CHILDHOPE ASIA PHILIPPINES

ANNUAL REPORT
CHAP ANNUAL REPORT

T HE EDITORIAL TEAM

Content
Ms. Teresita L. Silva, MSW President and Executive Director
Ms. Maribel D. Flores Assistant Executive Director/ Communications Coordinator
Dr. Herbert Quilon Carpio Physician/ Program Coordinator for Health and Medical Services

Photos
Ms. Mylene Lagman Resource Mobilization Officer
Ms. Tracy Cruz Resource Mobilization Officer

Layout and Graphics
Dr. Herbert Quilon Carpio

CHILDHOPE ASIA PHILIPPINES, INC.
1210 Penafrancia Extension
Paco, Manila 1007
Philippines
Phone: +63 2 563 4647
+63 2 561 7118
Telefax: +63 2 563 2242
Website : http://www.childhope.org.ph
E-mail : chap@childhope.org.ph
childhopeasia@yahoo.com

http://facebook.com/ChildhopeAsiaPhilippines

https://twitter.com/childhope_asia

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CHAP ANNUAL REPORT

O RGANIZATIONAL B ACKGROUND

Childhope Asia Philippines (CHAP) is a non-profit, non-political, non-sectarian organization whose
principal purpose is to advocate for the cause of street children throughout the world. It works toward
the liberation of the child from the suffering caused by working and living on the street.

CHILDHOPE was founded in 1986 by individuals from children's agencies who saw the need for an
international effort specifically on behalf of street children. Its Board of Directors included
representatives from international children's agencies and individuals who work directly with street
children.

CHILDHOPE Regional Office for Asia was established in July 1989 after the First Regional Conference of
Street Children in Asia held in Manila in May 1989. Participants in the conference recognized CHILDHOPE
as the organization that will initiate networking and collaboration among the different agencies working
for street children in the Southeast Asian region. In 1991, it started to respond to requests for
information and technical assistance from South Asia.

In 1995, CHILDHOPE officially became CHILDHOPE ASIA PHILIPPINES, Inc. as registered under the
Securities and Exchange Commission.

Among the organization’s functions are:
 To facilitate and conduct research about the situation, case studies, and evaluation on street
children;
 To advocate the plight of street children who work and live on the streets;
 To conduct regional training and country level workshops, seminars and field study visits among
staff and volunteers of street children programs;
 To establish a global network, an opportunity for programs which work with street children to
communicate among themselves and gain access to information, technical assistance and other
resources;
 To develop a databank of information on street children;
 To coordinate and facilitate technical and financial assistance to projects working with street
children or on preventive initiatives with their families and community.

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CHAP ANNUAL REPORT

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CHAP ANNUAL REPORT

I. OUTREACH & PROTECTION/ EDUCATION ON THE STREETS PROGRAM

INTRODUCTION/ BACKGROUND

CHAP’s banner program is the Outreach and
Protection/ Education on the Streets Program,
or aptly called Street Education Program. In
2012, a total of thirty-three (33) Street
Educators composed of social workers,
teachers and values formation facilitators
assisted street children by providing them
direct access to basic social services such as
counseling, alternative basic education, basic
literacy and numeracy, medical assistance,
sports and recreation, legal protection, and
referral services.

At the start of the year, the program continued
its daily operations in twenty (20) areas within
seven (7) major cities all over Metro Manila
(see Table 1). In July, CHAP entered a
memorandum of agreement (MOA) with Brgy.
San Lorenzo, Makati City to assist street
children in Pasay Road and Dasmarinas Village.
Two (2) street educators were assigned in the
said area to conduct profiling of street children
for two (2) months (Phase I). Implementation of
Phase II, which includes the conduct of the Street Education Program, was suspended due to financial
constraints and a shift in priority activities by the barangay officials for the upcoming local elections.

Within the 3rd quarter of this year, CHAP officially closed the Street Education Program at Santolan,
Marikina. This was done since most of the street children in the said area are already assisted by three
(3) other NGO’s which has the same services as CHAP: Kuya Center for Street Children, Children’s
Garden, and Love International. Likewise, individuals and group volunteers also conduct values
formation, as well as basic literacy and numeracy in the said area. To assure the welfare of the children,
CHAP coordinated a meeting with the aforementioned NGO’s to properly notify them of our
organization’s closing of its operations in Santolan.

