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Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Politics 4
Community 5
Sports 6-7
Classifieds 8
Television 9
Worldbriefs 10
Index
Wednesday,June5,2013 50¢daily Delphos,Ohio
Forecast
DELPHOS HERALD
The
TellingTheTri-County’sStorySince1869
Miller Memorial Tournament,
p6-7
Ottoville scholarship winners, p4
www.delphosherald.com
Mostlysunny
todaywith
highsinthe
upper70s.
Partlycloudy
tonightthrough
midnightthen
becomingcloudywithchance
ofshowersandaslightchance
ofathunderstorm.Lowsin
theupper50s.Seepage2.
Property rezoning goes to third reading
BY NANCY SPENCER
Herald Editor
nspencer@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — Rezoning legislation
willgotothirdreadingfollowingmore
discussion from neighboring residents
and Fischer Plumbing and Heating
owner Jason Buettner concerning the
rezoningofpropertyat215N.StateSt.,
Lot903,ownedbyStanWiechart,from
Residential1toBusiness2.
Councildeclinedtosuspendtherules
andvoteonthemeasureMonday,rather
lettingitrideuntiltheJune17meeting.
West Street resident Dave Ricker
read a statement to council outlining
residents’concernswithproposalsfrom
thegrowingbusiness.
“Therehasbeenasignificantincrease
intraffic,dirtanddustandnoiseinour
neighborhood.Thereareportabletoilets,
trucks, pipes, overflowing trash dump-
sters, a backhoe and various plumbing
supplies scattered around the lot and
against the buildings,” he read. “We
are here today to ask this council to
reject the zoning change request by
the Wiecharts, who want to have their
lot next door to Fischer’s rezoned to
business so that Fischer Plumbing and
Heatingcanpurchaseittoknockdown
the Wiechart house and expand their
businessevenfurtherintoourresidential
neighborhood.”
Ricker went on to express concerns
aboutincreasedriskofinjuryfromacci-
dents because of constant truck and
heavy-equipment traffic and the pres-
enceofportabletoilets,notonlybecause
ofaestheticsbutduetochildrenplaying
andbeinginquisitiveinthearea.
Buettneralsoaddressedcouncil,pro-
viding a map of his and the adjacent
Wiechart property. Buettner pointed to
wherehiscurrentlocationisandwhere
a 60-by-80-foot steel building for shop
space with room to park his compa-
ny vehicles would be located on the
Wiechartpropertyifitisrezoned.
Buettner again stressed that he did
look at existing properties zoned for
business at the current time in Delphos
and none had what he needed or were
cost-prohibitive.
Fischer Plumbing and Heating owner Jason Buettner shows Delphos
City Council members a map of his and the adjacent Wiechart property
proposed for rezoning from R1 to B1. (Delphos Herald//Nancy Spencer)
See PROPERTY, page 10
Knippenreadytoslowdown
andenjoygrandchildren
BY NANCY SPENCER
Herald Editor
nspencer@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — Sue Knippen sees more frequent trips to
Columbustovisithergrandchildrenonherhorizon.
The 40-year teaching veteran spent Monday cleaning her
room at St. John’s High School and entering the last of stu-
dents’gradesbeforeofficiallyretiring.
“That’s the cleanest that cupboard has been since I started
teaching here,” Knippen said as she pointed to the corner. “I
stillhadthingsintherefromthelastteacher.”
TheLeipsicnativehastaughtLanguageArtstohighschool
Blue Jays for that past 38 years. She was hired by Principal
George Adams after teaching a year each at high schools in
WestCentralOhio.
“Myhusbandisfromtheareasowhenhegotajobaround
here, he wanted to move back,” she recalled. “I was just for-
tunatetheyhadanopening.Forthelast38years,I’vetaught
freshmenthroughjuniors.”
Knippenhasenjoyedwatchingherstudentsgrowandsuc-
ceed.
“Thereisnofeelinglikethemcomingbackandtellingme
they aced freshman comp because of my classes,” she said.
“Nofeelinglikeit.Iappreciatethechancetoteachandmake
adifferenceinstudents’lives.”
Library kicks off Summer Reading Program
Children ages preschoolers through fifth grade showed up at the Delphos Public
Library Tuesday to sign up for the Summer Reading Program. A variety of activities
were available for the summer readers. Master Gardeners of Allen County supplied
pots and plants for summer readers to pot themselves. Above: Sisters Samantha
and Virginia Brotherwood put flowering plants in the pots they decorated. Below:
Children work on a craft to take home. (Delphos Herald/Stacy Taff)
St. John’s High School Language Arts teacher Sue
Knippen gives a final read to students’ papers. Knippen is
retiring after 40 years in the classroom. (Delphos Herald/
Nancy Spencer)
OhioSenateproposesmorechangestostatebudget
By ANN SANNER
Associated Press
COLUMBUS — A pro-
posal before a Republican-
controlledOhioSenatepanel
would give more money to
schools in the state budget
and keep a provision that
would effectively defund
PlannedParenthoodbysend-
ing it to the back of the line
for public family planning
money.
The Senate Finance
Committee on Tuesday
released its latest changes to
the more than $61 billion,
two-year spending plan. The
panel is expected to vote on
the measure today, with the
full Senate voting Thursday.
Senate passage would send
the bill into compromise
talks.
The latest package of
changes would boost state
spending on K-12 education
by more than $717 million
compared with the current
budget,whichendsJune30.
Schools would see an
additional $141.6 million
in direct state aid under the
Senate plan, compared with
the funding formula the
House passed in its version
ofthebudget.
Majority Republicans in
the Senate also want to set
aside an additional $50 mil-
lion per year for the gov-
ernor’s proposed Straight
A fund, which will deliver
grants to school districts for
innovation and efficiency
measures. Early childhood
educationwouldgetanaddi-
tional $20 million over the
budget period, on top of the
$10 million the House allot-
ted.
A proposed amend-
ment would set up spend-
ing requirements for schools
that get money for economi-
cally- disadvantage students.
The funding would have
to be used on an extended
school day or year, read-
ing improvement, dropout
prevention, school safety,
instructional technology, or
professional development in
readinginstructionforteach-
ers of students in kindergar-
tenthroughthirdgrade.
