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CHAPTER I 1. INTRODUCTION
INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY 1.1 MARKET OPPORTUNITY ANALYSIS Market Opportunity Analysis is concerned with the acquisition, codification, analysis and presentation of market information that describes and predicts the size, distribution and growth of the market opportunity. The opportunity analyst provides this understanding by analyzing customer/market buying behavior and spending on the demand-side as well as our and competitor revenue on the supply-side within the unit’s key market segments. They analyze market, customer, competitor and economic trends and forecasts, and use that information to formulate hypotheses about the parameters that drive demand within their market segments. They build opportunity models that generate opportunity estimates and forecasts based on key parameters such as historic buying patterns, projected industry trends and economic forecasts. Their analyses, models and the estimates are used to help shape and drive business development decisions regarding our - by segment - coverage strategy, market selection, revenue and market share performance objectives, and compensation. Key to their success is the analyst’s ability to understand management’s needs for opportunity analysis, structure models that address those needs and communicate the resulting opportunity estimates in ways that add value. The opportunity analyst must identify, procure and utilize relevant data sources, reconcile conflicting data sources and estimates, and present numeric data and findings in a clear and understandable form that enables decisions, assessments and measurements. They persuasively present their findings and stand behind their recommendations. They select, procure and participate in the development of market data, analyze and interpret market information, describe complex interrelationships and models, effectively communicate results, manage the research process, know the Market Planning Process, understand how their analysis is used in Group and Business Unit Business Plans, and in Marketplace Assessments, and effectively use Opportunity Analysis tools

2 TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NATURE OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT In simple words, training and development refers to the imparting of specific skills, abilities, knowledge to an employee. A formal definition of training and development is determined as follows: The need for training and development is determined by the employee’s performance deficiency, computed as follows: Training and development needs = Standard performance – Actual performance We can make a distinction among training, education and development. Such distinctions enables us to acquire a better perspective about the meaning if the term training. Which refers to the process of imparting specific skills, Education, on the other hand is confined theoretically learning in classroom To distinct more, the training is offered in case of operatives whereas development programs are conducted for employees at higher levels. Education however is common to all the employees. Importance of Training and development for the organization There are many benefits of Training and Development to the organization as well as employee. We have categorized as under 1. Benefits for the organization 2. Benefits for the individual 3. Benefits for personnel and human relation, intra group and internal group relation and policy implementation 1. Benefits for the organization a. Improves communication between group and individuals. b. Aid in orientation of new employee and those taking new job through transfer or promotion. c. Provides information on equal opportunities and affirmative action. d. Provides information on other government laws and administration policies. e. Improve interpersonal skills.

3 2. Benefits for the individual a. Helps and individual in making better decision and effective problem solving. b. Through training and development, motivational variables of recognition achievement, growth, responsibility and advancement are internalized and operationalised. c. Aid in encouraging and achieving self–development and self confidence. d. Helps a person handle stress, tension, frustration and conflict. e. Provides information for improving leadership, knowledge, communication skills and attitudes. 3. Benefits for personnel and human relation, intra group and internal group relation and policy implementation a. Improves communication between group and individuals. b. Aid in orientation of new employee and those taking new job through transfer or promotion. c. Provides information on equal opportunities and affirmative action. d. Provides information on other government laws and administration policies. e. Improve interpersonal skills. QUALITY IN EDUCATION “Even the ancient Indian texts in Sanskrit indicate that ancient Indian education meant excellence.” There has been eternal quest for quality through the ages of human history. It has been the driving force for all human endeavours. Quality is the inspiration for transcendence from the mundane to the higher realms of life. It is the source of craving behind the unfolding human civilization through ages immemorial. The phenomenal expansion of education at all levels in the country, the management of quality has become a major challenge. Globalization has added a new dimension; for, it is not just the globalization of economy, but also the globalization of socio-cultural institutions including education. The challenge has narrowed down to global standards. Defining quality in education is a massive challenge since it deals with

Motwani et al. the learning environment and improvement of knowledge. benefits for the customers and benefits for the workers. Quality assurance in education is a multifaceted problem. 2. ISO CERTIFICATION: ISO 9000 standards are rapidly being implemented in many service industries such as educational institutions. Absence of any quality standard specific to education sector has given a scope to implement ISO 9000 quality standards in educational institutions. faculty. (1996) has summarised the benefits of ISO 9000 implementation. Beaver (1994) pointed out that quality management is very essential to reassure that educational institutions perform well and that the customers of education are being well served. The competitive environment demands students to have in depth and practical knowledge. understanding of their specific area along with interpersonal and communication skills. . students. namely the operational results. instructional delivery. In accordance with the classification given in Vloeberghs and Bellens (1996). As a society we want that institution must ensure quality of education to provide able professionals for continuous growth and development Benefits of ISO 9000 standards to educational institution The standards’ long-term contribution to the organizations may be positive. ISO 9000 standards have made strong impact on institutions. neutral or negative. Education is vital for society and no one can ignore its role and contribution. financial results. banking sectors and postal services etc. staff and students. These standards are gaining popularity in educational institutions in particular. The quality of an educational institute is expected to be perfect by various stakeholders such as parents. No wonder then that the concept of quality in education has attracted scholarly attention in India as well as in the west.4 the most sensitive creation on earth – the human beings. Student and their parents are rightfully questioning the quality of curriculum. the benefits are categorized into four groups. ISO 9000 standards in education Education itself is a multi-million dollar industry and is very important for country’s development. industry and society. depending on the way that companies choose to implement them.

improving efficiency. He expressed that time spent checking paper work is a major obligation felt by employees. Doherty (1995) identified the amount of time and effort of faculty and staff required for such activity is a major problem. It also reveals the benefits to the system. This paper presents the study conducted to identify the motives behind seeking the certification. shrinking university budget and lack of finance support by the government are main difficulties mentioned by the respondents. manpower and finance . The employee resistance to change and lack of employees’ commitments are the major hurdles in ISO implementation process. Since last five years many educational institutions in India are adopting ISO 9000 standard as a mean to improve the quality of processes and the educational system. The main difficulties in ISO 9000 implementation are constraints on resources that are time. Faculty and staff feel more obligations and more time consumed in such activities. faculty and students after implementing ISO 9000 standards. Difficulties in ISO 9000 implementation There are number of difficulties in the path to ISO 9000 certification. less time consumption to assess the documents and increased involvement of people.A survey pointed out that the high cost of implementation. volumes of paperwork were seen as the major problems related to ISO 9000. . The high costs of implementation.  Employee’s motivation and encouragement. The strengths of ISO 9000 in institutes such as improving the institutional leadership.5 These include  Improvements in operations and methods  Increased efficiency of organisation.

Students should pursue other non-academic courses along with academic activities to have competitive and employable edge. . Below are a few suggestions to bridge the gap between both the art and craft for enhancing employability in Indian youth.2.6 1. Involve students in the classroom to replicate what they might do in the workplace.2 INDUSTRY PROFILE It is common knowledge that management development and training are two sides of the same coin viz. Students should realise that acquiring qualification is only a comma not a full stop.1 Bridging both Knowledge and the Skills : A solid blend of both soft and hard skills is necessary for becoming a successful corporate professional. This is the climate of economic challenges and changes arising out of rapid globalisation where there is need for both soft and hard skills. Both industry and campus should empathize the limitations of others and work with cooperation for grooming students for employability. Globalisation has ushered in new employment opportunities as well as several challenges for the businesses globally. • • • • • It is essential to include soft skills training programs in every educational institution. Currently educational institutions in India only provide knowledge (art) but not the skills (craft) and attitude demanded by the employers. Training and Placement Officer (TPO) of an educational institution plays a crucial role both within the institution in bringing cooperation between faculty and students as well as outside the institution with the industry in bringing coordination between both the campus and the industry. Human Resource Development (HRD). 1.. They should appreciate and accept the fact that acquiring hard skills is only a comma while possessing soft skills is a full stop.