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CHAP ANNUAL REPORT
Table 1. Areas covered and corresponding number of Street Educators
CITY LOCATION NUMBER OF STREET
EDUCATORS ASSIGNED
Caloocan Monumento 2
Pasay Baclaran/ CCP
2
Makati Buendia
Barangay San Lorenzo 2
Manila Blumentritt 2
Divisoria/ Binondo/ Delpan 5
Lawton/ T.M. Kalaw 2
Pier/ Luneta 3
Plaza Ferguson/ P. Faura/ Ospital Ng Maynila/ Roxas Boulevard 2
Morayta/ Espana
2
Quezon Mayon
Balintawak 1
Paranaque Sucat Road/ NAIA 2
Multiple Financial Education/ Voc. Tech Facilitator 1
locations Physical and Sports Activities Facilitator 1
Values Formation Facilitators 6
TOTAL 33

STREET CHILDREN ASSISTED

From January to December 2012, we have reached and served a total of 1,206 street children—159
(13%) of which are new contacts. There was a slight decrease of 7% from last year’s total of 1,369 which
is mainly due to the following reasons:
Massive rescue operations by both local government units (LGU’s) and DSWD, especially during
the last quarter of the year
Closing of Street Education Program operations in Santolan, Marikina
Suspension of operations in Barangay San Lorenzo, Makati due to upcoming elections
Decreased number of sessions conducted, along with other activities of the Street Education
Program in the areas due to financial constraints

Figure 1. Gender of beneficiaries in 2012

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CHAP ANNUAL REPORT

Figure 2. Distribution of beneficiaries according to social category

Fifty eight percent (58%) of street children served were males while 42% were females. About 69% of
the beneficiary street children reached and served were children of families living on the streets, 25%
were completely abandoned (living alone on the streets), and 6% were community-based or working
children.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS PER PROGRAM COMPONENT

PSYCHOSOCIAL INTERVENTIONS: MOTIVATION FOR POSITIVE CHANGE
Psychosocial interventions play a major role in eliciting positive changes in the behavior of street
children. The main goal of these interventions is to help the street child cope with the problems and
challenges of being on the streets. Activities like individual and group counseling are geared towards
raising awareness of the risks and hazards of street life, helping them realize that there is a better
alternative to being on the streets, and eventually assist them in planning for their life goals.

Table 2. Comparative table of psychosocial intervention services given in 2011 and 2012
Type of Service Provided Baseline Number of Street Children Assisted
Data (2011) (2012)
Male Female Total
Individual Counseling 450 148 116 264
Group Counseling/ Focused Group 529 252 177 429
Discussion
Home Visitation 101 26 33 59
Referral to temporary shelter 56 10 4 14
Agency Visit for Child Exposure 89 37 36 73
Agency Visit/ Phone Call for Case Follow Up 43 7 5 12
Family Reconciliation 11 0 0 0
School Visit 44 23 30 53
Birth Registration 91 37 25 62
Psychological Evaluation/ Therapy 50 15 14 29

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CHAP ANNUAL REPORT

Psychosocial interventions are custom-tailored depending on the needs of each individual child. These
activities prepare the child for a life off the streets. As a result of intensive counseling and
psychotherapy, 14 children have been referred to shelters this year.

ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION: KNOWLEDGE AND VALUES FORMATION

Alternative Education sessions aim to improve street children’s knowledge on their rights, clarify their
understanding and practice of values, protect them from all forms of abuse, and help them realize their
responsibilities to themselves, their peers and the community.

This year, a total of 1,206 street children beneficiaries participated in the Alternative Education sessions
conducted by our Street Educators. These sessions are normally conducted in parks, along sidewalks, in
church premises, in parking lots, or practically anywhere with enough space to accommodate the
number of street children who will attend. Childhope has two (2) Mobile Education vans with
audiovisual equipment that the Street Educators use in conducting sessions.

Table 3. Summary of Alternative Education sessions for 2012
Baseline Data Number of Street Children
Alternative Education Session (2011) Assisted in (2012)
Male Female Total
Spiritual and Values Formation/ Values Education 808 392 286 678
UNCRC and other conventions/ Laws 598 260 173 433
Primary Health Care 593 247 171 418
Substance Abuse Prevention Education (SAPE) 439 206 150 356
STI-HIV/ AIDS 270 168 97 265
Adolescent Sexuality 176 143 102 245
Personal Safety and Protective Behaviour (PSPB) 460 232 167 399
Paralegal Education 257 146 87 233
Life Skills/ Life Goals (LSLG) 292 109 81 190
Gender Sensitivity 159 137 72 209
Skills for Life 169 101 61 162
Reproductive Health 241 92 73 165
Focused Group Discussions (FGD’s) / Group 811 331 209 540
Counselling on different topics of the Alt Ed modules

Note that there was a general decline in the number of street children who have been given alternative
education sessions. This relative decrease may be attributed to several reasons. First, some street
children have already completed multiple modules/sessions and have also attended several FGD
sessions. However, our present database is programmed to report only the unduplicated number of

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CHAP ANNUAL REPORT
street children assisted, undermining the fact that a single child could have attended several different
sessions within the year. Second, the decrease may also be due to more frequent rescue operations
carried out by local government units. Lastly, we have been blessed with there an increase in the
number of outreach activities participated in by the street children beneficiaries, especially during the
last quarter of 2012.