Senators also added an
amendment to make sure
the director of JobsOhio and
its employees and officers
couldn’tbebribed.JobsOhio
is a private entity formed by
RepublicanGov.JohnKasich
and approved by state law-
makers to spur economic
developmentinthestate.
Senate Finance Chairman
Scott Oelslager said the
technical change was made
because bribery wasn’t
defined under the law that
createdJobsOhio.
“Therewasagaptherewe
discovered,soweclosedthat
loophole to make sure that
nobodycouldtakeabribeas
part of JobsOhio,” Oelslager
said. “And if they did, they
wouldbeprosecuted.”
State senators have
already pulled what’s left of
Kasich’s proposed income
tax cut from the state budget
infavoroftaxrelieftargeted
atsmallbusinesses.TheOhio
Househadretained7percent
of the 20 percent permanent
incometaxcutoriginallypro-
posedbyKasich.
Countytotest
warningsirens
AllenCountyOfficeof
HomelandSecurityand
EmergencyManagementwill
testthe48countycommunity
warningsirensatnoontoday.
Testsareconducted
thefirstWednesday
ofeachmonth.
Intheeventofanactual
emergency,thesirensare
anindicationthatper-
sonsintheaffectedarea
shouldgoindoorsand
tunetolocalnewsmedia
foradditionalinformation
andinstructionsonemer-
gencyactionstobetaken.
FriendsofLibrary
setbooksale
TheFriendsofthe
PutnamCountyDistrict
Librarywillholdits
annualBookSalefrom9
a.m.to8p.m.onTuesday
andWednesdayatthe
FourthStreetGym,751
E.FourthSt.inOttawa.
Computerchairs
andattictreasureswill
alsobeforsale.
TheDelphosCanal
Commissionhasannounced
thesemi-annualCanal
Cleanupat8:30a.m.June22.
Volunteerswillregis-
terattheHanserPavilion
andsignwaiverforms.
Allagesarewel-
comeandcivicorgani-
zationsareencouraged
toworkasagroup.
Thoseparticipating
shoulddressaccordingly
fortheweatherandthe
possibilityofcominginto
contactwithskinirritants.
See KNIPPEN, page 10
Canalcleanup
setforJune22
OTTAWA—ThePutnam
CountySheriff’sOfficehas
receivedmultiplecomplaints
ofthreefemalesgoingdoor
todoorclaimingtheyare
fromtheCouncilonAging.
Accordingtoapress
releasefromSheriffMichael
Chandler,asmanyasthree
younger,welldressed,white
femalesaregoingdoorto
doorclaimingtheyarewith
theCouncilonAgingand
that“theyaretheretoassist
inanywaypossible.”The
femalesarenotshowing
anyformofidentificationor
givingoutanyliterature.
Thesubjectsaredriv-
ingawhiteSUV,year
andmakeunknown.
Thesheriff’sofficeis
askingresidentstonotlet
anyoneentertheirhousehold
thatmatchthedescription
whoportraysthemselvesas
representativesofthecoun-
ciloranyotherorganiza-
tionbutrathercontactthe
sheriff’sofficeorlocallaw
enforcementrightaway.
Sheriffreportsof
fraudulentagents
2 – The Herald Wednesday, June 5, 2013
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARIES
BIRTHS
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
IT WAS NEWS THEN
POLICE
REPORT
The Delphos Herald wants
to correct published errors in
its news, sports and feature
articles. To inform the news-
room of a mistake in published
information, call the editorial
department at 419-695-0015.
Corrections will be published
on this page.
CORRECTIONS
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 143 No. 249
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald Inc.
Don Hemple, advertising manager
Lori Silette,
circulation manager
The Delphos Herald
(USPS 1525 8000) is published
daily except Sundays, Tuesdays
and Holidays.
The Delphos Herald is deliv-
ered by carrier in Delphos for
$1.48 per week. Same day
delivery outside of Delphos is
done through the post office
for Allen, Van Wert or Putnam
Counties. Delivery outside of
these counties is $110 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.

405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DELPHOS HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Ruth P. Ford
Jan. 5 1915-June 4, 2013
Ruth P. Ford, 98, of Defiance
died at 2:45 a.m. Tuesday at
Brookview Healthcare Center.
She was born Jan. 5, 1915,
in Grover Hill to Jacob and
Agnes (Stahl) Edds, who pre-
ceded her in death.
On July 19, 1930, she mar-
ried Forrest Ford, who pre-
ceded her in death.
Survivors include a son,
William (Betty) Ford of
Cloverdale; two sons-in-law,
Robert Mason of Glendale,
Ariz., and Ronald Giesige
of Sherwood; a sister, Ethyl
(Leonard) Winters; eight
grandchildren, Chuck, Tom,
Tony, Jacki, Dave, Bill, Keri
and Nikki; many great-grand-
children and several great-
great -grandchildren.
She was also preceded in
death by her sisters, Doris
and Jude; her brothers, Floyd,
Carl and Paul; her daughters,
Colleen and Rhoda; two grand-
children and two great-grand-
children.
Mrs. Ford loved her fam-
ily, fixing Sunday meals, going
to Arizona and volunteering
at the Interfaith Thrift Shop.
She was a wonderful mother
and grandmother. She was a
woman of God and an inspira-
tion to many.
She was also a member of
First Assembly of God Church
in Delphos for many years.
Funeral services will be at
2 p.m. Friday at Harter and
Schier Funeral Home, Pastor
Carol Retcher officiating.
Visitation will be from 2-4
p.m. and 6-8 p.m. on Thursday
at the funeral home. Burial will
follow at Monroe Cemetery.
Memorial contributions
may be made to the Cancer
Society.
To leave condolences for
the family, visit harterand-
schier.com.
Daniel L. Kaverman
Feb. 13, 1963-June 4, 2013
Daniel L. Kaverman, 50,
of Delphos died at 1:20 p.m.
Tuesday at his residence.
He was born Feb. 13, 1963
to Ken (Bea) Kaverman of
Lexington, Ky., and Shirley
Drew (Bob Bridenstine) of
Ruskin, Fla.
On August 16, 1984, he was
united in marriage to Cindy A.
Jones of Delphos.
