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Published by Vaishnavi Jayakumar
FULL REPORT Children with Disabilities : SOWC 2013 UNICEF report

http://www.unicef.org/sowc2013/
FULL REPORT Children with Disabilities : SOWC 2013 UNICEF report

http://www.unicef.org/sowc2013/

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Published by: Vaishnavi Jayakumar on May 31, 2013
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Afghanistan

1 1

1 0 4 73 74 73 72 80

62

2 1 5 53 52 57 40 42 39 43 27

Albania

40 39

42 26 60 86 85 87 68 96

53

32 16 52 53 57 48 13 14 11 9 16

Bangladesh

15 14

15 11 16 61 61 60 42 85

53

– – – – – – – – – – –

Belarus

86 87

85 – – 97 97 96 95 98

72

– – – – – – – – – – –

Belize

32 30

34 16 59 86 88 83 73 94

50

40 17 73 57 55 58 2 3 2 4 1

Bhutan

10 10

10 3 27 54 52 57 40 73

51

6 1 24 52 36 60 14 13 15 17 7

Bosnia and Herzegovina

6 5

8 1 15 83 83 83 74 90

74

70 52 88 43 49 43 7 7 6 6 10

Botswana

18 –

– – –

– – – – –

– – – – – – – – – – –

Burkina Faso

2 3

1 0 9 14 14 14 12 26

24

– – – – – – – – – – –

Burundi

5 5

5 4 10 34 35 34 32 38

20

– – – – – – – – – – –

Cameroon

22 22

22 3 56 58 57 59 57 69

39

8 3 22 57 62 46 36 36 36 45 25

Central African Republic

5 5

6 2 17 74 74 74 70 78

42

1 0 3 49 41 51 61 60 62 58 60

Chad

5 5

4 1 16 70 69 70 64 71

29

1 0 2 43 38 50 56 57 56 58 56

Côte d’Ivoire

6 5

6 1 24 50 50 51 55 57

40

5 3 13 39 44 35 59 60 58 62 51

Democratic People’s
Republic of Korea

98 98

97 – – 91 88 93 – –

75

79 – – 47 – – 17 17 16 – –

Democratic Republic
of the Congo

5 5

5 2 18 61 61 62 62 76

36

1 0 2 29 21 40 60 60 60 69 39

Djibouti

14 12

16 – – 36 36 35 – –

23

15 – – 24 – – 12 11 13 – –

Gambia

18 17

19 13 33 48 49 47 50 56

21

1 0 5 42 29 49 21 22 19 25 18

Georgia

43 44

42 17 70 93 93 93 85 99

61

72 48 91 38 41 41 8 8 8 7 8

Ghana

68 65

72 42 97 40 38 42 23 78

30

6 1 23 41 31 51 21 21 21 27 15

Guinea-Bissau

10 10

10 4 26

– – – – –

– – – – – – – – – – –

Guyana

49 48

50 33 78 89 88 89 77 99

52

54 28 86 65 67 60 11 13 10 19 6

Iraq

3 2

3 – – 58 59 57 – –

60

– – – – – – – – – – –

Jamaica

86 84

88 – – 94 95 93 – –

41

57 – – 71 – – 4 4 3 – –

Kazakhstan

37 36

38 19 61 92 92 91 84 96

49

48 24 76 45 40 49 4 4 4 5 4

Kyrgyzstan

19 21

17 7 47 88 90 85 86 99

54

76 76 85 57 59 54 11 12 9 11 6

Lao People’s Democratic
Republic

7 8

7 1 44 33 33 34 20 59

24

3 1 11 57 54 40 26 26 25 33 17

Lebanon

62 63

60 – – 56 y 58 y 54 y – –

74 y

29 – – 16 y – – 9 8 10 – –

Mali

10 10

10 1 40 29 27 30 28 44

14

0 0 2 40 33 49 33 33 33 33 36

Mauritania

5 5

5 2 11 48 48 47 39 64

30

– – – – – – – – – – –

Mongolia

60 58

61 26 83 59 56 62 44 73

41

23 6 48 68 74 62 9 9 8 10 6

Montenegro

29 28

30 6 62 97 96 98 88 100

79

77 50 92 39 49 33 6 8 5 11 3

Morocco

39 36

41 6 78 48 y 47 y 49 y 35 y 68 y

56 y

21 y 9 y 52 y 14 y 19 y 7 y 9 9 9 11 6

Mozambique

– –

– – – 47 45 48 48 50

20

3 2 10

– – – 33 33 32 – –

Myanmar

23 23

23 8 46 58 y 58 y 58 y 42 y 76 y

44 y

– – – – – – – – – – –

Nepal

30 y 29 y

31 y 14 y 61 y

– – – – –

– – – – – – – – – – –

Nigeria

32 32

32 5 70 78 78 78 68 91

38

14 2 35 35 25 42 38 38 37 41 32

Sao Tome and Principe

27 29

26 18 51

– – – – –

– – –

– – – – – – – –

Senegal

22 y 23 y

21 y 7 y 43 y

– – – – –

– – – – – – – – – – –