MOBILE SCHOOL

The Mobile School, given by the Mobile School of
Belgium Foundation, is a portable cart with
blackboards and visual aids, and is used to teach
children basic education. These sessions are
done at the CHAP Office premises. About 135
street children have participated in the classes,
compare to only 30 last year. This is a direct
result of the training of new street educators in
conducting mobile school sessions.

VALUES EDUCATION

A total of 678 street children participated in Values
Education sessions/ Focused Group Discussions during
the reporting period. The facilitators also continue to
conduct Values Education sessions among the street
mothers in the areas.

Catholic street children participants continue to avail of
free services from the Nuestra Señora de Guia (Ermita)
Parish Church, Minor Basilica de San Lorenzo Ruiz, San
Roque Parish, and Our Lady of the Airways Parish to
prepare to receive the Sacraments of Baptism,
Confirmation, and First Communion, among others.

The Caloocan Bible Baptist Church continuously conducts Value Education sessions among 15 street
children in the area. While two (2) brothers from Canossian Seminary also conduct Values Education
sessions among 15 street children in the Balintawak area every Saturday. The street children also attend
a once a month formation session, sports and recreation activities in the Seminary.

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CHAP ANNUAL REPORT
Through established partnerships and continuous coordination with the parishes mentioned above,
CHAP street educators are allowed to use the parish facilities as venue for alternative education sessions
among street children and their parents, Skills Development training, MEV sessions and Mobile Health
Clinic sessions.

BASIC COMPUTER LITERACY

During Basic Computer Literacy sessions, the street educator
brings the laptops via the Mobile education Van to the
scheduled area. The computer sessions last for about 1-2
hours, where the children learn about the basics of computer
operations and processes.

In 2012, a total of 97 street children participants regularly
attended the Basic Computer Literacy sessions conducted by
five trained street educators throughout the year.

PHYSICAL AND SPORTS ACTIVITIES

A total of 667 children participated in various physical and
sports activities, including sports clinics organized by
different CHAP partners/ groups.
During the conduct of these sports sessions, aside from
keeping them fit, street children are taught values such as
team work, respect and self-discipline. Furthermore,
through their participation in competitive sports, the
children experienced and realized how to overcome
adversities such as losing to an opponent. These are all
crucial life skills that help build resilience of children as
they grow to be adults.

In partnership with High Five Hope Foundation in the
United States, the 6th Annual High Five Hope Sports
Festival for Street Children was conducted. A total of 372
street children participated in the sports fest. The opening
and closing ceremonies were held at the Rizal Memorial
Coliseum on March 30, 2012 and June 2, 2012 respectively.

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FINANCIAL EDUCATION AND SERVICE SKILLS TRAINING: PREPARING FOR
CHALLENGES AHEAD

Through Financial Education sessions, the street educators continue to educate street children
beneficiaries on the value of money and its proper use, and to motivate them to develop the habit of
saving for future use.

The following table lists the trainings conducted and their outcomes.

Table 4. Outcome of service skills trainings conducted
TRAININGS CONDUCTED NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS OUTCOME
Haircutting 15 Practicing skills with other children in
their respective areas
Balloon Design 9 4 were already employed
Silk screen Printing 10 Commissioned to do silk screen printing
on uniforms used by children during the
Sports Fest 2012
Bottle Design 15
Cellular phone Repair 19 8 underwent on-the-job training at
Manila Manpower Development
3 presently assisting in a cellular phone
repair stand
Cooking 11 1 was hired as a crew member in a fast
food establishment
Car washing 8 7 underwent a 4-day on-the-job
training
Housekeeping Skills 23 8 out of 9 who were qualified to take
the certificate exam from TESDA passed

Among 38 participants who regularly attend the Financial Education sessions, 34 continue to save
money.