According to the Center for Asia Pacific Aviation. These similarities are important for the following reasons: • • • • Distinctive business trends lead to changes in the skills requirement which may be common within sectors. those operating in the same business sector often share common problems.2 INDUSTRY-ACADEMIA SKILL GAP IN INDIA The Business Perspective India’s talent shortages are hitting the bottom line of business and are reflected in the increase in attrition rates of skilled manpower and wage inflation in various business verticals. Providers of education and training can effectively meet the sector specific knowledge and skill needs. New Delhi about 3. As per a McKinsey report 73 million workers are needed by 2015 i. 200 additional jobs for pilots will be created by 2010 and Ma Foi Management Consultants Ltd estimate about 2. is one way of helping employers address patterns of industrial change. sector specific skills: .5 million jobs by 2010 in the retail sector. 50% more than today in the automobile and electronic sector.2. Jobs in some sectors may contract with technological change and new patterns of consumer demand. Businesses can become more productive when they have appropriately skilled employees. Recognizing the sectoral needs is essential and critical. While there are skills common to every sector. Although firms may compete and be structured differently. They use similar technologies and face similar challenges.7 1. To be able to identify effect of economic trends on changes in employment patterns requires a strong sector perspective. but in other sectors. This situation is compounded by the increase in demand for skilled and semi – skilled manpower in various sectors. In strategic organizations. to develop models of partnerships and to provide value to the changing employment patterns. firms tend to learn from within their own sector what constitutes good business practice. those same factors may provide new jobs.e. Addressing the needs of specific sectors therefore.

there is enough justification for an increased assessment of the Quality of the country’s educational institutions. viz. these institutions assumed that Quality could be determined by their internal resources.. Some of the leading training organizations providing training to education institutions are • • • • • • • TÜV Rheinland-Academy Ma Foi Randstad’s Training Infosys HCL Wipro Hewlett Packard Cognizant IMPLEMENTING QUALITY IN HIGHER EDUCATION The overall scenario of higher education in India does not match with the global Quality standards.8 • Drive the workforce skill development in their sectors that improves productivity. Hence. 1. Some of the gaps are identified below: • • • • Lack of Industry orientation – the essence of the system still follows examination based evaluation processes and not project based assessments. Lack of industry experience of the teachers themselves. public service improvement and employability. business growth. faculty with an .3 Gaps in the Indian Higher Education System: Very often company executives express the mismatch that exists between their expectation from the management students and what is been provided to the management students as educational inputs.Since all educational institutions are under the ambit of UGC regulations the process of re-evaluation of course content becomes non-flexible. Rigidity . rightly understanding the importance of the ITES in a post-industrial economy. Traditionally. Lack of attention towards pure sciences – Even countries like China and Vietnam have been concentrating on the same.2.

9 impressive set of degrees and experience detailed at the end of the institute’s admission brochure. students directly receive the teaching services and hence are the customers of the teacher. Quality concepts in Higher Education Quality in industries could be defined as adhering to the stated or implied performance requirements of the customer. but with interpretations as varied as the individuals. In Quality management. Although. an ultra-modern campus. and their future employers are the customers of this product (education). there are certain limitations in adopting the corporate methods of Quality management because educational institutes cannot be considered as industry and the products are not their students. and the level of competency they are expected to attain should also be defined in consultation with them.. listening. assimilating. viewing. or by its definable and assessable outputs.. This view of determining Quality in higher education. . understanding. The competency of “problem solving” can be developed by solving text-book type of problems and the expertise so developed can be used in handling real-life situations. “Recall” amounts to a competency of gaining knowledge by way of reading. and problem solving. does not measure the competencies students develop through the courses offered. etc. the customer is defined as the next person in line. but it is the education imparted to the students. In an educational institute. number of books and journals in the library. it is rather difficult to define the Quality in educational institutions. The competencies are recall. popularly termed as the “valueaddition” approach. their parents. Students. The students should understand and accept these concepts. which requires explanations and vocabulary development. and demonstrating it by giving ideas. the Quality management concepts in business and in education remain same. efficient use of resources. and size of the endowment. predict. Even the supplier customer concept of Quality management cannot be applied in education because the customers do not understand what is to be acquired. and evaluate cause and effect. producing uniquely educated. viz. “Understanding” is comprehension. whereas the faculty and the Institute’s administrators are the suppliers of the services. and demonstrating it when required. or what is of good Quality. highly satisfied and employable graduates.

the Quality management concepts ensure that curriculum coherence increases. education is improved. SOME OF THE NABCB ACCREDITED CERTIFICATION / INSPECTION BODIES ARE • • • • • TÜV Rheinland TÜV TÜV SUD Bureau Veritas DNV . It is. students enjoy learning. If the teaching and learning process conforms to their ideas about what is Quality education. therefore necessary that the institutes of higher education accept the mantra of ‘Quality’ and provide for a standardised assessment of what exactly the students are able to do (that they were not able to do before) as a result of their education. and teachers and students find greater joy in their work and are able to make positive contributions to the society.10 The student’s definition of a Quality experience has to be found through discussions and observations of what gives them joy of learning. Teachers need to discuss such questions with the students as: Why are you here? What are you trying to do? What does it mean to you to do it well? How the teacher can help you in doing it well? A teacher has to build up a consensus in a class regarding what constitutes a Quality experience. Once a mutually agreed purpose is established. not just enjoyment without learning. productivity of teachers is enhanced.

industrial facilities and plants as well as consumer goods. Training and Consulting (TÜV Rheinland Bildung und Consulting) and Systems (Systeme). TÜV Rheinland has bundled its more than 2. It has over 400 locations in 61 countries on all five continents. using technical innovations. Today TÜV Rheinland is a global leader in the areas of toy. With a workforce of more than 13. society and industry cannot grow. TÜV Rheinland (German pronunciation: [ˈtʏf ˈʁaɪnlant]) is a global provider of technical. Life Care (TÜV Rheinland Leben und Gesundheit). 300. products and equipment in a safe.1 billion (40% outside of Germany). Germany. The TÜV Rheinland Group employs more than 12. COMPANY PROFILE TÜV RHEINLAND TÜV Rheinland Group is a leading group for the provision of technical services worldwide. For this very reason.500 services into a portfolio of 42 global business fields. The areas of testing include motor vehicles. Germany. safety and certification services. The group's guiding principle is to achieve sustained . Consumer goods for example can be tested and certified according to the German GS Mark by TÜV Rheinland.3. € 1. TÜV Rheinland is 137 years old and its headquarters are in Cologne.3. These are again combined into 6 business streams: Industrial Services (TÜV Rhineland Industry Service).1 The Brand: TÜV Rheinland. The motivating factor for TÜV Rheinland employees is the conviction that without technical progress. responsible manner is of decisive importance. Mobility (TÜV Rheinland Mobilität).11 1.and furniture testing as well as in the assessment and certification of Photovoltaic’s 1. 000 people in 360 locations in 62 countries and generates annual revenues of € 1. TÜV Rheinland has been a member of the Global Compact of the UN since 2006. Products (TÜV Rheinland Produkte). The guiding principle in the Group is sustainable development of safety and quality standards. it achieves turnover of approx.1 billion in 2008. Precisely Right. TÜV Rheinland was founded in 1872 and has its headquarters in Cologne.

12 development of safety and quality in order to meet the challenges arising from the interaction between man. expertise and a strong global network to contribute to the further development of products. 1. promoting. the Executive Board has adopted a binding Group Policy on Values and Accountability. when a group of entrepreneurs founded the Dampfkessel-Überwachungs-Vereine (DÜV) or Steam Boiler Inspectorate as their own independent organisation dedicated to ensuring technical safety.3. The company can trace its origins back to 1872. the corporate group is active in 61 countries and in 39 Business Fields. 1. technology and the environment (thus the triangular logo). Today. In order to set out this understanding in detail. ecological and economic responsibilities. services. . examining and certifying – these services inspire our customers every day.3.2 Values and Accountability In its Corporate Mission Statement. TÜV Rheinland are working towards a future that can fulfills the needs of both mankind and the environment in the long term. Advising. The Group Policy on Values and Accountability is designed to safeguard the role of the TÜV Rheinland Group as a leading provider of quality – based on principles and policies that are applied worldwide in equal measure along with suitable benchmarks with regard to neutrality. People and companies around the globe have placed their trust in the TÜV Rheinland Group since 1872. In so doing. developing.3 History The history of the TÜV Rheinland Group is the story of its growth from a regional testing organisation into an international provider of technical services. systems and people and make them more competitive. the TÜV Rheinland Group acknowledges its social. conscientiousness and objectivity. TÜV Rheinland use new ideas.

merge to form the new TÜV Rheinland Berlin-Brandenburg e. Restructuring of the corporate group. • Entry into the United Nations Global Compact initiative. Technische Überwachungsvereine (Technical Inspections Organizations) and Rheinischer DÜV becomes TÜV Köln. 1877 1900 1918 1936 1962 1967 1970 1992 1997 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 . the organisation was commissioned to carry out mandatory inspections. Integration of LGA Beteiligungs GmbH along with two leading Hungarian testing institutes.V. TÜV Köln with 600 employees and six offices is renamed TÜV Rheinland e.V. Merger with TÜV Pfalz e.V.the forerunner of today's TÜV Rheinland Group. • The new Business Stream. TÜV Rheinland Holding AG (a holding corporation) is formed to oversee the operations of the corporate group.V. First foreign TÜV Rheinland subsidiary is established. DÜV becomes TÜV.. DÜV expands its activities to include mining and energy. Integration of Brazil’s two leading testing institutes into TÜV Rheinland do Brasil. DÜV inspects the first automobiles and administers driving license tests. Soon afterwards. entrepreneurs set up the “Verein zur Überwachung der Dampfkessel” (an organization to inspect steam boilers) in the districts of Elberfeld and Barmen. Germany to ensure the safety of their production facilities .13 1872 Acting on their own initiative. TÜV Berlin-Brandenburg e. which ultimately becomes the TÜV Rheinland Group. “Life Care” is established. centralizing operations under the umbrella of TÜV Rheinland Holding AG. and TÜV Rheinland e.V. First domestic TÜV Rheinland subsidiary is established. to form TÜV Rheinland Berlin Brandenburg Pfalz e. The founding of a subsidiary in Australia sees the TÜV Rheinland Group establish a presence in 60 countries and on every continent through its own offices and subsidiaries. Over 80 operators of steam boilers amalgamate to form the “Rheinischer Dampfkessel-Überwachungsverein (DÜV) Cöln-Düsseldorf”.V.

