels of sedentary behaviour amongst children by region. Cancer Causes Control.10.9). Li T. sedentary behaviours include watching TV. Peters R De V and Boivin M (eds) Encyclopedia on Early Childhood Development.

218 5 24 36 35 1.746 7 20 24 49 771 5 22 33 40 954 6 25 33 37 1.336 6 23 29 41 919 7 24 36 33 1.367 2 15 32 51 1.183 3 12 33 53 875 2 8 28 62 647 5 29 34 32 4 23 31 42 6 39 34 21 7 39 34 20 5 38 37 20 4 25 36 35 2 11 35 51 1 9 27 63 16-24 % 25-34 % 35-44 % 45-54 % 55-64 % 65-74 % 75+ % Notes: Data come from a short set of questions asking about time spent sitting down in a number of leisure time activities.219 7 30 35 27 1. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre.374 3 20 37 39 1. The Information Centre: Leeds. 2012 Table 7.1 Self-reported sedentary time per day in adults. Bases vary but are of similar sizes. All rights reserved.000 2 10 25 63 945 5 29 33 33 4 22 35 39 7 38 34 20 9 42 31 17 7 36 35 21 3 25 38 35 1 13 35 51 2 9 23 66 5 20 31 44 6. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness.102   Physical Activity Statistics. England 2008 All adults % Men Weekday Less than 2 hours 2 to 4 hours 4 to 6 hours 6 hours or more Weekend day Less than 2 hours 2 to 4 hours 4 to 6 hours 6 hours or more Base Women Weekday Less than 2 hours 2 to 4 hours 4 to 6 hours 6 hours or more Weekend day Less than 2 hours 2 to 4 hours 4 to 6 hours 6 hours or more Base 5 23 34 39 8.512 5 27 37 32 1. Copyright © 2010. weekday. .098 4 21 31 44 1. those shown are for watching TV. by age and sex. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010).

England 2008 80 70 60 50 Percentage 40 30 20 10 0 All adults 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75+ Men Women Figure 7. by sex and age.1a Percentage of adults reporting 6 hours or more of sedentary time on weekdays. England 2008 80 70 60 50 Percentage 40 30 20 10 0 All adults 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75+ Men Women .1b Percentage of adults reporting 6 hours or more sedentary time on weekend days. by sex and age.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   103 Figure 7.

8 771 4.0 4.8 6.6 1.000 6.2 5.9 1.2 875 6.2 6. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010).218 4.3 5. All rights reserved.3 4.336 5.4 5. England 2008 All adults Men Weekday Weekend day Base Women Weekday Weekend day Base 5. Copyright © 2010.098 5. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre.746 5.4 954 4.4 5.8 647 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75+ Notes: Data come from a short set of questions asking about time spent sitting down in a number of leisure time activities.0 5.6 6. Bases vary but are of similar sizes.9 6.6 5. The Information Centre: Leeds.1 1. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness.3 5.4 919 4.0 5.2 Self-reported average number of hours of sedentary time per day in adults. Averages are based on all participants interviewed including those who reported no participation.6 1.1 1. .2 5.219 4. 2012 Table 7. those shown are for watching TV.1 1.3 1.3 8.3 4.9 1. by sex and age.9 945 5.367 6. weekday.104   Physical Activity Statistics.183 6.374 5.512 4.1 6.

2b Self-reported average number of hours of sedentary time per day in women.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   105 Figure 7. by age.2a Self-reported average number of hours of sedentary time per day in men. England 2008 8 7 6 5 Average hours 4 3 2 1 0 All adults 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75+ Weekday Weekend . by age. England 2008 8 7 6 5 Average hours 4 3 2 1 0 All adults 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75+ Weekday Weekend Figure 7.