Survivors include a son,
Bradley (Jessica Arledge)
Kaverman of Delphos;
a daughter, Bethany
Kaverman of Delphos; a sis-
ter, Vickie (Rodney) Bryan
of Spencerville; two broth-
ers, Duane (Jo) Kaverman
of Lexington, Ky. and Tim
(Becky Epling) Kaverman of
Elida; and two grandchildren,
Naudia and Natalee Kaverman.
He was a great friend to all
and truly loved spending time
with his family.
He was also a member of
Gardendale Church of God.
Funeral services will begin
at 11 a.m. Saturday at Harter
and Schier Funeral Home.
Visitation will be held on
Friday from 2-8 p.m. at the
funeral home and on Saturday
one hour prior to the service.
Burial will be at a later date.
Memorial contributions
may be made to the family.
To leave condolences for
the family, visit harterandschi-
er.com.
Mildred L. ‘Louise’
Schleeter
Sept. 5, 1925-June 3, 2013
Mildred L. “Louise”
Schleeter, 87, of Delphos died
at 1:45 a.m. Monday at The
Meadows of Kalida.
She was born Sept. 5,
1925, in St. Marys to the Rev.
Orville and Cecile (Burden)
Fisher, who preceded her in
death.
On March 28, 1947, she
married Leonard “Bud”
Schleeter, who died on March
7, 1996.
Survivors include three
sons, Danny (Linda) Schleeter
of Lima, Steven (Pam)
Schleeter of Fort Jennings
and Dale (Sandy) Schleeter of
Wetzel; two daughters, Sharon
(Ronnie) Foust of Delphos
and Judy (Larry) Sanders of
Ottawa; 15 grandchildren and
36 great-grandchildren.
She was also preceded
in death by four brothers,
Eugene, Ellsworth, Wendell
and William Fisher.
Mrs. Schleeter was a nurse
at Lima Memorial Health
System for 11 years. She was
a member of St. John the
Evangelist Catholic Church.
She enjoyed Yahtzee, crochet-
ing, Scrabble and loved chil-
dren and playing the piano.
Mass of Christian Burial
will begin at 11 a.m. Friday
at St. John the Evangelist
Catholic Church, the Rev.
Chris Bohnsack officiating.
Burial will be in the church
cemetery.
Friends may call from 2-8
p.m. Thursday at Harter and
Schier Funeral Home, where
a Parish Wake will begin at
7:30 p.m.
Preferred memorials are to
the American Diabetes Assoc.
or St. Jude’s.
To leave condolences for
the family, visit harterand-
schier.com.
Bernard A. Averesch
June 9, 1935
June 3, 2013
Bernard A. Averesch, 77,
of Kalida died at 4:30 a.m.
Monday at St. Rita’s Medical
Center, Lima.
He was born June 9, 1935,
in Cloverdale to Bernard and
Anna (Wolke) Averesch, who
preceded him in death.
On June 20, 1959, he mar-
ried Mary Jane Niemeyer, who
survives in Kalida.
Also surviving are his
eight children, Marlene (Phil)
Griffith of Ottawa, Lynda
(Glen) Fortman, Diane (Jeff)
Schroeder, Kathy (Gerry)
Vorst, Michele (Dean) Niese,
Deb (Jeff) Sheaks and Eric
(Brenda Delarber) Averesch
of Kalida and Lisa (Dirk)
Rummel of Lima; 21 grand-
children; six great-grandchil-
dren; two brothers, Raymond
(Dorothy) Averesch of Kalida
and Ralph (Judy) Averesch of
Ottoville; and a sister-in-law:
Sandy Averesch of Landeck.
He was also preceded
in death by a son, Kevin
Raymond Averesch; three
brothers, Wilfred, Gerald and
Harold Averesch; and two
sisters, Angeline Erhart and
Carmelita Schnipke.
Mr. Averesch retired from
Philips Display Components,
Ottawa, after 42 years. He
was a member of St. Michael
Catholic Church, Kalida, and
its Holy Name Society. He was
a member of Kalida Knights of
Columbus and the Kalida Fish
and Game. He served in the
National Guard.
Mass of Christian Burial
will be 10:30 a.m. Thursday at
St. Michael Catholic Church,
the Rev. Mark Hoying officiat-
ing. Burial will follow in the
church cemetery.
Visitation will be from 2-8
p.m. today at Love Funeral
Home, Ottawa, where there
will be a Holy Name and
Knights of Columbus Rosary
at 7:30 p.m.
Memorials may be made to
a charity of the donor’s choice.
Condolences can be
expressed at lovefuneralhome.
com.
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
Associated Press
TODAY: Mostly sunny.
Highs in the upper 70s. East
winds 5 to 10 mph.
TONIGHT: Partly cloudy
through midnight then becom-
ing cloudy. Chance of show-
ers and a slight chance of
a thunderstorm. Lows in the
upper 50s. Northeast winds 5
to 10 mph. Chance of measur-
able precipitation 40 percent.
THURSDAY: Mostly
cloudy with a chance of show-
ers and a slight chance of
a thunderstorm. Highs in the
lower 70s. Northeast winds 5
to 10 mph. Chance of measur-
able precipitation 40 percent.
THURSDAY NIGHT:
Mostly cloudy with a 30 per-
cent chance of showers. Lows
in the upper 50s. Northeast
winds 10 to 15 mph.
FRIDAY: Mostly cloudy.
Highs in the lower 70s.
FRIDAY NIGHT
THROUGH SATURDAY
NIGHT: Partly cloudy. Lows
in the upper 50s. Highs in the
mid 70s.
One Year Ago
With just 16 days until
the 10th annual Relay for
Life of Delphos, committee
members are making sure
teams are ready to talk the
talk and walk the walk. This
year’s event is held June 22
and 23 at the Community
Track at Jefferson High
School. Twenty-five teams
will take to the track for the
18-hour event.
25 Years Ago – 1988
Immaculate Conception
Catholic Church, Ottoville,
will celebrate the 100th
anniversary of its founding
Sept. 23, 1988. The church
was founded in 1848 by the
Rev. John Otto Bredeick.
The present church build-
ing was started in 1885
and completed in 1888.
