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Kindergarten Curriculum

Religion

Texts Used: Who Am I? Ignatius Press, 1994 (T2311) Who Am I? Teacher's Manual, Ignatius Press, (T2311A) Optional St. Joseph Picture Books, Catholic Book Publishing, 1978 (T2655) Course Description:
Kindergarten Religion gives the student a basic introduction to God, the Church, and to personal prayer, in part through participation in the Mass and the memorization of the Sign of the Cross, the Our Father, the Hail Mary, the Glory Be, and the Angel of God prayer. Emphasis is placed on knowing and loving God, and the dignity of the child made in God's image. The inclusion of the books of stories of our faith and the saints provide opportunity for teaching and discussion with your student.

Mathematics

Texts Used: MCP Math K, 1994 (T4200) MCP Math K Resource Manual, (T4200A) Optional Course Description:
Kindergarten Mathematics is directed to the development in the student of the capacity to understand the concepts presented in preparation for first grade. Topics covered include numbers from 0-20, time and money, order and place value, fractions and measurement, addition, and subtraction.

Language Arts

Texts Used: Phonics Book K, Modern Curriculum Press, 1995 (T1200) Resource Manual for MCP Phonics Book K, 1995 (T1200A) Optional McGuffey's Eclectic Primer, John Wiley & Sons, 1909 (T1900) Kolbe Guide to McGuffey's Eclectic Primer, Kolbe, 1998 (T1900A) Phonogram Cards, Kolbe, 2005 (T1859) Optional Course Description:
Kindergarten Language Arts is directed to the development in the student of the capacity to recognize the letters of the alphabet and their pronunciation and moving on to reading. MCP Phonics K begins very simply and will move very quickly the first few weeks. Likewise, McGuffey's Eclectic Primer begins easily but will progress rapidly. The student will learn listening and speaking skills, motor skills, visual and auditory discrimination, the letters of the alphabet, sounds of the consonants and short sounds of the vowels, as well as how to combine these sounds to begin reading.

Science
Texts Used:
Science and Living in God's World, Level 1A-Kindergarten, Lepanto Press 1960 edition (T4800) Science Experiments, Kolbe Academy Press, 2000 (T5018) Optional

Course Description:
Kindergarten Science gives the student their first look into the beauty of God's wonderful creation. At the kindergarten grade level, science involves the very basic concepts of the natural world around the student. The course, used in conjunction with the Science Experiments to accompany Science and Living in God's World, will help the student begin their journey of scientific inquiry, knowledge, and experimentation. Topics covered include the human body, weather, the seasons, seeds, animals, plants, and the environment.

First Grade Curriculum


Religion

Texts Used: Our Heavenly Father, Faith and Life Book 1, Catholics United for Faith, 3rd Edition, (T2301) Our Heavenly Father Activity Book, Faith and Life Book 1, Catholics United for Faith, 3rd Edition,(T2301A), Optional Our Heavenly Father Resource Book, Faith and Life Book 1, Catholics United for Faith, 3rd Edition,(T2301B), Optional The New Saint Joseph First Communion Catechism, Catholic Books Publishing, 1963 (T2231) Course Description:
First Grade Religion brings the student two things: information and formation. Information is provided to the child in the form of regimented, specific knowledge; and, formation is provided by the development of the external signs of our Faith in the life of the child in the form of: the Sign of the Cross, genuflecting, proper position of kneeling and attendance at Mass, pronunciation of prayers (in both Latin and English), and forms of address for the clergy, hierarchy and professed religious. Regimented, specific knowledge is provided so that the student may see the gradual development of a love for the Faith that is based on reason and knowledge. Regimented knowledge is also in tune with the ordered, basic knowledge that is inherent in the Catholic Faith. The student is introduced to the Trinity, with emphasis on the life of Jesus, the plan of salvation, and the child's part in that plan. The student is also introduced to Mary, the angels and saints.

Reading

Texts Used: Catholic National Reader, New Primer and Book One (T1861) Kolbe Guide to the Catholic National Reader, New Primer and Book One (T1861A) Phonogram Flash Cards (T1859) Course Description:
Reading in First Grade includes a selection of readings appropriate to the student's level. The texts gradually introduce new vocabulary. The teacher should read to the students, and students should in turn do their share of vocal and silent reading. Before a child can read, he must memorize the phonograms. When the child has memorized the sounds of twenty-six letters of the alphabet, have him begin reading in the book. Remember that all children are different and learn differently. It is better to go slowly and make sure he has mastered the material than to proceed without him really understanding. The Catholic National Readers are quite challenging, but once a child has learned the phonograms and read the primer, he is ready to read simple children's books. In using this course, the student will be introduced to reading as the natural way of learning, learn to identify characters, plots, details, and relationships, and begin to think critically about what has been read.

Phonics

Texts Used: Phonics Book A, Pearson Education, 2012 (T1201) Kolbe Academy Answer Key to Phonics Book A, 2009 (T1201B) optional Resource Manual for MCP Phonics Book A, 1995 (T1201A) optional

Course Description:
First Grade Phonics is directed to the development in the student of the capacity to pronounce, spell and understand differences in words. Topics covered include beginning sounds, rhyming sounds, consonants, long and short vowel sounds, consonant blends, word endings ed and ing, and contractions. MCP Phonics A begins very simply and the child should be able to do it without much difficulty, but do not let the workbook be a replacement for memorizing all seventy of the phonograms. It is strongly suggested that you practice every day in the way suggested in the guide until the student knows all of them without hesitation. Constantly point out the phonograms in new words that are introduced.

English Grammar

Texts Used: Ignatius Speaks and Writes: English I (T1010) Ignatius Speaks and Writes: English I Teacher Manual (T1010A), Optional Course Description:
Grade One English brings the student to study kinds of sentences and most of the parts of speech in a sentence. The student is met with the requirement to use simple punctuation, capitalize words and become acquainted with compound words, synonyms, antonyms, and homonyms as well as alphabetizing words and classifying objects. The student is also required to develop and practice composition skills, including writing letters and stories. Everything learned in English should be applied and reinforced in the student's reading, composition, spelling, and phonics. Most of the tasks in the Ignatius Speaks and Writes book are self-explanatory, so very little direction is included. Many of the pages have extra written work recommended to help the student retain what was introduced. The best way to teach English is by example and reinforcement of correct usage in the spoken and written word.

Spelling

Texts Used: Phonogram Flash Cards (T1859) Spelling word lists found in course plans Course Description:
The first words in the Grade One spelling list come directly from the Catholic National Readers New Primer and Book One. The child is learning to spell the words he is learning to read. Through this course, the student will learn visual and auditory discrimination of words, and achieve the ability to spell and use the given words in complete sentences.

Geography

Texts Used: Map Skills, Level B (T5801) Map Skills Answer Key for Level B (T5801A) - Optional Course Description:
First Grade Geography works to apply the geography lessons to the world around the child. Topics covered include finding places and things on a map, recognizing boundaries and landforms on a map, and using a globe to locate land, water, poles, and the equator. Geography does not need to be done every day and can be eliminated if the student is being challenged by the basics in other subjects.

Mathematics

Texts Used: MCP Math A, 1994 (T4201) MCP Math A Resource Manual (T4201A), Optional Course Description:
Grade One Math is based on the natural processes of thinking, namely induction and deduction. Inductive thinking arrives at the answer almost immediately because it seems obvious (although it is not always exact). Deductive thinking is a step-by-step process of reasoning leading to a solution. One process is not better than the other, only different from the other. In the course, students will learn numbers and basic addition and subtraction facts up to 18, 2 and 3-digit place value, money and time, addition of 2-digit numbers, geometry and measurement, and fractions and graphing. FAMILIES HAVE TWO OPTIONS FOR FIRST GRADE SCIENCE

Science (Option 1)

Texts Used: Harcourt Science, 2nd Grade* (Harcourt Publishing, 2005), (T4822) Harcourt Science, 2nd Grade* Workbook (T4822B) Optional
*Harcourt Science, 2nd Grade is used in both 1st and 2nd grade

Course Description:
First Grade Science is a basic introduction to the life, earth, and physical sciences. The most important part of teaching science in the early years is helping the student see the wonders of God's world, and

making him unafraid of the subject when he pursues science in more depth later. Children learn more from doing the experiments and investigations alongside the reading of the textbook. Science, like history, does not need to be done every day and can be set aside if the student is being challenged by the basics in other subjects. The Harcourt Science series has the availability of several online learning tools to anyone who purchases the textbook. The first is provided by the publisher, Harcourt. Another website is provided by the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA). This website allows you to select the topic you are studying in the book, and will take you to a page of selected website links that can help you to enhance and further develop the topics that your child is studying. The online resources are a wonderful addition to the activities provided within the text itself. Topics in this course include Life Science: plants, animals, and people; Earth Science: the Earth's surface, the Earth's resources, and the Earth's history; Physical Science: observing and measuring matter, changes in matter

Science (Option 2)

Texts Used: Science and Living in God's World, Level 1, Lepanto Press 1956 (T4801) Science and Living in God's World, Level 1, Answer Key (T4801A) Optional Science Experiments, Kolbe Academy Press, 2000 (T5018) Optional Course Description:
Science in First Grade should most importantly help the student see the wonders of God's world, and make him unafraid of the subject when he gets into serious science in later years. Topics covered include the world, air and weather, animals, plants, and people. Children learn more from doing experiments than they do from the book. It is recommended that you obtain Kolbe's science experiment book or any other science experiment book to use in conjunction with Science and Living in God's World. Science does not need to be done every day and can be eliminated if the student is being challenged by the basics in the other subjects.

Second Grade Curriculum


Religion

Texts Used: Jesus Our Life, Faith and Life Book 2, Catholics United for Faith, 3rd Edition,(T2302) Jesus Our Life Activity Book, Faith and Life Book 2, Catholics United for Faith, 3rd Edition,(T2302A), Optional Jesus Our Life Resource Book, Faith and Life Book 2, Catholics United for Faith, 3rd Edition,(T2302B), Optional The New Saint Joseph First Communion Catechism, Catholic Books Publishing, 1963 (T2231) Course Description:
Grade Two Religion guides the student through preparation for the reception of the Sacraments of Penance and Holy Communion. The law of God and salvation history are given as background for these Sacraments. The course emphasizes God's mercy and His inestimable gift of His Son. The student, if he was in the Kolbe program last year, has already used the First Communion Catechism, but the repetition is good. Using both of these books, the child will be ready to receive his First Confession and First Communion in the spring. It is advisable for you to have a child's Bible to use in conjunction with the lessons in religion.

Reading

Texts Used: Catholic National Reader, Book Two (T1862) Kolbe Guide to the Catholic National Reader, Book Two (T1862A) Course Description:
Second Grade Reading will cover a selection of readings appropriate to the level of the child. The readings will be taken from the Catholic National Reader Book Two, plus material from the Kolbe Academy Recommended Reading List or some other reliable source. The style of presentation in the Catholic National Reader is developed so that the full range of study is contained in each story (phonics, spelling, definitions and ever-increasing vocabulary). All outside reading should be chosen for the quality of content, art (if any is reproduced), and the gradual inclusion of more difficult vocabulary. Goals of the course include developing in the student a love for reading and appreciation of good literature, recognition of characters, details, relationships, and plots, the ability to retell the story in their own words and write book reports, and the ability to find the moral or objective of the selection. The Catholic National Reader is quite challenging, so if necessary proceed more slowly than the course plans suggest. It is not unusual for a student to be reading the book that is a year below his grade level.

Phonics

Texts Used: Phonics Book B, Pearson Education, 2012 (T1202) Kolbe Academy Answer Key to Phonics Book B, 2009 (T1202B) optional Resource Manual for Pearson Phonics Book B, 2012 (T1202A) optional Course Description:
Grade Two Phonics brings the student into the new areas of hard and soft c and g, r-controlled vowels, plurals, suffixes, vowel digraphs, diphthongs, prefixes, synonyms, antonyms, homonyms, and syllabication. Phonics B begins with easy material, and the child should be able to read the instructions and follow the directions. At first this may be challenging, but developing this skill at an early age will be of great value as the child progresses academically. Much in the phonics book reinforces what the student learns in English and Spelling.

English Grammar

Texts Used: English 2, 2nd Edition, Kolbe Academy Press (T1012) English 2 Teacher Manual, 2nd Edition, Kolbe Academy Press (T1012A), Optional Children's Dictionary, (T1001), Optional Supplement Course Description:

Grade Two English brings the student to study kinds of sentences and most of the parts of speech in a sentence. The student is met with the requirement to use simple punctuation, capitalize words and become acquainted with synonyms and antonyms, as well as alphabetizing words and classifying objects. The student is also required to develop and practice composition skills including writing book reports. Most of the tasks in this book are self-explanatory, so very little direction is included. Many of the pages have extra written work recommended to help the student retain what was introduced. The student should be expected to memorize many definitions, words, and lists in this book. A child's dictionary is recommended for use in English 2.

Spelling

Texts Used: Macmillan Children's Dictionary, Simon and Schuster, 2007 (T1001), optional Spelling word lists found in course plans Course Description:
Grade Two Spelling develops the student's capacity to pronounce, spell, use, look up in the dictionary, and understand the definitions of words. Other skills developed are the visual and auditory discrimination of words and becoming familiar with spelling rules that can be applied now and in future spelling. A child's dictionary is recommended in the second semester. At first using the dictionary is challenging for most children, but the more it is used the easier it becomes. It is great preparation for the future grades. If your student needs more challenging words, words from The Catholic National Reader can be assigned to supplement the weekly lists.

History

Texts Used: Child's Bible History by Fr. F. J. Knecht, D.D., 1973 (T2101) Kolbe Academy Answer Key to Child's Bible History, 2009 (T2101A) Course Description:
The core and meaning of all history is the history of our salvation, so history rightly begins with salvation history. This Grade Two History course is designed to supplement the study of religion by familiarizing the student with the chief figures and events of the Old and New Testament. These include creation and the fall of man, Abraham, Joseph, Moses and the Exodus, and the life of Jesus, and his suffering, death, and resurrection. This Bible history course should be used to reinforce what is learned in religion class with an emphasis on God's plan for salvation. The student should get an understanding of the genealogy of the people of the Old Testament in relation to the coming of Our Savior. He will begin to make the connections between the Old Testament, the New Testament, and our own times. Bible history does not need to be done every day and can be eliminated if the student is being challenged by the basics in the other subjects.

Geography

Texts Used: Map Skills, Level C (T5802) Map Skills Answer Key for Level C (T5802A) Optional Course Description:
In Second Grade Geography the student continues to apply the geography lessons to the world around him. These lessons include cardinal directions, identifying locations and landforms on maps, different types of maps, using an atlas, and locating continents, oceans, and hemispheres on a globe. Geography does not need to be done every day and can be eliminated if the student is being challenged by the basics in the other subjects.

Mathematics

Texts Used: MCP Math B, 1994 (T4202) MCP Math B Resource Manual (T4202A), Optional Course Description:
Grade Two Mathematics continues the activities of first grade in the area of inductive and deductive activities. The book begins with review of concepts that the student has already learned. It then continues

with problem solving, 3-digit place value, time and money, addition and subtraction of 2 and 3-digit numbers, geometry and fractions, measurement, and multiplication through 5x5.

FAMILIES HAVE TWO OPTIONS FOR SECOND GRADE SCIENCE

Science (Option 1)

Texts Used: Harcourt Science, 2nd Grade* (Harcourt Publishing, 2005), (T4822) Harcourt Science, 2nd Grade* Workbook (T4822B) Optional
*Harcourt Science, 2nd Grade is used in both 1st and 2nd grade

Course Description:
Second Grade Science continues the basic introduction to the life, earth, and physical sciences. The most important part of teaching science in the early years is helping the student see the wonders of God's world, and making him unafraid of the subject when he pursues science in more depth later. Children learn more from doing the experiments and investigations alongside the reading of the textbook. The Harcourt Science series has the availability of several online learning tools to anyone who purchases the textbook. The first is provided by the publisher, Harcourt. Another website is provided by the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA). The online resources are a wonderful addition to the activities provided within the text itself. Topics covered include habitats in Life Science, the Solar System and weather in Earth Science, and energy, as forces and motion, and as hearing and sound in Physical Science.

Science (Option 2)

Texts Used: Science and Living in God's World, Level 2, Lepanto Press 1956 (T4802) Science and Living in God's World, Level 2, Answer Key (T4802A) Optional Science Experiments, Kolbe Academy Press, 2000 (T5018) Optional Course Description:
Grade Two Science has the observation of physical phenomena as its focus. Topics covered include the dependence of animals on plants for food, insects, rocks and soil, the sun, plants and seeds, and travel. The most important part of teaching science in the early years is helping the student see the wonders of God's world, and making him unafraid of the subject when he gets into serious science in later years. Emphasis should be on experiments to facilitate this. Children learn more from doing experiments than they do from books. It is recommended that you obtain Kolbe's science experiment book, Mr. Wizard, or any other science experiment book to use in conjunction with Science and Living in God's World. Science, like history, does not need to be done every day and can be set aside if the student is being challenged by the basics in other subjects.

Third Grade Curriculum


Religion

Texts Used: Our Life with Jesus, Faith and Life Book 3, Catholics United for Faith, 3rd Edition, (T2303) Our Life with Jesus, Activity Book, Faith and Life Book 3, Catholics United for Faith, 3rd Edition, (T2303A), Optional Our Life with Jesus, Resource Book, Faith and Life Book 3, Catholics United for Faith, 3rd Edition, (T2303B), Optional St. Joseph Baltimore Catechism #1, Catholic Books Publishing, 1962 (T2232) Kolbe Academy Answer Key to the St. Joseph Baltimore Catechism #1 (T2232A), Optional Course Description:
Grade Three Religion develops the student's understanding of God's plan for the salvation of mankind. It begins with Creation and covers the Incarnation, the redemptive act of the Crucifixion, and the birth of the Church at Pentecost. The course introduces the student to the fullness of our life in the Church. It shows how man begins to use his gifts in cooperation with God's plan for mankind and His Church. Special emphasis is placed on the two most important Sacraments in the Church, illustrating their relationship to each other and to the salvific mission of the Church. In this year the study of the Mass begins. The student sees it first as a sacrifice and then as a means for unifying Christ's Church Militant. The student will also look at the family as the environment God has created to form us in his image and likeness, and the importance of family prayer to gain the strength needed to meet the challenges facing us.

Reading

Texts Used: Catholic National Reader, Book Three (T1863) Kolbe Guide to the Catholic National Reader, Book Three (T1863A) Course Description:
Third Grade Reading uses The Catholic National Reader, Book Three as the primary reader. The reading program is based on mutual response: teacher reading & students listening; student reading & teacher & other students listening. Vocal reading skill is to be practiced and developed; the child should read orally every day. The Catholic National Reader is quite challenging so if necessary, proceed more slowly than the course plans suggest. It is not unusual for a student to be reading the book that is a year below his grade level. Through this course, the student will understand how learning develops from good reading habits, be able to identify and describe what takes place and the point or objective of the author, continue to develop a love of reading, strengthen his vocabulary skills by reading and learning new words from the books read, and improve composition skills in writing book reports.

Phonics

Texts Used: Phonics Book C, Pearson Education, 2012 (T1203) Kolbe Academy Answer Key to Phonics Book C, 2009 (T1203B) optional Resource Manual for Phonics Book C, 2012 (T1203A) optional Course Description:
Third Grade Phonics brings the student into alphabetic sequence, all positions of consonants, hard and soft 'c' and 'g', short and long vowels, consonant blends, recognition of syllables, diphthongs, prefixes, and word types. The student will also look at prefixes, base words, and suffixes, synonyms, antonyms, and homonyms, homographs, and dictionary skills. Phonics C begins with easy material, and the child should be able to complete most of the work with very little help. Much in the phonics book reinforces what the student learns in English and Spelling.