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CHAP ANNUAL REPORT
Moreover, 42 street children in NAIA/ Sucat are trained on production of fashion accessories every
Tuesday and Thursday at the Aruga Center facilitated by women volunteers. The children were also
taught drawing, painting, Basic Literacy and Numeracy (BLAN) and Value Education sessions, while some
of the older children are engaged in wood craft/ carving.

ALTERNATIVE SYSTEM FOR BASIC EDUCATION: KNOWLEDGE IS POWER
During the whole year, a total of 22 Alternative Learning System classes have been opened in different
areas. Of these, 9 classes have closed while 13 have continued (8 BLP and 5 ALS-A&E classes).

Table 5. Street children assisted with ALS
Type of Session on Basic Education Baseline Data Number of Street Children Assisted
(2011) (2012)
Male Female Total
Basic Literacy and Numeracy (BLAN) 373 140 89 229
Basic Literacy Program (BLP) 84 101 61 162
Accreditation and Equivalency (A&E) 65 28 19 47

Among the reasons for closure are as follows: 1) high mobility of the street children participants, 2) lack
of training of new street educators in implementing the modules, 3) poor motivation of the children in
attending the classes conducted, and 4) relentess rescue operations carried out by the local social
welfare departments in conjunction with the LGU’s.

Twenty (20) street children from Ermita, Lawton, Luneta/ TM Kalaw and Binondo/ Divisoria and Delpan
areas continue to attend Basic Literacy and Numeracy/ tutorial sessions conducted by UP Manila’s
Pahinungod every Saturday.

Thirty five (35) street children under the joint project of CHAP, Malayan Insurance Company and
Binondo Catholic Church continue to attend the ALS-BLP sessions everyday from Monday to Friday.

Last November, 24 children took the DepEd A&E examination. The results of the exam will be published
in print and in the DepEd website in March 2013.

HEALTH AND MEDICAL SERVICES: WORKING TOWARDS IMPROVED HEALTH
FOR VULNERABLE GROUPS

From January to December 2012, the MHC Project has seen 3,356 consultations during its regular clinic
days in 20 areas located in major cities and municipalities in Metro Manila: Pasay, Makati, Manila,
Paranaque, Quezon City, and Caloocan.

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CHAP ANNUAL REPORT
Among the 3,356 total consultations for the year, about 3,257 were child consultations. These child
consultations were from 1,068 individual children who sought the MHC physician’s medical care.

Eighty eight percent (88%) of the 1,068 individual child consultations or 940 children were from ages 7
to less than 18 years old which is the target age of beneficiaries of the SE Program.

Among the top 5 cases seen are as follows: upper respiratory tract infections (bacterial and viral), dental
problems, hyperactive airways syndrome, systemic viral illness, and allergic rhinitis.

Table 6. Summary of cases diagnosed and treated in 2012
DIAGNOSIS NUMBER OF CASES
Well Child consults 970
Upper Respiratory Infection, probably bacterial 568
Dental Caries 366
Hyperactive Airways Syndrome 342
Systemic Viral Illness 267
Allergic Rhinitis 195
Upper Respiratory Infection, probably viral 124
Bronchial Asthma 57
Fungal Skin Diseases 50
Acute Gastroenteritis 39
Carbuncle/Furuncle/Folliculitis 31
Acute Conjunctivitis 28

It is very important to take note of the well child consultations during clinic operations. The impact of
this is manifold.

First, effective primary health care programs will show an increase in the number of children seen
without illness and are hence able to learn well and enjoy activities even better.

Second, this entails the impact of a positive
behavioral change among CHAP’s beneficiaries.
Now, the children put high value on their own
health that they wanted to be checked up by the
physician to be sure that they are illness-free.

Contributory to these is the continuous rapport
brought about by the constancy of the MHC
staff, particularly the MHC physician who has
been with the project since August 2007.

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About 70 street children beneficiaries under the Street education Program also participated in the daily
Nutrition/Feeding Program spearheaded by CHAP, in partnership with the Children’s Ministry of the
Nuestra Senora De Guia Parish in Ermita, Manila. All children participants have been noted to gain
weight during the program’s implementation.

The Junior Health Workers Project has been an
integral part of the success of CHAP’s Health and
Medical Services. The Junior Health Worker’s
presence in various areas lead to greater availability
of first aid and primary care services, as well as
better compliance to treatment protocols, especially
among the sick abandoned and neglected street
children.