Clean Development Mechanism 5. System Certification 3. Consulting and Logistics Elevators. Training and Consultant Industry Services • • • • • • Mobility • • • • Products • • • • • • Electrical and Electronic Mechanical and Machinery Services NABL Accreditation Product and Environmental Analysis Market Access Services Ergonomics and Usability Homologation Guided Transport System Automotive and Aviation Technology Transport Telematics.4 Products and Services Products and Services of TÜV Rheinland India Private Ltd are listed below.3. Conveyor and Machinery Technology Electrical Engineering and Building Technology Industrial Engineering Safety Energy and Environmental Technologies Pressure Equipment and Materials Technology Civil Engineering . Inspection 4. Plant Engineering. Product Safety Testing & Certification 2.14 1. 1.

medical devices. medical equipment.CB. Our TÜV Rheinland NABL accredited. photo therapy equipment. ISO 13485. photography equipment.which tests and certifies according to IS 13450. Web Services TÜV Rheinland STAR 1. laboratory as per ISO/IEC17025 in Bangalore is well-equipped to test a range of products.national and international. along with organizational and systems consulting. ISO 8359. oxygen concentrators/ baby warmers. project management assistance. Life Care The TÜV Rheinland Group offers a wide range of services in the field of health – from quality checks for high-tech equipment at clinics to psychology consulting services in companies. We are a globally recognized certification body . EN / IEC 60601.15 TÜV Rheinland evaluates tests and certifies the safety and quality of products in virtually all categories: from toys to state-of-the-art computer equipment and heavy industrial machinery . temporary employment and transfer agency services. . electronic and wireless equipment/ devices. and publishing products of the highest professional standards. Education and Consulting • • • Professional Education Business Consulting Vocational Training Systems • • • • Certification of Management systems IT and Communication System Security TÜV dotCOM. ISO 14971.3.5 TÜV Rheinland Academy The TÜV Rheinland Group offers a broad range of vocational and advanced training courses. including house-hold.

TÜV Rheinland Academy Objective • • • To improve the placement opportunities through developing unique skill and knowledge. Our training courses are specially designed to suit the client’s needs and customized for bridging the knowledge gap. IT and communication. Additional modules are offered in areas including welding. We have been associated with 50 educational institutions and 150 companies across India for providing services on Technical. operating licenses. To enhance the knowledge of students on Industrial Practices and Requirements.16 Their education and consulting service is popularly known as "TÜV Rheinland Academy" which is one of our six business fields and is operational in India offering services and support to industry and educational institutions in professional. TÜV Rheinland Academy is operational in India offering services & support. the organization and the processes are only as good as the employees that embody and shape them. Expertise and management skills provide the ideal foundations for a company. TÜV Rheinland Academy is offering services for both primary and secondary educational sectors in rural and urban areas. TÜV Rheinland Academy is deeply committed to introduce various concepts in educational sectors in order to promote the Quality practices. enhance efficiency and improve productivity. As a result. as well as industry. CNC. However. electrical engineering. vocational & industry-relevant training. companies can choose according to the company's needs. skills and competency in bearing ultimate responsibility for effective performance of individuals. To illustrate the importance of role. We associate with your educational institution to provide our services. . TÜV Rheinland Akademie has developed a comprehensive module program so that training companies can systematically and specifically expand the professional areas of application of their trainees. Non-technical and Management Oriented training and consultancy.

Aid in orientation of new employee and those taking new job through transfer or promotion. analysis and presentation of market information that describes and predicts the size. . Helps and individual in making better decision and effective problem solving. quality problems can be identified. wishing to implement ISO 9000 quality management systems. have number of motives behind its implementation Documentation improves understanding among faculty and staff and can be used to train newly hired staff. Motives of ISO 9000 standards Educational institutions. intra group and internal group relation and policy implementation Improves communication between group and individuals. We have categorized as under • • • • • • • Benefits for the organization Benefits for the individual Benefits for personnel and human relation.17 1.4 LITERATURE REVIEW Market Opportunity Analysis is concerned with the acquisition. distribution and growth of the market opportunity. There are many benefits of Training and Development to the organization as well as employee. So market and government accreditation benefits are generated. Through training and development. corrected and prevented in a systematic manner. codification. Aid in orientation of new employee and those taking new job through transfer or promotion. growth. motivational variables of recognition achievement. responsibility and advancement are internalized and operationalised. • • Improves communication between group and individuals. The overall systems of educational institute can be streamlined.

• The effective implementation of these quality management systems could provide a foundation on which TQM could be attained. Yeung. 3. Number of researchers provided reviews and case studies of implementing TQM in higher education (Lindstorm. Lo and Sculli. attitude to implementation and confidence of understanding the standard among senior management affect the development of a QMS and subsequently organisational performance.K. public enterprise and private sector. 1994. Effectiveness of ISO 9000 standards 405 implementation faced by small and medium scale industries of India by Barbara and Maling (2000) • They suggested eight dimensions for evaluating the impact of ISO 9000 on organisations. Waks and Frank. 1996. 1997.Mishra • The purpose of the this paper is to provide the backdrop of the socioeconomic and political scenario of India. discuss the role of management development and training in the context of the economic challenges confronting the country and the opportunities arising thereof. Owlia and Aspinwall. Lee and Chan (2003) studied the objectives of getting ISO certification. 2.18 Some studies have been done to know the extend the understanding of market opportunities for training organizations and also to estimate the benefits factors and factors affecting training program 1. Management Development training The Indian experience by R. Mittal et al. critically analyse the status of management development and training at the levels of the government. (2002) conducted an empirical study to find out the benefits and problems of ISO 9000 . 1999). Empirical study on the contribution of ISO 9000 standards towards total quality management by Gotzamani (2004) • It revealed long-term effectiveness and contribution of quality management system in Greek industry.

viz. and the level of competency they are expected to attain should also be defined in consultation with them. and size of the endowment. efficient use of resources. and demonstrating it when required. Although. The students should understand and accept these concepts.19 IMPLEMENTING QUALITY IN HIGHER EDUCATION There are many important Quality management tools and techniques that have been fully tried out in industry. which requires explanations and vocabulary development. listening. QUALITY CONCEPTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION Quality in industries could be defined as adhering to the stated or implied performance requirements of the customer. “Recall” amounts to a competency of gaining knowledge by way of reading. does not measure the competencies students develop through the courses offered. the Quality management concepts in business and in education remain same. The competencies are recall. Hence. but with interpretations as varied as the individuals. there is enough justification for an increased assessment of the Quality of the country’s educational institutions. producing uniquely educated.. number of books and journals in the library. assimilating. The competency of “problem solving” can be developed by solving text-book type of problems and the expertise so developed can be used in handling real-life situations. popularly termed as the “valueaddition” approach. highly satisfied and employable graduates. . these institutions assumed that Quality could be determined by their internal resources. viz. Traditionally. This view of determining Quality in higher education. faculty with an impressive set of degrees and experience detailed at the end of the institute’s admission brochure. The overall scenario of higher education in India does not match with the global Quality standards. or by its definable and assessable outputs. viewing. These tools would diagnose a system and identify potential for improvement. etc. and demonstrating it by giving ideas. and evaluate cause and effect. an ultra-modern campus. predict. writes Dr (Ms) Asha Tewari. it is rather difficult to define the Quality in educational institutions. understanding. and problem solving. “Understanding” is comprehension.. which could be adopted in the field of education..

students directly receive the teaching services and hence are the customers of the teacher. are expected to provide knowledge. or what is of good Quality. In an educational institute. Even the supplier customer concept of Quality management cannot be applied in education because the customers do not understand what is to be acquired. “Knowledge” enables them to understand what they learn in relation to what they already know. through their curriculum. Once a mutually agreed purpose is established. the Quality management concepts ensure that curriculum coherence increases. If the teaching and learning process conforms to their ideas about what is Quality education. their parents. and teachers and students find greater joy in their work and are able to make positive contributions to the society. but it is the education imparted to the students. know-how. The student’s definition of a Quality experience has to be found through discussions and observations of what gives them joy of learning. therefore necessary that the institutes of higher education accept the mantra of ‘Quality’ and provide for a standardised assessment of what exactly the students are able to do (that they were not able to do before) as a result of their education. and character to the students. wisdom. In Quality management. the customer is defined as the next person in line. and their future employers are the customers of this product (education). EXPECTATIONS FROM EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS Institutes of higher education. students enjoy learning. It is. “Know-how” takes them beyond merely . not just enjoyment without learning. productivity of teachers is enhanced. education is improved. Teachers need to discuss such questions with the students as: Why are you here? What are you trying to do? What does it mean to you to do it well? How the teacher can help you in doing it well? A teacher has to build up a consensus in a class regarding what constitutes a Quality experience. whereas the faculty and the Institute’s administrators are the suppliers of the services.20 there are certain limitations in adopting the corporate methods of Quality management because of educational institutes cannot be considered as industry and the products are not their students. Students. and creates an ability to generalise from their experiences.