Bases vary but are of similar sizes.562 34 36 21 8 248 19 40 27 14 268 13 34 37 16 230 12 36 34 19 226 13 37 29 21 237 13 35 31 22 255 17 26 36 22 233 10 37 35 19 252 10 33 34 23 297 11 29 33 27 291 8 27 34 31 241 10 26 29 36 257 10 18 31 41 281 7 26 26 41 246 17 43 27 12 37 41 13 9 22 42 26 9 24 48 24 4 26 49 19 7 23 58 15 5 25 49 18 8 22 55 18 5 15 53 26 6 15 49 25 11 9 44 35 12 10 37 38 15 7 38 38 17 6 27 46 20 5 24 39 33 14 34 29 23 3. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness. 2012 Table 7.106   Physical Activity Statistics. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. by sex and age. Participants were asked about sedentary time after school. Personal reports of physical activity among children aged 13-15 and parental proxy reports for children aged 2-12. weekday. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010). Copyright © 2010. those shown are for watching TV. . All rights reserved.3 Self-reported total sedentary time per day in children. England 2008 All % Boys Weekday Less than 2 hours 2 to 4 hours 4 to 6 hours 6 hours or more Weekend day Less than 2 hours 2 to 4 hours 4 to 6 hours 6 hours or more Base Girls Weekday Less than 2 hours 2 to 4 hours 4 to 6 hours 6 hours or more Weekend day Less than 2 hours 2 to 4 hours 4 to 6 hours 6 hours or more Base 13 31 31 25 3. and therefore any sedentary time during the school day is not included. The Information Centre: Leeds.503 39 38 15 8 255 24 46 23 7 239 18 42 29 10 249 13 44 29 14 240 14 33 33 20 252 9 33 37 21 235 10 42 31 16 236 9 35 30 26 244 8 34 29 28 255 10 30 36 24 255 11 25 30 33 260 9 24 31 36 286 11 26 29 34 266 8 24 28 40 231 18 44 27 11 40 37 16 6 26 50 19 5 24 53 17 6 32 42 19 7 24 46 22 8 17 57 20 6 17 53 22 8 15 50 28 7 14 44 30 11 10 46 35 8 8 38 38 15 6 40 39 15 7 37 35 21 7 31 33 30 2 % 3 % 4 % 5 % 6 % 7 % 8 % 9 % 10 % 11 % 12 % 13 % 14 % 15 % Notes: Data come from a short set of questions asking about time spent sitting down in a number of leisure time activities.

3a Percentage of children reporting 6 hours or more sedentary time on weekdays. by sex and age.3b Percentage of children reporting 6 hours or more sedentary time on weekend days. England 2008 35 30 25 20 Percentage 15 10 5 0 All 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Boys Girls Figure 7. by sex and age. England 2008 50 40 30 Percentage 20 10 0 All 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Boys Girls .British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   107 Figure 7.

Personal reports of physical activity among children aged 13-15 and parental proxy reports for children aged 2-12. and therefore any sedentary time during the school day is not included.8 286 4.8 3.4 255 4. .3 244 3.2 3.3 231 2 % 3 % 4 % 5 % 6 % 7 % 8 % 9 % 10 % 11 % 12 % 13 % 14 % 15 % Notes: Data come from a short set of questions asking about time spent sitting down in a number of leisure time activities.2 3.4 4. Copyright © 2010.9 252 3.2 235 3. Bases vary but are of similar sizes.2 3. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness.6 2. England 2008 All % Boys Weekday Weekend day Base Girls Weekday Weekend day Base 3.7 260 3.108   Physical Activity Statistics.0 239 2.9 266 4.5 4.8 4. The Information Centre: Leeds.0 3.0 4.503 2.6 2.0 4.2 246 3.1 3.4 4.9 4.4 4. Participants were asked about sedentary time after school. 2012 Table 7.7 240 3.9 4.4 291 3. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010).9 236 3.3 4. Averages are based on all participants interviewed including those who reported no participation.2 297 3.4 5.8 3.1 3.8 3.0 226 2.4 268 2.9 255 2.3 4.3 249 2.9 3.5 4.1 233 3.1 4. weekday. those shown are for watching TV.1 281 4.8 3. All rights reserved.0 252 3.8 230 2.9 4.9 237 3.6 255 2.4 Self-reported average number of hours of sedentary time per day in children.8 4.4 255 3.7 248 3.6 5. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. by sex and age.562 2.7 257 4.7 241 4.1 4.9 5.

4a Self-reported average number of hours of sedentary time per day in boys. England 2008 6 5 4 Average hours 3 2 1 0 All children 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Weekday Weekend day Figure 7.4b Self-reported average number of hours of sedentary time per day in girls. by age.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   109 Figure 7. England 2008 6 5 Average hours 4 3 2 1 0 All children 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Weekday Weekend day . by age.