Table 7. JHW accomplishments for 2012
Number of Children Given First Aid Services 1,885
Number of children assisted with referrals to local health 58
centers/hospitals
Number of health education sessions conducted 218

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LEADERSHIP AND EMPOWERMENT: FOSTERING SERVICE LEARNING AMONG
BENEFICIARIES

JUNIOR HEALTH WORKERS PROJECT
There were 53 Junior Health Workers (JHW’s)
among the street children who actively performed
their responsibilities during the reporting period.
From these, 18 were newly-trained. The JHW’s
continue to deliver basic first aid, facilitate
sessions on Primary Health Care among other
street children in their respective areas, and
accompany street children to be referred to local
hospitals or health centers.

The following lists the trainings and workshops participated in by JHW’s:
A leadership training/workshop was conducted last May 2012. It focused on honing the
strengths and capabilities of the JHW’s as community leaders. The two-day workshop camp was
spearheaded by the Spring of Life Foundation counselors.
A workshop on the preparation of herbal
medicine ointments was facilitated by senior
JHW’s in September 2012. This aims to teach and
assist younger JHW’s about the importance of
herbal medicines for the treatment of skin
diseases in the area such as scabies and
ringworm.
One representative was chosen to attend
the National Training Program on Child
Participation in Child Protection, spearheaded by
Plan International, last October 2012.
Two representatives were chosen by their
peers to attend the National Children’s Forum:
Children Talk to Children About UNCRC last November 17, 2012.
One representative from among the active JHW’s was chosen by their peers to attend the Task
Force Batang Ina Regional Summit, launched by Department Of Health and National Youth
Commission last December 12, 2012. The summit aimed at informing and getting information
from adolescents regarding adolescent sexuality and reproductive health issues.
A training-workshop for new JHW’s was facilitated last December 28 and 29, 2012 by the senior
JHW’s, with supervision from the project trainor and coordinators. They were able to teach Basic
First Aid, Primary Health Care and related health topics.

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JUNIOR CHILD RIGHTS ADVOCATES PROJECT
Junior Child Rights Advocates or JCRA’s assist the street educators in their respective areas during
alternative education sessions and outreach activities. They are also given task to discuss specific topics
on CRC among their fellow street children and report cases of abuse to the social worker if there is any.
There are about fifty (50) Junior Child’s Rights Advocates (JCRA’s) at present.

The following lists the trainings and workshops attended by the JCRA’s:
Twelve (12) newly trained Junior Child’s Rights Advocates were trained on how to conduct Child
Rights Advocacy from the areas of Divisoria, Monumento, NAIA/ Sucat, Mayon and Blumentritt last
May 4-5, 2012. The said training was conducted by the Street Education Program Supervisor, Mr.
Ronaldo Amora.
Review of the Junior Advocate’s Plan of Action and preparation/ validation of their
accomplishments were done during the General Assembly meeting conducted last September 22,
2012.
A Training Workshop among twelve (12) newly selected Junior Child’s Rights Advocates (JCRA’s)
was conducted last September 22-23, 2012 at Childhope Office.
One representative was chosen to attend the National Training Program on Child Participation in
Child Protection, spearheaded by Plan International, last October 2012.
One representative from was chosen by their peers to attend the Task Force Batang Ina
Regional Summit, launched by Department Of Health and National Youth Commission last December
12, 2012.

EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM
A total of 52 street children were sent to formal
school under CHAP’s Educational Assistance Program
in 2012. Among these, 44 continued to attend their
classes regularly until the end of the school year
2011-2012 and were promoted to the next
year/grade level while 8 children dropped out of
school. These 8 children underwent counseling via
our in-house psychologist.

The EAP does not only provide regular monthly
allowances for the beneficiaries’ daily school needs.
As part of the program, regular monthly meetings
and group counselling sessions were conducted to
closely monitor the children’s performance in
school.

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CHAP ANNUAL REPORT
Ten (10) children have continuously attended a once a week tutorial class in Math held at Childhope
office conducted by Mr. Chipps Guevarra.

PARALEGAL ASSISTANCE
Only one case was reported, requiring 3 visits to the police for coordination, wherein the street
educator accompanied the relatives of the child to the police station where he was detained for alleged
theft.

This notable decrease in cases requiring paralegal assistance was due to the continued orientation and
discussion sessions on child rights and related laws facilitated by Street Educators among the different
sectors, such as barangay leaders, law enforcers, police, and jeepney drivers, among others.

RELIEF AND MATERIAL
ASSISTANCE
A total of 131 street children received relief
assistance in the form of groceries to
augment their daily needs. Relief items
were also distributed among 300
beneficiaries who were affected by the
devastation caused by monsoon rains and
floods in Metro Manila.