21 understanding and enables them to put their knowledge to work. They think that these elements are to be taken care of by someone else. honesty. and ability to work alone and in a group. . curiosity. know-how. the two important human Qualities. to work together. most of the educational institutions hardly pay any attention to the development of either wisdom or character. Character development is recognised by certain traits. truthfulness. integrity. “Wisdom” makes them capable of deciding their priorities.. However. self-esteem. are best developed by making students participate in creative team activities. Many educators have not developed wisdom themselves and hence throw up their hands at the thought of imparting it to the students. viz. coupled with motivation. cooperativeness. and to develop the social skills required in a society where teamwork is essential to success. wherein they learn to set priorities. initiative. and wisdom. ‘Character’ development is the combined effect of knowledge. Wisdom and character.

To enhance the student interaction with corporate.  To examine the benefits and importance of training program. 4. 2. To enhances the corporate exposure in the educational institutions..  To examine the clients perception towards accreditation process.  To analyze the critical factors in decision making of training program. there is a growing pool for outsourcing of training activities in educational institutions.Academy in educational institutions.22 CHAPTER II 2.  To assess the awareness level for TÜV Rheinland . Secondary objectives:  To study the benefits of training program in educational institutions.2 Objectives Primary objectives:  To study the opportunities for TÜV Rheinland India Pvt Ltd.  To study the factors influencing the training program. 3. To enhances the soft skills among the students. in educational institutions. . the reason is 1.  To create awareness about the TÜV Rheinland training program.  To analyse the critical factors influencing decision making for training program. 2. To attain competitive advantage through implementing training programs.1 NEED & IMPORTANCE OF STUDY In recent trends. Need for this study is to find out the  To find out the opportunities for TÜV Rheinland training program.

23  To analyse the benefits of accreditation process and factors hindering accreditation process for educational institutions. 2.3 SCOPE: The study has been undertaken mainly to highlight the opportunities for TÜV Rheinland training program in educational institutions and in industries and also to create awareness about TÜV Rheinland training program in education institutions. The scope of the study is as follows:  This study critically analyse the market opportunities for TÜV Rheinland India Pvt Ltd.,training program specific to districts in Tamilnadu, so it will be beneficial for the TÜV in the estimation of market potential for TÜV Rheinland training program.  This study reveals the perception of different institutions to implement training program.  This study examines peception of training program in educational institutions , so according to result the training program can be modified to increase the effectiveness of training program  This study reveals factors influencing organisation not to take up the training program, so the restriction factors can be analysed to overcome it, and implement training to the organisations  This study also reveals the advantages/disadvantages of ISO, So through this opportunities for system certification can be analysed in the organisations and disadvantages can be rectified by proper guidance  This study examines the changes in organisation after implementation of ISO and also reasons for organisation not preferring ISO, so in this issue guidance can be given in the future to overcome the constraints and to get ISO certification. 2.4 GEOGRAPHICAL AREA:

24 This research study has been carried out for TÜV RHEINLAND Academy in Coimbatore, Salem and Namakkal Districts of Tamilnadu. The location is selected according to the reference of the organisation.

25 2.5 LIMITATIONS: This project is based on the perceptions of the respondents Hence the findings and suggestions are limited to the same.  The findings limited to specific areas  The findings of the study cannot be generalized to any other industry.

.26 2. The difference is significant. the larger the different smaller the likelihood. The smaller the difference greater the likelihood that our hypothesized value for the mean is correct. in this case this study explores and analyse the awareness and interest for TÜV Rheinland. It’s a exploratory type of research this study explores what is happening? Ie. NULL HYPOTHESIS H0: There is no significant difference between the variables. the methods are logically chosen and adopted so that the results are capable of being evaluated either by the researcher or by others. Primary data for the study is collected from the management representatives of selected educational institutions and in industries.6. located in the districts of Tamilnadu(Coimbatore. 2.2 RESEARCH DESIGN: This study is a descriptive and exploratory type of research.6. Salem. it’s a descriptive research because this study describes what is happening? In this case it describes the benefits of training program for students and faculties in educational institutions and also describes the benefits of accreditation process. Respondents were management representatives of educational institutions and industries. located in districts of Tamilnadu.6 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY Research methodology is used to systematically solve the problem. 2.Academy.1 HYPOTHESIS Hypothesis testing begins with an assumption that we take population parameter a hypothesis is a supposition made as a basis for reasoning a hypothesis in statistics is simple a quantitative statement about a population. The study is descriptive in nature. Namakkal) . Considering the objective of the study. ALTERNATE HYPOTHESIS Ha: There is significant difference between the variables.

6.4 POPULATION FRAME: Population frame is approximately 100 institutions.6.6 SAMPLING TECHNIQUE: The sample technique used in the study is simple random sampling technique.  Each institution is considered as one respondent.3 SAMPLE DESIGN SAMPLING UNIT: Data has been collected from their various management representatives. through interview / interaction with clients data are collected.6.6.6.5 SAMPLING SIZE: The sample size for the study is 60 educational institutions. 2.27 2. 2. 2. and it’s recorded in the questionnaire. 2. .7 DATA COLLECTION METHOD:  The data is collected through questionnaire method.

 The ranking analysis is done for the benefits of training program to faculties and students. number of departments in the institutions. students and faculty training program. benefits of organization due to accreditation process and endurance factors in accreditation factors. benefits of organization due to accreditation process and endurance factors in accreditation factors. the analysis and interpretation is done with in the order to help the researcher to find out various factors for analyzing the market opportunities for TÜV Rheinland India Pvt Ltd. benefits of training program to faculties and students. critical factors in training decision making. The tests used for the analysis are  Simple percentage analysis for various factors like organization category. .square test done to analyze the relationship between the organization category and knowledge of TÜV Academy. critical factors in training decision making.28 CHAPTER III ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION The date collected from the respondents is analysed and interpreted with various tools such as SPSS package and MS Excel.  Chi .

among the total of 60 educational institutions 51.1.3% are Arts and Science Colleges.1 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON ORGANIZATION CATEGORY No.7% are engineering colleges.7 26. 1 2 3 4 Organization category Engineering college Management institute Arts & Science college Polytechnic college Total Percentage 51. and 3.7% are Management institutes.3 100.No.1 ORGANIZATION CATEGORY Organization category 60 50 40 30 20 Percent 10 0 Engineering college Arts & Science colle Polytechnic college Management institute Organization category Interpretation: The above table and graph shows.1 SIMPLE PERCENTAGE ANALYSIS TABLE 3. of Respondents 31 16 11 2 60 S.3 3.0 CHART 3. 26.29 3. 18. .3% are Polytechnic colleges.1.7 18.

another 8. .3 100. 1 2 3 4 5 Number of Departments Size in the Institution 1-4 departments 5-8 department 9-12 departments 12-16 departments >16 departments Total No.3% of institutions with 9.7 8.3% of institutions with >16 departments.12 departments.No.3 28.7% of institutions are with 5-8 departments.3 31. 23.3% educational institutions are with 1-4 departments.3 8.2 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON NUMBER OF DEPARTMENTS S.0 CHART 3.1. 8.30 TABLE 3.1. of Respondents 14 19 5 5 17 60 Percentage 23.2 NUMBER OF DEPARTMENTS Number of Departments 40 30 20 10 Percent 0 1-4 departments 9-12 departments >16 departments 5-8 deparments 12-16 departments Number of Departments Interpretation: The above table and graph shows among the educational institutions.3% institutions are with12-16 departments and28. 31.

Number of students No.4 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON NUMBER OF STUDENTS S.3 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON NUMBER OF YEARS OF EXISTENCE Numbers of years of S.0 35.3 21.7 100.0 CHART 3. of Percentage . TABLE 3.3 NUMBER OF YEARS OF EXISTENCE Number of Years of existence 40 30 20 10 Percent 0 1-4 years 5-8 years 9-12 years >16 years Number of Years of existence Interpretation: The above table and graph shows the respondents among the educational institutions related to number years of existence 15% of institutions are with 1-4 years of existence.3% of institutions have 912 years of existence and about 30% of institutions have >16 years of existence.1. 35% of institutions have 5-8 years of existence.No. of Percentage 15.No. 1 2 3 4 existence 1-4 years 5-8 years 9-12 years >16 years Total Respondents 9 21 17 13 60 No.0 28.31 TABLE 3.1.1. 28.

0 CHART 3. 21.7 18.3 36.3 23.32 Respondents 1 2 3 4 5 101-300 students 301-500 students 501-700 students >701 students Total 13 11 14 22 60 21.4 NUMBER OF STUDENTS Number of Students 40 30 20 10 Percent 0 101-300 students 501-700 students >701 students 301-500 studentsi Number of Students Interpretation: The above table and graph shows the respondents among the educational institutions.3% of institutions has 301-500 students.1. 18. 23.7 100. .3% of institutions has 501-700 students and about 40% of institutions have >701 students.7% of institutions has a student strength of 101-300 students.