English Grammar

Texts Used: Voyages in English 3 (T1003)

Voyages in English 3, Teacher's Manual (T1003A), Optional Course Description:


If your student has done Kolbe Academy 's English 2, it is recommended that he skip Voyages in English 3and go on to Voyages in English 4. If this is the case, refer to the description for 4th grade material. The teaching of English is cumulative. In Grade Three the student will review what he learned in previous grades and build on it. Everything learned in English should be applied and reinforced in the student's reading, composition, spelling, and phonics. The student should be expected to memorize many definitions, words, and lists in this book. The student should also have a notebook especially for written composition and that he will write a paragraph in it every day. This course should be supplemented with readings in literature, with quarterly or semester book reports completed on these readings. Topics covered include the 4 types of sentences, with appropriate punctuation, writing paragraphs, letters, and book reports, irregular verbs, poetry, dictionary skills, synonyms, antonyms, and homonyms, capitalization, and contractions.

Spelling

Texts Used: Macmillan Children's Dictionary, Simon and Schuster, 2007 (T1001), optional Spelling word lists found in course plans Course Description:
Grade Three Spelling develops the student's capacity to pronounce, spell, use, look up in the dictionary, understand and remember the definitions of words, and understand the parts of speech of the listed words. A child's dictionary is necessary. At first using the dictionary is challenging for most children, but the more it is used the easier it becomes. It is great preparation for the future grades. If your student needs more of a challenge, words from The Catholic National Reader can be assigned in addition to those in the weekly lists.

History

Texts Used: The Catholic Bible Story Workbook, Fireside Bible Publishers, 2000 (T2103) Course Description:
Third Grade History uses The Catholic Bible Story Workbook. It is a wonderful at-level history for third grade, but is enhanced when the child reads from a child's Bible the stories corresponding to the lessons in the text. This course aims to familiarize the student with the great figures and scriptures of the Old and New Testament; to help the student become more familiar with the flow of history and the chronological relationships between events; and continue to introduce the student to cultural and historical perspectives that will help him recognize and criticize the assumptions of our own age from a Catholic standpoint. Topics covered from the Old Testament include creation, the tower of Babel , Jacob and Esau, Joseph, Moses and the Exodus, Joshua, Samson, Ruth, David and Goliath, Solomon, Jonah, and Daniel in the lion's den. From the New Testament, the student will look at the Annunciation and birth of Jesus, the finding in the temple, John the Baptist, the apostles, the wedding at Cana, the sermon on the mount, the raising of Lazarus, the Last Supper, the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus, and his appearance on the road to Emmaus.

Geography

Texts Used: Map Skills, Level D (T5803) Map Skills Answer Key for Level D (T5803A) - Optional Course Description:
In Third Grade Geography, the student continues to apply the geography lessons to the world around him. Topics covered include map symbols and keys, map scale, different types of maps, including physical, political, population, transportation, land us, climate, vegetation, and natural resource maps, climate zones, the rotation of the earth, and latitude and longitude on a globe. Geography does not need to be done every day and can be eliminated if the student is being challenged by the basics in other subjects.

Mathematics
Texts Used:

MCP Math C, 1994 (T4203) MCP Math C Resource Manual (T4203A), Optional

Course Description:
Grade Three Mathematics is directed to expanding the principles of the four functions that were begun in the second grade: addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. These four functions are the underpinnings of all that will be studied in arithmetic. Essentially, the course will involve the use of both inductive and deductive activities. Modern Curriculum Press Mathematics C begins with reviews of what the student has already learned. It then covers place values and recognition to 1,000,000, money, rounding and estimation, addition and subtraction up to 4-digit numbers, time to the quarter of an hour, perimeter and volume, temperature in Fahrenheit and Celsius, meter and liquid measures, multiplication and division facts through 9, multiplication of 1-digit by 2 and 3-digit numbers, area, geometric solids, angles, division with remainders, averages, fractions through 1/12, and decimals.

Science

Texts Used: Harcourt Science, 4th Grade*, Harcourt Publishing, 2005, (T4824) Kolbe Academy Answer Key for Harcourt Science 3/4, (T4824A), Optional Harcourt Science Workbook 4th Grade*, Harcourt Publishing, (T4824B), Optional Harcourt Science, 4th Grade* Workbook Teacher Manual, (T4824C), Optional
*Harcourt Science, 4th Grade is used in both 3rd and 4th grade

Course Description:
Third Grade Science is a basic introduction to the life, earth, and physical sciences. The most important part of teaching science in the early years is helping the student see the wonders of God's world, and making him unafraid of the subject when he pursues in depth science in later years. Children learn more from doing the experiments and investigations alongside the reading of the textbook. The Harcourt Science series has the availability of several online learning tools to anyone who purchases the textbook. The first is provided by the publisher, Harcourt. There are several supplementary activities for the student and teacher on this website. Another website is provided by the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA). This website allows you to select the topic you are studying in the book, and will take you to a page of selected website links that can help you to enhance and further develop the topics that your child is studying. The online resources are a wonderful addition to the activities provided within the text itself. Topics covered include in Life Science: cells, animals, plants, and fungi; animal growth and adaptations, animal needs, anatomy, and behavior; plant growth and adaptations, plant needs to live, structure, and reproduction; and human body systems, including skeletal, muscular, respiratory, circulatory, nervous, and digestive. Topics in Earth Science include causes and formations of earthquakes and volcanoes, the formation of fossils, and fossil fuels; in Physical Science, the student will look at the states and measurement of matter and its chemical and physical changes; heat, heat transfer, and thermal energy; sound and sound waves; and light.

Fourth Grade Curriculum


Religion

Texts Used: Jesus Our Guide, Faith and Life Book 4, Catholics United for Faith, 3rd Edition, (T2304) Jesus Our Guide, Activity Book, Faith and Life Book 4, Catholics United for Faith, 3rd Edition, (T2304A), Optional Jesus Our Guide, Resource Book, Faith and Life Book 4, Catholics United for Faith, 3rd Edition, (T2304B), Optional St. Joseph Baltimore Catechism #1, Catholic Books Publishing, 1962 (T2232) Kolbe Academy Answer Key to the St. Joseph Baltimore Catechism #1 (T2232A), Optional Course Description:
Grade Four Religion introduces the student to God's plan for the salvation of His people from sin. It shows us how we participate in that salvific act. This course explains to the student in clear and unmistakable terms the many ways God helps us in our pilgrimage here on earth. God, His Law, and His Church help and guide us. The suffering of man is demonstrated through the fall of man, Cain and Abel, Joseph in Egypt, the slavery of Israel in Egypt , and the Exodus to the Promised Land. King David and King Solomon are looked at, leading to the promise of a new king, fulfilled in Jesus. The material from the St. Joseph Baltimore Catechism #1 will overlap in many places with that of the Faith and Life Series. You may choose to follow the framework of the Baltimore Catechism rather than that of theFaith and Life Series, but you should choose one and only use the other for supplementary material. There are many wonderful activities at www.catecheticalresources.com that can be used in conjunction with the lessons in this book.

Reading

Texts Used: Catholic National Reader, Book Four (T1864) Kolbe Guide to the Catholic National Reader, Book Four (T1864A) Course Description:
Fourth Grade Reading presents a selection of readings appropriate to the level of the student. The program is based on mutual response: teacher reading and students listening; student reading and teacher and other students listening. Vocal reading skill is to be practiced and developed; to this end, the child should read orally every day. The Catholic National Reader (CNR), Book Four is the primary reader for this level. The CNR is quite challenging so if necessary, proceed more slowly than the course plans suggest. It is not unusual for a student to be reading the book that is a year below his grade level. In this course, the student will continue to develop a love for reading, understand how learning develops from good reading habits, understand the assimilation of word meanings and vocabulary from reading, identify characters, plots, and the point or objective of the author, and write book reports.

Phonics

Texts Used: Phonics, Level D, Pearson Education, 2912 (T1204) Kolbe Academy Answer Key to Phonics, Level D, 2012 (T1204B) optional Resource Manual for Phonics Level D, 2012 (T1204A) optional Course Description:
Grade Four Phonics introduces the student to a gradual sophistication of use in the skills developed from the previous phonics courses. Uses of the apostrophe, possessives, contractions, prefixes & roots all expand the student's ability to read, write and speak with use of simple but important and expanded phonics skills. Syllables, silent letters, diphthongs, vowel pairs and digraphs, alphabetical order, and dictionary skills are also included in this course. Phonics Level D begins with easy material, and the child should be able to read the instructions and follow the directions with very little help. Much in the word study book reinforces what the student learns in English and Spelling.

English Grammar

Texts Used: Voyages in English 4 (T1004A) Voyages in English 4, Teacher's Edition (T1004B), Optional Course Description:
English Grammar for Grade Four implements the functions of all the parts of writing to develop in the student the ability to write clearly and persuasively. This is partially accomplished by using the method of "imitation," reading the stories that go along with the Voyages in English text and then imitating the methods used in the stories to develop the writing skills of the student. This year in grammar brings all learning from the previous three years into focus and applies it in a progressively more difficult, but rewarding way. The teaching of English should be cumulative. In Grade Four the student will review what he learned in previous grades and build on it. Everything learned in English should be applied and reinforced in the student's reading, composition, spelling, and phonics. Topics covered include writing paragraphs, letters, invitations, and book reports, punctuation and capitalization, poetry, irregular verbs, contractions, abbreviations, and possessives.

Vocabulary and Spelling


Texts Used: Sadlier-Oxford Vocabulary Workshop, Level Orange, 2006 edition (T1429) Teacher's Edition for Sadlier-Oxford Vocabulary Workshop, Level Orange (T1429A)
Catholic National Reader, Book Four, (T1864), Optional

Course Description:
Grade Four Vocabulary & Spelling develops the student's capacity to pronounce, spell, use, look up in the dictionary, understand, and remember the definitions of words, their diacritical marks, and syllabication. It also develops the student's ability to work with synonyms, antonyms, homonyms, and analogies. Sadlier-Oxford Vocabulary Workshop, Level Orange is the primary book used for the course. The Catholic National Reader (CNR), Book Four is used during each week for additional vocabulary work. If doing both the vocabulary book and the words from the CNR is too time consuming and challenging, eliminate the words from CNR and do only the vocabulary book.

Classical Composition
Texts Used:
o o (T1551) Classical Composition Vol. I: Fable Stage Teacher Manual (CCFS), (T1551A) Classical Composition Vol. I: Fable Stage Student Workbook (CCFSSW),

Course Description:
Classical Composition instructs the novice writer as though he or she were an apprentice to the great master writers. Instruction is based on imitation. Beginning by making the student aware of the structure of sound writing, and proceeding by giving the student the tools to imitate it, the course ends by equipping the student to design his own sound writing. The course begins by acquainting the student with models from which he can gain a sound grasp of structure. Then sentence and word variation, figures of description, rhetorical devices, and stylistic considerations are introduced slowly all in service of the message to be communicated. At the end of the full course a student should emerge as a writer who can ascertain the purpose of any given writing task and employ the best means of completing the task to communicate the message. The full course is set forth in substance and sequence in the Fable Stage Teacher Manual, a complete, self-contained course that is part of a series. The Student Workbook compliments each lesson. English Composition I: Fable Stage is suitable for introducing classical composition to 4th or 5th graders. It may also be used with upper grammar school students whose writing background has not included classical composition instruction. Classical Composition Vol. I: Fable Stage Teacher Manual and the corresponding Student Workbook are the primary texts for this course. The child should write every school day, utilizing Fridays for writing instruction or practice, if the parent wishes to stay with the schedule as written. Parents are free to doubleup on lessons depending on the rate at which their children absorb the lesson and according to the

schedule they have established for their home school. The final week of every quarter is written to doubleup on the lessons in order to finish out the course in the traditional thirty-six (36) weeks. Quarterly exams have also been supplied to be used as the parent decides. The lessons are set forth on a 10 day cycle by the publisher, but as Kolbe parents you may adapt the pace and coverage to your own schedules.

FAMILIES HAVE TWO OPTIONS FOR FOURTH GRADE HISTORY

History (Option 1)
Texts Used:
o 1997, (T7304) o Kolbe Academy Answer Key to Founders of Freedom, (T7304A), Optional Founders of Freedom, Land of Our Lady Series, Volume I. Neumann Press,

Course Description:
Grade Four History concentrates on the ancient and medieval world events that led up to the founding of the United States of America . The flow of history in this course will be drawn from the beginnings of history through to the foundations of the American drama. Topics covered include the beginning of civilization, from Adam and Eve, the development of civilization in Greece and Rome, the beginning and challenges of Christianity, the role played by monks and missionaries, feudalism, the Magna Carta, religious orders, and the troubles in Europe, leading to the approach of the New World.

History (Option 2)
Texts Used:
o o o o o Famous Men of Greece Book, John Haaren & A.B. Poland, edited by Memoria Press 2006, (T7814) Famous Men of Greece Student Guide (T7814A), Optional Famous Men of Greece Teacher Guide (T7814B), Optional
Supplemental Material:

D'Aulaire's Book of Greek Myths (T3420) The Children's Homer (T3440), also in Elementary Literature

Course Description:
Grade Four History is designed to introduce the student to the great figures of ancient Greek history and myth, and to trace the historical rise and lasting influence of the Greek civilization. The textbook should be supplemented with material from other sources, particularly encyclopedias for the writing of brief research reports. As you read Famous Men of Greece, it is to the student's advantage to read about the incident or the god/goddess in D'Aulaire's Book of Greek Myths. This can give the student more details and help to reinforce in his memory persons, places, and incidents of Ancient Greece. Figures covered include the Greek gods, Cadmus, Perseus, Hercules, Jason, Theseus, Agamemnon, Achilles, Odysseus, Miltiades, Leonidas, Socrates, Xenophon, Philip of Macedonia, Alexander the Great, Demosthenes, Aristotle, Ptolemy, and the fall of Greece.

Geography
Texts Used:
o o Map Skills, Level E (T5804) Map Skills Answer Key for Level E (T5804A) - Optional

Course Description:
Fourth Grade Geography continues to apply the geography lessons to the world around the child. The Glossary at the back of the book contains definitions of terms found in the text. The textbook should be supplemented with material from other sources, particularly local maps, a map of the United States, a globe, an atlas, and sources found on the Internet. Geography does not need to be done every day and can be eliminated if the student is being challenged by the basics in other subjects. The topics covered include map keys and grids, mileage markers and map scale, natural boundaries and landforms on maps, different map types, including land use, vegetation, climate, rainfall, population, transit, natural resources, and historical maps, knowing which type of map to use, climate and time zones, Mercator and Robinson map projections, and latitude and longitude on a globe.

Mathematics
Texts Used:

Saxon Math 5/4, Third Edition, 2004, (T4054) Course Description:


Fourth Grade Math introduces to the student a program of "foundational" elements upon which the successful mathematical equations are worked out. This program contains a thorough review of addition, subtraction, and single digit multiplication and division. The subsequent arithmetic content includes number concepts, estimation functions, two- and three-digit computations, decimals and fractions. The basic skills of algebra and geometry are introduced. Continual and incremental practice with word problems, measurement, scale, and graph reading, as well as arithmetic, provides the opportunity for students to learn and remember the foundational skills and concepts of mathematics.

Science
Texts Used:
o o o Optional o Harcourt Science, 4th Grade* Workbook Teacher Manual, (T4824C), Optional
*Harcourt Science, 4th Grade is used in both 3rd and 4th grade

Harcourt Science, 4th Grade*, Harcourt Publishing, 2005, (T4824) Kolbe Academy Answer Key for Harcourt Science 3/4, (T4824A), Optional Harcourt Science Workbook 4th Grade*, Harcourt Publishing, (T4824B),

Course Description:
Fourth Grade Science continues the basic introduction to the life, earth, and physical sciences. The most important part of teaching science in the early years is helping the student see the wonders of God's world, and making him unafraid of the subject when he pursues science in more depth later. Children learn more from doing the experiments and investigations alongside the reading of the textbook. The Harcourt Science series has the availability of several online learning tools to anyone who purchases the textbook. The first is provided by the publisher, Harcourt. There are several supplementary activities for the student and teacher on this website. Another website is provided by the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA). This website allows you to select the topic you are studying in the book, and will take you to a page of selected website links that can help you to enhance and further develop the topics that your child is studying. The online resources are a wonderful addition to the activities provided within the text itself. Topics covered include in Life Science: the components, habitats, and conservation of ecosystems, rain forests, and coral reefs; in Earth Science: the atmosphere and weather prediction, the water cycle and the ocean floor, and the Earth, moon, and other planets; in Physical Science: electricity and magnetism, motion and forces, and simple machines, including levers, pulleys, and wheels.

Fifth Grade Curriculum


Religion

Texts Used: Credo: I Believe, Faith and Life Book 5, Catholics United for Faith, 3rd Edition (T2305) Credo: I Believe, Activity Book, Faith and Life Book 5, Catholics United for Faith, 3rd Edition (T2305A), Optional Credo: I Believe, Resource Book, Faith and Life Book 5, Catholics United for Faith, 3rd Edition (T2305B), Optional St. Joseph Baltimore Catechism #2, Catholic Books Publishing, 1962 (T2233) Kolbe Academy Answer Key to the St. Joseph Baltimore Catechism #2 (T2233A), Optional Course Description:
Fifth Grade Religion is designed to explicate the basic truths of the Catholic Faith contained in the Church's official creeds and doctrines. To know these truths is to know Jesus, who alone can set us free. Special emphasis is given to careful understanding of the basic content of the Gospels, the prophets, and the prayers of the Church. In this course, the student will look at the Trinity, creation, the fall of the angels and of man, God as the father of all mankind, God the Son as the redeemer of mankind, and God the Holy Spirit as the sanctifier, the nature and precepts of the Church, and Mary as the Mother of God in our lives. The material from Baltimore Catechism #2 will overlap in many places with that of the Faith and Life Series. You may choose to follow the framework of the Baltimore Catechism rather than that of the Faith and Life Series, which is followed in this outline, but you should choose one and only use the other for supplementary material. The sections listed from the St. Joseph Baltimore Catechism #2 are repeated in other years. The sections of this course that do not contain supplemental material from the St. JosephBaltimore Catechism #2 can be supplemented by Knect's Child's Bible History and/or Bible History by Ignatius Schuster.

Reading

Texts Used: Catholic National Reader Book Five, (T1865) Kolbe Academy Guide to the Catholic National Reader, Book Five (T1865A) Course Description:
Grade Five Reading is designed to introduce the young student to the world of literature. The student begins to understand the world and God's creation through literature. Essentially, all education is literature-based, as the overall style of the Scriptures shows. It is through literature that man comes to know, love, and serve. The Catholic National Reader (CNR), Book Five is the primary reader for this level. The CNR is quite challenging so if necessary, proceed more slowly than the course plans suggest. It is not unusual for a student to be reading the book that is a year below his grade level. Many of the stories in the Catholic National Reader are not included in the course plans. Encourage the student to read even the ones that are not assigned as evening reading for pleasure.

Phonics

Texts Used: Phonics Level E, Pearson Education, 2012 (T1205) Kolbe Academy Answer Key to Phonics Level E, 2012 (T1205B), optional Resource Manual for Phonics Level E, 2012 (T1205A, optional Course Description:
Grade Five Phonics continues to help the student grow more sophisticated in his use in the skills developed from the previous phonics courses. Study of vowel digraphs, diphthongs, prefixes, roots, compound words, syllabication, and suffixes expand the student's ability to read, write and speak with expanded phonics skills. The course has been shown as a daily subject, but you may condense it into a two-day or even a one-day a week subject as long as the student is doing well and understanding the material. The last three pages of the workbook contain Definitions, General Rules, and Syllabication Rules that can be very helpful in all

areas of the language arts. Much in the word study book reinforces what the student learns in English and Spelling.

English Grammar

Texts Used: Voyages in English 5 (T1005A) Voyages in English 5, Teacher's Edition (T1005B), Optional Course Description:
Grade Five English Grammar is designed to lead the student to speak and to write with precision, skill, and persuasiveness. To accomplish this, the course instructs the student in the use of all the parts that go to make up English Grammar: clear understanding of parts of speech, sentence construction, paragraph usage, syntax, punctuation, abbreviations, and capitalization. In addition, the student will be instructed in the social graces essential to achieving effective communication. Part One of the text is titled Creative Activities. The parts of the first half that instruct in paragraph writing have been included in the lesson plans, mostly for Fridays. The lesson plan concentrates on Part Two of the book, which is Grammar. The teaching of English should be cumulative. In Grade Five the student will review what he learned in previous grades and build on it. There are many exercises in the back of the book following the Index that can be used if time permits.