Moreover, 42 street children continue to
participate in the feeding program in NAIA/
Sucat every Tuesday and Thursday at the Aruga Center, sponsored by Ms. Didit Van der Linden,
Ms.Myrna Von Keyserlingk and Ms. Luningning Guest.

VOLUNTEER ACTIVITIES
Our street children beneficiaries
participated in several activities
conceptualized by volunteers. Among
them are children’s parties, performance
and visual arts workshops, feeding
programs, regular sports clinics, retreats,
gift-giving, and immersion activities,
headed by individuals, student groups,
corporate group partners and the like.

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II. TRAINING, ADVOCACY AND NETWORKING SERVICES
NETWORKING, ADVOCACY AND COALITION-BUILDING ACTIVITIES

Childhope is a member of different NGO and
government initiated social development
networks/coalitions among which were
National Council of Social Development
Foundation (NCSD), Association of Foundations
(AF), NGO coalition for the Monitoring and
Implementation of UNCRC, Philippines Alliance
against Youth Offenders (PAYO), DSWD-Social
Welfare and Development Learning Network
(SWD L-Net), DSWD-Area –Based Standard
Network (ABSNET), Street Educators Network
in Metro Manila -ASMAE Partners (SENMAP-ASMAE) Philippines Against Child Trafficking (PACT), Council
for the Protection of Children-National Network on Street children (CWC-NNSC), Pasay City Network for
the Protection of Children (PCNPC), Inter-Agency Network for the Protection of Children District V and
VI, Manila.

From January to December, 2012 the following meetings were attended by designated staff:
AF NCR Consultation Meeting
NCSD Mid-Year and Annual General Assembly held at Aristocrat Restaurant, Manila
Six (6) Social Welfare and Development Learning Network regular Meetings (SWDL-Net)
Two (2) DSWD ABSNET NCR West Cluster Meetings and General Assembly held in OWWA
Center, Pasay City.
Meeting with DSWD Sec. Dinky Soliman on 4Ps and MCCT Project
Meetings with Dr. Jon Matsuoka, Mr. Ray Dean Salvosa and Atty. Mia Castro, Incoming
Managing Director of Consuelo Foundation
Ten (10) regular meetings with CBCP/NASSA re: Network for Street children and their
Families, chaired by Bishop Broderick Pabillo.
Meeting with Mr. Roy Calfoforo of DSWD re: BCPC and 4Ps Program (Volunteer Partnership)
Two (2) NCSD Advocacy Committee meetings held at PSSW-PWU
NCSD Board meeting held at Kaibigan -Ermita Outreach Foundation office, Manila
Three (3) Technical Working Group meetings of the Social Services Committee of the House
of Representative for the HB4924 held at the Mitra Hall, Batasan Pambansa Complex.
World Vision 55th Anniversary Celebration held at Annabel’s Restaurant, Quezon City
NASSA Network members Dialogue with Manila Mayor Alfredo Lim held at the Office of the
Mayor, Manila City Hall.

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PRINTING/PUBLICATION OF BCPC TRAINING MANUAL FOR TRAINERS

The main objective of BCPC training manual is to enable the participants to facilitate the organization,
re-organization, and / or strengthening of the Barangay Council for the Protection of Children (BCPC) or
its equivalent community network structure for children’s rights and protection

The training manual is designed from a rights-based perspective
in the context of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of
the Child (UNCRC). It emphasizes the roles, knowledge and skills
required of the service providers as duty bearers to ensure child
protection and the process by which a BCPC is organized to
become functional. It is intended for the training of the staff and
members of the Provincial / City / Municipal Councils for the
Protection of Children, health service providers, and members of
the academe involved in community outreach; direct service
workers of non-government organizations (NGOs) including
faith-based organizations; leaders of youth groups; people’s
organizations (POs); community / barangay-based organizations.

In October, 2012, the BCPC training manual was completed.
Childhope in partnership with UNICEF agreed to facilitate the
printing and publication of the manual. The proposed design
for the cover and inside cover as well as the lay-out of the
training manual has been approved by UNICEF and Childhope
with some revisions.

RESEARCH STUDY
Case Study of the People’s Network for the Protection of Children (PNPC) : “Building Community-
based Systems for Child Protection in theNational Capital Region (NCR)”, has been finalized and
completed.
The Research project was supported by UNICEF Manila and National Council of Social Development. The
project aims to document an alternative model in organizing a community-based structure for the
protection of children and identifies what happens with a barangay as a result of an organization of a
people’s network for the protection of children and how the networkfunctions and sustain itself.