0 100.0 CHART 3.0 50. of Respondents 30 30 60 Percentage 50. 1 2 3 Number of faculties <100 faculties 101-300 faculties Total No.No. TABLE 3. 50% of institutions have Faculties strength of <100 faculties and another 50% of educational institutions have 101-300 faculties.1.5 NUMBER OF FACULTIES Number of Faculties 60 50 40 30 20 Percent 10 0 <100 f aculties 101-300 faculties Number of Faculties Interpretation: The above table and graph shows the respondents among the educational institutions.1.1.6 .33 TABLE 3.5 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON NUMBER OF FACULTIES S.

23.7 23.7% of institutions conducts only <5 training Programs for students.6 NUMBER OF TRAINING PROGRAM FOR STUDENTS Number of Training Program for students 40 30 20 10 Percent 0 <5 Programs 6-10 Programs 11-15 Programs 16-20 Programs Number of Training Program for students Interpretation: The above table and graph shows the respondents among educational institutions. 36.3% of institutions conducts 11-15 Programs and about 22% of institutions conducts 16-20 training for students across the year. 1 2 3 4 Percentage 36.34 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON NUMBER OF TRAINING PROGRAM FOR STUDENTS Number of training program for students across the year <5 Programs 6-10 Programs 11-15 Programs 16-20 Programs Total No. .3% of institutions conducts 6-10 Programs for students.3 18.3 21. 18.7 100. of Respondents 22 14 11 13 60 S.No.0 CHART 3.1.

3 1.0 CHART 3. and only 1.No. 1 2 No.7 NUMBER OF TRAINING PROGRAM FOR FACULTIES Number of Training Program for faculties 120 100 80 60 40 Percent 20 0 <5 Programs 6-10 Programs Number of Training Program for faculties Interpretation: The above table and graph shows the respondents among educational institutions.1. 98. of Respondents 59 1 60 Percentage 98.7% of institutions conducts 6-10 training Programs for faculties.1.3% of institutions conducts only <5 training Programs for faculties.7 100. .7 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON NUMBER OF TRAINING PROGRAM FOR FACULTIES NUMBER OF TRAINING PROGRAM FOR FACULTIES <5 Programs 6-10 Programs Total S.35 TABLE 3.

7% of institutions conducts technical programs frequently and 33.7 33.0 11.0 CHART 3.1.1.36 TABLE 3.8 RATING FOR TECHNICAL TRAINING PROGRAM Rank Technical Training Program 60 50 40 30 20 Percent 10 0 Most f requently Frequently Rarely Rank Technical Training Program Interpretation: The above table and graph shows the respondents among the educational institutes. 11. 55% of institutions conducts technical training program most frequently. . of Respondents 33 7 20 60 Percentage 55. 1 2 3 Technical Training Program Most frequently Frequently Rarely Total No.No.8 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON RATING FOR TECHNICAL TRAINING PROGRAM S.3% conducts technical programs rarely.3 100.

3 71. 13.1. 13. 1 2 3 Higher Competitive Advantage Strongly agree Agree Neutral Total Respondents 8 43 9 60 Percentage 13.9 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON GENERAL TRAINING BENEFITS TO THE ORGANISATION No.1.10 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON GENERAL TRAINING BENEFITS TO THE ORGANISATION . TABLE 3. of S.0 CHART 3.No.7 15.0 100.3% institutions agree the competitive advantage as a training benefit and 15% of institutions had given neutral response.9 GENERAL TRAINING BENEFITS TO THE ORGANISATIONHIGHER COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE Traing benifits-Higher competitive advantage 80 60 40 20 Percent 0 Strongly agree Agree Neutral Traing benifits-Higher competitive advantage Interpretation: The above table and graph shows the respondents among the educational institutions.3% of institutions strongly agree that higher competitive advantage as a benefit to organisation as a result of training program.1.37 TABLE 3.

10 GENERAL TRAINING BENEFITS TO THE ORGANISATIONENHANCED PERFOMANCE LEVELS Traing benifits-Enhanced Perfomance Levels 70 60 50 40 30 20 Percent 10 0 Strongly agree Agree Neutral Traing benifits-Enhanced Perfomance Levels Interpretation: The above table and graph shows the respondents among the educational institutions.0 58. 1 2 3 Enhanced Performance Levels Strongly agree Agree Neutral Total Respondents 13 37 10 60 Percentage 21. 61.0 CHART 3. of S.7 100.No.7% of institutions had given neutral response.No. 21. of Respondents 6 35 18 Percentage 10.7 16.7 61.1.3 30.7% of institutions strongly agree that enhanced performance level as a benefit to organisation as a result of training program. 1 2 3 Better Quality Standards Strongly agree Agree Neutral No.11 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON GENERAL TRAINING BENEFITS TO THE ORGANISATION S.38 No.1.0 .7% institutions agree the enhanced performance level in the organisation as a training benefit and 16. TABLE 3.

3% institutions agree the better quality in the organisation as a training benefit and 30% of institutions had given neutral response and 1.39 4 Disagree Total 1 60 1. . 58.7 100.1. 10% of institutions strongly agree that better quality standards as a benefit to organisation as a result of training program.0 CHART 3.7% of institutions disagree that better quality standards as a benefit to organisation as a result of training program.11 GENERAL TRAINING BENEFITS TO THE ORGANISATIONBETTER QUALITY STANDARDS Traing benifits-Better Quality Standards 70 60 50 40 30 20 Percent 10 0 Strongly agree Agree Neutral Disagree Traing benifits-Better Quality Standards Interpretation: The above table and graph shows the respondents among the educational institutions.

3% of institutions strongly agree that less industry-academia gap as a training benefit to organisation as a result of training program.7 4 Disagree 1 1. 18. .7% of institutions had given neutral response and 1.12 GENERALTRAINING BENEFITS TO THE ORGANISATIONTraing benifits-Less Academia-Industry Gap 60 50 40 30 20 Percent 10 0 Strongly agree Agree Neutral Disagree Traing benifits-Less Academia-Industry Gap Interpretation: The above table and graph shows the respondents among the educational institutions.12 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON GENERAL TRAINING BENEFITS TO THE ORGANISATION Less AcademiaS.3 2 Agree 32 53.7% of institutions disagree that decrease in industryacademia is the benefit to organisation as a result of training program.1. 53.3% institutions agree that decrease in industry-academia gap as a training benefit and 26. No.7 Total 60 100.3 3 Neutral 16 26.1.40 TABLE 3.No. of Respondents Percentage Industry Gap 1 Strongly agree 11 18.0 CHART 3.

1.3% of institutions strongly agree that changes in faculties-highly motivated workforce seen after the faculty development program.3% institutions agree that highly motivated workforce is the change seen after faculties development program and 8.3% of institutions had given neutral response.3 8.3 73.HIGHLY MOTIVATED WORK FORCE Traing Changes-Highly Motivated workforce 80 60 40 20 Percent 0 Strongly agree Agree Neutral Traing Changes-Highly Motivated workforce Interpretation: The above table and graph shows the respondents among the educational institutions. .0 CHART 3.No. of Respondents 11 44 5 60 Percentage 18.13 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON CHANGES WERE SEEN AFTER THAT FACULTY DEVEOPMENT TRAINING S. 73.3 100.41 TABLE 3. 1 2 3 Highly Motivated Workforce Strongly agree Agree Neutral Total No.13 CHANGES WERE AFTER THE FACULTY DEVEOPMENT TRAINING .1. 18.

0 53.3 36. 1 2 3 4 Better Time Management strongly agree Agree Neutral Disagree Total No. 53.7 5.7% of institutions had given neutral response and 5% of institutes disagree that better time management is the changes seen in faculties after faculty development training program.15 .1.42 TABLE 3. of Respondents 3 32 22 3 60 Percentage 5.BETTER TIME MANAGEMENT Better time management 60 50 40 30 20 Percent 10 0 strongly agree Agree Neutral Disagree Better time management Interpretation: The above table and graph shows the respondents among the educational institutions.1.14 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON CHANGES WERE SEEN AFTER THE FACULTY DEVEOPMENT TRAINING S. 5% of institutions strongly agree that changes in faculties-better time management seen after the faculty development program.0 100.No. TABLE 3.1.14 CHANGES AFTER THE FACULTY DEVEOPMENT TRAINING .0 CHART 3.3% institutions agree that better time management is the change seen after faculties development program and 36.