Vocabulary & Spelling


Texts Used: Sadlier-Oxford Vocabulary Workshop, Level Blue, 2006 edition, (T1430) Teacher's Manual for Sadlier-Oxford Vocabulary Workshop, Level Blue, (T1430A), Optional Catholic National Reader, Book Five, (T1865), Optional Course Description:
Grade Five Vocabulary & Spelling develops the student's capacity to pronounce, spell, use, look up words in the dictionary, understand, and remember the definitions of words, their diacritical marks, and syllabication. It also develops the student's ability to work with synonyms, antonyms, homonyms, and analogies. This can be challenging for some students and should not become a frustration. If it is too difficult, use only the Vocabulary Workshop, Level Blue making certain that the student understands the material.

FAMILIES HAVE TWO OPTIONS FOR FIFTH GRADE HISTORY

History (Option 1)

Texts Used: Bearers of Freedom, Land of Our Lady Series, Volume II. Neumann Press, 1997, (T7305) Kolbe Academy Answer Key to Bearers of Freedom, (T7305A), Optional Course Description:
Fifth Grade History aims to help student identify important people, events, places and dates during the exploring age of history. Students will learn to evaluate and discuss the relationships among peoples, events, places and dates in this course. Bearers of Freedom covers the exploring age including, the route to India and founding of America, pioneers in the southeast, southwest, and California, the discovery of the land between the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico, the thirteen colonies, and the dividing of French lands into English possession.

History (Option 2)

Texts Used: Famous Men of Rome Book, John Haaren & A.B. Poland, edited by Memoria Press 2005, (T7834) Famous Men of Rome Student Guide (T7834A), Optional Famous Men of Rome Teacher Guide (T7834B), Optional Course Description:
Grade Five History is designed to introduce the student to the great figures of Roman history and myth, and to trace the historical rise and fall of the Roman civilization. This course aims to familiarize the student

with the great figures of Rome that contributed to the thought and culture of Catholic Europe; to help the student become more familiar with the flow of history and the chronological relationships between events, particularly in regard to Rome and early Christianity; and to continue to introduce the student to cultural and historical perspectives that will help him recognize and criticize the assumptions of our own age from a Catholic standpoint.

Geography

Texts Used: Map Skills, Level F (T5805) Map Skills Answer Key for Level F (T5805A) - Optional Course Description:
Fifth Grade Geography continues to apply the geography lessons to the world around the child. Topics covered include map symbols, scale, and keys, reading a road map, latitude and longitude, time zones, map projections, and different types of maps, including population, transportation, climate, rainfall, vegetation, land use, weather, transit, historical, and language maps. The Glossary at the back of the book contains definitions of terms found in the text. The textbook should be supplemented with material from other sources, particularly local maps, a map of theUnited States, a globe, an atlas, and sources found on the Internet. Geography does not need to be done every day and can be eliminated if the student is being challenged by the basics in other subjects.

Mathematics

Texts Used: Saxon Math 6/5, Third Edition, 2004, (T4065) Course Description:
Grade Five Mathematics is designed to strengthen and increase the student's basic mathematical skills to a fifth grade level of competence. Topics include numeration, addition and subtraction up to 6 digits, multiplication to 3 digits, division up to 3 digit divisors, decimals to the 10 thousandths place, measurement, fractions, geometry, percents, probability, statistics and integers. The course aims to develop basic computational skills, develop problem solving skills, understand and sue skills in estimating, interpreting and organizing data, measuring and predicting, and to be able to apply mathematical ideas to everyday situations.

Science

Texts Used: Harcourt Science, 6th Grade*, Harcourt Publishing, 2005, (T4826) Kolbe Academy Answer Key for Harcourt Science 5/6, (T4826A), Optional Harcourt Science Workbook 6th Grade*, Harcourt Publishing, (T4826B), Optional Harcourt Science, 6th Grade* Workbook Teacher Manual, (T4826C), Optional
* Harcourt Science, 6th Grade is used in both 5th and 6th grade

Course Description:
Fifth Grade Science is an intermediate introduction to the life, earth, and physical sciences. The most important part of teaching science in the early years is helping the student see the wonders of God's world, and making him unafraid of the subject when he pursues in-depth science in later years. Children learn more from doing the experiments and investigations along with the reading of the textbook. The Harcourt Science series has several online learning tools available to anyone who purchases the textbook. The first, with several supplementary activities for the student and teacher, is provided by the publisher. Another website is provided by the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA). This website allows you to select the topic you are studying in the book, and will take you to a page of selected website links that can help you to enhance and further develop the topics that your child is studying. The online resources are a wonderful addition to the activities provided within the text alone. Topics in this course include Life Science: cells, genetics and heredity; Earth Science: ecosystems, interactions in ecosystems, Earth's oceans, and weather changes; Physical Science: atoms, elements, and compounds, matter and energy, sound and light.

Latin

Texts Used: New Missal Latin, 1941, (T6010)

Kolbe Academy Supplementary Exercises for New Missal Latin, 2005, (T6012) Course Description:
Sixth Grade Latin is a beginner's course using New Missal Latin, a book ideally suited for grade school age students. Latin is the language of the Church; as such it is an integral part of every Catholic's heritage. Students are introduced to Latin vocabulary and Latin grammar and syntax, including the nominative, genitive, accusative, ablative, and vocative noun cases, forms of first, second, and third declension nouns, and masculine, feminine, and neuter noun genders. Also covered are forms of first, second, and third declension adjectives and adverbs, present, imperfect, and future tenses of first, second, third, and fourth conjugation verbs, and prepositions. The book set includes the Student Book, Teacher's Manual, Student Test Book, Test Book Answer Key, and a Pronunciation Guide on CD. The Student Books are also sold separately.

Sixth Grade Curriculum


Religion

Texts Used: Following Christ, Faith and Life Book 6, Catholics United for Faith, 3rd Edtion (T2306) Following Christ, Activity Book, Faith and Life Book 6, Catholics United for Faith, 3rd Edtion (T2306A), Optional Following Christ, Resource Book, Faith and Life Book 6, Catholics United for Faith, 3rd Edtion (T2306B), Optional St. Joseph Baltimore Catechism #2, Catholic Books Publishing, 1962 (T2233) Kolbe Academy Answer Key to the St. Joseph Baltimore Catechism #2 (T2233A), Optional Course Description:
Grade Six Religion draws up a blueprint for a life of love. The law of God, particularly the Ten Commandments, draws us into that life of love. The heart of our life of love is Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament, as He comes to us in the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass. This year of study relates to the student a plan of action that begins with the understanding of the challenges that God's law places before us. It ends with the understanding that Our Heavenly Father will not leave us without the strengthening gift of His grace, enabling us to meet all challenges. The material from Baltimore Catechism #2 will overlap in many places with that of the Faith and Life Series. You may choose to follow the framework of the Baltimore Catechism rather than that of the Faith and Life Series, which is followed in this outline, but you should choose one and only use the other for supplementary material. The sections listed from the St. Joseph Baltimore Catechism #2 are repeated in other years. Repetition is essential for mastery, so it would be best to cover this material in all years. If time constraints prevent doing so, however, this material can be set-aside for later years. There are suggested topics for reports for each quarter that can be used if you choose. There are many wonderful activities at www.catecheticalresources.com that can be used in conjunction with the lessons in this book.

Reading

Texts Used: Catholic National Reader, Book Six (T1866) Kolbe Guide to the Catholic National Reader, Book Six (T1866A) Course Description:
Grade Six Reading brings the student to literature in a deeper, more rigorous fashion than previous reading courses. Classic poems and fragments of larger works are included in the National Catholic Reader. The course is comprised of two parts: the Catholic National Reader and outside reading. Between these, the student will be introduced to the world as seen in literature and in the minds of others. The Catholic National Reader (CNR), Book Six is the primary reader for this level. The Catholic National Reader is quite challenging; it is not unusual for a student to be reading the book that is a year below his grade level. Consequently, we have selected a limited number of passages to be covered. Encourage the student to read even the ones that are not assigned as evening reading for pleasure.

Phonics

Texts Used: Phonics Level F, Pearson Education, 2012 (T1206) Kolbe Academy Answer Key to Phonics Level F, 2012 (T1206B) optional Resource Manual for Phonics Level F, 2012 (T1206A) optional Course Description:
Grade Six Phonics continues to help the student grow more sophisticated in his use in the skills developed from the previous phonics courses. Study of vowel digraphs, diphthongs, prefixes, roots, compound words, syllabication, and suffixes expand the student's ability to read, write and speak with expanded phonics skills. Phonics Level F is quite self-explanatory and the child should be able to complete most of the work with very little help. The course has been shown as a daily subject, but you may condense it into a two-day or even a one-day a week subject as long as the student is doing well and understanding the material. The

last three pages of the workbook contain Definitions, General Rules, and Syllabication Rules that can be very helpful in all areas of the language arts. Much in the word study book reinforces what the student learns in English and Spelling. Because children sometimes forget, this is a good thing.

English Grammar

Texts Used: Voyages in English 6, (T1006A) Voyages in English 6, Teacher's Edition (T1006B) Course Description:
Sixth Grade English is designed to teach students to speak and write correctly and effectively. It will also emphasize, secondarily, training in the social graces, which are necessary for effective communication. This course plan concentrates on Part Two of the Voyages in English book, which is Grammar. The teaching of English should be cumulative. In Grade Six the student will review what he learned in previous grades and build on it. Everything learned in English should be applied and reinforced in the student's reading, composition, spelling, and vocabulary. A dictionary is recommended for use in this course. The student should diagram sentences in exercises as he proceeds through the work. There are many exercises in the back of the book following the Index that can be used if time permits for reinforcement. The daily work should include memorization of fundamental rules of grammar. Note that Part One of Voyages in English, which is Composition, is not used in this course. Composition is studied in Kolbe Academy 's Vocabulary and Composition course using Sadlier-Oxford Composition Workshop series.

Vocabulary & Composition


Texts Used: Sadlier-Oxford Vocabulary Workshop, Level A, 2005, (T1431) Teacher's Manual for Sadlier-Oxford Vocabulary Workshop, Level A, (T1431A) Sadlier Writing Workshop, Level A, 2009, (T1516) Teacher's Edition for Sadlier Writing Workshop, Level A, (T1516A) Course Description:
Grade Six Vocabulary develops the student's capacity to pronounce, spell, use, look up in the dictionary, understand, and remember the definitions of words, their diacritical marks, and syllabication. It also develops the student's ability to work with synonyms, antonyms, homonyms, homographs, prefixes, suffixes, roots, denotation, connotation, literal usage, figurative usage, and analogies. Grade Six Composition will aid the student in developing composition skills, which are so necessary for further education. These skills include developing thoughts in a logical manner, both for speaking and writing; writing narrative, informative, descriptive, and persuasive paragraphs and essays; and writing for different purposes, such as a newspaper, letters, a research report, and about literature. Many of these skills can be applied in Kolbe Academy 's Literature program both in written assignments and book reports. Overall, this course should dovetail with the literature course in assignment of written work.

FAMILIES HAVE TWO OPTIONS FOR SIXTH GRADE HISTORY

History (Option 1)

Texts Used: Leaders of Freedom, Land of Our Lady Series, Volume III. Neumann Press, 1997, (T7306) Kolbe Academy Answer Key to Leaders of Freedom, (T7306A), Optional Course Description:
Sixth Grade History begins with the issues leading to the Revolutionary War. It then proceeds through the creation of the new government inAmerica, and continues through the War of 1812 and the western expansion by the pioneers. It also takes a look atAmerica's way of life, particularly in education, art and literature, and inventions. The student will become familiar with The Declaration of Independence, the Constitution of theUnited States, and the Amendments to the Constitution.

History (Option 2)

Texts Used: The Old World And America , 1984, (T7871) Kolbe Academy Answer Key to Old World and America (T7871A)

Course Description:
Grade Six History is drawn from the beginnings of history through to the foundations of the American drama. This course introduces the course of history as it developed from three civilizations: The Hebrew, The Greek and The Roman. It is from these three cultures that Western Civilization, as we know it today, was built. The Hebrew gave us the Old Testament, which contained the promise of a salvific man/god. The Greek gave us the principles of logical thought and reasoning, and The Roman gave us a system of secular order that formed the modality for creating the great cities and governments in Europe . It covers the Middle Ages, the Crusades, the discoveries made by Columbus and other explorers, and the Spanish Empire. It concludes with the arrival of the English in the New World .

Geography

Texts Used: Map Skills, Level G (T5806) Map Skills Answer Key for Level G (T5806A) - Optional Course Description:
Sixth Grade Geography is the final course applying geography lessons to the world around the student. Topics covered include map symbols, scale, and keys, reading a road map, latitude and longitude, time zones, map projections, using the index, graphys, tables, and charts in an atlas, and different types of maps, including population, transportation, climate, rainfall, vegetation, land use, weather, transit, historical, and language maps. The Glossary at the back of the book contains definitions of terms found in the text. The textbook should be supplemented with material from other sources, particularly local maps, a map of the United States, a globe, an atlas, and sources found on the Internet. Geography does not need to be done every day and can be eliminated if the student is being challenged by the basics in other subjects.

Mathematics

Texts Used: Saxon Math 7/6, Fourth Edition, 2004, (T4076) Course Description:
Grade Six Mathematics moves the student from arithmetic to foundational treatments of "geometry, measurement, algebra, number, and scale and graph reading." Word problems are also included. Topics include linear measure, perimeter, area, and volume, averages, factors, fractions and decimals, prime factorization, exponents, ratios, angles, and unit conversion.

Science

Texts Used: Harcourt Science, 6th Grade*, Harcourt Publishing, 2005, (T4826) Kolbe Academy Answer Key for Harcourt Science 5/6, (T4826A), Optional Harcourt Science Workbook 6th Grade*, Harcourt Publishing, (T4826B), Optional Harcourt Science, 6th Grade* Workbook Teacher Manual, (T4826C), Optional
* Harcourt Science, 6th Grade is used in both 5th and 6th grade

Course Description:
Sixth Grade Science is the continuation of an intermediate introduction to the life, earth, and physical sciences. The most important part of teaching science is helping the student see the wonders of God's world, and making him unafraid of the subject when he pursues in-depth science in later years. Children learn more from doing the experiments and investigations along with the reading of the textbook. The Harcourt Science series has several online learning tools available to anyone who purchases the textbook. The first is provided by the publisher. There are several supplementary activities for the student and teacher on this website. Another website is provided by the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA). This website allows you to select the topic you are studying in the book, and will take you to a page of selected website links that can help you to enhance and further develop the topics that your child is studying. The online resources are a wonderful addition to the activities provided within the text alone. Topics in this course include Life Science: Types of plants and plant growth, invertebrates and vertebrates; Earth Science: The Earth's crust, rock cycles, cycles in the Solar System, and an exploration of the universe; Physical Science: Forces and machines.

Latin (Year 2)

Texts Used: New Missal Latin, 1941, (T6010) Kolbe Academy Supplementary Exercises for New Missal Latin, 2005, (T6012) Course Description:
Sixth Grade Latin is a beginner's course using New Missal Latin, a book ideally suited for grade school age students. Latin is the language of the Church; as such it is an integral part of every Catholic's heritage. Students master a large amount of Latin vocabulary while becoming acquainted with Latin grammar and syntax, including forms of the fourth and fifth declension nouns, forms of third declension adjectives and adverbs, and prepositions. This course also introduces the subjunctive and imperative mood of all four verb conjugations, common subjunctive uses and clauses, participles, and the verb sum, esse (to be). The book set includes the Student Book, Teacher's Manual, Student Test Book, Test Book Answer Key, and a Pronunciation Guide on CD. The Student Books are also sold separately.

Elementary Literature Curriculum


Course Description:
The Elementary Literature program for Grades Four, Five, and Six introduces the student to literature in a deeper, more rigorous fashion than a typical reading course. The course is comprised of classic literature and the lives of saints. There is a suggested amount of time in which to cover each book. Parents, possibly with the assistance of the student, are to select the proper number of books to fit into each quarter. Kolbe has provided suggested grade levels for each work to aid the parent in choosing appropriate books for their student's grade level in the syllabus. These are based on maturity level needed for themes present in the work, difficulty of vocabulary, and overall difficulty of the material presented in the work. A well-rounded literature course for each year includes choices from both the novels and lives of saints. Each Novel and most of the saint books include weekly written assignment topics. The Study Question booklets include study questions that are perfect to use for a short quiz after the student has read the daily assignment. Kolbe Academy has provided an extensive amount of literature to study over the course of 4ththrough 6th grade. As such, students are NOT expected to cover all of the material included in the Elementary Literature course.

Texts Used: Elementary Literature Study Question, Vocab, and Glossary Booklet 3-book set, (T3930) Novels: Black Beauty, Anna Sewell (T3901) The Black Cauldron, Lloyd Alexander (T3902) The Boxcar Children, Gertrude Chandler Warner (T3903) The Bronze Bow, Elizabeth George Speare (T3904) Caddie Woodlawn, Carol Ryrie Brink (T3905) Captains Courageous, Rudyard Kipling (T3906) The Children's Homer, Padraic Colum (T3440) Fingal's Quest, Madeleine Polland (T3418) The Great Brain, John Fitzgerald (T3907) Heidi, Johanna Spyri (T3908) The Hobbit, JRR Tolkein (T3909) I am David, Ann Holm (T3965) The Island of the Blue Dolphins, Scott O'Dell (T3910) Kidnapped, Robert Louis Stevenson (T3950) Kon-Tiki, Thor Heyerdahl (T3911) The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, C.S. Lewis (T3912) The Miracle Worker, William Gibson (T3913) Misty of Chincoteague Marguerite Henry, (T3915) Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH, Robert C. O'Brien (T3914) My Side of the Mountain, Jean Craighead George (T3916) Old Yeller, Fred Gipson (T3917) Outlaws of Ravenhurst, Sr. M. Imelda Wallace (T3447) The Secret Garden , Frances Hodgson Burnett (T3918) The Secret of Pooduck Island , Alfred Noyes (T3919) Swiss Family Robinson, Johann David Wyss (T3920) Where the Red Fern Grows, Wilson Rawls (T3948) White Fang, Jack London (T3921) The Witch of Blackbird Pond, Elizabeth George Speare (T3922) A Wrinkle in Time, Madeleine L'Engle (T3923) Saint Stories: Saint Catherine of Siena , Mother Frances Alice Forbes (T2730) The Children of Fatima, Mary Fabyan Windeatt (T2706) Saint Dominic, Mary Fabyan Windeatt (T2705) Saint Hyacinth of Poland , Mary Fabyan Windeatt (T2716)

Saint John Masias, Mary Fabyan Windeatt (T2721) The Little Flower, Mary Fabyan Windeatt (T2704) Blessed Marie of New France , Mary Fabyan Windeatt (T2722) Saint Martin de Porres, Mary Fabyan Windeatt (T2703) The Miraculous Medal, Mary Fabyan Windeatt (T2712) Saint Monica, Mother Frances Alice Forbes (T2731) Patron Saint of First Communicants, Mary Fabyan Windeatt (T2711) Saint Rose of Lima , Mary Fabyan Windeatt (T2708) Saint Thomas Aquinas, Mary Fabyan Windeatt (T2714)

Classical Composition
COURSE TITLE: English Composition I: Fable Stage
COURSE TEXTS:
Classical Composition Vol. I: Fable Stage Teacher Manual (CCFS) (T1551A) Classical Composition Vol. I: Fable Stage Student Workbook (CCFSSW) (T1551)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Classical Composition instructs the novice writer as though he or she were an apprentice to the great master writers. Instruction is based on imitation. Beginning by making the student aware of the structure of sound writing, and proceeding by giving the student the tools to imitate it, the course ends by equipping the student to design his own sound writing. The course begins by acquainting the student with models from which he can gain a sound grasp of structure. Then sentence and word variation, figures of description, rhetorical devices, and stylistic considerations are introduced slowly all in service of the message to be communicated. At the end of the full course a student should emerge as a writer who can ascertain the purpose of any given writing task and employ the best means of completing the task to communicate the message. The full course is set forth in substance and sequence in the Fable Stage Teacher Manual, a complete, self-contained course that is part of a series. The Student Workbook compliments each lesson. English Composition I: Fable Stage is suitable for introducing classical composition to 4th or 5th graders. It may also be used with upper grammar school students whose writing background has not included classical composition instruction. Classical Composition Vol. I: Fable Stage Teacher Manual and the corresponding Student Workbook are the primary texts for this course. The child should write every school day, utilizing Fridays for writing instruction or practice, if the parent wishes to stay with the schedule as written. Parents are free to double-up on lessons depending on the rate at which their children absorb the lesson and according to the schedule they have established for their home school. The final week of every quarter is written to double-up on the lessons in order to finish out the course in the traditional thirty-six (36) weeks. Quarterly exams have also been supplied to be used as the parent decides. The lessons are set forth on a 10 day cycle by the publisher, but as Kolbe parents you may adapt the pace and coverage to your own schedules. Read carefully and follow the Introduction to the Progymnasmata in the text itself. As an additional aid, Kolbe Academy has gone through the course as outlined in the text and has made instructional suggestions, scheduling the activities and assignments according to the familiar Kolbe course plan format. Of course, you are free to accelerate or slow your implementation of the program to meet your child's needs as you see fit.