Its purpose was to examine the process and the effects of organizing the community leaders and
members and to the children who are the beneficiaries of the organization as well as the whole
barangay. The end goal of the study was to explore the goals that a child protection network must be
initiated in each community, and that this change the way a community prevents child abuse and
protects children’s rights.

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CHAP ANNUAL REPORT
FIELD STUDY VISIT/ EXPOSURE TRIPS

From January 5-6, 2012, Childhope conducted an orientation on Street Education Programs and Services
and Field Exposure among 16 students from Korea in Sucat and Baclaran area in Metro Manila. The
students conducted interactive games with the street children.

Ten (10) Japanese students under Prof. Naomi Kunichi of Kwansei Gakuin University visited Childhope
Asia Philippines on February 21, 2012 and were oriented on CHAP programs and services. They also
went to plaza Lawton and Arrocerros area in downtown Manila for field study exposure. The students
conducted Japanese games and taught street children about Disaster Preparedness based on their
experience during the March 11, 2011 Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster.

In April, 2012, Mr. Syvongsay Changpitikhoun,
the Thematic Manager of Save the the Children
–Norway (Laos Office) came to visit Childhope
for orientation and field exposure on the Street
Education Program for Street Children and the
Childhope project on organizing and
strengthening the Barangay Council for the
Protection of Children. Mr. Syvongsay went to
Luneta area and observed the Alternative
Education session conducted by the street
educators.

Two Bhutanese Delegates were provided
orientation on June 14 and June 21, 2012 on Childhope Street Education Program and BCPC Project. The
2 delegates went to Barangay Commonwealth to observe how the BCPC works. They also went to plaza
Lawton, Manila to observe the Alternative Education sessions among street children. The study visit is
in partnership with PAIBARE Foundation in Quezon City..

In October 30, 2012, 15 Korean volunteers from Hands-On Volunteer-Korea were provided Orientation
on Childhope Street Education Program and went to Monumento area in Caloocan City for exposure and
interaction with the street children.

STAFF DEVELOPMENT

In 2012, the Street Educators and program staff participated in several training seminars and other
capacity-building activities which enabled them to perform their tasks more effectively and efficiently.

The following table lists the in-house and external trainings attended by the staff:

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CHAP ANNUAL REPORT
Table 7. Summary of In-house and External Trainings conducted and attended by CHAP Staff
IN-HOUSE TRAININGS/ WORKSHOPS Primary Health Care, Substance Abuse Prevention Education
(conducted by pool of expert trainers from CHAP) and STI-HIV/ AIDS
UN Convention on the Rights of the Child
Adolescent Reproductive Health/ HIV-AIDS Curriculum
Team-Building and Commitment Renewal Seminar
Focused-Group Discussion on Child Monitoring on Child
Protection
EXTERNAL TRAININGS/ WORKSHOPS Proficiency Training on Skills for Life
(conducted or sponsored by partner agencies and Parish Renewal Experience (PREX) Seminar
organizations) Workshop on Street Family Psychosocial Intervention Training
Social Case Management Workshop
Training Design and Management Course
Training Workshop on Street Family Psychosocial Intervention
Training on Personal Safety Lesson
Training on Mainstreaming Most at Risk Children and Young
People on HIV and AIDS response
Training on Handling Anger and Managing Conflict Strategies
that Work
Training on Conflict Management and Resolution
Art Therapy Workshop
Foundation for Family Functioning
Foundation for Family Counselling Training sponsored by VIC
Youth Civic Engagement Training
Community Managed Savings and Credit Association Training
APEC Digital Opportunity Center (ADOC) Training on E-
Commerce
Financial Management Workshop
Health Awareness Seminar on Advances in Cancer Treatment
Writeshop on Family Development Modules and Training of
Implementers

A total of 97 staff from Childhope, FCED
and Tahanan Sta. Luisa joined the Staff
Summer Outing held on May 29, 2012 at
Vistamar Beach Resort, Anilao, Batangas.
Team building activities were conducted
to further enhance inter-personal and
working relationship among the staff.

The joint Childhope/FCED/Tahanan Sta
Luisa Christmas party was held in
December 18, 2012. A total of 78 staff
from the 3 organizations attended the
activity where they enjoyed the fun
games, raffles, gift giving, group dance presentations and food.

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CHAP ANNUAL REPORT
VOLUNTEER PROGRAM

From September 1 – 30, 2012, Mr. Val Ouano, a Filipino and a resident of Quezon City, volunteered to
assist in the alternative education session among street children in Monumento/Balintawak area in
Caloocan City. He also assisted the street educators in conducting sports activities like basketball and
volleyball among street children.