Serbia

44 41

47 22 75 95 96 95 84 98

78

76 49 86 63 65 60 1 1 1 2 1

Sierra Leone

14 13

15 5 42 54 53 55 45 79

42

2 0 10 35 24 50 32 33 32 29 28

Somalia

2 2

2 1 6 79 80 79 76 85

48

– – – – – – – – – – –

South Sudan

6 6

6 2 13

– – – – –

– – – – – – – – – – –

Sudan

20 20

21 10 48

– – – – –

– – – – – – – – – – –

Suriname

39 37

40 17 63 75 75 76 61 92

31

45 20 75 64 67 63 7 6 8 13 1

Swaziland

33 32

34 36 50 50 50 50 35 71

10

4 1 12 69 64 74 15 15 15 20 9

Syrian Arab Republic

8 8

7 4 18 70 70 69 52 84

62

30 12 53 52 52 51 17 17 17 22 15

Tajikistan

10 11

10 1 29 74 73 74 56 86

23

17 4 33 46 43 44 13 13 12 15 11

Thailand

61 60

61 55 78 89 90 89 86 98

57

43 25 71 55 58 49 13 14 13 18 7

The former Yugoslav
Republic of Macedonia

22 25

19 0 59 92 92 91 81 97

71

52 19 83 71 70 79 5 5 5 10 1

Countries
and areas

Attendance in early childhood education
2005–2011*

Adult support for learning ++
2005–2011*

Father’s
support for
learning ++
2005–2011*

Learning materials at home
2005−2011*

Children left in inadequate care
2005−2011*

Children’s books

Playthings++

totalmalefemale

poorest
20%

richest
20%

totalmalefemale

poorest
20%

richest
20%

total

poorest
20%

richest
20%

total

poorest
20%

richest
20%

totalmalefemale

poorest
20%

richest
20%

THE STATE OF THE WORLD’S CHILDREN 2013: Children with Disabilities

152

STATISTICAL TABLES

153

Togo

29 27

31 10 52 62 61 63 55 68

38

2 0 7 31 26 41 41 42 41 45 35

Trinidad and Tobago

75 74

76 65 87 98 98 98 96 100

63

81 66 93 65 63 72 1 1 1 2 0

Ukraine

63 63

63 30 74

– – – – –

97 93 99 47 36 47 10 11 10 15 4

Uzbekistan

20 20

19 5 46 91 91 90 83 95

54

43 32 59 67 74 62 5 5 5 6 7

Viet Nam

72 71

73 59 91 77 74 80 63 94

61

20 3 49 49 41 54 9 10 9 17 4

Yemen

3 3

3 0 8 33 34 32 16 56

37

10 4 31 49 45 49 34 36 33 46 22

SUMMARY INDICATORS#

Sub-Saharan Africa

21 21

21 6 47 – – – – –

– – – – – – – – – – – –

Eastern and
Southern Africa

– –

– – – – – – – –

– – – – – – – – – – – –

West and Central Africa 22 22

23 6 49 63 63 63 57 77 35

8 1 21 36 29 43 43 43 43 47 34

Middle East
and North Africa

– –

– – – – – – – –

– – – – – – – – – – – –

South Asia

– –

– – – – – – – –

– – – – – – – – – – – –

East Asia and Pacific

– –

– – – – – – – –

– – – – – – – – – – – –

Latin America
and Caribbean

– –

– – – – – – – –

– – – – – – – – – – –

CEE/CIS

– –

– – – – – – – –

– – – – – – – – – – – –

Least developed countries 11 11

12 6 24 – – – – –

– – – – – – – – – – –

World

– –

– – – – – – – –

– – – – – – – – – – – –

# For a complete list of countries and areas in the regions, subregions and country categories, see page 98.

DEFINITIONS OF THE INDICATORS

Attendance in early childhood education – Percentage of children 36–59 months old who
are attending an early childhood education programme.

Adult support for learning – Percentage of children 36–59 months old with whom an adult
has engaged in four or more of the following activities to promote learning and school readiness
in the past three days: a) reading books to the child, b) telling stories to the child, c) singing
songs to the child, d) taking the child outside the home, e) playing with the child and f) naming,
counting or drawing things with the child.

Father’s support for learning – Percentage of children 36–59 months old whose father has