7 28.3% of institutions suggested it as least significant change and 11. 20% of the institutions suggested that enhanced communication and presentation skills as a most significant changes seen amongst the student after training session. TABLE 3.43 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON MOST SIGNIFICANT CHANGES SEEN AFTER THE TRAINING SESSION AMONGST THE STUDENTS S.7 100. of Respondents 12 16 17 8 7 60 Percentage 20.0 26.3 13.No.15 MOST SIGNIFICANT CHANGES SEEN AFTER THE TRAINING SESSION AMONGST THE STUDENTS Rank traing changes-Enhanced Communication & Presentation skills 30 20 10 Percent 0 Most Significant Signif icant Neutral Not Significant Least Signif icant Rank traing changes-Enhanced Communication & Presentation skills Interpretation: The above table and graph shows the respondents among the educational institutions.28.3% institutions had given neutral response. 13.16 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON MOST SIGNIFICANT CHANGES SEEN AFTER THE TRAINING SESSION AMONGST THE STUDENTS . 1 2 3 4 5 Enhanced Communication And Presentation Skills Most Significant Significant Neutral Least Significant Not Significant Total No.1.1.3 11. 26.7% of institutions suggested that enhanced communication & presentation skills is not a significant change seen amongst the students after training session.7% institutions suggested it as a significant change.0 CHART 3.

7 4 Least Significant 7 11. 10% institutions suggested it as a significant change. 11.16 MOST SIGNIFICANT CHANGES SEEN AFTER THE TRAINING SESSION AMONGST THE STUDENTS Rank traing changes-Better Career Decision & Corporatr exposure 40 30 20 10 Percent 0 Most Significant Significant Neutral Not Signif icant Least Signif icant Rank traing changes-Better Career Decision & Corporatr exposure Interpretation: The above table and graph shows the respondents among the educational institutions.3 2 Significant 6 10.7 5 Not Significant 14 23.7% of institutions suggested it as least significant change and 23.0 3 Neutral 13 21.0 CHART 3.3 Total 60 100.No. 21. No. of Respondents Percentage Corporate Exposure 1 Most Significant 20 33.3% of the institutions suggested that better carrier decision and corporate exposure as a most significant changes seen amongst the student after training session.3% of institutions suggested that better carrier decision and corporate exposure is significant change seen amongst the students after training session.17 not a .1.7% institutions had given neutral response. TABLE 3.1.44 Better Carrier Decision And S. 33.

7 2 Significant 19 31.7% of the institutions suggested that Increased Confidence in facing GD/Interview as a most significant changes seen amongst the student after training session. TABLE 3.17 MOST SIGNIFICANT CHANGES SEEN AFTER THE TRAINING SESSION AMONGST THE STUDENTS Rank traing changes. 46.0 CHART 3. of 40 30 20 Percent 10 0 Most Signif icant Significant Neutral Not Significant Least Significant Rank traing changes.Increased confidence in facing GD/Interview Interpretation: The above table and graph shows the respondents among the educational institutions.1. 11. 3% institutions had given neutral response.1.No.18 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON TRANSFORMATIONS SEEN IN FACULTIES AFTER THE FACULTIES DEVELOPMENT TRAINING . 31.Increased confidence in facing GD/Interview 50 S. Increased Confidence In Facing No.7 3 Neutral 3 5.0 Total 60 100.45 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON MOST SIGNIFICANT CHANGES SEEN AFTER THE TRAINING SESSION AMONGST THE STUDENTS Percentage GD And Interview Respondents 1 Most Significant 28 46.7% institutions suggested it as a significant change.7 5 Not Significant 3 5.0 4 Least Significant 7 11.7% of institutions suggested it as least significant change and 5% of institutions suggested that Increase Confidence in facing GD/Interview is not a significant change seen amongst the students after training session.

of Respondents 41 19 60 Percentage 68.0 CHART 3.1.18 TRANSFORMATION WERE SEEN IN FACULTIES AFTER THE FACULTT DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM .1.46 Enhances embedding Of S. 68.EMBEDDING OF SOFT SKILLS IN HARD SKILLS IN TEACHING Enhanced enbedding of Soft skills in Hard skills in teaching 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 Percent 10 0 Agree Neutral Enhanced enbedding of Soft skills in Hard skills in teaching Interpretation: The above table and graph shows the respondents among the educational institutions.7 100. of Respondents Percentage . and 31. 1 2 Soft Skills In Hard Skills In Teaching Agree Neutral Total No.3 31. Efficiency in Corporate interaction No.No.19 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON TRANSFORMATIONS SEEN IN FACULTIES AFTER THE FACULTIES DEVELOPMENT TRAINING S.No.7% of institutions had given neutral response.3% of institutions strongly agree that transformation seen in facultiesenhances the embedding of soft skills in hard skills in teaching seen after the faculty development program. TABLE 3.

7 Disagree 1 1.19 TRANSFORMATION WERE SEEN FACULTIES AFTER THE FACULTY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM .47 Strongly Agree 12 20. 51.7% of institutions had given neutral response and 1.3 16.No.7% institutions agree that Efficiency in Corporate interaction is a transformation seen in faculties seen after faculties development program and 26.7 . 20% of institutions strongly agree that transformation seen in facultiesefficiency in corporate interaction seen after the faculty development program. 1 2 Brand Image Of Training Institute Strongly Agree Agree No.7 Total 60 100.0 CHART 3.7 Neutral 16 26.1.0 Agree 31 51.7% of institutes disagree that efficiency in corporate interaction is a transformation seen in faculties after faculty development training program. of Respondents 26 10 Percentage 43.1. TABLE 3.EFFICIENCY IN CORPORATE INTERACTION Efficiency in Corporate interaction 60 1 2 3 4 50 40 30 20 Percent 10 0 Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Efficiency in Corporate interaction Interpretation: The above table and graph shows the respondents among the educational institutions.20 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON CRITICAL FACTOR IN TRAINING DECISION MAKING S.

21 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON INSTITUTES INTERESTED TO TAKE UP TÜV RHEINLAND TRAINING PROGRAM Technical Training Program Yes No Total S.3 100.7 % of institutions strongly disagree that Brand image of training institute as a critical factor in training decision making. TABLE 3.3% of institutions disagree and 6. of Respondents 31 29 60 Percentage 51. 1 2 No.20 CRITICAL FACTORS IN TRAINING DECISION MAKING IN TRAINING DECISION MAKING Brand Image of Training Institute 50 40 30 20 Percent 10 0 Strongly Agree Agree Satisfactory Disagree Strongly disagree Brand Image of Training Institute Interpretation: The above table and graph shows the respondents among the educational institutions.No. 16.3 6. 25% of institutions suggested it as a satisfactory factor.0 8.7% institutions agree that Brand image of Training institute as a critical factor in training decision making.0 .48 3 4 5 Satisfactory Disagree Strongly disagree Total 15 5 4 60 25.0 CHART 3.7 48.7 100.1.1. 20% of institutions strongly agree Brand image of the Training institute as a important critical factor in training decision making. 8.

.21 INSTITUTES INTERESTED TO TAKE UP TÜV RHEINLAND TRAINNG ACTIVITIES .49 CHART 3.TECHNICAL TRAINING PROGRAM Intrested in TUV training-Technical 60 50 40 30 20 Percent 10 0 Yes No Intrested in TUV training-Technical Interpretation: The above table and graph shows the respondents among the educational institutions 51.7% of institutions are interested to take up TÜV Rheinland-Academy training-technical type of training program and 48.3% of institutes are not interested to take up TÜV Rheinland Technical type of training programs.1.

of Respondents 41 19 60 Percentage 68.7% of institutes are not interested to take up TÜV Rheinland.3 31.No.Technical Training Program Yes No Total No.1. Non-Technical type of training programs. Non-technical type of training program and 31.22 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON INSTITUTES INTERESTED TO TAKE UP TÜV RHEINLAND TRAINING PROGRAM S.TECHNICAL TRAINING PROGRAM Non-Technical Training 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 Percent 10 0 Yes No Non-Technical Training Interpretation: The above table and graph shows the respondents among the educational institutions 68.22 INSTITUTES INTERESTED TO TAKE UP TÜV RHEINLAND TRAINNG ACTIVITIES NON.3% of institutions are interested to take up TÜV Rheinland-Academy training. 1 2 Non .1.7 100.50 TABLE 3. .0 CHART 3.

0 CHART 3.1. of Respondents 42 18 60 Percentage 70.23 EDUCAT IONAL INSTITUTES INTERESTED TO TAKE UP CERTIFICATE COURSE / DIPLOMA COURSE Interested to take up Certificate Course / Diploma Course 80 60 40 20 Percent 0 Yes No Interested to take up Certificate Course / Diploma Course Interpretation: The above table and graph shows the respondents among the educational institutions 70% of institutions are interested to take up Certificate Course/Diploma course of TÜV Rheinland-Academy and 30% of institutes are not interested to take up Certificate Course/Diploma Course TABLE 3.1.51 TABLE 3.1.0 30.23 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON INTERESTED TO TAKE UP CERTIFICATE COURSE / DIPLOMA COURSE Interested to take up S.0 100.No. 1 2 Certificate Course / Diploma Course Yes No Total No.24 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON INSTITUTES ACCREDITATION .