Copyright © 2010. by sex and age. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness. All rights reserved.110   Physical Activity Statistics. 1 MET is considered a resting metabolic rate obtained during quiet sitting. The data in this table have been adjusted for average wear time using regression techniques. 2012 Table 7.138 221 218 176 174 195 188 249 243 176 179 128 136 592 563 580 546 558 512 561 544 583 551 607 587 663 640 970 968 179 180 145 145 170 164 202 200 160 163 114 116 600 579 587 541 566 543 569 561 591 582 615 599 670 646 16-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75+ Notes: Adults aged 16 and over. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. . Cases with 4 or more days valid accelerometry data included. Sedentary activity is defined as below 1. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010). Metabolic Equivalent (MET) is defined as the ratio of work metabolic rate to a standard resting metabolic rate.145 1. England 2008 All adults Men Weekday Weekend day Base Weekdays Weekend days Women Weekday Weekend day Base Weekdays Weekend days 1.5 METs. to allow comparisons between groups with different average wear time.5 Objectively measured average number of minutes of sedentary time per day in adults. The Information Centre: Leeds.

by age.5b Objectively measured average number of minutes of sedentary time per day in women.5a Objectively measured average number of minutes of sedentary time per day in men. England 2008 800 700 600 Average minutes 500 400 300 200 100 0 All adults 16-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75+ Weekday Weekend day . England 2008 800 700 600 500 Average minutes 400 300 200 100 0 All adults 16-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75+ Weekday Weekend day Figure 7.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   111 Figure 7. by age.

The data in this table have been adjusted for average wear time using regression techniques. All rights reserved. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010). Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness. England 2008 All children Boys Weekday Weekend day Base Weekdays Weekend days Girls Weekday Weekend day Base Weekdays Weekend days 405 378 112 106 145 140 148 132 467 435 405 375 454 429 542 502 365 348 89 90 144 130 132 128 433 407 382 347 430 400 487 473 4-7 8-11 12-15 Notes: Cases with 4 or more days valid accelerometry data included. 2012 Table 7.6 Objectively measured average number of minutes of sedentary time per day in children. Metabolic Equivalent (MET) is defined as the ratio of work metabolic rate to a standard resting metabolic rate.5 METs. Sedentary activity is defined as below 1. The Information Centre: Leeds. 1 MET is considered a resting metabolic rate obtained during quiet sitting. . to allow comparisons between groups with different average wear time. by sex and age. Copyright © 2010.112   Physical Activity Statistics. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre.

England 2008 600 500 400 Average minutes 300 200 100 0 All children 4-7 8-11 12-15 Weekday Weekend day Figure 7. by age.6b Objectively measured average number of minutes of sedentary time per day in girls.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   113 Figure 7. by age. England 2008 600 500 Average minutes 400 300 200 100 0 All children 4-7 8-11 12-15 Weekday Weekend day .6a Objectively measured average number of minutes of sedentary time per day in boys.

Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010).5 METs. The data in this table have been adjusted for average wear time using regression techniques. Sedentary activity is defined as below 1. to allow comparisons between groups with different average wear time. 2012 Table 7. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness. Copyright © 2010. Metabolic Equivalent (MET) is defined as the ratio of work metabolic rate to a standard resting metabolic rate. 1 MET is considered a resting metabolic rate obtained during quiet sitting. . The Information Centre: Leeds. All rights reserved. England 2008 Highest Men Women Base Men Women 350 330 278 324 200 307 591 585 Middle 573 567 Lowest 575 569 Notes: Adults aged 16 and over. by sex. Cases with 4 or more days valid accelerometry data included. age and tertile of equivalised household income.114   Physical Activity Statistics.7 Objectively measured number of minutes of sedentary time per day in adults.

The data in this table have been adjusted for average wear time using regression techniques.5 METs. England 2008 Highest Boys Girls Base Boys Girls 76 106 146 126 80 117 426 464 Middle 424 463 Lowest 413 452 Notes: Children aged 4 to 15 years. Cases with 4 or more days valid accelerometry data included. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness. Copyright © 2010. Sedentary activity is defined as below 1. Metabolic Equivalent (MET) is defined as the ratio of work metabolic rate to a standard resting metabolic rate. The Information Centre: Leeds.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   115 Table 7. . Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. to allow comparisons between groups with different average wear time. by sex and tertile of equivalised household income. All rights reserved.8 Objectively measured average number of minutes of sedentary time per day in children. 1 MET is considered a resting metabolic rate obtained during quiet sitting. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010).