engaged in one or more of the following activities to promote learning and school readiness
in the past three days: a) reading books to the child, b) telling stories to the child, c) singing
songs to the child, d) taking the child outside the home, e) playing with the child and f) naming,
counting or drawing things with the child.

Learning materials at home: children’s books – Percentage of children 0–59 months old
who have three or more children’s books at home.

Learning materials at home: playthings – Percentage of children 0–59 months old with two
or more of the following playthings at home: household objects or objects found outside (sticks,
rocks, animals, shells, leaves, etc.), homemade toys or toys that came from a store.

Children left in inadequate care – Percentage of children 0–59 months old left alone or in
the care of another child younger than 10 years of age for more than one hour at least once in
the past week.

MAIN DATA SOURCES

Attendance in early childhood education – Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS),
Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) and other national surveys.

Adult support for learning – MICS and other national surveys.

Father’s support for learning – MICS and other national surveys.

Learning materials at home: children’s books – MICS and other national surveys.

Learning materials at home: playthings – MICS and other national surveys.

Children left in inadequate care – MICS and other national surveys.

NOTES

– Data not available.

y Data differ from the standard definition or refer to only part of a country. If they fall within the
noted reference period, such data are included in the calculation of regional and global averages.

* Data refer to the most recent year available during the period specified in the column heading.

++ Changes in the definitions of several ECD indicators were made between the third and fourth
rounds of MICS (MICS3 and MICS4). In order to allow for comparability with MICS4, data from
MICS3 for the adult support for learning, father’s support for learning and learning materials
at home (playthings) indicators were recalculated according to MICS4 indicator definitions.
Therefore, the recalculated data presented here will differ from estimates reported in MICS3
national reports.

TABLE 14 EARLy CHILdHOOd dEVELOpmENT

Countries
and areas

Attendance in early childhood education
2005–2011*

Adult support for learning ++
2005–2011*

Father’s
support for
learning ++
2005–2011*

Learning materials at home
2005−2011*

Children left in inadequate care
2005−2011*

Children’s books

Playthings++

totalmalefemale

poorest
20%

richest
20%

totalmalefemale

poorest
20%

richest
20%

total

poorest
20%

richest
20%

total

poorest
20%

richest
20%

totalmalefemale

poorest
20%

richest
20%

STATISTICAL TABLES

153

THE STATE OF THE WORLD’S CHILDREN 2013: Children with Disabilities

154

Conventions, optional protocols,
signatures and ratifcations

A note on terms used in this report

A Convention is a formal agreement between States parties. The term ‘Convention’ is used (rather than its

synonym, ‘treaty’) to denote a multilateral instrument with a large number of States parties, including one

open to participation by the international community as a whole and negotiated under the auspices of an

international organization.

