British Council CD – Practise Your Pron – Study Guide

Welcome to Practise Your Pron, the British Council’s self study pronunciation programme. This programme consists of a CD plus a study guide and script for the CD. It is suitable for students of English at all levels who want to improve their pronunciation. The programme deals with the sounds of English and with ways of making your speech sound polite and natural. It includes dialogues and short texts to help you practise your pronunciation in everyday situations. Follow the programme or select from it and you can learn how to speak more clearly and naturally and communicate more successfully. Produced by the British Council Singapore ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: Producer: Allen Baird; Scriptwriter: Lesley Fellingham; Readers: Gill Atkinson, Shaza Haq, David Humphreys, Editors: Irene Cruikshanks, Paul Tolton, Alaisdair Raynham, David Kemp, Allen Baird

Practise Your Pron – Study Guide Track 1
Introduction Welcome to Practise Your Pron, the British Council’s selfstudy pronunciation programme. Follow the self-study guide and listen to and copy the voices on the recording. After each sound, word or sentence, there will be time on the recording for you to repeat what you hear. For the dialogues and longer texts you will need to stop the recording to practise. By following the programme you can improve your pronunciation and communicate with more confidence. We wish you all the best as you work through the programme.

Track 2
The alphabet Let’s start by practising the pronunciation of the letters of the alphabet. Listen and repeat. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 A B C D E F G H I J K L M a b c d e f g h i j k l m /eɪ/ /biː/ /siː/ /diː/ /iː/ /ef/ /dʒiː/ /eɪtʃ/ /aɪ/ /dʒeɪ/ /keɪ/ /el/ /em/ 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z n o p q r s t u v w x y z /en/ /əʊ/ /piː/ /kjuː/ /ɑː/ /es/ /tiː/ /juː/ /viː/ /ˈdʌbəljuː/ /eks/ /waɪ/ /zed/

STUDY GUIDE
Track List 1 2 3 4 S 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 Introduction The alphabet and spelling The phonemic symbols Intonation – asking questions Yes/No questions First questions – in the café Sounding polite and friendly Sounding polite and friendly – practice Sounds /v/ and /b/ /v/ and /b/ – dialogue practice Sounds /l/ and /r/ Making an announcement Sounds /t/ /θ/ and /ð/ /t/ /θ/ and /ð/ – dialogue Sounds /m/ and /n/ Phone conversation – The wrong number Sounds – clusters Clusters story Weak sounds – the schwa /ə/ Long and short vowels Dialogue in a café Word endings Story with past tense Story with ‘s’ endings Syllables and word stress Stress in nouns and verbs Stress in word families Sentence stress Linking Making links Dialogue practice with linking The gorilla joke

Spelling Practise the alphabet by spelling these country names. Listen, and repeat the spelling. 1 How do you spell China? 2 How do you spell Singapore? 3 How do you spell Vietnam? 4 How do you spell Thailand? 5 How do you spell Korea? 6 How do you spell Indonesia? 7 How do you spell Britain? 8 How do you spell Cambodia? 9 How do you spell Myanmar? 10 How do you spell Japan? 11 How do you spell France? 12 How do you spell Wales? 13 How do you spell Iraq? 14 How do you spell Zimbabwe?