3% of institutes already got the accreditation.3 16.0 100. 16. but planning in future Total No.7 40.No.7% are not interested in accreditation and 40% of institutes had no accreditation but they are planning to get accreditation in the future.but planning in f College Accreditation Interpretation: The above table and graph shows the status of Educational Institutions related to accreditation process. of Respondents 26 10 24 60 Percentage 43. 1 2 3 College Accreditation Yes No No.1.24 RESPONDENTS BASED ON INSTITUTION ACCREDITATION College Accreditation 50 40 30 20 Percent 10 0 Yes No No.52 S. . among the institutes 43.0 CHART 3.

7 31.0 100.26 .25 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON BENEFITS OF ACCREDITATION PROCESS TO THE ORGANISATION S.3% of institutions disagree and 10% of institutions strongly disagree that competitive advantage is the benefits reaped by organisation through accreditation process.7% of institutions strongly agree that competitive advantage as a benefit reaped by organisation due to accreditation process.53 TABLE 3. of Respondents 13 19 14 8 6 60 Percentage 21.7% institutions agree that competitive advantage as a benefit reaped due to accreditation process. TABLE 3.1. 21.No. 13.7 23.0 CHART 3.3 13.1.3 10. 1 2 3 4 5 Competitive Advantage Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total No.3% of institutions had given neutral response. 23.25 BENEFITS OF ACCREDITATION PROCESS TO THE ORGANISATION Competitive Advantage 40 30 20 10 Percent 0 Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Competitive Advantage Interpretation: The above table and graph shows the respondents among the educational institutions.1. 31.

3% of institutions disagree and 10% of institutions strongly disagree that systematic functioning of organisation is the benefits reaped by organisation through accreditation process.2 RANK ANALYSIS . 13.54 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON BENEFITS OF ACCREDITATION PROCESS TO THE ORGANISATION S.3% of institutions had given neutral response.7 100.0 10. 40% of institutions strongly agree that systematic functioning of organisation as a benefit reaped by organisation due to accreditation process. 1 2 3 4 5 Systematic Functioning of Organization Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total No. of Respondents 24 6 5 13 10 60 Percentage 40. 3.26 BENEFITS OF ACCREDITATION PROCESS OT THE ORGANISATION.3 21.0 CHART 3.No.0 8.7 16. 23.1. 10% institutions agree that systematic functioning of organisation as a benefit reaped due to accreditation process.SYSTEMATIC FUNCTIONING OF ORGANIZATION Systematic Functioning of Organization 50 40 30 20 Percent 10 0 Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Systematic Functioning of Organization Interpretation: The above table and graph shows the respondents among the educational institutions.

2. 1 2 3 Factors Technical Training Program Non-Technical Training Program Management-Oriented Training Program Rank 1 2 3 Interpretation:  From the above table it is inferred that technical training program has scored rank 1 among educational institutions.55 TABLE 3. technical training program has scored Rank 2 and Management oriented training program is of rank 3.No.1 RANKING FOR TRAINING PROGRAMS CONDUCTED ACROSS THE YEAR IN EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS Total Weighted Score 133 116 96 S. .

2.2 RANKING FOR CRITICAL FACTORS IN TRAINING DECISION MAKING S.56 TABLE 3. The least factors include Financials and Institutes past performance.No. 1 2 3 4 5 Factors Brand image of institute Trainers Profile Time Period & Methodology Financials Institutes Past Experience Total Weighted Score 229 198 194 176 164 Rank 1 2 3 4 5 Interpretation:  From the above table it is inferred that top three critical factors that influence the decision making for training program are Brand image of institute. trainers profile and time period methodology. .

less academia-industry gap.2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Factors Enhanced Performance Level Higher Competitive Advantage Less Academia-Industry Gap Improved Team Dynamics More Commitment Better Quality Standards Increase in Brand Image Total Weighted Score 243 239 233 231 226 226 208 Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Interpretation:  From the above table it is inferred that the top three outcomes/benefits from the training program to the organisation includes enhanced performance level. The least outcomes include increase in better quality standards and brand image .No.3 RANKING FOR THE BENEFITS TO ORGANISATION AS A RESULT OF TRAINING ACTIVITIES S. higher competitive advantage.57 TABLE 3.

2.  The ranking shows the benefits reaped by the organization due to accreditation process the top most benefits are competitive advantage.4 RANKING FOR THE BENEFITS REAPED BY ORGANIZATION DUE TO ACCREDITATION PROCESS S. 1 2 3 4 5 Factors Competitive Advantage Systematic Functioning of Organisation Increased Efficiency and Course Delivery Productive Time Management Reduce Operating Cost Total Weighted Score 205 201 161 189 155 Rank 1 2 3 4 5 Interpretation:  The above table shows ranking for the benefits reaped by organization due to accreditation process. systematic functioning of organization and increased efficiency and course delivery.No. .58 TABLE 3.

0. it is proved that there is a significant relationship between the organization category and knowledge of TÜV Rheinland .Academy. So the null hypothesis is rejected and the alternate hypothesis is accepted. ALTERNATE HYPOTHESIS Ha: There is significant relationship between the knowledge of TÜV Rheinland.05 Cal 2 2 Tab Interpretation: The above calculation shows that the table value is less than calculated value.067 .0.1 CHI-SQUARE TEST SHOWING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE KNOWLEDGE OF TÜV ACADEMY WITH THE ORGANIZATION CATEGORY Organization category Engineering college Management institute Arts & Science college Polytechnic college Total Calculated value Table Value . 4. χ > χ 0.59 3.067>0.Academy with the organisation category.05 Knowledge of TÜV Academy Yes 17 8 4 2 29 No 14 8 7 2 31 Total 31 16 11 60 NULL HYPOTHESIS H0: There is no significant relationship between the knowledge of TÜV Rheinland-Academy with the organisation category. Therefore. the overall awareness level is comparatively less among the organization category especially among engineering colleges.3. FINDINGS The overall findings of the study are mentioned below: .3 CHI-SQUARE TEST TABLE 3. Hence.

another 8.  Among the total of 60 educational institutions 51. 35% of institutions have 5-8 years of existence.3% of institutions conducts only <5 training Programs for faculties. 31. 23.7% are engineering colleges. 18.  Respondents among the educational institutions.7% of institutions are with 5-8 departments.8.3% of institutions conducts 11-15 Programs and about 22% of institutions conducts 16-20 training for students across the year.  Respondents among educational institutions.3% of institutions conducts 6-10 Programs for students.3% of institutions with >16 departments.7% of institutions conducts technical programs frequently and 33.3% conducts technical programs rarely. 28.  Respondents among the educational institutions. 18. and only 1. 98.3% are Arts & Science Colleges.3% institutions are with 12-16 departments and28.3% are Polytechnic colleges.7% of institutions conducts only <5 training Programs for students.7% of institutions has a student strength of 101-300 students.60 4.3% educational institutions are with 1-4 departments.3% of institutions has 501-700 students and about 40% of institutions have >701 students .3% of institutions with 9. .1 The Simple Percentage Analysis Findings are. 55% of institutions conducts technical training program most frequently. 11.7% of institutions conducts 6-10 training Programs for faculties.  The above table and graph shows the respondents among educational institutions.  Among the educational institutions.  The above table and graph shows the respondents among the educational institutes. 26.3% of institutions has 301-500 students. 50% of institutions have Faculties strength of <100 faculties and another 50% of educational institutions have 101-300 faculties. 23. and 3.7% are Management institutes. 36.12 departments. 18. 23. 21.3% of institutions have 9-12 years of existence and about 30% of institutions have >16 years of existence.  Respondents among the educational institutions related to number years of existence 15% of institutions are with 1-4 years of existence.

 The respondents among the educational institutions.7% of institutions disagree that decrease in industry-academia is the benefit to organisation as a result of training program.3% of institutions strongly agree that higher competitive advantage as a benefit to organisation as a result of training program. 58.61  The above table and graph shows the respondents among the educational institutions.3% of institutions strongly agree that changes in faculties-highly motivated workforce seen after the faculty development program. 53.7% institutions agree the enhanced performance level in the organisation as a training benefit and 16.7% of institutions strongly agree that enhanced performance level as a benefit to organisation as a result of training program.3% of institutions had given neutral response.7% of institutions disagree that better quality standards as a benefit to organisation as a result of training program.7% of institutions had given neutral response.  Respondents among the educational institutions.3% institutions agree that better time management is the change seen after faculties development program and 36. 73.3% institutions agree that highly motivated workforce is the change seen after faculties development program and 8.3% institutions agree that decrease in industryacademia gap as a training benefit and 26. 18.3% of institutions strongly agree that less industry-academia gap as a training benefit to organisation as a result of training program. 21.  Respondents among the educational institutions. 53.3% institutions agree the competitive advantage as a training benefit and 15% of institutions had given neutral response.7% of institutions .  Respondents among the educational institutions.7% of institutions had given neutral response and 1. 5% of institutions strongly agree that changes in faculties-Better time management seen after the faculty development program.3% institutions agree the better quality in the organisation as a training benefit and 30% of institutions had given neutral response and 1. 13. 13. 61.  Respondents among the educational institutions. 10% of institutions strongly agree that better quality standards as a benefit to organisation as a result of training program. 18.