From August 6 – September 6, 2012, Ms. Florence Frossard, a Swiss national came to the Philippines to
do volunteer work for Childhope’s street education program and Resource Mobilization Unit. Ms.
Flossard stayed for 2 weeks in Tahanan Sta. Luisa to interact and teach the sexually abused street girls.
Ms. Flossard is a graduate of Bachelor of Arts in Sociology, Communication and Business Management
as well as an MA in Public Administration at Fribourg, Switzerland.

From October 1, 2012 – March 2013, Ms. Betty Luan, a Chinese- American graduate of Stanford
University volunteered at Childhope to assist the street educators in conducting alternative education
sessions among street children in Luneta Park, Manila. She also assisted Dr. Harvey Carpio in the health
and medical activities of the Mobile Health Clinic.

October 16, 2012-October 15, 2013, Ms. Yasuko Ichikawa, a PHD student on Social Engineering at Tokyo
Institute of Technology, decided to stay in the Philippines for 1 year to do volunteer work for the street
education program assisting the street educators in Plaza Lawton, Manila. Ms. Ichikawa also does
volunteer work at FCED to assist in the community organizing for Barangay Council for the Protection of
Children specifically in Barangay 905, Punta Sta.Ana, Manila.

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CHAP ANNUAL REPORT

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CHAP ANNUAL REPORT

III. DATABANK AND RESOURCE CENTER

The Databank and Resource Center of Childhope Asia Philippines, Inc. boasts of more than 800 titles of
books/manuals/handbooks, non-reference materials, compact disc in VCD and DVD formats, brochures,
posters, newsletters, news/feature articles, annual reports and journals.

CHAP publications are also shared and distributed by the Databank for advocacy purposes. These
include brochures and annual narrative reports of CHAP, Families and Children for Empowerment and
Development (FCED), and Tahanan Sta. Luisa Crisis Intervention Center for Sexually-exploited Street
Girls (TSL). FCED and TSL are CHAP’s sister organizations.

The Databank and Resource Center is open not only to CHAP staff but also to researchers from schools
in Metro Manila, as well as other individuals and organizations who want to learn more about street
children.

IV. RESOURCE MOBILIZATION AND COMMUNICATIONS

DONATIONS RECEIVED

Type of Donors Number
Local Organizations / Foundations 10 (4 old/regular, 3 new, 3 one-time donation)
Local Corporate Donors 39 (12 old/regular, 6 new, 21 one-time donation)
Individual/Groups 45 (23 old/regular, 3 new, 19 one-time donation)
International Donors 18 (15 old/regular, 1 new, 2 one-time grant)
Sports Fest Donors 9 (8 old/regular, 1 new)
Christmas Carols 11 donors (raised P76,984.51 + USD 20.00)

COIN CANS
The following are our new Coin Can Project partners in 2012:
Rustan’s Supercenter Inc.
Land Bank of the Philippines

With the addition of the above-mentioned partners, CHAP was able to raise a a total amount of Php
104,813.00 for this year.

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CHAP ANNUAL REPORT
CHAP GREETING CARDS
The total number of cards sold in 2012 was 1,706 (with 2 regular clients) amounting to Php 34,120.00.

MEDIA FEATURE
In 2012, CHAP was featured in the following:
4 newspapers (Business World, Manila Bulletin, Phil. Star, MEDIC of UP)
2 websites (GMA News and Embassy of Japan)
7 TV programs including life stories of Ms. Silva and Butch Nerja (GMA 7, GMA News TV, ABS
CBN, UNTV)

V. ADMINISTRATION

THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Dr. Jaime Galvez Tan Chairperson
Mr. John Victor Tence Vice Chairperson
Ms. Teresita L. Silva President
Atty. Darwin Mariano Corporate Secretary
Mr. Vitaliano Nanagas II Treasurer
Mr. Sherwin O Assistant Treasurer
Ms. Therese Badoy-Capati Member
Ms. Didit Van Der Linden Member

Prepared by:

Herbert Quilon Carpio, MD
Program Coordinator for Health and Medical Services
Outreach and Protection/ Education on the Streets Program
CHILDHOPE ASIA PHILIPPINES, INC.

Noted by:

Ms. Maribel D. Flores Ms. Teresita L. Silva, MSW
Assistant Executive Director President and Executive Director
CHILDHOPE ASIA PHILIPPINES, INC. CHILDHOPE ASIA PHILIPPINES, INC.

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