COURSE OBJECTIVES: Develop in the student an appreciation for sound writing Inculcate in the student the habits of good writers through imitation of their structure and style Equip the apprentice writer to become an analytical reader and writer
Provide techniques the student writer can employ to reason his way to the best approach to take and solution to implement for any given writing task

Prepare the student writer to generate ideas, organize those ideas, and express those ideas well by providing him with structured practice in invention, arrangement, and decoration (discovery, organization, and elocution) Develop a shared vocabulary and practice in classical writing between the teacher and student Lay the foundation for the student to grow in his skill and understanding of writing

Seventh Grade Curriculum


Religion

Texts Used: The Life of Grace, Faith and Life Book 7, Catholics United for Faith, 3rd Edition (T2307) The Life of Grace, Activity Book, Faith and Life Book 7, Catholics United for Faith, 3rd Edition (T2307A), Optional The Life of Grace, Resource Book, Faith and Life Book 7, Catholics United for Faith, 3rd Edition (T2307B), Optional St. Joseph Baltimore Catechism #2, Catholic Books Publishing, 1962 (T2233) Kolbe Academy Answer Key to the St. Joseph Baltimore Catechism #2 (T2233A), Optional Course Description:
Seventh Grade Religion is designed to teach the student the meaning of grace. It covers God's creation of man, His Incarnation, and His founding of the Church, to which He entrusted the means of salvation so that we can live the life of grace now and the life of glory in Heaven forever. This course looks at God's revelation to us through creation and the prophets, the sacraments as the means through which we receive God's grace, and how God's grace works in us, relating to the practice of virtues. The material from Baltimore Catechism#2 will overlap in many places that of the Faith and Life Series. You may choose to follow the framework of the Baltimore Catechism rather than that of the Faith and Life Series, but you should choose one and use the other for supplementary material only. Many of the lessons listed in the St. Joseph Baltimore Catechism #2 have been covered in previous years. Repetition is essential for mastery, so it is a good thing to repeat them. There are suggested topics for reports for each quarter. You may or may not assign them. There are many wonderful activities at www.catecheticalresources.com that can be used in conjunction with the lessons in this book.

Bible History

Texts Used: Bible History: A Textbook of the Old & New Testaments for Catholic Schools , 1931 (T2104) Answer Key to Bible History: A Textbook of the Old & New Testaments for Catholic Schools, (T2104A) Bible History: A Textbook of the Old & New Testaments for Catholic Schools Workbook(T2104B) Course Description:
Grade Seven Bible History covers most of the Old Testament, one-half of the textbook. The last part of the Old Testament and the New Testament are covered in Eighth Grade. The course is guided by theCatechism of the Catholic Church and covers God's divine plan, the creation and fall of man, covenants with Noe and Abraham, the Exodus from Egypt and the giving of the Ten Commandments, and the great men of the Old Testament, in the Judges, Kings, and Prophets. It can be used in conjunction with the Religion course and done easily in one or two days a week. The text presents an important aspect for one who is going to be educated with a classical curriculum because it shows how God used all cultures and peoples to bring about the Redemption of mankind through His Son, Jesus Christ.

English Grammar

Texts Used: Voyages in English 7, (T1007A) Voyages in English 7, Teacher's Edition (T1007B) Course Description:
Seventh Grade English is designed to teach students to speak and write correctly and effectively. Students should progress, at this level, to an understanding of English grammar that should suffice for a lifetime of general usage. The lesson plan concentrates on Part Two of the Voyages in English book, which is Grammar. In Grade Seven the student will review what he learned in previous grades and build on it. Everything learned in

English should be applied and reinforced in the student's reading, composition, spelling, and vocabulary. A dictionary is recommended for use in English. The student should diagram sentences in exercises with your discretion as to how many sentences should be diagrammed as he proceeds through the work. There are many exercises in the back of the book following the Index that can be used if time permits. The best way to teach English is by example and reinforcement of correct usage in the spoken and written word. Note that Part One of Voyages in English, which is Composition, is not used in this course. Composition is studied in Kolbe Academy's Vocabulary and Composition course using Sadlier-Oxford Composition Workshop series.

Vocabulary & Composition


Texts Used: Sadlier-Oxford Vocabulary Workshop, Level B, 2005, (T1432) Teacher's Manual for Sadlier-Oxford Vocabulary Workshop, Level B, (T1432A) Sadlier Writing Workshop, Level B, 2009, (T1517) Teacher's Edition for Sadlier Writing Workshop, Level B, (T1517A) Course Description:
Grade Seven Vocabulary develops the student's capacity to pronounce, spell, use, understand, and remember the definitions of words, their diacritical marks, and syllabication. It also develops the student's ability to work with synonyms, antonyms, homonyms, homographs, prefixes, suffixes, roots, denotation, connotation, literal usage, figurative usage, and analogies. Grade Seven Composition uses the Sadlier Writing Workshop, Level B to aid the student in developing composition skills, which are so necessary for further education. These skills include developing thoughts in a logical manner, both for speaking and writing; writing narrative, informative, descriptive, and persuasive paragraphs and essays; test taking; and writing for different purposes, such as a newspaper, letters, a research report, and about literature. The best way to teach Vocabulary and Composition is by example and reinforcement of correct usage in the spoken and written word.

FAMILIES HAVE TWO OPTIONS FOR SEVENTH GRADE HISTORY

History (Option 1)

Texts Used: Challenge of Freedom, Land of Our Lady Series, Volume IV. Neumann Press, 1997, (T7307) Kolbe Academy Answer Key to Challenge of Freedom, (T7307A), Optional Course Description:
Seventh Grade History continues with the westward expansion covered in sixth grade, with the reaching of the Pacific. It looks at slavery, leading into the Civil War, and the reconstruction of our nation following the war. It looks at the formation of American people from all nations, and the effects that progress has in our country.

History (Option 2)

Texts Used: Christ the King, Lord of History, 3rd edition, 1994 (T7801) Kolbe Academy Answer Key to Christ the King, Lord of History Workbook (T7801A) Christ the King, Lord of History Workbook (T7801B) Course Description:
Grade Seven History covers world history from the beginning of recorded history to the present. The perspective is Catholic throughout, with Biblical history skillfully interwoven with secular records in the early chapters. It focuses primarily on the history of Europe and the Middle East, beginning around 2000 B.C. and moving through biblical history, the kingdom of Israel, the Greek and Roman empires, into the Middle Ages and Renaissance, up through World Wars I and II. Special attention is paid to the growth of the Church and its influence in the world.

Mathematics

Texts Used: Saxon Math 8/7, Third Edition, 2004, (T4087) Course Description:

Seventh Grade Math provides the student with an introduction to algebra, on a level to be used before Algebra 1 or before a pre-Algebra course. If a student completes this course with ease, he is ready to go onto Algebra 1. The student who struggles with this course is advised to continue with Saxon Algebra 1/2 or another pre-Algebra course. Although much of the same ground is covered, he will be able to attain greater mastery. Topics covered include prime and composite numbers, ratios, graphs, exponents, square roots, scientific notation, circumference, pi, mean, median, mode, range, and probability.

Science

Texts Used: Holt Science and Technology: Earth Science, 2007 (T4827) Kolbe Academy Answer Key for Holt Earth Science, (T4827A) Course Description:
Seventh Grade Science covers topics in geology: minerals, resources, fossils, earthquakes, and volcanoes; hydrology: water flow, erosion, deposition; oceanography: ocean structure, life, and movement; meteorology: atmosphere, storms, forecasting, and climate; and astronomy: stars, galaxies, the Universe, formation of the solar system, and the planets . There are several website resources that correspond with the Holt Science and Technology series, providing extra activities for students who are interested in the subjects being covered. The topics in the field of Earth Science sometimes present students and parents with controversial issues, including the origin of life on earth, formation of the universe (cosmology), and other issues. It is up to the parents as first teachers of their children to discuss these issues with their students and instruct the students in Church teaching. We have done our best to point out these controversial issues and to provide guidance on how to address them. For example, the topic of the Big Bang is studied in Quarter 4, Week 4, but Church teaching on this issue is addressed within the course plan.

Latin (Year 3)
Texts Used:
New Missal Latin, 1941, (T6010) Kolbe Academy Supplementary Exercises for New Missal Latin, 2005, (T6012)

Course Description:
Seventh Grade Latin is a beginner's course using New Missal Latin, a book ideally suited for grade school age students. Latin is the language of the Church; as such it is an integral part of every Catholic's heritage. In this year, students continue with a large amount of Latin vocabulary while becoming acquainted with Latin grammar and syntax, including perfect, imperfect, pluperfect, perfect subjunctive, and pluperfect subjunctive of all four verb conjugations. Also covered is an introduction to sequence of tenses, and the passive voice in the indicative and subjunctive moods. The book set includes the Student Book, Teacher's Manual, Student Test Book, Test Book Answer Key, and a Pronunciation Guide on CD. The Student Books are also sold separately.

Greek (Year 1)

Texts Used: Basic Greek in 30 Minutes a Day, 1983 (T6071) Course Description:
Seventh Grade Greek uses the first half of Basic Greek in Thirty Minutes a Day. The second half is used in the Eighth Grade Greek course. Emphasis is placed on repetition and memorization, as these are the primary ways to learn a language. Students work to master the Greek alphabet, vocabulary, noun genders, noun cases, and prepositions and cases. The student will also learn key Greek words for Biblical study, and further their knowledge of the English language by seeing how Greek roots and grammar are used in English.

Eighth Grade Curriculum


Religion

Texts Used: Our Life in the Church, Faith and Life Book 8, Catholics United for Faith, 3rd Edition (T2308) Our Life in the Church, Activity Book, Faith and Life Book 8, Catholics United for Faith, 3rd Edition (T2308A), Optional Our Life in the Church Resource Book, Faith and Life Book 8, Catholics United for Faith, 3rd Edition (T2308B), Optional St. Joseph Baltimore Catechism #2, Catholic Books Publishing, 1962 (T2233) Kolbe Academy Answer Key to the St. Joseph Baltimore Catechism #2 (T2233A), Optional Course Description:
Eighth Grade Religion introduces the student to ecclesiology, the study of the Church, covering the origin and nature, and teaching and governing authority of the Church. It looks at the sacraments, Mary, the saints, and our separated brethren. The course addresses the work of the Christian in the world, through virtue, the works of mercy, vocations (single, religious, and married), and the law, conscience, and social order. It also looks at the four last things, of death, judgment, heaven, and hell. The course is written to help the student to desire to imitate the saints of the Church.

Bible History

Texts Used: Bible History: A Textbook of the Old & New Testaments for Catholic Schools , 1931 (T2104) Answer Key to Bible History: A Textbook of the Old & New Testaments for Catholic Schools, (T2104A) Bible History: A Textbook of the Old & New Testaments for Catholic Schools Workbook(T2104B) Course Description:
Grade Eight Bible History covers the last part of the Old Testament about how God's chosen people were led into captivity and their kingdom was destroyed; It leads into the New Testament and the fulfillment of God's promise to His chosen people. (The first half of the book is used in seventh grade.) The text presents an important aspect for one who is going to be educated with a classical curriculum because it shows how God used all cultures and peoples to bring about the Redemption of mankind through His Son, Jesus Christ. This is a two year course. The first half of the book is presented in seventh grade and the second half in eighth grade. It can be used in conjunction with the Religion course and done easily in one or two days a week. If the student has not read the first part of the book in seventh grade, it is recommended that it be read before following the course plan for the eighth grade. It would not be necessary to do the written work attached, but it would be beneficial to have the background for what will be covered this year.

English Grammar

Texts Used: Voyages in English 8, (T1008A) Voyages in English 8, Teacher's Edition (T1008B) Course Description:
Grade Eight English is designed to teach students to speak and write correctly and effectively in the English language. Students should progress, at this level, to an understanding of English grammar that should suffice for a lifetime of general usage with some amount of study of more complex construction. The class will also emphasize, secondarily, training in the social graces, which are necessary for successful communication. The lesson plan concentrates on Part Two of the book, which is Grammar. Everything learned in English should be applied and reinforced in the student's reading, composition, spelling, and vocabulary. A dictionary is recommended for use in English. The daily work should include memorization of fundamental rules of grammar. The student should diagram sentences in exercises as he proceeds through the work.

There are many exercises in the back of the book following the Index that can be used if time permits. The best way to teach English is by example and reinforcement of correct usage in the spoken and written word. Note that Part One of Voyages in English, which is Composition, is not used in this course. Composition is studied in Kolbe Academy 's Vocabulary and Composition course using Sadlier-Oxford Composition Workshop series.

Composition & Vocabulary


Texts Used: Sadlier Writing Workshop, Level C, 2009, (T1518) Teacher's Edition for Sadlier Writing Workshop, Level C, (T1518A) Sadlier-Oxford Vocabulary Workshop, Level C, 2005, (T1433) Teacher's Manual for Sadlier-Oxford Vocabulary Workshop, Level C, (T1433A) Course Description:
Eighth Grade Composition uses Sadlier Writing Workshop, Level C to aid the student in developing composition skills, which are so necessary for further education. These skills include developing thoughts in a logical manner, both for speaking and writing; writing narrative, informative, descriptive, and persuasive paragraphs and essays; test taking; and writing for different purposes, such as a newspaper, letters, a research report, and about literature. Grade Eight Vocabulary uses Sadlier-Oxford Vocabulary Workshop to encourage the student to use the new vocabulary words in speech and written work. It also develops the student's ability to work with synonyms, antonyms, homonyms, homographs, prefixes, suffixes, roots, denotation, connotation, literal usage, figurative usage, and analogies. The best way to teach Vocabulary and Composition is by example and reinforcement of correct usage in the spoken and written word.

FAMILIES HAVE TWO OPTIONS FOR EIGHTH GRADE HISTORY

History (Option 1)

Texts Used: Guardian of Freedom, Land of Our Lady Series, Volume V. Neumann Press, 1997, (T7308) Kolbe Academy Answer Key to Guardian of Freedom, (T7308A), Optional Course Description:
Eighth Grade History looks at the United States and its place among other nations. It begins with a look at American business, labor, and farming. It then leads the student through World War I and World War II, ending with the preservation of American heritage and democracy. Before going through the text of a chapter, check out the activities, etc. at the end of the chapter and the end of the unit.

History (Option 2)

Texts Used: Christ and the Americas , 1997 (T7802) Kolbe Academy Answer Key to Christ and the Americas Workbook (T7802A) Christ and the Americas Workbook (T7802B) Course Description:
Eighth Grade History seeks to provide familiarity with the historical context of the settlement of the Americas. This course will help the student to obtain a broad Catholic understanding of the anthropological history of the Americas up until the last decade. It begins with the explorations of Columbus, Cortes, and Magellan, proceeds to the arrival of the English in the American colonies and the American Revolution, the influence of missionaries, the birth of the American government, the Civil War, through the Depression, World Wars I and II, and concludes with a look at the moral decline of America.

FAMILIES HAVE THREE OPTIONS FOR EIGHTH GRADE MATH

Mathematics (Option 1 - PreAlgebra)


Texts Used: Saxon Algebra 1/2, Third Edition, (T4091) Saxon Algebra 1/2 Solutions Manual, (T4091A) Course Description:

This Eighth Grade Mathematics course is a pre-Algebra course, providing a transition "from the concrete concepts of arithmetic to the abstract concepts of algebra." Students who may have struggled with Saxon Mathematics 8/7 are encouraged to use Saxon Algebra 1/2 prior to moving onto a course in Algebra I. Topics covered include points, lines, and rays, roots, surface area, ratio and proportion, absolute value, parentheses, properties of algebra, exponents and signed numbers, classifying triangles, Roman numerals, probability, the Pythagorean theorem, permutations, and real numbers.

Mathematics (Option 2 - Algebra 1)


Texts Used: Saxon Algebra 1, 3rd edition (T4091) Solution Manual for Saxon Algebra I (T4091A), Optional Course Description:
Students may begin this course after completing any pre-Algebra course, including the Saxon Math 8/7 (with pre-Algebra) course. Students who struggled with Saxon 8/7 are advised to use Saxon Algebra 1/2 prior to beginning an Algebra I course. Upon completion of Saxon's Algebra I, students may either continue with the Saxon program by using Saxon's Algebra 2 book, or may switch into a standard Geometry course using Jacob's Geometry. Please be advised that Saxon does not have a separate Geometry course. The author instead integrates all Geometry concepts throughout the Algebra I, Algebra II, and Advanced Math programs. It is advisable that all college bound students exclusively using the Saxon program complete through Advanced Math in order to cover all the Geometry and Trigonometry concepts that might appear on the PSAT, ACT, and SAT standardized tests. This course covers the following topics: division by zero, reciprocal and multiplicative inverse, exponents, algebraic phrases, word problems, canceling, ratio, conjunctions, dividing fractions, domain, elimination, closure, probability, algebraic proofs, rational equations functions.

Mathematics (Option 3 - Algebra 1)


Texts Used: Elementary Algebra, Harold Jacobs, 1979 (T4100) A Teacher's Guide to Elementary Algebra, (T4100A), Optional Algebra DVD Lectures (T4100D), Optional Course Description:
Harold Jacob's Elementary Algebra provides a strong course for the Algebra I student. His text is set up in a traditional style so that students have the opportunity to practice many types of problems taught within each lesson. This course provides the backbone of Algebra I concepts to prepare the student for taking Algebra II, and adequately prepare a student to take the Algebra I Math sections of the PSAT, SAT, and ACT standardized tests. Additional graphing supplements are provided in the course plan as an introduction to graphing. Students can succeed in this course after completing any pre-Algebra course, including the Saxon Math 8/7 (with pre-Algebra) text. Students who struggled with Saxon Math 8/7 are advised to use Saxon Algebra 1/2 or another pre-Algebra course prior to beginning this course. Note that about the first five chapters will include much review of pre-Algebra concepts. This course is typically done in the 8th or 9th grade. Topics include: fundamental operations, functions and graphs, domain and range of functions, integers, rational numbers, equations in one variable, equations in two variables, simultaneous equations, exponents, polynomials, factoring, fractions, square roots, quadratic equations, graphing quadratic equations, real numbers, fractional equations, inequalities, graphing inequalities in two variables, and arithmetic and geometric sequences.

