Noel McCarthy and Johan Giesecke American Journal of Epidemiology Copyright © 2001 by The Johns Hopkins University School

of Hygiene and Public Health

jejuni infection The risk of developing GBS during the 2 months following a symptomatic episode of C. jejuni infection is approximately 100 times higher than the risk in the general population   . Campylobacter jejuni infection has been found in approximately one out of every four cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) GBS is an important but rare complication of C.

fecaloral.Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) • Acute polyneuropathy • A disorder affecting the peripheral nerveous system • Usually triggered by an infection Campylobacter jejuni • One of the main causes of bacterial foodborne • Routes of transmission. ingestion of contaminated food/water. eating raw meat .

GBS Damage myelin (fatty insulating layer of the nerve) Nerve conduction block Due to an immune response to foreign Antigens (infectious agents) End result – autoimmune attack on the peripheral nerves Muscle paralysis Mistargeted at host nerve tissue (gangliosides) MOLECULAR MIMICRY Sometimes accompanied by autonomic/ sensory disturbance .

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All cases of C. jejuni infection. . and subsequent Guillain-Barré syndrome among unreported (C) and reported (D) cases of C. jejuni infection (B). jejuni infection in the Swedish population during the study period (A). The study cohort of cases with reported laboratory-confirmed C.

jejuni infection. It confirms that GBS is an important but rare complication of C. The result of this study permits the establishment of a more firm quantitative foundation for assessment of the importance of GBS relative to other clinical manifestations of C. jejuni infection. .

 Incidence of Guillain-Barré Syndrome following Infection with Campylobacter jejuni (Noel McCarthy and Johan Giesecke) American Journal of Epidemiology Copyright © 2001 by The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health .

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