1

When we ask an open (or ‘wh’) question. It is important to use the correct intonation when asking questions. 2 18 19 20 /əʊ/ /eə/ /aɪ/ /aʊ/ note there sky cow soap air bite owl open care pie mouse Numbers 21 to 44 on the chart are consonants. The underlined part of the example word is the sound we are practising.British Council CD – Practise Your Pron – Study Guide Track 3 The phonemic symbols – Practising the sounds of English Look at the chart of phonemic symbols in your study guide. we generally start with a high pitch and go down at the end. A vowel is a sound in which the air coming out of the mouth is not restricted in any way. 1 Excuse me. A consonant is a sound we make when we restrict the air in some way before it leaves the mouth. we often make our voice go up at the end. Practise the diphthongs. Vowels can be short or long. /uː/ Listen to the vowel sounds and the example words and repeat them. If a consonant is voiced. A diphthong is a vowel sound that starts as one vowel but changes into another one. the cords in your voice box vibrate when you make the sound. Where can I register for the Intermediate course? 2 How much are the course fees? 3 How long does the course last? 4 What time does the class usually start? 5 Which floor is my classroom on? 6 Where can I buy my coursebooks? 7 Where can I buy coffee? 8 Who will my teacher be? 9 When can I go to the next level? 10 How do I join the library? /iː/ eat cheese team /e/ edge said friend 2 /ɪ/ it system begin /ə/ asleep colour the 3 /ʊ / put could good /ɜː/ earth journal heard 4 /uː/ boot move kangaroo /ɔː/ ball floor caught 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 /æ/ /ʌ/ /ɑː/ / ɒ/ at cut art pot bad some heart watch glad blood march clock Numbers 13 to 20 on the chart are diphthongs. Practise the consonants. like this: 41 42 43 44 /iː/. V = voiced> 17 . The symbol for a long vowel sound has two dots after it. 1 Track 4 Intonation – Asking questions Now we are going to practise some questions about your first course at the British Council. Intonation means the way the pitch of your voice goes up or down when you speak. <U = unvoiced. Listen again and practice the yes/no questions. You should be able to feel the vibration when you make the sound. Does the voice go up or down at the end? 1 Can I buy you a drink? 2 Are you married? 3 Are you a student? 4 Do you like your teacher? 5 Do you like the weather here? 6 Do you like spicy food? 7 Have you got any brothers or sisters? 8 Did you come here by bus? 9 Would you like a cigarette? 10 Is there a phone near here? When we ask a closed or yes/no question. 9 13 /ɪə/ here ear beer 14 /eɪ/ make tail aim 15 /ʊə/ pure tour cure 16 /ɔɪ/ boy oil lawyer Track 2 Yes/no questions Now listen to these questions. just in front of the voice box. 1 5 9 21 /p/ (U) put happy passport /tʃ/ (U) church march nature /f/ (U) fat coffee physics /s/ (U) city history loss /m/ (V) mad hammer some /l/ (V) led balloon candle 22 /b/ (V) back rubber bright /dʒ/ (V) judge edge age /v/ (V) view leave of /z/ (V) zero easy please /n/ (V) know funny sun /r/ (V) red marry wrong 23 /t/ (U) tea butter walked /k/ (U) key cool cheque /θ/ (U) thing maths heath /ʃ/ (U) sure motion fish /ŋ/ (V) sung finger sink /w/ (V) wet no one queen 24 /d/ (V) day ladder called /g/ (V) ghost bigger bag /ð/ (V) then father either /ʒ/ (V) pleasure Asia leisure /h/ (U) hot whole high /j/ (V) yet Europe excuse iː e æ 13 15 18 2 6 10 ɪ ə ʌ 14 16 19 3 7 11 ʊ ɜː ɑː 4 8 12 uː ɔː ɒ 25 26 27 28 ɪə ʊə eə 22 26 30 34 38 eɪ ɔɪ aɪ 23 27 31 35 39 17 20 29 30 31 32 əʊ aʊ 24 28 32 36 40 21 25 29 33 37 p tʃ f s m b dʒ v z n t k θ ʃ ŋ d g ð ʒ h 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 l r w j Numbers 1 to 12 on the chart are vowel sounds. With unvoiced consonants there will be no vibration. Example: What’s your name? Listen and practise. You can check you are making the sound correctly by placing your fingers on your throat. Consonants can be voiced or unvoiced.