Dedication of the church
was on Sept. 23, 1888. In
connection with the cen-
tennial year, artifacts and
displays for viewing are in
the basement of the church.
Franklin Elementary
School honored students
for their achievements at
its annual awards assembly.
Student Council members
who were awarded certifi-
cates and had their names
placed on a plaque are Kevin
Gibson, Brian Haunhorst,
Lisa Metcalfe, Renee
Straman, Ryan Brenneman,
T. J. Kohorst, Amber
Kimmet, Scott Kimmet,
Jay Hoersten, Max Wisher,
Shelly Schleeter, Michelle
Gunter, Larry Lindeman,
Harmony Brenneman and
Jason Cross.
Both Jefferson girls
relay teams qualified for
the Class A state finals
Saturday at Ohio Stadium,
Columbus. The 4x200-
meter relay team of Kim
Carmean, Laura Schmelzer,
Kathy Grothaus and
Stephanie McClure fin-
ished its qualifying heat
in 1:49. The 4x400-meter
relay of Heather Barnes,
Carmean, Schmelzer and
McClure finished in 4:12.
50 Years Ago – 1963
Fourt een members
of Delphos Methodist
Youth Fellowship will
be among 500 youth to
meet at Lakeside, Ohio
Methodist Conference
Grounds, for the Lima
District Senior Methodist
Youth Fellowship Institute,
June 9-15. Youth attend-
ing from Delphos are Jack
Rozelle, John Ayers, Diane
Broaddus, Jill Ditto, Carol
Mueller, Carol Armstrong,
Mary Baumgartner, Gerald
Rozelle, Susan Truesdale,
Charlyn Buettner, Michael
Kaskel, Barbara Ladd,
Maxine Foust and Donald
Hull.
Delphos Country Club
will hold its annual Junior
Summer dance June 15 at
the clubhouse northwest of
Delphos. Tommy Ross and
his orchestra will provide
the music.
Members of the Past
Chiefs Association of the
local Pythian Sisters had
their husbands as guests at
the group’s annual picnic
held Tuesday evening at
the country home of Mrs.
Lewis Vogt. Mrs. Harvey
Rice served as assistant
hostess. In contests held,
Virgil Buchanan and Alfred
Allemeier were most suc-
cessful.
75 Years Ago – 1938
Final preparations for
Van Wert’s famous Peony
Festival to be held June
8 are nearing completion.
Fifty-eight bands are in
readiness to participate
in the gigantic afternoon
and evening parades. The
Jefferson High School band
will be in the parade. The
coronation of Betty Jane
Althoen as Queen Jubilee
VII will be an event of
regal splendor.
A new roadside pocket
park is being construct-
ed by 15 National Youth
Administration boys under
supervision of Norma
Doepker, Putnam County
superintendent of State
Highways, at the corner
of U. S. Route 224 and
State Route 190, north of
Delphos. The NYA boys
will help with the drilling
of a well and construct out-
door picnic ovens, picnic
tables and benches and toi-
lets at the park site.
Mrs. Robert Granger
was elected as president of
the Faith-Hope Class of the
United Brethren Church at
a regular meeting of the
class held Friday evening
with Mr. and Mrs. Marion
Rigdon, west of Delphos.
Other officers chosen were
Marion Rigdon, vice presi-
dent; Howard Hoover,
secretary; and Mrs. Fred
Kiggins, treasurer.
Corn $6.96
Wheat $6.74
Soybeans $15.42
Credit card theft
under investigation
An employee at a business
on Gressel Drive in Delphos
reported Monday that an
unknown subject had gotten
into her locker and stolen a
credit card. The victim found
that multiple charges were
made on the card before it
was cancelled.
This incident is under
investigation by the Detective
Bureau.
Teen arrested for
domestic violence
At 8:46 p.m. on Sunday,
officers were dispatched to a
residence in the 600 block of
North Main Street in reference
to a domestic dispute.
After further investiga-
tion, officers found probable
cause to arrest the suspect,
19-year-old Nadine Clarkson,
for causing physical harm to a
household member.
Clarkson will appear on a
charge of domestic violence in
Lima Municipal Court.
Cash, medication
missing after break in
At 3:11 on Monday, offi-
cers received a complaint of
a residence being broken into
in Holland Trailer Court, 202
Holland Avenue.
The victim stated that an
unknown subject entered her
residence through a locked
back door. Items taken includ-
ed a small amount of cash
and some prescription medi-
cations.
This incident is under
investigation.
A boy, Waylon Lee, was
born at 11:35 a.m. on May 28
to Jon and Maria Diltz.
He weighed 7 pounds, 14
ounces and was 20 inches
long.
Grandparents are Mindy
and Jim Moreland, Dave
Klaus and Justin and Marcia
Diltz.
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Tuesday:
Mega Millions
10-11-12-20-55, Mega
Ball: 19
Megaplier
3
Pick 3 Evening
5-5-7
Pick 3 Midday
3-8-3
Pick 4 Evening
4-1-1-9
Pick 4 Midday
4-6-7-9
Pick 5 Evening
3-1-1-5-7
Pick 5 Midday
8-6-8-7-8
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $50
million
Rolling Cash 5
02-10-19-32-36
Estimated jackpot:
$120,000
2
0
0
0
6
5
4
2
7
The Bingo Crew
Happy Birthday
Dolly
1
419-339-0110
GENERAL REPAIR - SPECIAL BUILT PRODUCTS
TRUCKS, TRAILERS
FARM MACHINERY
RAILINGS & METAL
GATES
CARBON STEEL
STAINLESS STEEL
ALUMINUM
Larry McClure
5745 Redd Rd.
Delphos
Fabrication & Welding In
c.
Quality
0
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0
6
5
9
6
6
2013 CadillaC Cts 3.0 V-6,
Silver/Tan, AWD, Full Top.
2013 CadillaC Xts awd 4 Door,
Di. White, Tan Leather, Loaded 2K.
2013 Chevy impala lt2 White,
Tan Leather, Everything.
2012 BuiCk enClave CXl Di.
White, Tow Pkg., Leather, 14K.
2012 BuiCk Regal CXl Lt. Tan
Met., Leather, Dual Power Seats, 12K.
