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Living in Cold Places

Humans are not adapted to living in very cold places. Animals that live in the Arctic and the Antarctic are welladapted to these conditions.

Lots of these animals have a thick layer of fat (sometimes called blubber) under their skin. This insulates them and keeps them warm.

Lots of Antarctic or Arctic animals have thick fur or feathers that traps air next to the body and keeps them warm.

Many animals that live in Arctic/Antarctic conditions are white in color. This provides them with camouflage in snow and ice.

Many cold-weather animals are large in size. This means that they have a small surface area compared to their volume. A large surface area means that they lose more heat.

Animals that live in cold conditions often have small extremities such as ears. Smaller ears means less heat loss. Very often, closely related tropical species have much bigger ears to help lose heat.

Living in Cold Places

Lots of Arctic and Antarctic animals have a thick layer of fat (sometimes called blubber) under their skin. This insulates them and keeps them warm. They often have thick fur or feathers that traps air next to the body and keeps them warm. Many of these animals are white in color. This provides them with camouflage in snow and ice. Many are large in size. This means that they have a small surface area compared to their volume. A large surface area means that they lose more heat. Animals that live in cold conditions often have small extremities such as ears. Smaller ears means less heat loss. Very often, closely related tropical species have much bigger ears to help lose heat.