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St Osyth, Essex

St Osyth, Essex

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Published by Wessex Archaeology
Wessex Archaeology was commissioned by Videotext Communications Ltd to carry out archaeological recording and post-excavation analysis on an archaeological evaluation by Channel 4’s ‘Time Team’ in the village of St Osyth, Essex. St Osyth is located in the Tendring district of north-east Essex, approximately five miles west of Clacton-on-Sea. The village, which developed around the site of the medieval Priory, lies on the crest of a low spur of land, centred at NGR 612500 215800, that rises approximately 19m aOD (above Ordnance Datum) from the St Osyth creek to the south.
The aim of the evaluation was to gain an understanding of the evolution and development of St Osyth with its relationships to the development of the Priory and examine the role of the creek in the economy of the town. To achieve this, a number of techniques were employed, including geophysical survey, fieldwalking, trial trenching and dendrochronology. The work was undertaken between the 11th and 14th May 2004. Spoil from all of the archaeologically significant trenches was metal detected by approved operators.
Wessex Archaeology was commissioned by Videotext Communications Ltd to carry out archaeological recording and post-excavation analysis on an archaeological evaluation by Channel 4’s ‘Time Team’ in the village of St Osyth, Essex. St Osyth is located in the Tendring district of north-east Essex, approximately five miles west of Clacton-on-Sea. The village, which developed around the site of the medieval Priory, lies on the crest of a low spur of land, centred at NGR 612500 215800, that rises approximately 19m aOD (above Ordnance Datum) from the St Osyth creek to the south.
The aim of the evaluation was to gain an understanding of the evolution and development of St Osyth with its relationships to the development of the Priory and examine the role of the creek in the economy of the town. To achieve this, a number of techniques were employed, including geophysical survey, fieldwalking, trial trenching and dendrochronology. The work was undertaken between the 11th and 14th May 2004. Spoil from all of the archaeologically significant trenches was metal detected by approved operators.

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Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: Wessex Archaeology on Apr 15, 2009
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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10/17/2011

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4.3.1

This category includes fragments of brick, roof, floor and wall tile. The
greatest proportion (1174 pieces) consists of fragments of flat roof (peg)
tiles, mostly in fabrics which are visibly coarse and sandy in texture. No
complete tiles were recovered, and only one complete width (165mm). Four
tiles are at least partially glazed on the upper surface. Two pantiles were
recognised, and five other curved fragments could either derive from further
pantiles, or from ridge tiles (no clearly diagnostic ridge tiles were identified).
In addition, four roof tiles of modern ‘corrugated’ type were found at the
White Hart (Trench 12 topsoil).

4.3.2

Of the 99 brick fragments, one from the White Hart is of obviously modern
date (Trench 12 topsoil); the others are all unfrogged types of varying sizes,
in relatively soft, coarse fabrics (two pale-firing). Many of these fragments
are heavily abraded.

25

4.3.3

Eleven floor tiles (all plain, and most of them glazed) were identified, as well
as one modern paving/flooring tile from the White Hart (Trench 12 topsoil).
In addition, four fragments of perforated brick in a pale-firing fabric, all from
Old House (topsoil and garden soil in Trench 8), can be identified as forming
part of a malthouse floor (compare late 18th

/19th

century examples: Belford

and Ross 2004, fig. 4).

4.3.4

Twenty pieces were identified (with varying degrees of confidence) as of
Romano-British date. This comprised one possible (combed) flue tile, and 19
miscellaneous brick fragments, of which 16 came from Wheatfield (topsoil in
Trench24; seven of these are in pale-firing fabrics). The rest were either
unstratified (fieldwalking) finds, or were residual in medieval or post-
medieval contexts.

4.3.5

All of the four wall tile fragments identified (all from the White Hart; Trench
12) are of modern date.

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