Practise it by yourself or with a partner. You can sound friendlier by using a wide range in your intonation. Do you know her? Is she your teacher too? A: No. I had my first lesson this morning. 1 Barbara. Use your voice. We are in the café at the British Council. That’s a long time! A: It’s not so long really. I’ve been here for six months. 3 Look. Are you a new student too? A: No. Where do you live? With a family? B: Well. making him sound bored and slightly rude. I buy a lot of stuff from there. Can you go to the butcher’s and get some veal and some beef? Barry: No problem. Are you hungry? Husb: Not really. the baby’s blowing bubbles. I think so. Track 7 Sounding polite and friendly Here’s some more practice of intonation. Then open your lips quickly. I’ll be back at the same time as usual. Do you know of any good places? A: Yes. What class are you in? Intermediate or …? B: Intermediate Three. Pay attention to the /v/ and /b/ sounds. It’s great! Where did you get the CD? Erm – I think it was in the CD Shop in the Mall. Are you a new student here? B: Yes. They’re overdue. Barry: I’m going to the shops in a minute. Listen to the whole dialogue. But she taught me last term. What’s your name? B: Hello. my friend has a spare room in her apartment and she’s looking for a flatmate. Valerie: I’ll see you later then. I’d better take back the videos we borrowed last week. Notice how the guest’s replies sound polite and friendly because of the varied intonation. just olives please. B: Six months. Barry: Bye! I’ll be back before seven. I’ve got some photos of our holiday in Ireland. The library’s beside the baker’s. village Victor arrive view vinegar November love valley vowel vase Now try reading these sentences. 3 I love this view of the valley. It’s a good shop. We can use intonation to show our feelings and attitudes. A: Ah! Does she wear glasses? B: Yes. A: Hi Ricky. * vol au vent = a small. We’ll need some other things for the party. A: Wow. 1 Victor lives in a village in Vietnam. Hey. not long. 2 The plane leaves at 5 p. and twelve bottles of beer. A: That’s probably Anne Wallis. I’m not thirsty. Do you like olives? Or would you prefer crisps? Oh. you will sound bored or impolite. savoury pastry often served as finger food at parties bash = party Track 8 Sounding polite and friendly – practice Now listen to a conversation between a hostess and her dinner guest. Get some vanilla ice cream. How long have you been here? B: Only a week. My name’s Ricky. Valerie: Better visit the supermarket then. What do we need? Valerie: We’re okay for vegetables but we should stock up on meat. Barry: Okay. If your intonation is too flat. To make the /v/ sound touch your bottom lip with your top teeth. I’m looking for somewhere more permanent. so I’ll go to the baker’s. I’ll get some vol au vents* for Victor’s birthday bash* on Friday. Can I buy you a coffee? Hostess: Guest: Hostess: Guest: Hostess: Guest: Hostess: Come and sit down. Would you like her phone number? B: That would be great! Thanks for your help. baby butter Bobby Barbara hairbrush bubble birthday ribbon bottle club Now try reading these sentences. B: Yes that’s right. isn’t it? Hostess: Yes. We also need bread. Track 10 /v/ and /b/ – Dialogue practice Listen to the dialogue and then practise it by yourself or with a partner. Why not? I’d love to! Listen to the second dialogue again. I’m staying at the YMCA at the moment. Now. Hong Lei. 3 . Wife: Hello darling! Did you have a good day? Husb: It was okay. Listen to this conversation between a husband and wife. Try to use polite intonation. Then practise it by yourself or with a partner. Track 9 Sounds – /v/ and /b/ To make the /b/ sound close your lips together tightly. some butter and some vinegar. Would you like a drink? Oh. red hair. Notice how the husband’s intonation is flat. Have you been there? Guest: Yes. Wife: Good. I did. Wife: Would you like a drink? Husb: No thanks. Wife: Dinner will be ready at six. Try these words.m. Make sure you use your voice. A: Hi! I’m Hong Lei. Who’s your teacher? B: I can’t remember her name. blow the air out between your lips and your teeth. but she’s got curly. Actually. where’s your hairbrush? 2 It’s Bobby’s birthday in September. Try these words. Did you pick up the suits from the cleaners? Husb: Yes. Wife: Oh. We’ll need balloons for that too. yes please! I’d love a gin and tonic. Push the air forward in your mouth.British Council CD – Practise Your Pron – Study Guide Track 6 First questions – In the café Here is our first dialogue. And what about you? A: I’m in Advanced One. What music is this? Do you like it? It’s Irish music. Would you like to see them? Guest:. Are you going to the pub tonight? Husb: Yes.