Science

Texts Used: Physical Science: Concepts in Action, Prentice Hall, 2006 (T4828) Answer Key to Physical Science: Concepts in Action, (T4828A) Course Description:
Eighth Grade Science studies the fundamental principles of physical science which are so important for the in depth approach to the high school sciences of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. The main emphasis in this course is on Chemistry and Physics, but the same scientific though processes are applied and used

in the high school Biology course as well. This course covers a breadth of material recommended both for eighth grade students interested in honors science coursework in high school. Topics covered include Chemistry: properties and states of matter, atomic structure, the periodic table, chemical bonds and reactions, and solutions, acids, and bases; Physics: forces and motion, work, power, and machines, energy, mechanical waves and sound, the electromagnetic spectrum and light, optics, electricity, and magnetism. Ideally, this course should be taken concurrently with Algebra I. However, strong math students will find that a pre-Algebra course provides most of the necessary math skills needed to complete this course successfully.

Latin (Year 4)

Texts Used: New Missal Latin, 1941, (T6010) Kolbe Academy Supplementary Exercises for New Missal Latin, 2005, (T6012) Course Description:
Eighth Grade Latin is a beginner's course using New Missal Latin, a book ideally suited for grade school age students. Latin is the language of the Church; as such it is an integral part of every Catholic's heritage. Students build upon their knowledge from previous study, including perfect, imperfect, pluperfect, perfect subjunctive, and pluperfect subjunctive of all four verb conjugations. Also covered is an introduction to sequence of tenses, and the passive voice in the indicative and subjunctive moods. The course also includes an introduction of the dative with special verbs, the perfect passive participle, the conjugation of io verbs, and infinitives. The book set includes the Student Book, Teacher's Manual, Student Test Book, Test Book Answer Key, and a Pronunciation Guide on CD. The Student Books are also sold separately.

Greek (Year 2)

Texts Used: Basic Greek in 30 Minutes a Day, 1983 (T6071) Course Description:
Eighth Grade Greek uses the second half of a book ideally suited for grade school age students. Greek is the language of the New Testament and of translations of the Old Testament that were used by the writers of the New Testament; as such it is an integral part of every Catholic's heritage. Students continue to work to master the Greek alphabet, vocabulary, noun genders, noun cases, and prepositions and cases. The student will also learn key Greek words for Biblical study, and further their knowledge of the English language by seeing how Greek roots and grammar are used in English.

Junior High Literature Curriculum


Course Description:
The Junior High Literature program for Seventh and Eighth Grade introduces the student to literature in a deeper, more rigorous fashion than previous reading courses. The course is comprised of classic literature, poetry, short stories, and the lives of saints. Parents, with the assistance of the student, select the proper number of books to fit into each quarter. A complete course in poetry and a complete course of short stories are included; each is designed to cover one quarter. A well-rounded literature course for each year might include novels and lives of saints for three quarters and either the poetry or the short story course for one quarter. Each Novel and some of the Saint books include weekly written assignment topics. The Study Question booklets include study questions that are perfect to use for a short quiz after the student has read the daily assignment. Kolbe Academy has provided an extensive amount of literature to study over the course of 7thand 8th grade. As such, students are NOT expected to cover all of the material included in the Junior High Literature course.

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Texts Used: Junior High Literature Study Question, Vocab, and Glossary Booklet 3-book set, (T3980) Novels: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Mark Twain (T3946) Animal Farm, George Orwell (T3938) Anne of Green Gables, L.M. Montgomery (T3942) The Black Arrow, Robert Louis Stevenson (T3957) Dandelion Wine, Ray Bradbury (T3953) Diary of a Young Girl, Anne Frank (T3937) Fellowship of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien (T3936) Little Women, Louisa May Alcott (T3940) Merchant of Venice , William Shakespeare (T3959) Oliver Twist, Charles Dickens (T3956) Out of the Silent Planet, C.S. Lewis (T3967) Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen (T3955) The Red Badge of Courage, Stephen Crane (T3944) Robinson Crusoe, Daniel Defoe (T3951) The Screwtape Letters, C.S. Lewis (T3945) A Tale of Two Cities, Charles Dickens (T3943) Treasure Island , Robert Louis Stevenson (T3949) 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, Jules Verne (T3935) Uncle Tom's Cabin, Harriet Beecher Stowe (T3960) The Yearling, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings (T3966) Saint Stories: St. Athanasius, Mother Frances Forbes (T2728) St. Benedict, Mary Fabyan Windeatt (T2707) St. Edmund Campion, Harold C. Gardiner (T3961) St. Ignatius, August Derleth (T3962) Blessed Kateri Tekakwitha, Evelyn M. Brown (T3972) St. Maria Goretti, Fr. Godfrey Poage (T3963) St. Maximilian Kolbe, Fr. Jeremiah J. Smith (T2725) Blessed Miguel Pro, Ann Ball (T3964) St. Paul the Apostle, Mary Fabyan Windeatt (T2718) St. Teresa of Avila , Mother Frances Forbes (T2726) Short Story Course: The Gift of the Magi and Other Short Stories, O. Henry (T3947) The Ransom of Red Chief The Last Leaf

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The Gift of the Magi The Story of the Other Wise Man, Henry Van Dyke (T3954) The Old Man and the Sea, Ernest Hemingway (T3968) Three Short Stories, (T3939) The Legend of Sleepy Hollow,Washington Irving The Red Headed League, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle The Devil and Daniel Webster, Stephen Vincent Benet A Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens (T3941)

Poetry Course: A Collection of Poetry, (T3411) The Highwayman, Alfred Noyes Lochinvar, Sir Walter Scott The Wreck of the Hesperus, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, Samuel T. Coleridge O Captain! My Captain, Walt Whitman Sea Fever, John Masefield Crossing the Bar, Alfred Lord Tennyson The Lonely Street, William Carlos Williams School's Out, William Henry Davies Daffodils, William Wordsworth The Waterfall, Barbara Frances Lloyd The Raven, Edgar Allen Poe The Naming of Cats, T.S. Eliot The Panther, Ogden Nash If, Rudyard Kipling The Jabberwocky, Lewis Carroll God's Grandeur, Gerard Hopkins An Irish Airman Foresees His Death, W.B. Yeats Anthem to Doomed Youth, Wilfred Owen Charge of the Light Brigade, Alfred Lord Tennyson The Song of Hiawatha, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (T3412)

HIGH SCHOOL
Theology Curriculum
Introduction to Sacred Scripture

Honors Designation Available Course Texts: The Holy Bible. Revised Standard Version: Catholic Edition. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1966. Preferred, (T2001 or T2002) Catechism of the Catholic Church. Liberia Editrice Vaticana and United States Catholic Conference. New York: Doubleday, 1997. (T2243A) Introduction to the Bible. Fr. John Laux, M.A. Rockford, Ill.: Tan Books and Publishers, Inc. 1990. (T2143) The Catholic Catechism. Fr. John A. Hardon, S.J. New York: Doubleday, 1981. (T2244) Kolbe Academy Study Guide for Introduction to the Bible. Napa: Kolbe Academy Press, 2005. (T2143A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide for Humani Generis. Napa: Kolbe Academy Press, 2000.
Course Description: This course is designed to familiarize the student with the revealed word of God. It explains how we come to know Christ, the Word of God, better through both the Old and New Testaments. The course introduces the student to methods of reading and understanding God's Word and teaches the student the content and significance of the Old and New Testaments. The Bible History course offered in 7th & 8thGrade is a helpful pre-requisite to this course. This course will enable the student to understand and embrace the Church's teaching on Divine Revelation, in both Sacred Scripture and Sacred Tradition; understand the role of the Magisterium in preserving, defending, interpreting, and explaining the Word of God; become familiar with the Messianic prophecies and their fulfillment in Christ, and recognize the Church, in her four marks, prefigured in Israel; know how to read God's Word with understanding and to begin to read it prayerfully and profitably; understand the historical and eternal significance of the Incarnation, public ministry, Crucifixion, and Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ; trace the development of the Church from its founding by our Lord to the death of the last Apostle and the closing of public revelation, and to understand our Lord's provisions for the continuity of His Holy Church from then to now; and find and explain the New Testament passages that teach the Real Presence of our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament, as well as the passages referring to the other six sacraments.

Mass, the Sacraments and Prayer & Church History I


Honors Designation Available Course Texts: The Holy Bible. Revised Standard Version: Catholic Edition. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1966.Preferred, (T2001 or T2002) Catechism of the Catholic Church. Liberia Editrice Vaticana and United States Catholic Conference. New York: Doubleday, 1997. (T2243A) The Catholic Catechism. Fr. John A. Hardon, SJ. New York: Doubleday Publishers, 1966.(T2244) Mass and the Sacraments. Fr. John Laux, M.A. Rockford, Ill.: Tan Books and Publishers, Inc., 1990. (T2541) Early Christian Writings. The Apostolic Fathers. Trans. Maxwell Stamford . New York: Penguin Books,1987. (T2741) The History of the Church. Eusebius. Trans. G.A. Williamson. New York: Penguin, 1989. (T2229) Kolbe Academy Study Guide for Mass and the Sacraments. Napa: Kolbe Academy Press, 2005. (T2541A)

Kolbe Academy Study Guide for The History of the Church. Napa: Kolbe Academy Press, 2006. (T2741A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide for The Early Christian Writings. Napa: Kolbe Academy Press, 2006. (T2229A)
Course Description: Grade Ten Theology is a two-part course. The first semester of the course covers Mass, the Sacraments and Prayer and the second semester >Church History I. The semesters may be taught in any order. The first semester of the course will teach the student the origin of the seven Sacraments, the development in the Church's understanding of them, and their absolute necessity in the Christian life. The student will also be exposed to the Church's rich tradition of prayer. The second half of the course, Church History I, the student will learn the development of the Church from the close of the Apostolic age to the conversion of the Roman emperor Constantine: approximately 90 to 325 A.D. This course will enable the student to understand in detail the nature of the Sacraments he is receiving, and be able to defend the Catholic understanding of each Sacrament against detractors; deepen the student's appreciation of the Mass and of the Sacraments, so as to make reception of the Sacraments more fruitful; gain exposure to the Church's treasury of prayers and spiritual practices, so as to develop an appreciation for the Church's tradition and a zealousness to serve God; study the Word of God as it moved from the Apostles through the Apostolic Fathers to the Fathers of the Church; become familiar with the early Fathers and their works, particularly as they contributed to the unfolding of Catholic Doctrine and Sacred Tradition; and apply Christian principles faithfully as a result of studying the examples and seeking the intercession of saints of the period.

Apologetics & Church History II


Honors Designation Available Course Texts: Catholic Apologetics. Fr. John Laux, M.A. Rockford, Ill.: Tan Books and Publishers, Inc., 1990. (T2201) Catechism of the Catholic Church. Liberia Editrice Vaticana and United States Catholic Conference. New York: Doubleday, 1997. (T2243A) The Holy Bible. Revised Standard Version: Catholic Edition. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1966. (Preferred) (T2001 or T2002) Kolbe Academy 11th Grade Theology: Church History II and Apologetics Reader. Napa: Kolbe Academy Press, 2008. (T2221) Kolbe Academy 11th Grade Theology: Church History II and Apologetics Study Guide. 2 Volumes. Napa: Kolbe Academy Press, 2008. (T2221A)
Course Description: Grade Eleven Theology covers Church History from the Council of Nicea to the Counter Reformation, focusing on the development of doctrine. The Course is divided into four quarters with each focusing on a particular period and its doctrinal controversies and developments. The original writings of those engaged in these controversies and developments will be our guide. The first quarter of the course focuses on the late patristic period from the First Council of Nicea in 325 to the Second Council of Nicea in 787. The second quarter of the course examines developments through the Carolingian Period to the beginning of the High Middle Ages. The third quarter of the course focuses on the high Middle Age with special emphasis on the writings of St. Thomas Aquinas. The fourth quarter of the course will take us into the Catholic Counter Reformation. Throughout the course, we will also be studying the contents of Catholic Apologetics by Fr. John Laux. The lessons in that text have been arranged to match up thematically with the other readings. Relevant sections of the Catechism of the Catholic Church have been assigned as well. This course aims to help the student to be able to "give a reason for the hope that is in you," by studying the scriptural and rational bases that support Catholic doctrine and practice; gain exposure to the writings of great saints and theologians who have had a significant impact on the development of Catholic thought; study the organic development of the Church's teaching; become familiar with the early Fathers and their works, particularly as they contributed to the unfolding of Catholic Doctrine and Sacred Tradition; and apply Christian principles faithfully as a result of studying and understanding the living tradition of the Church, and seeking the intercession of saints of the period.

Morality/Church History III


Honors Designation Available Course Texts: The Holy Bible. Revised Standard Version: Catholic Edition. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1966. (Preferred), (T2001 or T2002) Catechism of the Catholic Church. Liberia Editrice Vaticana and United States Catholic Conference. New York: Doubleday, 1997. (T2243A) St. Francis De Sales, Introduction to the Devout Life. Trans. John K. Ryan. Image Books, Doubleday: New York, 1966. (T2208) Colombiere, Bl. Claude; Fr. Jean Baptiste Saint-Jure. Trustful Surrender to Divine Providence .Trans. Prof. Paul Garvin. Tan Books and Publishing, Inc.: Rockford, IL, 1980. (T2204) Laux, Fr. John, M.A. Catholic Morality. A Course in Religion: Book III. Tan Books and Publishing, Inc.: Rockford, IL, 1990. (T2205) Kolbe Academy 12th Grade Theology: Church History III & Morality Reader, 2 Volumes.Kolbe Academy: Napa, 2008. (T2207) Kolbe Academy : Catholic Morality & Trustful Surrender Study Guide. Kolbe Academy: Napa, 2008. (T2204A) Kolbe Academy : Introduction to the Devout Life Study Guide. Kolbe Academy: Napa, 2008. (T2208A) Kolbe Academy : 12th Grade Theology Reader Study Guide. Kolbe Academy: Napa, 2008. (T2207A) Course Description:
This aim of this course is to teach students how to pray, and inspire them to pursue virtue and sanctity, to trust in Divine Providence, and to make life choices based on sound moral principles. The course will explore in the Church teachings regarding prayer, Divine Providence, morality, vocations, marriage, the family, the Church and, in true Kolbian style, it will end with a study of Our Blessed Mother. The course will introduce the student to a devout life in the modern world and the practice of mental prayer; give the student the tools to distinguish between forms of prayer that are compatible with Christianity and those that are not; explain why sanctity and perfection consist in doing "everything to conform to God's will" as St. Teresa of Avila says, and why that is the highest perfection possible; encourage boundless trust in God, His Divine Providence, His Love, and His Mercy; impart a firm understanding of Christian moral principals and the proper application of Christian moral principals in life situations; impart a greater understanding of the dignity of the human person, freewill and vocation; foster a deeper admiration of the particular callings within the Church; inspire each student to respond with greater zeal to the Universal Call to Holiness; reveal the beauty and sanctity of Matrimony in the Catholic Church and the benefits and responsibilities of family life; show forth the excellence of religious vocations, their benefits and responsibilities, as well as briefly define the various type of religious vocations in the Church; further the understanding of one's duties to God, Church, self, spouse, family, state, and society; and foster a profound appreciation and understanding of Our Lady, her role in salvation and in our lives.

English Curriculum
English: Composition and Rhetoric 9

Honors Designation Available Course Texts: Vocabulary Workshop Level D, Enriched Edition, Jerome Shostak. Sadlier-Oxford: New York, 2012. (T1434) Vocabulary Workshop Level D, Enriched Edition, Teacher's Manual. Sadlier-Oxford: New York, 2012. (T1434A) Writing Workshop Level D. Sadlier: New York, 2009. (T1519) Writing Workshop Level D, Teacher's Manual. Sadlier: New York, 2009. (T1519A) An Odyssey in Rhetoric: High School I English Supplement. The Kolbe Oral Presentation Series, Vol. I. Kolbe Academy: Napa, California, 2008. (T1410) MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (7th edition). Joseph Gibaldi. MLA: New York, 2009. (T1439) Course Description:
According to the Ignatian method, Kolbe Academy's English course has been designed to help form the student's abilities to effectively Speak, Write, and Act. The lessons of the three component parts of the course, Vocabulary, Composition, and Oral Presentations are woven together along with subject matter from other Kolbe Academy 9th Grade courses in order to strengthen and enrich the student's academic experience. This course emphasizes an introduction to quoting and citing outside sources in one's academic essays using the MLA handbook.

English: Composition and Rhetoric 10


Honors Designation Available Course Texts: Vocabulary Workshop Level E Jerome Shostak. Sadlier-Oxford: New York, 2005. (T1435) Vocabulary Workshop Level E, Teacher's Manual. Sadlier-Oxford: New York, 2005. Optional, (T1435A) Writing Workshop Level E. Sadlier: New York, 2009. (T1520) Writing Workshop Level E, Teacher's Manual. Sadlier: New York, 2009. Optional, (T1520A) In Cicero's Footsteps: 10th Grade English Supplement. The Kolbe Oral Presentation Series, Vol. II. Kolbe Academy: Napa, California, 2008. (T1411) Write Better Essays in Just 20 Minutes a Day*. Chesla, Elizabeth. Learning Express, LLC: 2006. (T1416)
*The answer key for all exercises in Write Better Essays is included in the book on pages 173-191. It is recommended that this section be removed prior to the student beginning this course.

Course Description:
According to the Ignatian Method, Kolbe Academy's Grade 10 English course has been designed to help form the student's abilities to effectively Speak, Write, and Act. The lessons of the three component parts of the course-Vocabulary, Composition, and Oral Presentations-are woven together with one another, and with subject matter from other Kolbe 10th Grade courses in order to strengthen and enrich the student's academic experience. This course emphasizes writing well-formed essays.

English: Expository Writing and Rhetoric 11


Honors Designation Available Course Texts: Vocabulary Workshop Level F. Jerome Shostak. Sadlier-Oxford: New York, 2005. (T1436) Vocabulary Workshop Level F Teacher's Manual. Sadlier-Oxford: New York, 2005. Optional, (T1436A) Writing Workshop Level F. Sadlier: New York, 2009. (T1521) Writing Workshop Level F Teacher's Manual. Sadlier: New York, 2009. Optional (T1521A)

Student Guide to Writing a Research Paper: A Step-By-Step Approach . Phyllis Goldenberg. Sadlier-Oxford: New York, 2004. (T1550) Everyman's Journey: 11th Grade English Supplement. The Kolbe Oral Presentation Series, Vol. III. Kolbe Academy: Napa, California, 2008. (T1412) MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (7th edition). Joseph Gibaldi. MLA: New York, 2009. (T1439)

Course Description:
According to the Ignatian Method, Kolbe Academy's Grade 11 English course has been designed to help form the student's abilities to effectively Speak, Write, and Act. The lessons of the four component parts of the course-Vocabulary, Composition, Research, and Oral Presentations-are woven together with one another, and with subject matter from other Kolbe 11th Grade courses in order to strengthen and enrich the student's academic experience. The methodology for writing an extensive research paper is an integral part of this course.

English: Creative Writing from Imitation 12


Honors Designation Available Course Texts: Vocabulary Workshop Level G (New Edition) Jerome Shostak. Sadlier-Oxford: New York, 2005. (T1437) Vocabulary Workshop Level G Teacher's Manual. Sadlier-Oxford: New York, 2005. Optional, (T1437A) The Art of the Short Story. Ed. Dana Gioia & R.S. Gwynn. Pearson: New York, 2006. (T1441) Treasury of Poems. (BOOK) The Kolbe Oral Presentation Series, Vol. IV. Kolbe Academy: Napa, California, 2008. (T1440) Poetry: A Spoken Art. (CD) The Kolbe Oral Presentation Series, Vol. IV. Kolbe Academy: Napa, California, 2008. (Included with purchase of T1440) The Menagerie of Marsepink. Claudio Salvucci. Arx Pub: Bristol PA, 2005. (T1443) Writer's Workshop. Gregory L. Roper. ISI Books: Wilmington DE, 2007. (T1442) Course Description:
According to the Ignatian Method, Kolbe Academy's Grade 12 English course has been designed to help form the student's abilities to effectively Speak, Write, and Act. The lessons of the three component parts of the course-Vocabulary, Composition, and Oral Presentations-will all contribute to development in these fields. This course is also designed to help stimulate and develop the student's creative imagination through admiration and imitation of great writers and styles.