Participants were asked about sedentary time outside of school.4 611 3. The Information Centre: Leeds.1 4. Personal reports of physical activity among children aged 13-15 and parental proxy reports for children aged 2-12. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010).1 4 562 3.4 4.3 610 3. .7 4. 2012 Table 7.5 4. Data come from a short set of questions asking about time spent sitting down in a number of leisure time activities. and therefore any sedentary time during the school day is not included. Bases given are for ‘Watching TV’.2 644 2nd 3rd 4th Lowest Notes: Children aged 2 to 15 years.1 666 3.9 419 3.4 4.7 4.4 4.3 640 3. All rights reserved. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. by quintile of equivalised household income. England 2008 Highest Boys Weekday Weekend day Base Girls Weekday Weekend day Base 3.1 693 3.116   Physical Activity Statistics. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness.9 Self-reported average number of hours of sedentary time in the last week in children. Copyright © 2010.0 673 3.0 453 3.1 3. All other bases vary but are of a similar size.5 4.

British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   117

Figure 7.9a Self-reported average number of hours of sedentary time in the last week in boys, by quintile of equivalised household income, England 2008
5

4

3 Average hours

2

1

0
Highest 2nd 3rd 4th Lowest

Weekday

Weekend day

Figure 7.9b Self-reported average number of hours of sedentary time in the last week in girls, by quintile of equivalised household income, England 2008
5

4

3 Average hours

2

1

0
Highest 2nd 3rd 4th Lowest

Weekday

Weekend day

118   Physical Activity Statistics, 2012

Table 7.10 Self-reported average number of hours of sedentary time in the last week in children, by Strategic Health Authority, England 2008
Strategic Health Authority
North East North West Yorkshire & the Humber East Midlands West Midlands East of England London South East Coast South Central South West

Boys Weekday Weekend day Base Girls Weekday Weekend day Base 3.2 4.2 180 3.4 4.1 535 3.7 4.1 396 3.5 4.2 294 3.7 4.4 341 3.4 4.1 412 3.6 4.3 465 3.2 4.1 291 3.1 4.0 312 3.3 4.0 336 3.4 4.2 173 3.4 4.2 525 3.6 4.2 348 3.3 4.0 297 3.4 4.2 355 3.3 4.2 413 3.5 4.2 458 3.4 4.1 320 3.4 4.2 261 3.2 3.8 353

Notes: Children aged 2 to 15 years. Data come from a short set of questions asking about time spent sitting down in a number of leisure time activities. Bases given are for ‘Watching TV’. All other bases vary but are of a similar size. Personal reports of physical activity among children aged 13-15 and parental proxy reports for children aged 2-12. Participants were asked about sedentary time outside of school, and therefore any sedentary time during the school day is not included. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010). Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness. The Information Centre: Leeds. Copyright © 2010, Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. All rights reserved.

British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   119

Figure 7.10a Self-reported average number of hours of sedentary time in the last week in boys, by Strategic Health Authority, England 2008
5 Weekday Weekend day

4

3 Average hours

2

1

0
North West West Midlands South East Coast East of England Yorkshire & the Humber East Midlands South Central South West North East London

Figure 7.10b Self-reported average number of hours of sedentary time in the last week in girls, by Strategic Health Authority, England 2008
5 Weekday Weekend day

4

3 Average hours

2

1

0
North West West Midlands East of England South East Coast Yorkshire & the Humber East Midlands South Central South West North East London