Here it is. Roger rather likes Lucy. Try these words. Manchester 6739792 Nancy: Hello. I’m attending a meeting at the Hilton then. Use your voice and try to make the sound come through your nose. Use your voice. Mandarin or any other Chinese dialect. but you must use your voice. Many an anemone sees an enemy anemone. Melvin: Hello. Are you free on Thursday afternoon? Cathy: Yes. Betty and Bob brought back blue balloons from the big bazaar. but Roger doesn’t love Lesley. These combinations can be difficult to pronounce. Just for fun! Try this tongue twister. Track 14 /t/ /θ/ and /ð/ – Dialogue Keith and Cathy are trying to arrange a business meeting. man May from some small Mum bomb home-made marmalade summer To make the /n/ sound you should touch the roof of your mouth with your tongue. To make the /l/ sound your lips should be slightly parted. Is that Nicholas? Melvin: Nicholas? Nicholas Nickleby? No. Nancy: 4945939. She is wearing a red dress and her hair is tied up with two red ribbons. Try these words. land lily long label lesson table help milk usually final To make the /r/ sound keep your lips lightly parted. Turn up the tip of your tongue. thin think teeth both thing healthy breath The /ð/ sound is exactly the same. Track 13 Sounds – /t/ /θ/ and /ð/ To pronounce the /t/ sound make sure your lips are slightly parted. just behind your front teeth. This is an unvoiced sound. your tongue should touch the roof of your mouth behind your teeth and you should force the air over the sides of your tongue and out of the mouth. but the sides of the tongue should touch the back teeth. Nancy: Never! Do you know his new number? Melvin: Yes. I’m meeting Dorothy Heath at North Bridge Road. then those mother together that with weather breathe Track 17 Sounds – Clusters A cluster is a combination of two or more consonant sounds in a word. Marvellous! Thanks for your help. I’m busy then too. She looks Chinese. I’ve got it somewhere. Try these words. Use your voice. Cathy: What about the next day? Keith: No. Blow the air out between your tongue and your front teeth. Try these words. Track 16 Phone conversation – The wrong number Listen and then practice the conversation by yourself or with a partner. This is an unvoiced sound. know number nine funny name November foreign plan hand even Track 12 Making an announcement You hear this on the PA system of a large department store. Your tongue should not touch the roof of your mouth. Do you have a pen to write it down? Nancy: Yes. Push the air in your mouth forward and pull your tongue back. Listen and then read. Your tongue should touch your side teeth too. Will the parents of this child please come to the Customer Service Department on the first level?’ Just for fun! – Try this tongue twister. Try these words. right read orange mirror horror really wrong problem Track 15 Sounds – /m/ and /n/ To make the /m/ sound press your lips together. How about the fourteenth in the morning? Keith: I’m sorry. Lesley loves Roger. top ten table teacher tunnel tomato potato later fatter hat built To pronounce the /θ/ sound stick your tongue out between your teeth. Practise these words. Lesser leather never weathered wetter weather better. Try these words.British Council CD – Practise Your Pron – Study Guide Just for fun! – Try these tongue twisters! Vincent vowed vengeance very vehemently. Keith: Good idea! Is two o’clock okay? Cathy: That’s fine. Practise these words. I’m meeting Ruth then. I think I am. Try to make the sound come through your nose. See you there! Just for fun! Try this tongue twister. it’s on the memo. but she doesn’t answer to questions in English. He’s moved to Morecombe. Listen and then practise the dialogue by yourself or with a partner. Go on. against asked carrots clothes facts faults holds crisps months prompt receptionist lumps sports switched socks sixth 4 . ‘A small girl of about three years old has lost her parents. He doesn’t live here any more. I do. The consonant clusters are underlined in your study guide. Let’s meet for lunch at Mouth restaurant. Put the tip of your tongue behind your front teeth. Where did I put it? Ah – I remember. Track 11 Sounds – /l/ and /r/ People often have problems pronouncing these sounds correctly and distinguishing between them. Keith: Are you free on the thirteenth in the afternoon? Cathy: No. She was found crying near the leather goods section on the fourth floor. I’m afraid not. Melvin: His number’s 4945939. Let me see.