Literature Curriculum
Ancient Greek Literature

Honors Designation Available Course Texts: Homer, The Iliad of Homer. Trans. Richmond Lattimore. The University of Chicago Press: Chicago, 1961. (T3441) Homer, The Odyssey of Homer. Trans. Richmond Lattimore. Harper Perennial: New York, 1967. (T3442) Aeschylus, The Oresteian Trilogy. Trans. Philip Vellacott. Penguin Books: London, 1959. (T3443) Sophocles, The Theban Tragedies. Trans. E. F. Watling. Penguin Books: London, 1974. (T3446) Plato, Great Dialogues of Plato. Trans. W.H.D. Rouse. Signet Classic: New York, 2008. (T3451) Dorsch, T.S. Trans. Classical Literary Criticism. "Poetics" of Aristotle. Penguin Books: London, 2000. (T3452) King, Abigail. Classics Conference: The Greeks. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2002. (K2662 or K2664), Optional Greek Literature Weekly Quiz Book and Study Guide. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T3460) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to The Iliad. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T3441A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to The Odyssey. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2005. (T3442A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to The Three Theban Plays. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2005. (T3446A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to The Oresteian Trilogy. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2005. (T3443A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to Great Dialogues of Plato. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T3451A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to the Art of Poetry. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2005. (T3452A) Course Description:
This course is a companion to the Greek history course. It introduces the student to the foundational works of Greek literature and Western culture, as well as to the study of genres and literary forms. The texts of antiquity are studied for their universal appeal to the human experience, as well as for their influence upon the great thinkers and development of the West. The Greek epics, plays, and philosophy are referenced throughout the literary and intellectual works of Western thinkers to this day. Students will identify and examine the inter-relationship between the four primary genres of all imitative forms of literature: the epic, the lyric, the tragedy, and the comedy; identify and use literary devices and figures of speech such as: similes, metaphors, allegories, fables, parables; imitate these genres and literary devices in his writing, in order to understand more deeply the nature and power of these forms; become familiar with the greatest examples of Greek literature, and their impact upon Western literature and modes of thought throughout subsequent history; compare and contrast Greek ideals of heroism and virtue with the Christian understanding of these ideals, and identify what ways Greek thought served as preparation for the Gospel.

Ancient Roman Literature


Honors Designation Available Course Texts: Virgil, The Aeneid. Trans. Patric Dickinson. Penguin Books: New York, 1961. (T3641) Marcus Aurelius, Meditations. Trans. M. Staniforth. Penguin Books: New York, 1964. (T3674)

Plutarch, Fall of the Roman Republic. Trans. Rex Wagner. Penguin Books: New York, 1972. (T3673) Plutarch, Makers of Rome. Trans. Ian Scott-Kilvert. Penguin Books: New York, 1965. (T3672) The Kolbe Academy Roman Reader. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2006. (T3675) Shakespeare, "Coriolanus." Ed. Jonathan Crewe. Penguin Books: New York, 1999. (T3728) Shakespeare, "Julius Caesar." Ed. William Montgomery. Penguin Books: New York, 1988. (T3729) Shakespeare, "Antony and Cleopatra." Ed. A.R. Braunmuller. Penguin Books: New York, 1999. (T3730) St. Augustine, Confessions. Trans. R.S. Pine-Coffin. Penguin Books: New York, 1961. (T2778) King, Abigail. Classics Conference: The Romans. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2002. (K2663 or K2664), Optional Kolbe Academy Study Guide to The Aeneid. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2006. (T3641A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to Meditations. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2006. (T3674A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to Plutarch. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2006. (T3672A), Kolbe Academy Study Guide to The Roman Reader. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2006. (T3675A), Kolbe Academy Study Guide for Shakespeare's "Coriolanus," "Julius Caesar," and "Antony and Cleopatra." Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2006. (T3730A), Kolbe Academy Study Guide to St. Augustine. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2006. (T2778A)

Course Description:
This course is a companion to the Roman history course, introducing the student to the important works of Roman literature, as well as to the use of figures of Roman history and literature by great writers of later times. The texts of antiquity are studied for their universal appeal to the human experience, as well as for their influence upon the great thinkers and development of the West. The Roman epics, plays, and philosophy are referenced throughout the literary and intellectual works of Western thinkers to this day. Shakespeare is also studied in this course for his inimitable analysis of the great personalities of Rome. Students will become familiar with the main examples of Roman literature and their use by later writers, notably Shakespeare; identify and examine the inter-relationship between the Greek epic (the Iliad and the Odyssey), and the Roman epic (the Aeneid); identify the Roman virtue of pietas and its subsequent transformation in Christianity; further the study and imitation of these genres: epic, tragedy, comedy, and rhetoric. Biography (Plutarch) and autobiography (St. Augustine) will also be considered; learn to interpret and distinguish the fourfold senses of theological writings: the literal, the allegorical, the moral, and the eschatological; and trace the effect of the Greek world on the development of Latin literature, as well as the Greek influence in the works of St. Augustine.

Literature of Christendom

Honors Designation Available Course Texts: Anonymous. The Dream of the Rood. Trans. James M. Garnett, M.A., LL.D. Gutenberg Press: 1911. (The Dream of the Rood is incorporated into T3702) Anonymous, Beowulf. Trans. David Wright. Penguin Books: London, 1951. (T3700) Anonymous, Song of Roland. Trans. Dorothy Sayers. Penguin Books: New York, 1957. (T3701) Anonymous, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Trans. J.R.R. Tolkien. Ballantine books: New York, 1980. (T3703) Alighieri, Dante. The Divine Comedy: Hell. Dorothy Sayers, Trans. Penguin books: New York, 1959. (T3751)

Alighieri, Dante. The Divine Comedy: Purgatory. Dorothy Sayers, Trans. Penguin books: New York, 1959. (T3752) Alighieri, Dante. The Divine Comedy: Paradise. Dorothy Sayers, Trans. Penguin Books: New York, 1959. (T3753) Chaucer, Geoffrey. The Canterbury Tales. Nevill Coghill, Trans. Penguin Books: New York, 1977. (T3771) Shakespeare, William. Richard III. Barbara A. Mowat and Paul Werstine, Eds. Washington Square Press: New York, 1996 for The Folger Shakespeare Library. (T3733) Shakespeare, William. Macbeth. Barbara A. Mowat and Paul Werstine, Eds. Washington Square Press: New York, 1992 for The Folger Shakespeare Library. (T3732) Shakespeare, William. The Tempest. Peter Holland, Ed. Penguin Books: New York, 1999. (T3717) Shakespeare, William. Hamlet. A.R. Braunmuller, Ed. Penguin Books: New York, 2001. (T3726) Shakespeare, William. A Midsummer Night's Dream. Russ McDonald, Ed. Penguin Books: New York, 2000. (T3715) Milton, John. Paradise Lost & Paradise Regained. Christopher Ricks, Ed. Penguin Books: New York, 1968. (T3776) Kolbe Academy The Dream of the Rood and Study Guide including the poem. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T3702) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to Beowulf. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T3701A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to Song of Roland. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T3701A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T3703A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to The Divine Comedy: Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T3753) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to The Canterbury Tales. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T3771A) Kolbe Academy Shakespeare Medieval Study Guide. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T3733A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to Paradise Lost. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T3776A) Kolbe Academy 11th grade Literature presents: Keep the Faith Lectures by Dr. David White and Dr. John C. Rao. Optional, (K2670)
Additional audio supplements available (OPTIONAL): Audio series by Henry Russell (1) The Catholic Shakespeare

Macbeth-Tape (K2665) The Tempest-CD (K2668) Hamlet-Tape (K2667) Midsummer Night's Dream-CD (K2666)

(2) Introduction to the Divine Comedies-CD (K2669)


Course Description:
This course is a companion to the History of Christendom, introducing the student to the important works of the period, as well as to the literary styles and conventions developed in this period both those that it borrowed from previous times and those it expanded on or created. Students will become familiar with the main examples of Medieval literature; identify and examine the inter-relationship between the Greek epic (the Iliad and the Odyssey), the Roman epic (the Aeneid) and the Catholic epic (The Divine Comedy); identify the Christian virtue of chivalry and its role in Medieval society; identify the Christian virtue of courtesy and its role in Medieval society; identify the Christian metaphor of the spiritual quest to attain salvation; further the study and imitation of these genres: epic, tragedy, comedy, and rhetoric; learn to interpret and distinguish the fourfold senses of theological writings: the literal, the allegorical, the moral,

and the eschatological; and trace the effect of the Christian world on the development of Medieval literature.

Modern Era Literature


Honors Designation Available Course Texts: Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Penguin Books: New York, 1985. (T3881) Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities. Signet Classics: New York, 1997. (T3943) Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment. Signet Classics: New York, 1968. (T3871) Evelyn Waugh, Brideshead Revisited. Little Brown and co: New York, 1973. (T3889) G. K. Chesterton, The Man Who was Thursday. Penguin Books: New York, 1986. (T3891) Robert Louis Stevenson, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Bantam Classics: New York, 1981. (T3888) Alexander Solzhenitsyn, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich. Signet Classics: New York, 1998. (T3873) George Orwell, 1984. Signet Classics: New York, 1977. (T3884) New York, The Waste Land, Prufrock and other Poems. Dover Publications: New York, 1998. (T1444) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T3881A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to The Tale of Two Cities. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T3943A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to Crime and Punishment. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T3871A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to Brideshead Revisited. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T3889A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to The Man Who Was Thursday. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T3891A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T3888A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T3873A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to 1984. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T3884A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to "The Waste Land." Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T1444A) Kolbe Academy 12th grade Literature presents Lectures on Dostoyevsky by Dr. White from Keep the Faith. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (K2671), Optional Course Description:
This is a challenging course intended to be taken in conjunction with the 12th grade Modern and US History course. The course is largely based on reflective reading and writing essays based on text analysis. The novels have been chosen for their timelessness and their accurate, stunning portrayal of important historical events and the ideas that have helped shape the Modern world. This course in Modern Literature will show how modern times have reaffirmed man's capacity for terror. Dickens presents "Madame Guillotine" as the patroness of a new nation. In Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment, Raskolnikov, a brilliant young man, caters to a philosophy that is utterly evil and selfdestructive. Evelyn Waugh's Brideshead Revisited chronicles the struggle of the individual seeking goodness and truth in a world that is increasingly indifferent to man's spiritual needs. Robert Louis Stevenson shows how the degenerative possibilities of scientific discoveries can affect the nature of man and subconsciously devolve him into a Mr. Hyde. In 1984, the path of atheistic politics strikes the beauty and integrity of man and dwarf him from a creature made to love and serve God to a cog in the machine of a finite and pathetic state deity. Although modernity, in the words of T.S. Eliot, is a Waste Land "where the

sun beats and the dead tree gives no shelter," the Church is the refuge for Heaven-directed pilgrims, and it is a large rock in the desert inviting all to "come under the shadow of this red rock." Students will become familiar with some of the major authors and most influential novels from the Modern Era; identify the historical events that took place during the life of the Modern writers and how these events have impacted their writing; have a greater understanding of the evolution of literary style and technique in the Modern Era; learn to interpret and analyze an author's means of conveying ideas; and appreciate the impact of philosophy upon literature, and the subsequent impact of literature upon culture.

History Curriculum
World History I: Ancient Greece

Honors Designation Available Course Texts: Herodotus: The Histories. Tran. Aubrey De Slincourt. Penguin Books: London, 1996. (T7820) Thucydides: The History of the Peloponnesian War. Tran. Rex Warner. Penguin Books: London, 1954. (T7815) Plutarch, The Rise and Fall of Athens: Nine Greek Lives. Tran. Ian Scott-Kilvert. Penguin Books: London, 1960. (T7819) Xenophon: The Persian Expedition (Anabasis). Tran. Rex Warner. Penguin Books: London, 1949. (T7816) Plato, Great Dialogues of Plato. Trans. W.H.D. Rouse. Signet Classic: New York, 1984. (T3451) King, Abigail. Classics Conference The Greeks. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2002. (K2662 or K2664), Optional Kolbe Academy Weekly Quiz Book for Greek History. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2002. (T7825) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to Herodotus. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2005. (T7820A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to Thucydides . Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2005. (T7815A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to Xenophon's Persian Expedition & Plutarch's Rise and Fall of Athens . Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2005. (T7816A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to Great Dialogues of Plato. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2000. (T3451A) Course Description:
This course examines the great civilization of ancient Greece, beginning around 600 B.C. with the rise of the Lydian state, and concentrating on the rise and fall of Athens. The course reads the great ancient histories of the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars. It then examines Plato's view of the ideal state. Plato's state can be compared to the actual Greek states and to modern day Republics.The study of ancient Greece is vital to any genuine understanding of the movement and progress of History in the West. The personalities and events from this prominent era in history have largely influenced those of later times.This course will enable the student to observe the timelessness of human relations and the similarities of man's responses to the conditions in which he finds himself, across time periods; discover the similarities of and difference between ancient Greek and Christian ideas of virtue; trace the cause and effect of political developments in the ancient world and, by extension, in the modern; identify the periods of ancient history and major characters of the period; become familiar with the map of the ancient world and the seeds of modern conflicts; and relate modern historical situations and documents to their ancient antecedents.

World History II: Ancient Rome


Honors Desgination Available Course Texts: Livy: The History of Rome from Its Foundations: The Early History of Rome. Tran. Aubrey De Slincourt. Penguin Books: London, 1960, 2002. (T7830) Livy: The History of Rome from Its Foundations: The War with Hannibal. Tran. Aubrey De Slincourt. Penguin Books: London, 1965. (T7839) Plutarch, Makers of Rome. Trans. Ian Scott-Kilvert. Penguin Books: New York, 1965. (T3672) Tacitus: The Annals of Imperial Rome. Tran. Michael Grant. Penguin Books: London, 1977. (T7835) St. Augustine: City of God. Tran. Henry Bettenson. Penguin Books: London, 1972, 2003. (T2779)

Kolbe Academy Study Guide to Livy's Early History of Rome. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2006. (T7830A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to Livy's War with Hannibal. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2006. (T7839A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to Plutarch. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2006. (T3672A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to Tacitus. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2006. (T7835A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to St. Augustine. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2006. (T2779A)

Course Description:
This course examines the pre-Christian and early Christian world as seen through the rise and fall of the Roman Empire. It covers highlights of Roman history from the mythical founding of the city in 753 BC, the fall of the Republic in the first century BC, to the fall of the Empire in 476 AD. St. Augustine provides background on the conflict of Catholicism with paganism in Roman society. The study of ancient Rome is vital to any genuine understanding of the movement and progress of History in the West. The personalities and events from this prominent era in history have largely influenced those of later times. This course will enable the student to Become familiar with the political and religious developments of this period; know and understand the significance of the important events, dates, persons and places in the Western Europe of 753 BC-476 AD; trace the cause and effect of political developments in the ancient world and, by extension, in the modern; observe the timelessness of human relations and the similarities of man's responses to the conditions in which he finds himself, across time periods; identify the periods of ancient history and major characters of the period; and become familiar with the map of the ancient world and the seeds of modern conflicts

World History III: The Era of Christendom


Honors Designation Available Course Texts: Kolbe Academy 11th Grade History: The Era Of Christendom Reader. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T7860) Byzantium: Church, Society, and Civilization Seen through Contemporary Eyes, Geanakoplos, Deno. (T7859) Viking Portable Medieval Reader, Penguin (T7857) Chronicles, Froissart, Jean. (T7858) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to Kolbe World History III: Quarter 1. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T7860A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to Kolbe World History III: Quarter 2. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T7857A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to Kolbe World History III: Quarter 3. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T7858A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to Kolbe World History III: Quarter 4. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T7859A) Course Description:
This course is an introduction to the post-Pagan Roman world (which encompassed the province of Britannia, in the west, to the Kingdoms of Armenia and Georgia in the east), and to the expansion and transformation of that world, i.e. the new lands won for Christ by missionaries and the renewal or abolition of many western and central European institutions and traditions. More than this, the Kolbe 11th grade History Course is an attempt to present as an elaborate thriving organism, an often slandered or overlooked period in which the Christian ideal shaped and inspired the social and political order. Students will study this era through its sources, occasionally comparing them against the judgments of modern historians, in order to form an impression that is marred neither by the pejoratives of progressives nor the sense of vindication often voiced by Catholics. Students will be able to identify the greater themes of this era and to distinguish between the vagaries of life in this (or any) era, the anomalies of this era, and its ideals. An over-emphasis on particularsa trick of progressive and anti-Catholic historiansis misleading. Similarly, the person who passes judgment on this era with reference to only the political formulations issued by popes and the recorded aspirations saints will have obscured or overlooked a very

complex culture. In short, our goal is to let this era manifest itself to the student, while supplying occasional readings or glosses that put the readings in proper context. For this very reason the Kolbe 11th Grade curriculum is entitled "the Era of Christendom", rather than the "Middle Ages Curriculum" or "Dark Ages Curriculum", for the designations "medieval", "Middle ages" and "Dark Ages" are shamefully derogatory and unscientific, as the historian Theodor Ernst Mommsen observed. We feel it is important therefore that even something so seemingly insignificant as the title of the course suggest a fresh approach to this subject.

United States and Modern History


Honors Designation Available Course Texts: Kolbe Academy Modern History Reader, 2 Volumes; Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T7884) A Documentary History of the United States, Richard D. Heffner, 1999. (T7872) The Federalist Papers, Hamilton, Madison, Jay (T7873) Democracy in America, Alexis de Tocqueville, abridged edition, 1984. (T7876) Modern Times: The World from the 20's to the 90's, Paul Johnson, 1992. (T7875) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to the US & Modern History Course, Quarter 1 . Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T7884A) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to the US & Modern History Course, Quarter 2. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T7884B) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to the US & Modern History Course, Quarter 3 . Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T7884C) Kolbe Academy Study Guide to the US & Modern History Course, Quarter 4 . Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2008. (T7884D) Course Description:
Thought shapes history. Man's thoughts are shaped by his beliefs, his habits (be they virtue or vice), his society, culture, custom, environment, experience, and education. Man shapes history through his choices, which are rooted in those soils of his thought. As you read the pages of modern history you will see that man's thoughtbeliefs and philosophiesare some of the most powerful forces on earth. This course studies the major ideological trends of modern Western Civilization and their effects on the world. In this course students will be asked to examine the work of a number of thinkersphilosophers, scientists and theologians in conjunction with their study of historical events and documents. In essence this is both a course in history and in political philosophy. It will be most fruitful to seriously consider the power of an idea to shape history.

Mathematics Curriculum
Algebra I (Jacobs)

Course Texts: Elementary Algebra, Harold Jacobs, 1979 (T4100) A Teacher's Guide to Elementary Algebra, Harold R. Jacobs (T4100A), Optional Algebra DVD Lectures (T4100D), Optional Course Description:
Harold Jacob's Elementary Algebra provides a strong course for the Algebra I student. His text is set up in a traditional style so that students have the opportunity to practice many types of problems taught within each lesson. This course provides the backbone of Algebra I concepts to prepare the student for taking Algebra II, and adequately prepare a student to take the Algebra I Math sections of the PSAT, SAT, and ACT standardized tests. Additional graphing supplements are provided in the course plan as an introduction to graphing. Students can succeed in this course after completing any pre-Algebra course, including the Saxon Math 8/7 (with pre-Algebra) text. Students who struggled with Saxon Math 8/7 are advised to use Saxon Algebra 1/2 or another pre-Algebra course prior to beginning this course. Note that about the first five chapters will include much review of pre-Algebra concepts. This course is typically done in the 8th or 9th grade. Topics include: fundamental operations, functions and graphs, domain and range of functions, integers, rational numbers, equations in one variable, equations in two variables, simultaneous equations, exponents, polynomials, factoring, fractions, square roots, quadratic equations, graphing quadratic equations, real numbers, fractional equations, inequalities, graphing inequalities in two variables, and arithmetic and geometric sequences.