694 5.535 6. UK 1999 to 2010 1999 Males 4-15 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Base 4-15 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Females 4-15 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Base 4-15 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ All 4-15 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Base 4-15 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ 9.112 4.483 3.737 3.145 7.003 7.522 3.428 3.401 3.441 8.132 8.100 9.199 6.555 5.516 9.110 4.048 4.648 8.348 3.435 3.454 3.569 6.889 7.806 3.433 3.634 6.584 4.179 4.229 9.832 3.123 7.847 2.479 3.757 7.027 3.825 3.578 9.490 5.695 5.744 6.637 4.082 7.886 4.727 6.170 4.204 4.926 4.689 4.221 4.508 4.566 4.409 5.310 18 23 27 25 27 32 36 18 23 26 25 28 32 36 17 23 26 25 27 31 36 17 21 26 26 28 32 35 17 22 28 27 30 33 37 17 20 27 27 30 33 37 16 21 27 27 30 33 36 16 21 25 27 30 32 35 16 21 26 27 30 34 36 16 21 26 27 31 34 37 17 22 26 27 31 34 37 18 23 25 29 33 38 41 4.354 3.425 3.469 4.057 9.477 3.177 6.722 3.268 3.232 9.631 5.149 6.135 4.527 3.444 3.895 3.126 6.146 3.715 4.417 8.007 8.863 4.786 9.427 3.630 6.11 Average hours of TV viewing per week.809 7.547 6.617 5.962 4.296 3.126 4.472 4.698 9.249 3.819 4.145 3.559 4.377 3.074 4.777 2.509 4.541 3.447 7.805 3.860 4.865 3.509 9.811 4.624 9.138 7.507 9.340 3.187 7.405 3.809 3.218 8.759 9.130 3.940 3.174 3.093 3.785 4.589 7.616 6.120 7.755 4.656 4.121 4.448 3.258 4.963 9. by sex and age.817 3.870 8.196 4.054 8.103 4.295 8.844 9.733 8.454 3.144 4.734 3.787 3.355 3.619 3.449 3. Source: BARB.924 5.064 4.024 8.778 7.059 3.840 4.922 7.183 4.360 3.167 8.112 3.818 9.026 3.442 3.207 3.976 7.534 4.674 4.646 5.133 3.289 8.820 4.644 3.012 8.158 3.288 9.401 3.942 6.576 18 20 24 24 26 31 36 18 20 24 25 27 31 36 17 20 23 24 27 30 37 17 19 23 24 27 31 35 17 19 25 26 28 32 36 17 18 25 26 28 31 36 16 18 24 26 28 31 35 15 18 23 25 28 31 34 16 18 23 25 28 32 35 16 17 24 26 30 32 37 16 18 24 25 30 33 37 18 20 23 27 31 36 40 4.408 4.322 7.568 3.666 9.186 3.072 3.727 8.169 6.266 19 18 22 23 25 29 36 19 17 21 24 27 30 36 18 17 21 23 26 29 38 16 16 21 23 26 29 34 17 17 22 25 27 30 35 17 16 22 25 27 30 34 16 16 22 24 27 29 34 15 15 21 24 27 29 33 16 15 20 24 26 29 34 16 14 21 24 28 30 36 15 15 22 24 28 31 36 17 17 21 26 30 34 39 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Notes: Some changes to data collection occurred in 2010.677 9.796 2.721 3.098 7.764 4.678 5.951 4.073 3.308 8. 2012 Table 7.145 7. Personal communication .250 3.527 3. this was felt to make it more accurate but may explain some differences to previous years.059 8.843 3.002 6.345 3.362 4.277 4.422 8.243 4.097 4.263 7.625 3.611 5.009 8.970 3.697 4.535 6.187 9.850 2. RSMB Television Research Ltd: London (2011).494 3.164 3.660 4.723 8.210 4.618 3.094 3.943 4.134 3.720 8.981 4.742 7.833 2.186 3.133 4.314 3.506 4.823 6.897 3.240 3.921 5.742 4.212 7.009 4.727 3.997 3.778 2.751 3.582 4.582 3.095 4.063 3.084 4.749 3.458 4.158 4.168 4.453 4.696 4.915 5.200 9.840 2.738 4.710 3.307 9.120   Physical Activity Statistics.

by age.11a Average hours of TV viewing per week in males.11b Average hours of TV viewing per week in females. UK 2002 to 2010 45 40 35 30 Average hours 25 20 15 10 5 0 4-15 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ 2002 2006 2009 2010 Figure 7.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   121 Figure 7. UK 2002 to 2010 45 40 35 Average hours 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 4-15 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ 2002 2006 2009 2010 . by age.