2012 ChevRolet impala Cyber
Gray, Sunroof, Leather, 12K, 3.6 V-6,
6-Speed Auto.
2012 ChRysleR town &
CountRy van Bk. Met., Loaded, 19K.
2012 FoRd esCape 4 Door, Gray,
XLT, 35K, AWD.
2012 gmC yukon slt Di. White,
Every Option Available, 12K, 22"
Wheels.
2011 Chevy maliBu ltZ 4 Door,
3.6 V-6, White, Bk. Leather, 17K.
2011 honda CiviC 4 Door,
Charcoal, Cloth Interior, 11K, Auto.
2010 ChevRolet CamaRo 2 Door,
V-6, 7K, Special Blue Met./Silver Striping.
2010 ChRysleR town &
CountRy touRing van Gold Met.,
37K, New Tires, Excellent Condition
2010 ChRysleR town &
CountRy touRing van Silver, 20K.
2010 FoRd esCape limited 4
Cyl., Red/Tan Leather, Loaded, 31K.
2010 maZda 6 V-6, 4 Door, Black,
Roof, 24K, Loaded.
2009 BuiCk luCeRne 4 Door, Red, Tan
Leather Roof, Chromes, Hot & Cold Seats.
2008 satuRn outlook FWD,
White, Tan Cloth, 41K.
2008 toyota avalon Xls
2-Blue/Gray Leather, 50K, Loaded
2007 BuiCk RendeZvous CX 3
Seats, Br. Tan Cloth, 83K, Excellent Condition.
2007 ChevRolet hhR 4 Door,
Black, Gray Leather, 27K, Chromes,
Senior Owned.
2007 hyundai aZeRa limited
4 Door, Loaded, Fern Mist, Only 42K.
2006 pontiaC solstiCe
ConveRtiBle Black, Tan & Gray
Leather, 94K, 5 Spd.
2004 ChevRolet CoRvette
Coupe 16K, Red, Like New, 6 Spd.
2003 gmC 1-ton auto A/C,
Power Steering, Brakes, 10-foot Cargo
Box, 100K, 4.8 V-8.
2000 linColn town CaR sig
Di. White, Extra Clean, 93K.
231 S. Walnut St.
Van Wert, Ohio
Phone: 419-238-6440
Fax: 419-238-9715
TAYLOR’S AUTO SALES, INC.
00066347
See us on the web: TaylorAutoSalesInc.com
~ Over 60 Years in Business ~
OPEN Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri. 8:00-6:00; Wed. 8:00-5:30; Sat. 9:00-12:00
See Gary Taylor or Gary Miller
Wednesday, June 5, 2013 The Herald – 3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
BRIEFS
H.G. Violet Equipment
2103 North Main St
Delphos , OH 45833
Phone 419-695-2000
www.hgviolet.com
H.G. Violet Equipment
2103 North Main St.
Delphos, OH 45833
Phone 419-695-2000
www.hgviolet.com
Nothing feels beter than a white, bright, healthy
smile. Tat’s why we ofer a full line of
general and cosmetic dental services to
keep your teeth beautiful.
Brighten Every Day
with a Great Smile
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General Dentist
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419.692.GRIN
(4746)
Open Mon-Wed-Thurs 8-5,
Fri 8-11
Call for appointment
www.mohrsmilesohio.com
Kalida High School Honor Roll
All A’s
Sixth grade
Tara Gerding, Trevor Lambert, Grant Laudick, Christian
Nartker, Trevor Vorst, Jack Zeller. Seventh grade
Nick Cleemput, Brady Decker, Kevin Hamburg, Jacob
Kahle, Josh Klausing, Sarah Klausing, Taylor Lucke, Tori
Niese, Kierstan Siebeneck, Jaylen Vandemark, Taylor Zeller.
Eighth grade
Kelly Doepker, Bailey Eickholt, Brianna Good, Jeffrey
Knueve, Alexis Schroeder, Trent Siebeneck and Jade Zeller.
Freshmen
Sarah Hovest, Joni Kaufmam, Brady Laudick, Brooke
Lucke, Allison Recker, Kaleb Selhorst, Allison Siebeneck,
Katelyn Siebeneck, Grant Unverferth and Alex von der
Embse.
Sophomores
Mariah Doepker, Erin Knueve, Devin Kortokrax, Luke
Langhals, Nicole Recker and Logan Roebke.
Juniors
Dana Cattell, Alexis Decker, Meredith Kromer, Pat Millott,
Kylie Siebeneck, Whitney Smith, Elizabeth Turnwald and
Justine Verhoff.
Seniors
Andrea Bellmann, Carrie Gerding, Rich Langhals, Rafaela
Marone, Amy Smith, Kaylyn Verhoff and Eric Warnecke.
AB Honor Roll
Sixth grade
Sami Backus, Rachael Basinger, Keith Doepker, Melissa
Erhart, Adam Fitzgerald, Nicole Fortman, Halie Kaufman,
Connor Krouse, Lauren Langhals, Treyton Martin, Clay
Meyer, Owen Niemeyer, Makenna Niese, Owen Recker,
Ethan Schmenk, Cameron Siebeneck, Hannah Smith, Josh
Verhoff, Paul von der Embse and Allison Wurth.
Seventh grade
Anna Berheide, Alicia Dunn, Dillon Elkins, Kyona Gray,
Trent Guisinger, Chandler Hopkins, Rachel Kahle, Alex
Meyers, Carter Moore, Kara Siefker, Hannah Warn and
Kamryn Webken.
Eighth grade
Derek Buss, Erica Edwards, Ryan Ellerbrock, Kristen
Fortman, Reed Fuller, Lucas Gerding, Keara Hopkins,
Hannah Kahle, Layne Keefer, Brooke Kimball, Dana Knueve,
Noah Lambert, Abby Langhals, Samantha Langhals, Tyler
Lehman, Carlee Miller, Collin Nartker, Griffin Recker,
Sierra Schroeder, Caleb Siebeneck, Jenna Siefker, Erik
Verhoff and Adam von der Embse.