Geometry (Jacobs)

Honors Designation available Course Texts: Geometry: Seeing, Doing, Understanding, Harold Jacobs, 3rd edition, 2003 (T4101) Teacher's Manual (T4101A), Optional Geometry DVD Lectures (T4101D), Optional Course Description:
This Geometry course can follow any Algebra I program, whether the student has used Saxon Algebra I, Jacob's Elementary Algebra, or another First year Algebra course. If questions should arise about the preparedness of a student for this course, please contact the Academic Advisor department at Kolbe Academy. This course presents all the geometrical concepts in a traditional fashion to the high school student. This course will sufficiently prepare the student for questions on the math section of the PSAT, ACT, or SAT standardized tests. Students completing this course as well as a previous Algebra I program will be ready to take the traditional second year of Algebra II. Student's who wish to continue on in the Saxon mathematics series upon completion Jacob's Geometry will find much repetition in the Saxon Algebra II course because the majority of the material covered is Geometry. Students choosing to continue with Saxon after this course should be prepared to take through Advanced Mathematics I in order to complete all the Algebra II concepts necessary to succeed on the ACT and SAT standardized tests. It is more desirable for students to pursue a traditional Algebra II course following this Geometry course. The Kolbe Academy recommended course of study includes continuing with Foerster's Algebra and Trigonometry upon completion of the Jacob's Geometry text. The Harold Jacob's Geometry text includes engaging language that will help to keep the interest of the student throughout the duration of the course. The lessons are set up to challenge students, yet offer sound explanations to give students the tools to complete problems efficiently. The author has set his text up to include three sets of problems with each lesson so as to present the basic concepts in Set I exercises, applications in Set II exercises, and extension of concepts in Set III exercises. Finally, there are Algebra reviews located at the end of most chapters in the student textbook. This course is typically done in 9th or 10th grade. Topics include: conditional statements, direct and indirect proofs, Pythagorean theorem, lines and angles, congruence, inequalities, parallel lines, quadrilaterals, transformations, area, similarity, the right triangle, circles, the concurrence theorems, regular polygons and the circle, Geometric solids, and non-Euclidean geometry.

Algebra II & Algebra II/Trigonometry (Foerster)


Honors Designation available Course Texts: Algebra and Trigonometry: Functions and Applications, Paul A. Foerster, 2006 (T4102) Solutions Manual (T4102A), Optional Algebra and Trigonometry Graphing Calculator Lab Manual(T4102B) Kolbe Academy Solution Manual to the Graphing Calculator Lab Manual (T4102C), Optional Foerster DVD Lecture Set (T4102D), Optional Course Description:
Topics in the Algebra II course include: linear functions, systems of linear equations and inequalities, quadratic functions and complex numbers, exponential and Logarithmic functions, rational Algebraic Functions, irrational Algebraic Functions, quadratic Relations and Systems (circles, ellipses, hyperbolas, and parabolas); those taking Alg II/Trigonometry will also cover: trigonometric and circular functions; properties of trigonometric and circular functions; trigonometric Identities; triangle Problems; and vectors. Additionally, a Graphing Calculator Supplement is assigned in the course plan as they correspond with the appropriate sections. While it isn't absolutely essential for students to learn how to use a graphing calculator, it is preferable, especially in courses of Algebra II and beyond. Students need to know how to graph things on paper, but it is very useful to know how to appropriately use a graphing calculator for the more complex problems where graphing (or other calculations) would bog the student down with unnecessary busy work. Furthermore, the ACT and SAT both allow the use of a graphing calculator, so it can greatly benefit students to know some short cuts to aid them on the math portions of these exams. The Algebra II/Trigonometry (H) course moves at a very quick pace and emphasizes the more difficult concepts and mathematical applications in the text. This course of study, although up to the parent's discretion, is recommended for students who received an A in either Algebra I or Geometry and received at least a B+ in both Algebra I and Geometry. Students who do well in the Honors Algebra II/Trig course will find themselves ready for the study of Calculus during the following year. All students pursuing honors should expect to find the content and pace of the coursework challenging and should be sure to allot extra time for their studies. Those wishing to pursue the Honors designation in this course will have a heavier emphasis on the mathematical applications of concepts learned in the course. The Algebra II (K) course moves at a very reasonable pace for most high school students. It is meant to be a college preparatory course in nature, taking the student through a great number of Algebra II concepts but also spending a little more time on reviewing Algebra I than the honors course. This course of study can be completed by most average students. Upon completion of Algebra II (K), students will be ready to tackle any PreCalculus course the following year. If a student is struggling with this course, parents may want to call and speak with an advisor, but the following modifications could be made omitting Chapters 9 & 10.

PreCalculus (Foerster)
Honors Designation Available Course Texts: Precalculus: Concepts and Applications, Paul A. Foerster, 2012 (T4093) Solutions Manual, Optional, (T4093A) Course Description:
This course is a one year course (10 credits) in high school Precalculus. The honors track, although up to the parent's discretion, is aimed for students who have shown aptitude toward mathematics in their Geometry and Algebra II courses, or who have successfully completed the honors Algebra II/Trig course. All students pursuing honors should expect to find the content and pace of the coursework challenging and should be sure to allot extra time for their studies. The Kolbe Honors (H) track, although up to the parent's discretion, is recommended for students who have achieved one of the following: a "B" or better in Algebra II/Trig (H) or an "A" in Algebra II (K). All students pursuing honors should expect to find the content and pace of the coursework challenging and should be sure to allot extra time for their studies. The Kolbe Core (K) track is recommended for any student who has successfully completed Algebra II (K) or Algebra II/Trig

(H). If a student finds the work load unbearable, please contact the advisor department so that suggestions can be made for the student to succeed in this course.

Calculus (Foerster)
Honors Designation Available Course Texts: Calculus: Concepts and Applications, Paul A. Foerster, 2012 (T4094) Solutions Manual, Optional, (T4094A) Course Materials: Programmable Graphing Calculator, preferably TI-83 or TI-84 model (required) Calculator Programs download at www.keymath.com, scroll down, and click on Calculus Not available from Kolbe- An AP Calculus prep book for students interested in taking either AP exam. Course Description:
This course plan includes a one year course (10 credits) in high school Calculus. The Kolbe Honors Calculus I and II (H) course prepares the student for the AP Calculus BC exam, which typically gives Calculus I and II credit at many colleges and universities. The Kolbe Core Calculus (K) course prepares the student for the AP Calculus AB exam, which typically gives Calculus I credit at most colleges and universities. (see each university's AP policy for credits) The Kolbe Honors (H) track, although up to the parent's discretion, is recommended for students who have achieved one of the following: a "A" or better in Algebra II/Trig (H), an A in PreCalculus (K), or a "B+" in PreCalculus (H). All students pursuing honors should expect to find the content and pace of the coursework challenging and should be sure to allot extra time for their studies. The Kolbe Core (K) track is recommended for students who have achieved one of the following: a "B" or better in Algebra II/Trig (H), or successful completion of PreCalculus (K or H).

Algebra I (Saxon)

Course Texts: Saxon Algebra 1, 3rd edition (T4091)Solution Manual for Saxon Algebra 1 (T4091A), Optional Course Description:
Students may begin this course after completing any pre-Algebra course, including the Saxon Math 8/7 (with pre-Algebra) course. Students who struggled with Saxon 8/7 are advised to use Saxon Algebra 1/2 prior to beginning an Algebra I course. Upon completion of Saxon's Algebra I, students may either continue with the Saxon program by using Saxon's Algebra 2 book, or may switch into a standard Geometry course using Jacob's Geometry. Please be advised that Saxon does not have a separate Geometry course. The author instead integrates all Geometry concepts throughout the Algebra I, Algebra II, and Advanced Math programs. It is advisable that all college bound students exclusively using the Saxon program complete through Advanced Math in order to cover all the Geometry and Trigonometry concepts that might appear on the PSAT, ACT, and SAT standardized tests. This course covers the following topics: division by zero, reciprocal and multiplicative inverse, exponents, algebraic phrases, word problems, canceling, ratio, conjunctions, dividing fractions, domain, elimination, closure, probability, algebraic proofs, rational equations functions.

Algebra II with Geometry* (Saxon)


*Students who opt to do a separate Geometry course in addition to this course will have a course title of simply "Algebra II."

Course Texts: Saxon Algebra 2, 3rd edition (T4092) Solution Manual for Saxon Algebra 2 (T4092A), Optional Course Description:
The following course covers the basics of Algebra II and good deal of Geometry. The only students that should be using this Algebra II course are those who have completed Saxon's course in Algebra I. Please be advised that Saxon does not have a separate Geometry course. The author instead integrates all

Geometry concepts throughout the Algebra I, Algebra II, and Advanced Math programs. It is advisable that all college bound students exclusively using the Saxon program complete through Advanced Math in order to cover all the Geometry and Trigonometry concepts that might appear on the PSAT, ACT, and SAT standardized tests. Topics include: absolute value, percent, Pythagorean theorem, substitution, scientific notation, area, trinomial factoring, chemical compounds, abstract fractional equations, radical equations, ideal gas laws, quadratic formula, force, vectors, slope formula, discriminant number, and word problems.

Precalculus with Geometry* (Saxon)


Honors Designation available
*Students who opt to do a separate Geometry course in addition to this course will have a course title of simply "PreCalculus."

Course Texts: Saxon Advanced Mathematics, 2nd edition. (T4098) Solution Manual for Saxon Advanced Math (T4098A), Optional Course Description:
The only students that should be using this PreCalculus with Geometry course are those who have completed Saxon's course in Algebra 2. The Advanced Mathematics book by Saxon can be used in 2, 3, or 4 semesters. Kolbe Academy offers a course in two (10 credits) and four (20 credits) semesters. Those students who are more proficient in math, may want to use this one year honors Advanced Math course (10 credits), calling the course "Precalculus with Geometry." Students will be prepared for Calculus after this one year study of Advanced Mathematics. Students wishing to pursue a less rigorous approach to the advanced mathematics course should follow the Advanced Math I and II two-year (20 credits) track. This course provides, among other topics, in-depth coverage of the following: trigonometry, logarithms, geometry, analytic geometry.

Advanced Math I: Algebra III with Geometry* (Saxon)


*Students who opt to do a separate Geometry course in addition to this course will have a course title of simply "Algebra III."

Course Texts: Saxon Advanced Mathematics, 2nd edition. (T4098) Solution Manual for Saxon Advanced Math (T4098A), Optional Course Description:
The only students that should be using this PreCalculus with Geometry course are those who have completed Saxon's course in Algebra 2. This course covers the first 60 lessons of the Saxon Advanced Mathematics textbook and is the final step in fulfilling a Geometry requirement. The Advanced Mathematics book by Saxon can be used in 2, 3, or 4 semesters. Those students who are more proficient in math, may want to use the one year honors Precalculus with Geometry course (10 credits) outlined above. Students wishing to pursue a less rigorous approach to the advanced mathematics course should follow the Advanced Math I and II two-year (20 credits) track, beginning with this course, Algebra III with Geometry. This course provides, among other topics, in-depth coverage of the following: trigonometry, logarithms, geometry, analytic geometry.

Advanced Math II: Precalculus (Saxon)


Course Texts: Saxon Advanced Mathematics, 2nd edition. (T4098) Solution Manual for Saxon Advanced Math (T4098A), Optional Course Description:
The only students that should be using this PreCalculus course are those who have completed Advanced Math I: Algebra III using the Saxon Advanced Math book. This course covers the last 60 lessons of the Saxon Advanced Mathematics textbook. The Advanced Mathematics book by Saxon can be used in 2, 3, or 4 semesters. This course plan is a continuation of the Algebra III with Geometry course. Students completing this course will be prepared to take Calculus next year. This course provides, among other topics, in-depth coverage of the following: trigonometry, logarithms, geometry, analytic geometry.

Calculus I (Saxon)

Course Texts: Saxon Calculus, 2nd Edition, 2007 (T4099) Solutions Manual for Saxon Calculus (T4099A), Optional Course Description:
This book is designed for prospective mathematics majors as well as for students whose primary interests are in engineering, physics, business, or the life sciences. This course covers the first half of Saxon Calculus. Students taking this Calculus I course will have a firm foundation in Calculus I concepts and a brief introduction to Calculus II concepts. Students may wish to proceed for an additional full year of Calculus II and complete the latter half of the textbook. The book contains a sufficient review of PreCalculus concepts, however, students should not attempt this Calculus course without completing one of the following: Algebra II/Trigonometry, PreCalculus, Saxon Advanced Mathematics, or other equivalent PreCalculus course. Students who excelled in mathematics throughout high school or who are highly motivated, might consider pursuing the Honors Calculus I and II course described below. Topics include: PreCalculus review, limits and their properties, introduction to differentiation, techniques of differentiation, applications of differentiation, and an introduction to integration.

Calculus II (Saxon)

Course Texts: Saxon Calculus, 2nd Edition, 2007 (T4099) Solutions Manual for Saxon Calculus (T4099A), Optional Course Description:
This book is designed for prospective mathematics majors as well as for students whose primary interests are in engineering, physics, business, or the life sciences. This course covers the last half of Saxon Calculus. Students taking this Calculus II course will have a firm foundation in Calculus II concepts. After completing Calculus I and upon completion of this course, students will be prepared well for the AP Calculus AB exam. Students will also be prepared sufficiently well for the AP Calculus BC exam, but a few select topics may need to be supplemented. Topics include: introduction to integration, applications of integration, techniques of integration, analytical geometry, series and sequences.

Calculus I and II (Saxon)


Honors Designation Available Course Texts: Saxon Calculus, 2nd Edition, 2007 (T4099) Solutions Manual for Saxon Calculus (T4099A), Optional Course Description:
This book is designed for prospective mathematics majors as well as for students whose primary interests are in engineering, physics, business, or the life sciences. Students pursuing this course will be working at a very quick pace and should expect to put in a significant amount of time into their studies as the entire book is covered in one year. Students following the Kolbe Honors Calculus I and II track will have a firm foundation in Calculus I and II concepts. The Honors course prepares a student for taking the AP Calculus AB Exam as well as preparing them fairly well for the AP Calculus BC Exam. The book contains a sufficient review of PreCalculus concepts, however, students should not attempt this Calculus course without completing one of the following: Algebra II/Trigonometry, PreCalculus, Saxon Advanced Mathematics, or other equivalent PreCalculus course. Students who excelled in mathematics throughout high school or who are highly motivated, should be encouraged to pursue the Honors track. Topics include: PreCalculus review, limits and their properties, introduction to differentiation, techniques of differentiation, applications of differentiation, introduction to integration, applications of integration, techniques of integration, analytical geometry, series and sequences.

Science Curriculum
Introduction to Physics & Chemistry (IPC)

Course Texts: Physical Science: Concepts in Action by Wysession, Frank, and Yancopoulos; 2006 (T4828) Kolbe Academy Physical Science Answer Key and Online Access, (T4828A), Optional Course Description:
Introduction to Physics & Chemistry (IPC) is a course that studies the fundamental principles of physical science which are so important for the in depth approach to the high school sciences of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. Although the main emphasis in this course is on Chemistry and Physics, the same scientific thought processes and especially many of the Chemistry concepts, are applied and used fully in the high school Biology course as well. Any student wishing to pursue the Kolbe Academy Core or Honors high school science courses is encouraged to complete this course in order to put in place the math, analysis, and process skills necessary for success in those courses. This course plan covers a breadth of material recommended both for eighth grade students interested in beginning honors science coursework in high school and for typical ninth grade science coursework. For students who do not have plans for honors science in high school, parents may wish to modify the course plan according to their child's abilities. Ideally, IPC should be taken concurrently with Algebra I. However, strong math students will find that a pre-Algebra course provides most of the necessary math skills needed to complete this course successfully. Topics covered include an introduction to properties of matter, states of matter, atomic structure, the Periodic Table, chemical bonds, chemical reactions, solutions, acids and bases, forces and motion, forces in a fluid, work, power and machines, energy, thermal energy and heat, mechanical waves and sound, the electromagnetic spectrum and light, optics, electricity and magnetism.

Biology

Honors Designation Available Course Texts: Biology by Miller and Levine (2006), Prentice Hall, (T5153) Prentice Hall Biology Virtual Labs CD-ROM (T5153A) Kolbe Academy Biology Answer Key and Online Student Access (T5153B), Optional Kolbe Academy Lab Report Writing Guide, (T5140), Optional Church Teaching Materials: Humani Generis, an Encyclical Letter of Pius XII (1950) (Available online free) Kolbe Academy Humani Generis Study Guide (T5150A) Chance or Purpose? Creation, Evolution, and a Rational Faith , Christoph Cardinal Shoenborn (T5154A) Catechism of the Catholic Church (T2243A) Optional Church Teaching Materials (not available from Kolbe): Humanae Vitae, Familiaris Consortis, Evangelium Vitae, Casti Connubii, Theology of the Body (Pope John Paul II) Course Description:
This course is designed to give students an appreciation of creation and of the order and complexity of living things. The course plans outline a track for a Kolbe Academy Core course (K) and a Kolbe Academy honors course (H) in Biology. The "Core Biology" track will emphasize the basic biological processes of how life systems work while the "Honors Biology" track will outline the more in depth physiological processes of life systems. The science of biology presents the student with some of the bioethical issues that exist in today's world, such as stem cell research, genetic engineering, and cloning. It is the role of the parent to discuss these issues with the student and instruct the student in Church Teaching. We have done our best to point out these controversial issues and to provide guidance on how to address them. For example, the topic of evolution is studied alongside the Church's teaching in Humani Generis. Miller and Levine's Biology book periodically includes an "Issues in Biology" segment which should be used as points of discussion between the student and parent. It is important to bring in the Church's teaching on moral and bioethical

issues during these discussions. Projects have been assigned during some weeks so that the student can explore the Church's teachings on controversial topics on their own. The honors track, although up to the parent's discretion, is aimed for students who have previously had a solid background in physical science. A student who still wishes to pursue this course as an honors course that did not follow the recommended course of study for physical science, may find the pace of the course challenging. These students should be sure to allot extra time for their studies. The honors track should be followed if students wish to have the opportunity to take the AP test in Biology as most of the topics needed to be successful on the Biology AP exam are covered. Since this book is NOT a college text, it is important to study for the AP with an AP specified study guide for Biology. To see the AP Biology requirements, go to www.collegeboard.com. This course is typically done in 9th or 10th grade and includes the following topics: the nature of life, ecology, cells, genetics, evolutionary theory, microorganisms and fungi, plants, invertebrates, chordates, and the human body. Lab work is suggested throughout the lesson plan through the use of the Virtual Lab CD and labs in the textbook that do not require extensive materials. Alternate labs from the textbook are suggested with every Virtual Lab assignment for students who wish to complete a hands-on lab using this text.

Chemistry (Option 1)

Honors Designation Available Course Texts: Chemistry by Wilbraham, Staley, Matta, and Waterman, 2005, Prentice Hall, (T5250) Kolbe Academy Chemistry Answer Key with ChemASAP student online access, (T5250A), Optional Prentice Hall Virtual Labs Chemistry CD-ROM (T5250B) Kolbe Academy Lab Report Writing Guide, (T5140), Optional Course Description:
This course is designed to give students an appreciation of creation and of the order and complexity of atoms and their interactions with each other. The course plans outline a track for a Kolbe Academy Core course (K) and a Kolbe Academy honors course (H) in Chemistry. The "Core Chemistry" track will emphasize the basic chemical interactions between atoms, compounds, and molecules while the "Honors Chemistry" track will delve more deeply into the theoretical, mathematical, and organic chemical processes. This course provides an introduction to chemistry suitable for students in a college preparatory program. The honors track, although up to the parent's discretion, is aimed for students who have previously had a solid background in physical science. A student who still wishes to pursue this course as an honors course that did not follow the recommended course of study for physical science may find that the pace of the course very quick and should be sure to allot extra time for their studies. The honors track should be followed if students wish to have the opportunity to take the AP test in Chemistry. Since this book is NOT a college text, it is important to study for the AP with an AP specified study guide for Chemistry. Most of the topics needed to be successful on the Chemistry AP exam are covered in the honors course of study. To see the AP chemistry requirements, go to www.collegeboard.com. This course is typically done in 10th or 11th grade and includes the following topics: matter and change, scientific measurement, atomic structure, the Periodic Table, ionic, metallic, and covalent bonding, chemical names and formulas, balancing chemical equations, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, states of matter, gas behavior, water and aqueous systems, solutions, thermochemistry, reaction rates and equilibrium, acids, bases and salts, oxidation-reduction reactions, electrochemistry, hydrocarbon compounds, alcohols, ethers, carbonyl compounds, carbohydrates, amino acids, lipids, nucleic acids, and nuclear chemistry. Lab work is suggested throughout the lesson plan through the use of the Virtual Lab CD and labs in the textbook that do not require extensive materials. Alternately, a parent may choose to utilize the labs that occur in the textbook for lab credit.