Waiter: Okay. I’ll have a cheese sandwich instead. She spent lots of money on sports clothes too. and long vowels too short so that they all sound about the same length. Jean: Where shall we sit? Look! There are some free seats in the corner. In a café. 4 What would you like to drink? 5 I’m going to the beach on Sunday. Track 19 Weak sounds – the Schwa /ə/ Because we usually only stress one syllable in each word. We’ll have one chicken and chips with baked beans and one cheese sandwich please. Practise reading these questions. 1 I’m going to work. Just for fun! Try this tongue twister. She wanted to do more exercise so she decided to join a gym. America forgotten amateur astronomer /əˈmerɪkə/ /fəˈgɒtən/ /ˈæmətə/ /əˈstrɒnəmə/ about photographer abacus familiar /əˈbaʊt/ /fəˈtɒgrəfə/ /ˈæbəkəs/ /fəˈmɪlɪə/ conclusion /kənˈkluːʒən/ upon /əˈpɒn/ In questions that begin with Can the letter a in can is also pronounced as a schwa. Waiter: Good evening. Make sure you pronounce the word can with a schwa sound. Track 20 Long and short vowels Learners of English often make short vowels too long. 3 An observant amateur photographer took her picture. This means that we don’t pronounce the vowel sound strongly in these weak syllables. 6 Take it to the garage to get it serviced. She switched from crisps to carrots at snack times. Jill: Good evening. it’s much cheaper. a mint tea and a coffee with cream. She needed special socks and trainers. 2 She’d like to meet you on Thursday. Just for fun! Try this tongue twister. 1 Can you call me later? 2 Can you drive? 3 Can I help you? 4 Can I sit here? 5 Can you remember when John’s birthday is? 6 Can you tell me where the supermarket is? The word to is usually pronounced with a schwa sound. Jill: The seats by the window are better. Make sure you pronounce the letter o in the word to as a schwa sound. 3 I don’t want to be late. Practise saying the /iː/ and /ɪ/ sounds correctly. Practise reading these sentences.British Council CD – Practise Your Pron – Study Guide Track 18 Clusters story Listen to this story and then practise reading it. They often give grammatical meanings such as singular/plural. The letter s at the end of words can be pronounced in three sometimes /z/ and sometimes /ɪz/. Jean: Okay. and they were very expensive. one cheese sandwich. She changed her diet as well. Instead we use the schwa sound. I think I’ll have chicken and chips with baked beans. 1 bean bin 5 caught cot 2 sheep ship 6 sport spot 3 dark duck 7 Luke look 4 march much 8 fool full 5 . the other syllables are ‘unstressed’ or ‘weak’. Take care not to stress the schwa. Jill: And what about drinks? I think I’ll have some mint tea. Sometimes the final s is pronounced /s/. Waiter: No problem! What would you like to drink? Jean: A mint tea and a coffee please. What would you like to eat? Jill: I’m really hungry. Practise the following words. Singular/Plural 1 cake cakes groups 2 group boys 3 boy beans 4 bean roads 5 road houses 6 house 7 orange oranges 8 watch watches Subject-verb agreement beats 1 beat rests 2 rest shuts 3 shut saves 4 save 5 break breaks feels 6 feel different ways. I ship cheap ice chips in cheap ice chip ships. Now try some more sentences. Track 22 Word endings The ends of words are very important in spoken English. Try to make the others weak. Repeat the following pairs of words. Stress the underlined syllables. Jean: No that’s really expensive! It’s three dollars sixty cents! I’ll have a coffee. Oh – and please bring me some cream for the coffee. Why don’t you have the chicken too? Jean: I don’t eat meat. 2 A professional burglar has entered the apartment. Track 21 Dialogue in a café Listen to the dialogue. Let me repeat your order. subject-verb agreement and tense choices. One chicken and chips with beans. /ə/. Judith thought she was unfit. 1 Sir Edward Anderson is a government official. It’ll be cooler there. It makes me ill. She asked the receptionist about membership and joined up for six months. Top chopstick shops stock top chopsticks. Practise saying these groups of words. There was an extra charge for a locker and she also took out a subscription for the monthly fitness magazine. Pay attention to the sounds at the ends of the words.

