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The Beginner's Guide to Job Networking - By Drew Kerr of Four Corners Communications

The Beginner's Guide to Job Networking - By Drew Kerr of Four Corners Communications

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Published by Drew Kerr
A compact two-page guide for college graduates on how to network for a job. An invaluable document for students looking for a new job or anybody wanting to learn the basics of networking.
A compact two-page guide for college graduates on how to network for a job. An invaluable document for students looking for a new job or anybody wanting to learn the basics of networking.

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Published by: Drew Kerr on Apr 16, 2009
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05/11/2014

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Drew Kerr 212-849-8250

THE BEGINNER’ G IET J BN T R IG S UD O O E WO KN
“ o cn owniyu o o p y Y u a n t i fo d n t l . a”

Sending e-mails and letters to advertisements or just over-the-transom to companies is a routine job hunting tactic. However, not all advertisements have real jobs attached to them, and you are sending your cover letter and resume in with hundreds and hundreds of other people. While you should continue to do this, you are not covering all your bases when hunting for a job. Remember, the name of the game is to improve your odds. You want to find a job w e yur nt eesrycm en a n wt t s f o ptos ed gi t ir u e hr o’ o ncs i o pt g l g i o o cm et sni n h re m e e al i o h n ir n e s for the same position. T a s hr ntok gcm s n Your job search is not completely effective unless ht w e e ri o e i ’ e w n . you devote time to networking the right way. Put yourself in the shoes of somebody hiring for an open position: would you rather go through the pile of letters and resumes, or meet with people who were actually referred to you by friends and/or associates? Is n-brainer. t ao ’ Another piece of advice: you are not married to your first job. You want to get out there adl r w a t bs f i fr o. o m yko ia ed, u is K iyudntIf n e n hth eti s o yu Y u a nw t l ay btt O f o o’ a e t r ’ . sm t n t s t or erad i , e t iad e iiso yu o e i u ayu ha n m n t n r tn seft fr o. hg g t dh y ’ Here are the steps to get yourself out there networking to a real job:  SET UP A LINKEDIN ACCOUNT (http://www.linkedin.com/): Facebook is great for friends and family – t very socially geared. However, LinkedI iw e is apn g is ’ n s hr t hpei e’ n when it comes to jobs and careers. Fill in as much as possible that will sell you. Visit this site for some advice on how to do this: http://tinyurl.com/5thzkf. Once you are set up, start connecting with as many people as possible, including friends, mentors, professors, and people you met on jobs and internships. Everybody is fair game –dnt eit t o’hsa o te send them an invite. The other benefit is your LinkedIn profile will turn up higher on search engine rankings, like on Google.  MAKE A LIST OF PEOPLE YOU WANT TO SPEAK WITH: Think about companies which interest you, in fields which catch your fancy. Go onto Google, look up their corporate sites and search for a couple of executives at these companies. Write them down. Go to the web sites of publications which cover the fields you are interested in (i.e. iyur cr u aot de in, ot www.adage.com or www.adweek.com). Look f o’ ui s bu avrs g g o e o ti for pieces of news that interest you and take note of the names of the people you read about. Look them up too on Google. Do your professors know interesting people? How about people from the alumni office or college mentoring program? What do your fed’ a n d? d t mt t lto. r nspr t o A dh o h i t i es e es o  ASK FOR INFORMATIONAL INTERVIEWS: Employers will have their guard up for job interviews and may not respond, turn you down, or refer you to HR, which nearly all the time is as good as being nowhere. However, if you send an e-mail or letter asking for 15 minutes o t it eo er m r aothipoes n n w at y oisa fh ri t l n oe bu t r rf i ad hth d, ’f e m a e so e t r less threatening. Aw y pth pr ns it a ent sb cl e fh e las u t e o’ fsnm i h uj ti o t -mail (i.e. e s r e e n e Mr. Joe Smith: Informational interview request). People like to talk about what they do.

They will be more receptive to having you come in and meet with them. And yes, have a cawt yu fed’ a n . ye vn r ns f or w pr t ht i orr nspr t Mab ee fed o yu o n a n . h i es i es  DO YOUR HOMEWORK: Before you meet anybody, go on to Google and learn something about them and the company. Sew a t ya u t le , el t yv e hth r p o a l da h ’e e e ty s e been making, etc.  MEET WITH THEM: Show up 10 minutes before the interview time, no earlier. Is t ’ OK to bring a resume and give it to the person you are meeting, but remember why you are there – network. Thank them first and then ask questions about what they do, how to they got to be where they are. Ask follow-up questions. Be interested and upbeat. Listen. D nt eitt t e notes. Tell them that you want to learn more and you hope to get a o’hsa o a te k job soon. Give them your resume. Do not overstay your welcome. D ntogt ask o’fre -them if they know anybody else you can speak with. It y o prashylg e o fh d, e p t ’ i yu e h e lv that info right t r O t ylpo i t cn ct m This is where you build out your h e rh ’ rm s o ot th . e. e l e a e next contact.  SEND A THANK YOU NOTE: Within the first 24 hours. Very very important –it really counts.  MAKING CONTACT WITH THE REFERRAL: Take that new contact and drop them an e-mail –ueyu r e a s name in the subject line (i.e. Ms. Jane Doe: Joe s or e r l f r’ Smith referred me to you). Again, ask for 15 minutes for an informational interview.  LINKEDIN CONNECTIONS: Invite every new person you meet to connect with you on LinkedIn. D ntb srre i af pol dntcneto t et i t e o’ e upi d f e ep o’ onc r a h r i s w e k e m connecting. You want to keep adding people to LinkedIn.  FOLLOWING UP WITH YOUR NEW CONTACTS: You want to stay in contact pr d ay i ee bd yuv m t o w n tm i a go r a e oi l wt vr oy o’e e Y u ato a tn od e t i cl h y . ni lionships in your network and stay on their radars too. There are two good ways to do this: 1) create a G ol Ae frh cn c s u nm og l to t ot t fl a eso that anytime that person shows up in the e r e a’ l nw , o’ notified. Then drop that person a short e-mail saying you read about them, e syur e cnr s o akaqet n l t m ko w a yur di –no more than a two oga , r s t uso,e h i t e nw ht o’ o g e n paragraph e-mail. 2) If you see something online that you think will interest one of your cn c ,ow r itt mwta o l e T ogto’ f d h i e sn. ot t fr a to h as d e i nt i “ huh yud i t sn r t g h ek n i te i ”  UTILIZING LINKEDIN: The beauty of this site is that you can see all the contacts of your connections, all the people they know, what they do. Isi a odr lod a t l e w ne u ra m p ’ k f of contacts, so dig in and see who knows who. See somebody int et gyudl e o e sn o’ i t r i k meet for an informational interview? Drop a line to your contact and ask them if they can introduce you to that connection of theirs for an informational interview.  GO TO NETWORKING AND CLUB EVENTS: Download a free RSS reader to quickly and efficiently read blogs and web site news. I recommend Feed Demon (http://www.newsgator.com/Individuals/FeedDemon/Default.aspx) and always keep it running on your PC. Subscribe to sites like Mashable (http://mashable.com/) and Meetup (http://www.meetup.com/), which are invaluable for finding local networking events and groups, as well as providing excellent job hunting advice utilizing social media.

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