444 3.724 3.218 3.910 3.420 4.468 3.321 145 105 113 129 106 90 124 345 276 307 404 352 310 456 212 163 170 212 193 191 276 17 21 26 26 28 32 35 17 21 25 25 28 32 35 17 18 27 28 30 39 38 19 21 32 33 33 37 38 15 23 25 24 31 36 36 16 21 25 27 30 32 35 16 21 25 27 29 31 35 14 15 24 24 29 28 36 15 22 27 30 36 39 36 15 20 28 25 33 41 35 4.086 4.201 3.312 3.611 4.228 2.701 2.385 153 112 106 122 103 84 94 366 275 286 368 334 290 330 229 160 160 202 184 185 215 16 16 21 23 26 29 34 17 16 21 23 25 28 33 16 18 20 26 25 27 34 15 18 25 27 30 31 40 18 18 20 23 27 34 36 15 15 21 24 27 29 33 15 16 21 23 26 28 33 15 12 18 23 27 25 33 14 15 24 29 29 34 37 17 14 25 26 27 30 36 .122   Physical Activity Statistics.944 2.879 3.610 2.855 4. countries of the UK 2002 to 2010 2002 UK England Northern Ireland Scotland Wales UK England 2006 Northern Ireland Scotland Wales Males 4-15 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Base 4-15 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Females 4-15 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Base 4-15 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ 4.544 3.674 3.142 2.567 5.535 3.273 2. 2012 Table 7.862 3.764 3.582 3.752 4.803 3.636 3.969 3.265 3.737 3. by sex and age.978 4.243 2.705 3.496 3.569 3.520 3.235 4.862 3.252 3.009 3.167 150 102 122 123 99 82 105 366 285 339 400 341 287 422 227 151 182 208 197 166 274 4.120 4.12 Average hours of TV viewing per week.141 161 104 123 118 95 75 80 394 279 354 384 330 254 299 234 160 189 208 194 160 204 4.826 3.891 3.189 4.444 3.024 3.645 3.733 3.176 3.146 4.795 2.

492 2.092 4.422 3.807 3.432 3. RSMB Television Research Ltd: London (2011).695 2.837 4.895 3.445 136 110 119 130 120 95 135 331 278 309 385 384 327 469 203 169 167 208 206 199 289 17 22 26 27 31 34 37 17 22 25 27 30 34 37 16 21 25 24 29 31 39 18 23 27 29 37 39 41 17 15 32 24 31 42 37 18 23 25 29 33 38 41 18 22 25 28 33 38 41 25 21 30 34 32 39 42 19 24 28 34 37 44 43 19 30 28 29 36 43 42 4.497 3.989 3.712 5.154 3.379 2. small bases may make data less reliable.338 3.531 4.713 5.889 4.283 3.452 3.422 3.881 3.250 3.207 3.696 2.400 137 112 114 131 116 95 129 332 284 309 396 382 325 467 205 168 164 210 201 198 286 4.uk/ .150 3.523 4. Personal communication.802 4.233 3.co.095 4.483 2.606 4. Some changes to data collection occurred in 2010 this was felt to make it more accurate but may explain some differences to previous years.131 3.357 3.938 3.713 4.770 3.165 3.869 3.587 151 113 113 123 114 92 105 355 284 294 350 359 304 358 220 174 162 193 195 190 237 15 15 22 24 28 31 36 15 14 22 23 28 30 35 15 15 20 20 27 32 35 16 16 25 28 31 34 40 16 15 20 26 30 33 41 17 17 21 26 30 34 39 17 17 20 25 29 34 38 16 17 27 28 27 36 41 16 19 25 26 37 36 43 21 16 23 29 29 38 48 Notes: Bases between countries vary.808 3.202 3.295 3.331 2.716 3.barb.371 3.287 3.524 147 112 110 123 111 89 100 359 290 297 358 355 304 349 220 174 156 194 192 190 230 4.967 3.383 4.446 3.048 3.800 3. http://www.470 3.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   123 2009 UK England Northern Ireland Scotland Wales UK England 2010 Northern Ireland Scotland Wales Males 4-15 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Base 4-15 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Females 4-15 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Base 4-15 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ 4.550 4. Source: BARB.