Freshmen
Cathy Basinger, Kylie Buss, Maddison Edelbrock,
Alexa Ellerbrock, Brandon Erhart, Trent Gerding, Adam
Goergens, Brittany Kahle, Trevor Maag, Samantha Nagy,
Kylie Osterhage, Paige Roller, Brandon Verhoff, Renee
Vorst, Kassie Warnecke, Trey Webken, Sidney White and
Allison Wurth.
Sophomores
Rebecca Brinkman, Katey Buss, Jacob Dunn, Molly
Ellerbrock, Zach Erhart, Jackie Gardner, Kennedy Hoffman,
Trevor Holtkamp, Ericka Kimball, Morgan Niese, Olivia
Schmenk, Derek Schroeder, Megan Vine, Alexis Vorst,
Spencer Vorst, Casey Wehri and Grant Zeller.
Juniors
Thadd Backus, Joe Gerdeman, Trevor Guisinger, Dylan
Hoffman, Ryan Kahle, Katelyn Kortokrax, Andrew Krouse,
Cody Niese, Kiersten Recker, Nicole Reindel, Michael
Schroeder, Derek Verhoff, Sarah Verhoff and Randy Zeller.
Seniors
Leah Berheide, Damon Birkemeier, Jessica Doepker,
Anthony Dunn, Kristi Honigfort, Adam Knueve, Kayla
Siefker, Casey Unverferth, Jordan Wurth and Joel Zeller.
VW Elks lodge
announces Flag Day
observance
Information submitted
VAN WERT — All citi-
zens are encouraged to
attend the annual Flag Day
Services which will be held on
Wednesday, June 12 at 7 p.m.
in the Elks lodge home.
The annual event is spon-
sored by the Benevolent and
Protective Order of Elks. Also
participating will be the Van
Wert unit of the Civil Air
Patrol.
Flag Day, celebrated
each June 14 as specified by
President Woodrow Wilson
in 1916, honors the creation
of the Stars and Stripes as
the official flag of the United
States. Flag Day did not
become formally recognized
until President Truman, him-
self an Elk, signed the resolu-
tion in 1949 declaring Flag
Day an official national holi-
day.
The continental Congress
adopted the design of the Stars
and Stripes on June 14, 1877,
resolving that “The flag of the
United States shall be thirteen
stripes, alternate red and white
on a blue field, representing a
new constellation.”
The Elks is the first and
only fraternal organization
to mandate that on June 14th
every year, each lodge must
conduct a solemn and beauti-
ful Flag Day ceremony. This
ceremony is open to the public
so that we can show our local
communities that we honor
our flag and all it represents.
As part of this year’s cer-
emony the local lodge win-
ners of the Grand Lodge
Americanism Contest will
read their winning essays.
Gerard Mazur, exalted
ruler of Van Wert Elks Lodge
1197, encourages all citizens
to attend the lodge’s Flag Day
ceremony and demonstrate
their love of flag and coun-
try. All citizens are asked to
proudly display the flag on
Flag Day.
Information submitted
As a part of the Van Wert
Peony Festival, a free fishing
derby for kids ages 3-13 will
be held Saturday, June 8 from
9-11 a.m. at the YMCA Camp
Clay pond, 9196 Liberty Union
Rd. All you need is your own
fishing rod or pole with the
necessary tackle for your kids
to fish from the pond’s shore-
line. Bait will be furnished
free of charge. A State of Ohio
fishing license is not required.
Only children will be allowed
to fish during this time, no
adults. Children must hold
their own fishing pole dur-
ing the derby; an adult cannot
hold the rod or pole for them.
Volunteers will be available to
assist with removing fish and
baiting hooks as necessary. All
fishing is catch and release.
A total of 10 prizes will be
awarded to the first, second,
and third longest fish caught
for each age group, as well as
an award for the overall longest
fish caught. Prizes awarded are
fishing related items. The over-
all prize is a fishing pole.
Remember to dress appro-
priately for the weather expect-
ed on Fishing Derby day. This
event will only be canceled if
the weather prevents safe out-
door activity at Camp Clay. It
will not be rescheduled. Please
check the official website at
vanwertpeony.com for the sta-
tus of the Free Fishing Derby.
For more information, visit
vanwertpeony.org or contact
Trudy Webster at (419)605-6049.
Stumps and Stump-
Jumpers
LIMA — Allen County
Chapter of Ohio Genealogy
Society will meet on Sunday,
June 16 at 2 p.m. at the Allen
County Museum, 620 W.
Market St., Lima.
The name of the program
this month is “Stumps and
Stump-Jumpers.” It’s like
a roundtable discussion or
a question and answer ses-
sion. The person is stumped
resolving the problem and the
Stump-Jumpers are the mem-
bers answering the questions.
If you’ve come against a brick
wall about an ancestor, you can
ask a question and members
will discuss it or give sugges-
tions how to research it.
The public is invited and
refreshments will be served.
Fake health
insurance entity
targets Ohioans
Information submitted
COLUMBUS - Ohio
Lieutenant Governor and
Insurance Director Mary
Taylor has issued a cease and
desist order to United States
Contractors Trust (USCT) for
selling fictitious health insur-
ance coverage to at least four
Ohioans. USCT is not licensed
to sell insurance in Ohio and
has also recently been ordered
to stop its unauthorized
insurance business in South
Carolina, North Carolina,
Vermont, Florida and Maine.
“Our mission at the
Department is to protect
Ohioans and take action against
those who prey on innocent con-
sumers,” Taylor said. “We urge
Ohio consumers with informa-
tion about this scam to contact
the Department immediately.”
USCT is targeting people
over the Internet with pre-exist-
ing health conditions that are
experiencing difficulty finding
insurance. Desperate to secure
individual or family health
insurance, the Ohioans eagerly
completed contact information
forms on innocuous-looking
websites. The victims were then
called by a USCT representa-
tive and eventually signed-up
for what they thought was insur-
ance. The victims agreed to have
the monthly premium, ranging
from $200 to $550, debited from
their bank accounts.
The victims’ first few claims
were paid but thereafter they
began to receive unpaid medi-
cal bills and calls from medi-
cal providers explaining they
were having difficulty pro-
cessing the claim with USCT.
When contacted by the victims
and medical providers, USCT
blamed the mix-up on comput-
er problems and explained the
matter would be resolved soon.