con-grat-u-la-tions has five syllables. For this sentence.British Council CD – Practise Your Pron – Study Guide Regular Past Tense Some past tense endings are pronounced /t/. It is important to know which ones to stress. The meeting was interesting. 3 The object of the game is to win as many cards as you can. We ordered a drink and talked for a while before he wanted to start talking business. For example. When the wrong words are stressed. For example. 7 Any convict had the right to appeal to the Prison Governor. Track 26 Stress in nouns and verbs Many English words can be both nouns and verbs. you should not give equal stress to each word. She leaves the office for lunch at 12 o’clock. Underline the stressed syllable. She travels to work on the underground and arrives at about 8:45. She chats to her colleagues for a while and starts work at 9 o’clock. the content words are: Where prefer go holiday Listen and repeat. Listen to the following words. 6 . 2 Please record that in the minutes Mrs Lim. He agreed that that would be a better idea. Repeat each word. She likes something sweet in the morning so she gets croissants and Danish pastries. When she feels a bit more alert she showers and changes. 6 He has broken the world record for the 100-metre dash. We generally stress the more important words in the sentence. She gets up at about seven o’clock and then drinks a cup of coffee. book house fast well Most words however. These are the words which carry most of the meaning. We’ll have to buy her a present. 9 It’s Jenny’s twenty-first birthday next week. ta-ble has two syllables. Repeat the following pairs of words. 4 Imports of oil have risen dramatically in recent years. Track 23 Story with past tense Listen to the story and practise the past tenses. Putting the stress on the wrong syllable can make it difficult for your listener to understand you. Mr Wong invited me to The Italian Kitchen at The Quay. Where do you prefer to go on holiday? To read this sentence naturally. in-tro-duc-tion has four syllables. managerial 1 manager infamous 2 famous reputation reputable 3 reputed sympathetic 4 sympathy personality 5 personal executive execution 6 execute 7 communicate communication photographer photographic 8 photograph contribution contributor 9 contribute Track 25 Syllables and word stress Every word is made up of syllables. have more than one syllable. Try to pronounce the past tense endings correctly. This means we say it louder and stronger than the other syllables. 8 The headmaster will present the certificates. We have no record of your application. She goes home after work or sometimes eats out or meets her friends for a drink. Repeat the words using the correct stress. Underline the syllable in the words in italics which you think is stressed. 1 live lived 2 touch touched 3 start started 4 wash washed 5 lease leased 6 aim aimed 7 move moved 8 wait waited 9 expect expected 10 depend depended calendar lavender vegetable souvenir secretary comfortable thermometer certificate passenger pronunciation maintenance basically chocolate ancestor career Now check the key to see if you have underlined the correct syllable. She goes to bed at midnight most weekdays and saves her energy for the weekends. Then listen and check. 5 The teachers object to students using their mobile phones in class. For example. a-gen-da has three syllables. 1 He was convicted of murder. soon after we asked for the menu. She checks her email and then spends the rest of the morning on the telephone to customers. Then check the answer key. She buys breakfast at the café below her block and takes it to work to eat. the content words. he said he wished to get straight to the point and asked me what I thought about the new factory project. You can also check the stress in the answer key. However. Track 24 Story with ‘s’ endings Listen to the story and practise the s at the ends of the words. In this sentence record is a noun and the stress is on the first syllable. Some words have only one syllable. some are pronounced /d/ and some are pronounced /ɪd/. I hinted that I thought it was located in the wrong place and asked him if he had considered moving it to Shanghai. one of the syllables is stressed. Listen to the following sentences. In every English word of more than one syllable. Could you record that film on Channel 5 tonight? In this sentence record is a verb and the stress is on the second syllable. Look at this example. and decide which syllable has the main stress. 10 Singapore imports a lot of dairy products from Australia. Track 27 Stress in word ‘families’ Underline the stressed syllable in these words before you listen to the recording. speech can be difficult to understand. In-ter-contin-en-tal has six syllables. purchase Track 28 Sentence stress Not all words in a sentence are stressed.