An Optional protocol to a Convention is a legal instrument intended to supplement the original agreement

by establishing additional rights or obligations. It may be used to address in greater detail a matter

mentioned in the original agreement, to speak to a new concern relevant to any of its topics, or to add

procedures for operation or enforcement. Such a protocol is optional in the sense that States parties to a

Convention are not automatically bound by its provisions, but must ratify it independently. Thus, a State

may be party to a Convention but not to its Optional Protocols.

The process by which a State becomes party to a Convention comprises, in most cases, two steps:

signature and ratification.

By signing a Convention, a State indicates its intention to take steps to examine the Convention and

its compatibility with domestic law. A signature does not create a legal obligation to be bound by a

Convention’s provisions; however, it does indicate that a State will act in good faith and will not take

actions that would undermine the purpose of the Convention.

Ratification is the concrete action by which a State agrees to be legally bound by the terms of a

Convention. The procedure varies according to each country’s particular legislative structure. After a

State has determined that a Convention is consistent with domestic laws and that steps may be taken to

comply with its provisions, the appropriate national organ (e.g., a parliament) makes a formal decision

to ratify. Once the instrument of ratification – a formal, sealed letter signed by the responsible authority

(e.g., a president) – is deposited with the United Nations Secretary-General, the State becomes party to

the Convention.

In some cases, a state will accede to a Convention or Optional Protocol. Essentially, accession is like

ratifying without first having to sign.

For further information and more detailed definitions of these and related terms, see

.

The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities is available at

.

The Optional Protocol is available at .

© United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF)
May 2013

Permission is required to reproduce any part of this publication. Permission will be
freely granted to educational or non-profit organizations. Others will be requested
to pay a small fee. Please contact:
Division of Communication, UNICEF
Attn: Permissions H6F
3 United Nations Plaza, New York, NY 10017, USA
Tel: +1 (212) 326-7434
Email: nyhqdoc.permit@unicef.org

This report and additional online content are available at sowc2013>. Perspective and Focus essays represent the personal views of
the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position of the United Nations
Children’s Fund.

For corrigenda subsequent to printing, please see .
For latest data, please visit .
ISBN: 978-92-806-4656-6
eISBN: 978-92-806-4662-7
United Nations publication sales no.: E.13.XX.1

Cover photo:

Schoolchildren queue to enter their classroom in this 2007 photograph from the
Syrian Arab Republic. © UNICEF/HQ2007-0745/Noorani

UNICEF Headquarters

UNICEF House
3 United Nations Plaza
New York, NY 10017, USA

UNICEF Regional Office for Europe

Palais des Nations
CH-1211 Geneva 10, Switzerland

UNICEF Central and Eastern Europe/
Commonwealth of Independent
States Regional Office

Palais des Nations
CH-1211 Geneva 10, Switzerland

UNICEF Eastern and Southern Africa
Regional Office

P.O. Box 44145
Nairobi, Kenya 00100

UNICEF West and Central Africa
Regional Office

P.O. Box 29720, Yoff
Dakar, Senegal

UNICEF Latin America and
the Caribbean Regional Office

P.O. Box 0843-03045
Panama City, Panama

UNICEF East Asia and Pacific
Regional Office

P.O. Box 2-154
Bangkok 10200, Thailand

UNICEF Middle East and North Africa
Regional Office

P.O. Box 1551
Amman 11821, Jordan

UNICEF South Asia Regional Office

P.O. Box 5815
Lekhnath Marg
Kathmandu, Nepal

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Children with
Disabilities

THE STATE OF THE WORLD’S CHILDREN 2013

United Nations Children’s Fund

3 United Nations Plaza
New York, NY 10017, USA
Email: pubdoc@unicef.org
Website: www.unicef.org

© United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF)
May 2013

To read this report online,
scan this QR code or go to
www.unicef.org/sowc2013

US $25.00
ISBN: 978-92-806-4656-6
eISBN: 978-92-806-4662-7
United Nations publication sales no.: E.13.XX.1

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