Watching TV including DVDs or videos expressed as a percentage of all sedentary time. 2012 Table 7.512 58. using a computer or playing video games. Copyright © 2010.6 46. weekday.6 8.6 954 58.367 58.13 Percentage of self-reported sedentary time that is spent watching television in adults.218 59.336 48.1 945 56.1 1.098 57. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010).374 57. Other sedentary time includes doing such things as reading.4 55. The Information Centre: Leeds.4 1.000 55.219 56.8 1.183 59.1 50. by sex and age. Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness. those shown are for watching TV.0 919 55.1 60. England 2008 All adults % Men Weekday Weekend day Base Women Weekday Weekend day Base 56.1 58.8 57.5 55. Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. working.7 875 57.6 771 53. All rights reserved.9 1.746 44.0 59. drawing.7 57.6 1. Averages are based on all participants interviewed including those who reported no participation.1 57.3 1.1 6.1 59. .1 56. eating a meal/snack.7 58.9 647 16-24 % 25-34 % 35-44 % 45-54 % 55-64 % 65-74 % 75+ % Notes: Data come from a short set of questions asking about time spent sitting down in a number of leisure time activities.7 1. Bases vary but are of similar sizes.0 56.124   Physical Activity Statistics.7 55.4 1.0 57.

England 2008 80 70 60 Percentage 50 40 30 20 10 0 All adults 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75+ Weekday Weekend day . England 2008 80 70 60 50 Percentage 40 30 20 10 0 All adults 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75+ Weekday Weekend day Figure 7.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   125 Figure 7.13b Percentage of self-reported sedentary time that is spent watching television in women. by age. by age.13a Percentage of self-reported sedentary time that is spent watching television in men.

Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre.503 54 54 255 57 59 239 57 58 249 54 57 240 52 56 252 52 55 235 52 54 236 53 56 244 51 55 255 51 52 255 48 52 260 49 50 286 44 46 266 46 45 231 2 % 3 % 4 % 5 % 6 % 7 % 8 % 9 % 10 % 11 % 12 % 13 % 14 % 15 % Notes: Data come from a short set of questions asking about time spent sitting down in a number of leisure time activities. England 2008 Age (years) All % Boys Weekday Weekend day Base Girls Weekday Weekend day Base 51 54 3. All rights reserved. 2012 Table 7.562 52 52 248 53 56 268 55 57 230 55 56 226 50 55 237 53 55 255 55 55 233 53 53 252 53 55 297 53 57 291 51 55 241 49 51 257 50 53 281 45 46 246 50 54 3.14 Percentage of self-reported sedentary time that is spent watching television in children.g.126   Physical Activity Statistics. The Information Centre: Leeds. Copyright © 2010. doing homework. e. reading. drawing. Averages are based on all participants interviewed including those who reported no participation. Other sedentary activities include sitting down for any other activity. . by sex and age. Source: Joint Health Surveys Unit (2010). Health Survey for England 2008: Physical activity and fitness. using a computer or playing video games. Watching TV including DVDs or videos expressed as a percentage of all sedentary time. weekday. those shown are for watching TV. Bases vary but are of similar sizes.

England 2008 70 60 50 40 Percentage 30 20 10 0 All children 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Weekday Weekend day . by age. England 2008 70 60 50 40 Percentage 30 20 10 0 All children 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Weekday Weekend day Figure 7.British Heart Foundation and University of Oxford   127 Figure 7.14a Percentage of self-reported sedentary time that is spent watching television in boys.14b Percentage of self-reported sedentary time that is spent watching television in girls. by age.

Brian Steenson. Natasha Stewart. Ed Dicks. Andy Carver. . Jane Shepley and Peter Weissberg for their help in producing this publication. Mark Wheatcroft. Catherine Kelly.128   Physical Activity Statistics. Lisa Purcell. 2012 Acknowledgements The compilers would like to thank Katie Larkins.

registered charity in England and Wales (225971) and in Scotland (SC039426) Print code: M130 .uk Information & support on anything heart-related Phone lines open 9am to 5pm Monday to Friday Similar cost to 01 or 02 numbers British Heart Foundation Greater London House 180 Hampstead Road London NW1 7AW T 020 7554 0000 F 020 7554 0100 © British Heart Foundation 2012. patient care. Because together we can beat heart disease. We rely on your donations of time and money to continue our life-saving work. bhf.uk/ statistics Heart Helpline 0300 330 3311 bhf.org.We are the nation’s heart charity. campaigning for change and by providing vital information.org. But we urgently need your help. dedicated to saving lives through pioneering research.

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