Chemistry (Option 2)

Course Texts: Introduction to Chemistry by John Charlesworth. Kolbe Academy Press, 2000. (T5251) Course Description:

This course gives the student important, basic, and widely used terms and ideas, such as what are atoms and molecules, what is dissolving, what happens during chemical reactions, etc. It is recommended that a student have knowledge of elementary algebra. Answers are included in the text. Topics include: Metric system, units, and measurement, density, temperature, pressure, and gas volume, temperature conversion, exponential notation, the atom and the periodic table, energy, ionic bonds, symbols and charges, writing formulas for ionic compounds, naming ionic compounds, covalent bonds, naming and writing formulas for covalent compounds, the coordinate covalent bond, names and formulas for the common acids, skeletal structural formulas, structures of some common covalent compounds, molecules, atomic, molecular and formula weights, mixtures, electronegativity and polar covalent bonds, oxidation number, oxidation and reduction, acids, bases, salts and dissolving, reading and writing chemical equations, predicting precipitates in chemical reactions, the mole, mole and gas density, mole and the chemical equations, concentration of solutions, molarity, and pH and neutralization power

Physics with Lab


o

Honors Designation Available Course Texts: Principles of Physics, Digital Text only, Kinetic Books (T5501) Principles of Physics, Textbook, Kinetic Books (T5501B) is also available, but emphasis is given that the Digital Text provides the homeschool friendly delivery. Principles of Physics Answer Key and Solution Guide*, Kolbe Academy, Optional Virtual Physics Labs, Kinetic Books (T5502) Virtual Physics Labs Answer Key*, Kolbe Academy, Optional Kolbe Academy Guide to Writing a Lab Report (T5140), Kinetic Books, Optional
*Kolbe Academy has made available to registered families ONLY the answer key to questions assigned within the scope of the following Kolbe Academy course plan. See the course plan for details on accessing these materials.

Supplemental: AP Physics B preparation book for students interested in taking the AP Physics B exam. Local bookstores or libraries generally carry books by Princeton Review and Kaplan. You can find other suggestions at the College Board website: www.collegeboard.com. Course Description:
This course is designed to give an understanding of classical physics. Physics is the science of the natural laws of the physical universe, which, like the natural moral law, flow through creation, having as their origin the goodness of God. "The beauty of creation reflects the infinite beauty of the Creator and ought to inspire the respect and submission of man's intellect and will" (New Catechism of the Catholic Church 342). Kolbe Core (K) Physics course of study: The Kolbe Core (K) is conceptual in nature and is recommended to students who may not be interested in pursuing science in college, but who would like to include physics in their high school course of study. Although the course is conceptual in nature, it does include physics rquations and some problem working. The chapters, sections, and problems assigned in this course of study mimic EXACTLY the previous Kinetic Books Conceptual Physics text that Kolbe has carried in previous years. The physics topics included are mechanics, thermodynamics, mechanical waves, electricity and magnetism, light and optics. PRE-REQUISITES: Algebra 1, Geometry, Intro to Physics and Chemistry. Kolbe Honors (H) course of study: The Honors (H) course of study is designed for students who may have an interest in science, math, or engineering or for students who might prefer a more mathematical approach to physics in their high school course of study. While it is a more rigorous course of study than the Kolbe Core (K) course of study, it does not require the use of Calculus to solve problems. This text is mentioned on the College Board website as appropriate for students preparing to take the AP Physics B exam, and the Kolbe Honors (H) course of study adheres closely to the requirements for this exam. Topics include mechanics, mechanical waves, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, light and optics, and an introduction to modern physics. PRE-REQUISITES: Geometry, Algebra II, Intro to Physics and Chem, Chemistry. CO-REQUISITE: Trigonometry or PreCalculus.

Kolbe Academy recommends that Physics be taken by the high school student in 11th or 12th grade after the successful completion of Intro to Physics and Chemistry in 8th or 9th, Biology in 9th or 10th, and Chemistry in 10th or 11th.

Astronomy

Course Texts: Descriptive Astronomy, by John Charlesworth (T5402) A Student Guide to Writing a Research Paper, by Phyllis Goldenberg, (T1550), optional The Edmund Scientific Star and Planet Locator (included with purchase of T5402) Course Description:
The course is designed to give students an appreciation of the order and complexity of creation, and of the order and complexity in the cosmos. Revelation and science complement each other in illuminating God's glory. The course covers the different kinds of celestial objects, their characteristics, how they formed and developed, and their eventual fates. This includes a discussion of stars (including our sun), star groups, black holes, asteroids and comets, the earth, moon, and planets. It also covers the theories of the origin, development, and future of the universe, as well as whether other planets and life forms exist in space. The student will study, and have the opportunity to observe, the main stars and constellations for both summer and winter. The workload may vary somewhat week to week. The course plans encourage the student to cover material by topic, which may provide a more thorough understanding of the concept. While some topics may be more simple and covered in less time, others are more complex and may require more of the student's time. A final research paper and oral presentation on an astronomy topic take the majority of the fourth quarter. Kolbe Core (K) credit is available to those students that follow the course plan and turn in the appropriate sample work. This course is typically done as an elective science course in the 12th grade and includes the following topics: history of astronomy, modern astronomy, electromagnetic waves, the Universe, cosmology and theology, stars and constellations, sky observations, the Solar System: comets, meteors, asteroids, the moon, the earth, and the planets. Lab credit is not available with this course.

Anatomy and Physiology


Course Texts: Hole's Essentials of Human Anatomy & Physiology by Shier, Butler and Lewis, McGraw Hill (10th Edition), (T5350) McGraw Hill Ph.I.L.S. Physiology Interactive Lab Simulations CD-ROM, Optional (T5350C) Kolbe Academy Guide to Writing a Lab Report, Optional (T5140) Course Description:
While the word "anatomy" is derived from the word for "dissection", this course will require little dissection. Instead, the student will study and benefit from the results of countless dissections that produced proper names and descriptions of the structures of the human body. Furthermore, the student will learn the function of these structures, properly known as the science of physiology and come to appreciate the complexity of God's creations. This course does touch upon some ethical issues present in today's society, including birth control, fertility drugs and in vitro fertilization and genetic engineering. The Hole's textbook periodically features a "Topic of Interest" note that should be used as topics of discussion between the parent and student. Later in the year, the student will use one of these ethical issues and focus on the Church's teachings concerning it in a short paper. This course suggests supplemental materials that focus on the Church's teachings when indicated to help guide both parent and student during such discussions. Please note that this is a TRUE Anatomy and Physiology course. The textbook contains pictures and descriptions that may not be suitable for all students, particularly Chapters 19 & 20. Please be sure to review the course plan and textbook thoroughly before proceeding with the course. The textbook covers the material from a scientific and not a moral perspective. Kolbe Academy has included Church teaching to cover the moral perspective. We recommend this course for 12th Graders and more mature students who may be interested in the health sciences. This course includes the following topics: Chemical Basis of Life, Cells and Cellular Metabolism, Tissues, Integumentary System, Skeletal System, Muscular System, Nervous System, The Senses, Endocrine System, Blood and the Cardiovascular System, Lymphatic System and Immunity, Digestive System and

Nutrition, Respiratory System, Urinary System, Water, Electrolyte and Acid-Base Balance, Reproductive Systems, Pregnancy, Growth, Development and Genetics. Lab work is incorporated throughout the course and combines the Ph.I.L.S CD-ROM, the ARIS website and other activities as well. Many anatomy and physiology courses would allow for exploring bones, diagrams, and models during a lab section called a "practical." As home schooled students, these can be hard to come by! Therefore, the "practicals" will consist of labeling illustrations and lab reports should be written to reflect Kolbe's Guide to Writing a Lab Report.

Foreign Language Curriculum


Latin I (Henle)

Course Texts: Henle, Robert J., S.J. Henle First Year Latin. Loyola Press: Chicago, 1958. (T6061) Answer Key to Henle First Year Latin. (T6061A), Optional Henle, Robert J., S.J. Henle Latin Grammar. Loyola Press: Chicago, 1958. (T6060) Course Description:
Latin is the language of the Church; as such it is an integral part of every Catholic's heritage. This course in Latin will give a comprehensive introduction to Latin grammar. Students will complete the first twentyeight lessons in Henle First Year Latin. By diligent work in this course, the student will obtain a sound foundation of Latin vocabulary; an introductory grasp of Latin grammar and syntax; facility in Latin pronunciation; an expanded English vocabulary, by understanding etymology of Latin derivatives; and a reinforced grasp of English grammar through the study of Latin grammar. Topics covered include: Verbs: all four conjugations, indicative, imperative and subjunctive moods; noun cases: nominative, genitive, accusative, ablative, and vocative; forms of first, second, third, fourth and fifth declension nouns; present and perfect tenses, active and passive voices of verbs; demonstratives, personal pronouns, reflexive pronouns; relative pronouns; Sum; Student assignments include daily vocabulary work throughout the year, composition work, and reading & speaking exercises.

Latin II (Henle)

Course Texts: Henle, Robert J., S.J. Henle First Year Latin. Loyola Press: Chicago, 1958. (T6061) Answer Key to Henle First Year Latin. (T6061A), Optional Henle, Robert J., S.J. Henle Second Year Latin. Loyola Press: Chicago, 1958. (T6062) Answer Key to Henle Second Year Latin. (T6062A), Optional Henle, Robert J., S.J. Henle Latin Grammar. Loyola Press: Chicago, 1958. (T6060) Course Description:
Latin is the language of the Church; as such it is an integral part of every Catholic's heritage. This course in Latin will give a comprehensive study of advanced Latin grammar, as well as an introduction to translation. Students will finish the last fourteen lessons in Henle First Year Latin as well as complete Lessons 1-30 in Henle Second Year Latin. By diligent work in this course, the student will obtain a sound foundation of Latin vocabulary; an in-depth grasp of Latin grammar and syntax; facility in Latin pronunciation; an expanded English vocabulary, by understanding the meaning of Latin derivatives; and a reinforced grasp of English grammar through the study of Latin grammar. Topics covered include: Verbs: all four conjugations, indicative, imperative and subjunctive moods; active and passive voices; -io verbs; deponent verbs; Participles; noun cases: nominative, genitive, dative, accusative, ablative, and vocative; forms of first, second, third, fourth and fifth declension nouns; adjective forms, and the comparison of adjectives; demonstratives, personal pronouns, reflexive pronouns; relative pronouns; Sum, Possum, and Eo; specific case uses and constructions (like the Ablative of Separation); the gerund and gerundive; purpose, Result and Characteristic Clauses; daily vocabulary work throughout the year. Students assignments will include composition work, reading & speaking exercises, and longer translation assignments based upon the writings of Julius Caesar.

Latin III

Course Texts: Henle, Robert J., S.J. Henle Third Year Latin. Loyola Press: Chicago, 1959. (T6063) Henle, Robert J., S.J. Henle Latin Grammar. Loyola Press: Chicago, 1958. (T6060) Answer Key to Henle Third Year Latin. (T6063A), Optional Course Description:
Latin is the language of the Church; as such it is an integral part of every Catholic's heritage. This course in Latin stresses translation of source texts while reinforcing knowledge of Latin grammar. By diligent work in this course, the student will obtain a sound foundation of Latin vocabulary; an in-depth grasp of Latin grammar and syntax; facility in Latin pronunciation; an expanded English vocabulary, by

understanding etymology of Latin Related English and Latin words; and an acquaintance with Roman oratory through the study of Cicero. Topics include: a review of nouns: forms of first, second, third, fourth and fifth declension nouns; noun cases: nominative, genitive, dative, accusative, ablative, and vocative; review of adjective forms, and the comparison of adjectives; review of verbs: Forms of first, second, third, fourth, and -io verbs in all tenses and voices; review of demonstratives, personal pronouns, reflexive pronouns; relative pronouns; review of Latin clauses and syntax, including review of direct and indirect questions, purpose, result, and characteristic clauses; review of conditional sentences; review of specific case uses and constructions (like the Ablative of Separation); review of the gerund and gerundive; Student assignments include daily vocabulary work throughout the year, composition work, reading & speaking exercises, study of Roman oratory with political and rhetorical context; reading and translation of Cicero; and reading and translation of excerpts of ecclesiastical Latin.

Latin IV

Course Texts: Henle, Robert J., S.J. Henle Fourth Year Latin. Loyola Press: Chicago, 1959. (T6064) Henle, Robert J., S.J. Henle Latin Grammar. Loyola Press: Chicago, 1958. (T6060) Answer Key to Henle Fourth Year Latin. (T6064A), Optional Course Description:
Latin is the language of he Church; as such it is an integral part of every Catholic's heritage. This course in Latin will give an introduction to translation of source texts will einforcing knowledge of Latin grammar. By diligent work in this course, the student will obtain: A sound foundation of Latin vocabulary (5 words memorized per day is ideal); An in-depth grasp of Latin grammar and syntax; Facility in Latin pronunciation; An expanded English vocabulary by understanding etymology of Latin related English & Latin words; An acquaintance with Roman oratory and poetry through the study of Cicero and Virgil; Familiarity with Christian poems, documents and Sacred Scripture.

Latin I (Wheelock)

Course Texts: Wheelock, Frederic M. Wheelock's Latin, 6th Edition. Harper Collins: New York, 2000. (T6041) Comeau, Paul, & Richard LaFleur. Workbook for Wheelock's Latin, 3rd Edition Revised*. Harper Collins: New York, 2000. (T6041A)
*Answer key available for free to registered families.

Course Description:
Latin is the language of the Church; as such it is an integral part of every Catholic's heritage. This course in Latin will give a comprehensive introduction to Latin grammar. Students will complete the first half of Wheelock's Latin textbook. By diligent work in this course, the student will obtain a sound foundation of Latin vocabulary, an introductory grasp of Latin grammar and syntax; facility in Latin pronunciation, an expanded English vocabulary, by understanding etymology of Latin derivatives, and reinforce the student's grasp of grammar through the study of Latin grammar. Topics include verbs: all four conjugations; noun cases: nominative, genitive, accusative, ablative, and vocative; forms of first, second, third and fourth declension nouns; present and perfect tenses, active and passive voices of verbs; demonstratives, personal pronouns, reflexive and intensive pronouns; numerals; relative pronouns; and Sum and possum.

Latin II (Wheelock)

Course Texts: Wheelock, Frederic M. Wheelock's Latin, 6th Edition. Harper Collins: New York, 2000. (T6041) Comeau, Paul, & Richard LaFleur. Workbook for Wheelock's Latin, 3rd Edition Revised*. Harper Collins: New York, 2000. (T6041A)
*Answer key available for free to registered families.

Course Description:

Latin is the language of the Church; as such it is an integral part of every Catholic's heritage. This course in Latin will give a comprehensive introduction to Latin grammar and translations. Students will complete the last half of Wheelock's Latin textbook. By diligent work in this course, the student will obtain a sound foundation of Latin vocabulary; a further understanding of Latin grammar and syntax; facility in Latin pronunciation, an expanded English vocabulary, by understanding etymology of Latin derivatives, and a reinforced grasp of English grammar through the study of Latin grammar. Topics include: verbs: all four conjugations; noun cases: nominative, genitive, dative, accusative, ablative, and vocative; forms of first, second, third, fourth and fifth declension nouns; adjectives, including irregular, comparative and superlative forms; present and perfect tenses, active and passive voices of verbs; deponent verbs; demonstratives, personal pronouns, reflexive and intensive pronouns; numerals; relative pronouns; participles; infinitives; the subjunctive; special constructions like the passive periphrastic with the dative of agent and indirect statement; conditions; gerunds and gerundives; Sum and possum. Student assignments include daily vocabulary work throughout the year, grammar drill exercises, reading and translation exercises, and oral Latin and English derivative work.

Italian I

Course Texts: Prego! An Invitation to Italian student text, 8th Edition. Lazzarino, Graziana, et al. McGraw-Hill. (T6050) Online Laboratory Manual to accompany Prego! An Invitation to Italian, 8th Edition. (T6050C) Online Workbook to accompany Prego! An Invitation to Italian, 8th Edition. (T6050B) Prego! An Invitation to Italian Online Learning Center. Available for free with purchase of student text. Full online instructor access for teaching resources, including answers to the textbook. Available with purchase of this course plan or enrollment with Kolbe Academy. See the Online Access User's Manual, Parts III and IV for instructions. Guides students through all of the online resources and materials available with this course. (See Parts I and II). Guides parents through the steps to obtaining teacher resources, grading help, and answer keys***. (See parts III and IV). The User's Manual is available with the course plan. Course Description:
Studying a modern language like Italian helps to reinforce the student's grasp of English grammar while learning the language of another culture. This course will aim to help the student have a sound foundation of Italian vocabulary, grammar, and syntax as well as having facility in pronouncing the Italian language. Students will complete the first half of the textbook for high school Italian I credit. Topics include the Italian alphabet, pronunciation, numbers, calendar; nouns (gender and number), articolo indeterminativo, buono, present tense of avere (to have); adjectives, present tense of essere (to be), articolo determinative, bello; present tense of -are verbs, dare, stare, andare, and fare, possessive adjectives, questo and quello; present tense of -ere and -ire verbs, dovere, potere, and volere, dire, uscire and venire, direct object pronouns, time; preposizioni articolate, passato prossimo with avere and essere, consocere and sapere, indirect object pronouns, using the past participle for the passato prossimo tense, piacere, interoggative; reflexive verbs, reciprocal constructions, advebs, numbers over 100; imperfetto tense, trapassato tense, suffixes. Student assignments include grammar and translation assignments from the textbook, grammar exercises from the online workbook, conversation, dictation, comprehension, and pronunciation assignments from the online language laboratory, and additional writing assignments.

Italian II

Course Texts: Lazzarino, Graziana, et al. Prego! An Invitation to Italian, 6th Edition. McGraw-Hill: New York: 2004. (Student text) (T6050) Quia Online Workbook to accompany Prego! An Invitation to Italian, 6th Edition. McGraw-Hill: New York: 2004. (T6050A) Quia Online Laboratory Manual (online conversation lab) to accompany Prego! An Invitation to Italian, 6th Edition. McGraw-Hill: New York: 2004. (T6050B)

Kolbe Academy Answer Key and Online Access for Italian I and II. Kolbe Academy Press: Napa, 2007. (T6050C)

Course Description:
Studying a modern language like Italian helps to reinforce the student's grasp of English grammar while learning the language of another culture. This course will aim to help the student have a sound foundation of Italian vocabulary, grammar, and syntax as well as having facility in pronouncing the Italian language. Students will complete the second half of the textbook for high school Italian II credit. Topics include disjunctive pronouns, comparatives, relative superlative; future (simple) tense, impersonal pronoun (si); use of ne, and ci (more impersonal pronouns), double pronouns (direct-indirect objects), imperative; indefinite adjectives, indefinite pronouns, negatives, formal imperative; present conditional, past conditional, possessive pronouns; relative pronouns, infinitive verb constructions, nouns and adjectives ending in -a; passato remoto verb tense, ordinal numbers, volerci and metterci; present subjunctive and its uses, past subjunctive; conjunctions that use the subjunctive form and other uses of the subjunctive.; imperfect subjunctive, trapassato subjunctive, proper choice of subjunctive tense Student assignments include grammar and translation assignments from the textbook, grammar exercises from the online workbook, conversation, dictation, comprehension, and pronunciation assignments from the online language laboratory, and additional writing assignments.