Mark the words you think are stressed.British Council CD – Practise Your Pron – Study Guide Where do you prefer to go on holiday? Look at these sentences. Would you like it with ice-cream? Customer: No. to strike up a conversation. I’ll let you know. the final consonant slides into the following vowel. we don’t get many gorillas in here’. a word which ends in a vowel sound is followed by another word that begins with a vowel sound. who was very happy. In this case. I’m in a bit of a rush. ‘I’m not surprised with the price of your whisky. When are you starting? Steve: Probably in a week or two. get away in Australia look over green apple set up live in Linking a vowel sound to a vowel sound. ‘That’ll be fifty dollars please’. the barman got curious and decided to find out why the gorilla was in the bar. Track 30 Making links Look at the following sentences. English speakers usually ‘link up’ the two words. or /r/. 4 Switch on the light. You can also check the sentence stress in the answer key. 4 The parcel should arrive by Friday. /j/. get up But we say. thanks. A gorilla went in to a bar and ordered a whisky. 5 There isn’t anything else I can say. How are you? I’m fine. Then practise reading the text yourself. Busy at work. Sharon: That’s great. 2 Could I have a cup of coffee. Track 29 Linking When speech is linked. Could I just have a piece of apple pie please? Assistant: Certainly. ge-tup Try these phrases. please? 3 I’m in an awful hurry. Goodbye and good luck. he said. we write. It looks like it’s going to rain. The gorilla immediately took out his wallet and paid the barman. linking the final consonant of the first word to the vowel at the beginning of the second word. he thought he would try to take advantage of the situation and overcharge him. 7 . This can be /w/. Sometimes. thanks. ‘It’s funny. But don’t stop now. For example. I think I heard a noise. I’m afraid. 3 If I’d known she was a vegetarian. Conclusion That’s the end of our pronunciation CD. Where will the links be? Mark them in.’ the gorilla replied. 5 I enjoyed the meal but it was a bit expensive. but they all involve the final sound of one word connecting to the first sound of the next word. Then listen and check and repeat. The barman thought that it was unusual to see a gorilla in a bar drinking whisky and. an extra sound is inserted between the words to make the link easier to pronounce. 8 Get on a boat to Africa. Dialogue Sharon: Steve: Sharon: Steve: 2. As the gorilla was drinking his whisky. So. We hope you’ve enjoyed it and feel more confident about your pronunciation. There are different types of linking. Then listen and repeat. When this happens. actually. Linking a consonant to a vowel. 9 I’m going to be away for a few days. love. He served the gorilla his whisky and said. 1 I’ll type the letters and send them to him. 2 Jane will call you later. Assistant: Can I help you? Customer: Yes. I’d have cooked something special for her. When a word ending in a consonant comes before a word beginning with a vowel. of course – we’ve got a big project coming up in Malaysia. it flows and sounds softer and less disjointed. Track 7 Dialogue practice with linking Mark the links in these dialogues. How about you? I’m OK. thinking that gorillas must be stupid. Then listen and check. keep practising. I may have to go KL in a few weeks. 6 You’d better take an umbrella. 6 Anne and a friend are in Orchard Road. 7 Stop and ask around. What are you doing these days? Not a lot. The gorilla drank his whisky quietly and then ordered another. 1 It’s almost eight o’clock. Practise these links: /w/ Do I? /j/ weigh up /r/ Where is it? go out be aware there isn’t no ink I am mother and father Track 32 Just for fun – The gorilla joke Listen to the following joke and mark where the links are. The barman served him and charged him another fifty dollars. Dialogue 1.

I’d have cooked something special for her. It looks like it’s going to rain. We’ll have to buy her a present. Anne and a friend are in Orchard Road. If I’d known she was a vegetarian. Stress in word ‘families’ – Track 27 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 manager famous reputed sympathy personal execute communicate photograph contribute managerial infamous reputation sympathetic personality executive communication photographer contribution reputable execution photographic contributor Sentence stress – Track 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 I’ll type the letters and send them to him. Switch on the light. Making links – Track 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 It’s almost eight o’clock. please? I’m in an awful hurry. 8 . The teachers object to students using their mobile phones in class. Singapore imports a lot of dairy products from Australia. I think I heard a noise. Get on a boat to Africa. Any convict had the right to appeal to the Prison Governor. It’s Jenny’s twenty-first birthday next week. Could I have a cup of coffee. love. Please record that in the minutes Mrs Lim. There isn’t anything else I can say. Jane will call you later. I’m afraid. I’m going to be away for a few days. The headmaster will present the certificates. Imports of oil have risen dramatically in recent years.British Council CD – Practise Your Pron – Study Guide Answer key Syllables and word stress – Track 25 calendar souvenir thermometer pronunciation chocolate lavender secretary certificate maintenance ancestor vegetable comfortable passenger basically career Stress in nouns and verbs – Track 26 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 He was convicted of murder. The parcel should arrive by Friday. I enjoyed the meal but it was a bit expensive. He has broken the world record for the 100-metre dash. Stop and ask around. You’d better take an umbrella. The object of the game is to win as many cards as you can.