3% of the institutions suggested that better carrier decision and corporate exposure as a most significant changes seen amongst the student after training session.7% institutions suggested it as a significant change.7% institutions had given neutral response.7% of institutions suggested it as least significant change and 5% of institutions suggested that Increase Confidence in facing GD/Interview is not a significant change seen amongst the students after training session. 11.3% of institutions suggested that Better Carrier Decision and Corporate Exposure is not a significant change seen amongst the students after training session. and 31.  Respondents among the educational institutions.11. 28. 46. 26.  The above table and graph shows the respondents among the educational institutions.7% institutions suggested it as a significant change.62 had given neutral response and 5% of institutes disagree that better time management is the changes seen in faculties after faculty development training program. 3% institutions had given neutral response.7% of institutions suggested that enhanced communication and presentation skills is not a significant change seen amongst the students after training session. 68.7% of institutions suggested it as least significant change and 23. 20% of the institutions suggested that enhanced communication & presentation skills as a most significant changes seen amongst the student after training session.7% of the institutions suggested that Increased Confidence in facing GD/Interview as a most significant changes seen amongst the student after training session. 33.7% of institutions had given neutral response.13. 21.3% of institutions strongly agree that transformation seen in faculties enhances the embedding of soft skills in hard skills in teaching seen after the faculty development program.3% of institutions suggested it as least significant change and 11. 31.  Respondents among the educational institutions.3% institutions had given neutral response. 20% of institutions strongly agree that transformation seen in faculties-Efficiency in corporate interaction seen .  Respondents among the educational institutions.10% institutions suggested it as a significant change.  The respondents among the educational institutions.

31.7% of institutions had given neutral response and 1. 23.7% of institutes disagree that efficiency in corporate interaction is a transformation seen in faculties after faculty development training program.3% of institutions had given .  Respondents among the educational institutions 51.63 after the faculty development program.  Respondents among the educational institutions.3% of institutions are interested to take up TÜV Rheinland-Academy training. 51.8. 21.7% of institutions are interested to take up TÜV Rheinland-Academy training-technical type of training program and 48. Non-Technical type of training programs. Non-technical type of training program and 31.7 % of institutions strongly disagree that Brand image of training institute as a critical factor in training decision making. 16.  Respondents among the educational institutions 68.7% institutions agree that competitive advantage as a benefit reaped due to accreditation process.7% are not interested in accreditation and 40% of institutes had no accreditation but they are planning to get accreditation in the future. 25% of institutions suggested it as a satisfactory factor.3% of institutes are not interested to take up TÜV RheinlandAcademy technical type of training programs.7% institutions agree that brand image of training institute as a critical factor in training decision making.3% of institutions disagree and 6. 20% of institutions strongly agree Brand image of the Training institute as a important critical factor in training decision making. 16.3% of institutes already got the accreditation. among the institutes 43.7% institutions agree that efficiency in corporate interaction is a transformation seen in faculties seen after faculties development program and 26.  Respondents among the educational institutions 70% of institutions are interested to take up Certificate Course/Diploma course of TÜV Rheinland-Academy and 30% of institutes are not interested to take up Certificate Course/Diploma Course  Respondents among the educational institutions related to accreditation process.  Respondents among the educational institutions.7% of institutes are not interested to take up TÜV Rheinland-Academy.7% of institutions strongly agree that competitive advantage as a benefit reaped by organisation due to accreditation process.

trainers profile and time period methodology.3% of institutions had given neutral response.  The top three critical factors that influence the decision making for training program are Brand image of institute. systematic functioning of organization and increased efficiency and course delivery. 40% of institutions strongly agree that systematic functioning of organisation as a benefit reaped by organisation due to accreditation process.23. The least outcomes include increase in better quality standards and brand image  Ranking shows the benefits reaped by the organization due to accreditation process the top most benefits are competitive advantage. 4. 13. The least factors include Financials and Institutes past performance.2 Rank Analysis The rank analysis findings are given below. technical training program has scored rank 2 and Management oriented training program is of rank 3. .64 neutral response.10% institutions agree that systematic functioning of organisation as a benefit reaped due to accreditation process. higher competitive advantage. less academia-industry gap.  In the ranking for training programs conducted across the year it is inferred that technical training program has scored rank 1 among educational institutions.  The top three outcomes/benefits from the training program to the organisation include enhanced performance level.  Respondents among the educational institutions.3% of institutions disagree and 10% of institutions strongly disagree that systematic functioning of organisation is the benefits reaped by organisation through accreditation process.13.3% of institutions disagree and 10% of institutions strongly disagree that competitive advantage is the benefits reaped by organisation through accreditation process.

3 Chi. knowledge of TÜV Rheinland-Academy.Square Test analysis findings are given below.65 4.  The findings are the table value is less than calculated value so there is a relation between the organization category and knowledge of TÜV Rheinland-Academy.4 Other Findings The other findings of the study are furnished below.  The training being conducted in many educational institutions Technical  Technical Seminar  Workshop  Guest Lecture Non Technical  Personality Development Training Programs  Communication Skills Development  Aptitude Test  Case study analysis Management Oriented  Management concept presentations  Paper Presentation .Square Test The Chi.  To analyse the relationship between the variables like organization category. 4.

66  Guest Lecture .CEO speak .

67 Different accreditations already obtained by the institutions are. .  TÜV Rheinland  TÜV SUD  TÜV NORD  BVNQ  DNV Most of the institutions associated with training organization like.  NBI Accreditation Most of the institutions are associated with accreditation bodies like.  HCL Academy  Infosys  WIPRO  Cognizent Most of the training programmes conducted by the organization are  Technical type of training programs conducted by the organization across the year.

 Most of the educational institutions are interested to take up TÜV Rheinland -Academy Non-Technical type of training program so more importance can be given to Non-Technical type training programs and technical and management oriented programs can be customized and provided to the institutions. TÜV Rheinland have good brand image in the market and also competent trainers profile. SUGGESTIONS  In many institutions the number of training program conducted across the year is very minimum i.  In the critical factors for the training decision making the top most decision factors are brand image of the training institute and trainers profile.68 5.  Knowledge of TÜV Rheinland-Academy especially about training services is lacking in many educational institutions but it has good brand name in service certifications so awareness about the TÜV Rheinland . more concentration can be given to methodology &time period of training program. workshops and orientation programs in educational institutions. So awareness campaign can be conducted to increase the awareness so it enables institutions to conduct more training programs.e > 5 programs.Academy can be increased among the institutions by conducting seminars. so institutions can be approached to conduct many programs like mostly of technical and non technical training programs. .

 In accreditation process many institutions are well aware about the benefits of accreditation process but the hindrance factors in educational institutions for certification process are documentation/paper work and extra work load so the perception of organisation’s hindrance factors can be broken by detailed presentation explaining the certification process so it removes the hindrance mask on certification process. . so training program can be customized according to the training needs of institutions and provided to institutions.  In accreditation process. most of the institutions are yet to be certified and in that majority of the institutions are planning to get certification in future so as TÜV Rheinland-Academy has a good market opportunity for system certification process among the educational institutions.69  ]wareness programs and orientation programs can be conducted in institutions about the methodology and benefits of out-bound and other training activities so it increases awareness and also it increases institutions interest to take up more TÜV Rheinland .Academy training activities.  The educational institutions are well aware of the importance benefits and transformational changes as a result of training programs to students & students in the educational institutions.

So it enhances the interest of institutions to take up training program and also competitive advantage for the organisation in the market. . Based on the findings and suggestions market opportunity analysis for TÜV Rheinland (India) Private Ltd has a good market opportunity both for training programs and system certification that can be acquired by adopting proper marketing strategy Customization of training programs based on the organization need is suggested. Also suggested to conduct more open house programs and orientation programs among the educational institutions for students and teachers in district wise to increase the awareness of TÜV Academy.70 CONCLUSION This research has aimed to analyse the market opportunities of market opportunity analysis for TÜV Rheinland (India) Private Ltd.

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Satyabhushan Dash. Pearson Prentice Hall.Malhotra.75.com .89. Marketing Management.TÜV . 13th edition.uk/trainingbenefits  www.com  www. Kevin Keller. Oct 2009.php  http://www. Page no. Training and Development magazine. Mc Graw Hill. Advantages of Training and Development-Text & Cases.  Emprical study on the contribution of ISO Standards towards TQM by Gotzamani WEBSITES:  www. 2nd edition. Viswa Prakasam.org  www.K. 5th edition. Reasearch Methodology. Pearson Prentice Hall. Methods and Techniques. 4th edition.iso.J.Mishra. Malhotra.30-38.qcin.qcin.  Kothari C. Page no. Marketing Research .  K.An Applied Orientation.20 ARTICLES:  Management Development Training The Indian experience by R. Page no.org/  www.R.markintell.75 BIBLIOGRAPHY BOOKS:  Naresh K.org..ictknowledgebase.  Philip Kotler. page no.org/nabcb/index.

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