This back and forth continued
for months while money con-
tinued to be withdrawn from
the victims’ checking accounts.
The Ohio Department of
Insurance advises potential
victims of this scam to take the
following immediate steps:
Contact your bank and have
the automatic premium with-
drawals stopped. Then call the
Department’s fraud hotline at
1-800-686-1527.
Avoiding Health Insurance
Scams:
• Fake insurance companies
and dishonest people often try
to sell coverage that is usu-
ally difficult to secure and sell
policies that are significantly
cheaper. If it seems too good to
be true, it usually is.
• Ask if the company and
person representing the prod-
uct are licensed in Ohio. Then
confirm the license status at
www.insurance.ohio.gov and
by calling 1-800-686-1526.
• Be cautious if there are not
many questions about your health.
Ask your own hard questions
about the coverage and company.
• Be mindful that scammers
will make marketing materials,
letterhead and websites appear
legitimate, including copying
and using official documen-
tation from real companies.
Always carefully read and
scrutinize all materials, includ-
ing information on websites.
• Never provide your check-
ing account number to have
your premiums automatically
deducted unless you are deal-
ing with a reputable company.
Be suspicious if you are being
pressured into using the direct
deposit payment method.
If you believe you’ve been
victimized by this scam, call the
Department’s fraud hotline at
1-800-686-1527. You can also
report it at www.insurance.ohio.
gov.
VW Peony Festival
hosts fishing derby
Visit us at www.delphosherald.com
4 – The Herald Wednesday, June 5, 2013
www.delphosherald.com
The Next Generation
2
Ottoville High School scholarship winners
Rachel Beining
Attending Bluffton University
The Ottoville Mutual
Telephone Co.
Scholarship- $500
BU Academic Honors
with Distinction-
$14,000, renewable
BU Presidential Scholarship
Competition Award-
$1,000, renewable
Monica Buettner
Attending Wright State
University, Dayton
The Ottoville Mututal
Telephone Co.
Scholarship- $500
Matt Burgei
Attending The
University of Toledo
UT Rocket Award
Scholarship- $1,500,
renewable
Alyssa DeLong
Attending Ohio
University, Athens
OU Gateway Scholarship-
$500, renewable
Dylan Fortman
Attending The Ohio State
University, Columbus
Putnam Co. Alumni
Scholarship- $500
OSU Provost
Scholarship- $3,000
OSU Scarlet & Gray
Scholarship- $4,000,
renewable
OSU Battelle/Thomas
Scholarship- $2,000,
renewable
Cory Fischer
Attending Bowling
Green State University
The Ottoville Mutual
Telephone Co.
Scholarship- $500
The Ottoville Local Staff
Scholarship- $500
Edward A. & Ettie
Rieman Putnam Co.
Scholarship- $1,000
BGSU Award of Scholars-
$4,000, renewable
BGSU Science & Math
in ACTION- $18,100
Put. Co. Retired Teachers
Assoc. Scholarship- $500
Logan Gable
Attending The Ohio State
University, Columbus
OSU Trustee’s Scholarship-
$2,000, renewable
OSU Putnam County Alumni
Scholarship- $400, renewable
Paulding-Putnam Electric
Coop. Scholarship- $600
Henry Fought Putnam Co.
Memorial Scholarship- $750
Brittany Foster
Attending Bowling
Green State University
BGSU Award of
Performance- $4,000,
renewable 3 years
Kara Hoersten
Attending The
University of Dayton
Univ. of Dayton Music
Talent Award- $5,000
Marvin Charles Ellerbrock
Veterans Foundation
Scholarship- $1,000
Univ. of Dayton Trustee’s
Merit Scholarship-
$19,000, renewable
Alex & Jennie
Miller Memorial
Scholarship- $1,000
Bryan Hohlbein
Attending The Ohio State
University, Columbus
OSU Scarlet & Gray
Scholarship- $4,000,
renewable
Kendra Koester
Attending Bowling
Green State University
BGSU Award of Scholars-
$6,000, renewable
Melinda Justice Cheerleading
Scholarship- $500
Logan Kortokrax
Attending The University
of Cincinnati
Harter & Schier Funeral
Home Scholarship- $500
Kayla Korte
Attending James A. Rhodes
State College, Lima
Earl Belch Putnam Co.
Scholarship- $1,000
Ryan Honigford
Attending The
University of Toledo
UT Rocket Scholarship-
$1,500, renewable
Tori Jackson
Attending Bluffton
University
BU Presidential Scholarship-
$1,000, renewable
BU Academic Honors with
Distinction Scholarship-
$14,000, renewable
BU Music Major
Scholarship- $2,000,
renewable
BU Opportunity Scholarship-
$2,225, renewable
Casey Miller
Attending James A. Rhodes
State College, Lima
Rhodes to Success
Achievement
Scholarship- $1,000
Rhodes PSEOP
Scholarship- $1,000
Marissa Pohlabel
Attending The
University of Toledo
UT Rocket Scholar Award-
$6,500, renewable
Audrey Rieger
Attending The
University of Toledo
The Ottoville Mutual
Telephone Co.
Scholarship- $500
The Foundation for Rural
Services Scholarship- $2,500
UT Rocket Scholar Award-
$6,500, renewable
Putnam Co. Ambulatory Care
Center Scholarship- $500
Catholic Order of
Foresters Scholarship-
$1,250, renewable
Rich Gerding Putnam Co.
Memorial Scholarship- $400
The Ottoville Lion’s Club
Scholarship- $1,000
Zachary Miller
Attending Wilmington
College
Wilmington College
Scholarship- $21,000,
renewable
Putnam Co. Soil & Water
Scholarship- $500
Sharon (Paige) Lucas
Enlisted in the Ohio
Army National Guard
Attending The University of
Northwestern Ohio, Lima
Ohio National Guard
100% Tuition Scholarship-
$8,775, renewable
McKenzie Martin
Attending Bowling
Green State University
BGSU Freshman Award-
$1,000, renewable
Megan Marlow
Attending East Tennessee
State University,
Johnson City, Tenn.
ETSU Academic Excellence
Scholarship- 1/2 out of
state tuition- $9,384
Derek Schimmoeller
Attending The
University of Toledo
UT Rocket Scholar Award-
$6,500, renewable
UT Legacy Award-
$500, renewable
Levis Leadership
Scholarship- $1,000,
renewable for $750
Abby Siefker
Attending Bowling
Green State University
BGSU Basketball Grant-
in-Aid (Full)- $21,760,
renewable plus books
Putnam County Dr. Mack
Schaffer Scholarship- $200
Lima News Female Scholar
Athlete of the Year- $1,000
Jacob Turnwald
Attending The
University of Dayton
Chad L. Staib Memorial
Scholarship- $1,000
Father Chaminade
Scholarship- $6,500,
renewable
Ashley Wehri
Attending James A. Rhodes
State College, Lima
The Ottoville Mutual
Telephone Co.
Scholarship- $500
Medical Mutual of Ohio
Scholarship- $500
Rhodes PSEOP
Scholarship- $1,000
Zach Weber
Attending Defiance College
DC Student Achievement
Scholarship- $12,000,
renewable
DC Leadership Scholarship-
$2,000, renewable
Tammy Wannemacher
Attending James A. Rhodes
State College, Lima
Textbook Scholarship- $600
Rhodes PSEOP Scholarship-
$1,000, renewable
Rachel Turnwald
Attending Bowling
Green State University
The Ottoville Local Staff
Scholarship- $500
BGSU Freshman
Academic Scholarship-
$4,000, renewable
Our local, national and international news coverage is insightful and concise, to keep
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please call us at 419-695-0015.
THE DELPHOS HERALD
405 N. Main St. • Delphos
PUTTING YOUR
WORLD IN PERSPECTIVE
Visit www.delphosherald.com
The Ottoville
High School
graduat-
ing class of
2013 received
a total of
$830,926 in
scholarships.
Wednesday, June 5, 2013 The Herald – 5
COMMUNITY
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
Van Wert Gazebo
Lovina readying for church
BY LOVINA EICHER
Church services are now
past and are set to be here
again in two weeks. Through
it all, I was battling a cough
and lost my voice
for a few days. I’m
feeling better every
day, which I’m
glad for.
I will share rec-
ipes for this week
and will write more
about church ser-
vices next week.
Tonight is Verena’s
eighth-grade grad-
uation.
Meanwhile, enjoy these
spring recipes:
FROSTY STRAWBERRY
SQUARES
2 egg whites
1 c. sugar
2 c. crushed fresh straw-
berries
1 c. whipping cream
Beat together egg whites,
berries and sugar for 10 min-
utes in a large bowl. Make
sure the bowl is very large
because the mixture will
triple in size. Whip cream
and fold into mixture. Stir
until well-blended. Pour into
molds or pan and freeze at
least 6 hours. Cut into squares
and serve. Delicious!
TOMATO ASPARAGUS
SALAD
3/4 pound fresh asparagus
cut and trimmed into 1 1/2-
inch pieces
3 plum-sized tomatoes,
halved and sliced
3/4 cup chopped
red onions
1/2 cup bal-
samic vinaigrette
dressing
Place asparagus
in a steamer basket.
Place in a sauce-
pan over 1 inch of
water. Bring to a
boil and then cover
and steam for 5 to 7
minutes or until crisp-tender.
Drain and immediately place
asparagus in ice water. Drain
and pat dry. In a large bowl,
combine the asparagus, toma-
toes and onions. Drizzle with
vinaigrette and gently toss to
coat. Serve using a slotted
spoon.
RHUBARB CUSTARD PIE
1 1/2 cups rhubarb, fresh
diced
2 tablespoons flour
2 eggs
1 cup sugar
3/4 cup cream
Preheat oven to 350
degrees. In a large bowl,
mix together all ingredients
except rhubarb. Put rhubarb
in unbaked 9-inch pie shell
and pour mixture over the
rhubarb. Bake for 45 minutes
to an hour or until set.
Camp Robin Rogers offers
Adult Weekend Camps
The Arc of Allen County and Camp Robin Rogers
are now accepting registration for this summer’s Adult
Weekend Camps. The camps are for adults 18 years and
older affected by intellectual and/or developmental dis-
abilities.
The camps begin at 7 p.m. on Fridays and run through 1
p.m. Sundays and are held on various weekends throughout
the summer. Weekends are: June 28-30, July 12-14, July
26-28, August 9-11, August 23-25, Sept. 6-8, Sept. 13-15
and Sept. 20-22.
All programs are age-appropriate and success-oriented.
Activities include swimming, fishing, music and crafts.
Exercise programs, campfires, movies and nature programs
are also a part of the weekend. Meals and snacks are pro-
vided.
Attendance is limited each weekend.
For more information and/or an application, call Joan or
Bob at The Arc of Allen County, 419-225-6285.
Information submitted
Thirty-nine members and one guest opened
the May 14 tea party meeting of the Landeck CL
of C with a crowning of Mary by Joan Mason
and granddaughter Alanna Knebel during the
singing of “On This Day O’ Beautiful Mother.”
A delicious meal followed, served by the com-
mittee. Leah Hohenbrink gave an enjoyable per-
formance on vintage clothing. Thank you to all
the members that performed as models. Prayers
were sent out to all sick members along with
birthday wishes for May, June, July and August.
Our Summer Fling is set for June 11 at 1 p.m. at
The Grind in Delphos, followed by a tour of the
Black Swamp Antique Shop. Call Catherine by
June 9 for reservations at 419-692-9753.
Pot of Gold winner for May was Ethel Burgei,
not present. Club 25 winner for May was Cathy
Siefker, June was Bea Kaverman, July was
Jessica Ladd and August was Lauretta Shaffer.
Door prize winners of teapot flower planters
were Kate Smith, Marilyn Sickle, Lois Deitz
and Mackenzie Hammons. Flower raffle win-
ners were Kathy Siefker, Arianna Knebel, Velma
Wehri, Louise Westbay, Lois Deitz and Laura
Ladd.
The group is still collecting travel-size or
larger personal items for the Joining Hands proj-
ect. All items will be delivered in September. The
meeting ended with prayer.
The next meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m. on
Sept. 10 with a potluck.
Attendees should wear purple for Alzheimer’s
Month. Military mail will be started. A Gently-
Used Purse Party for $5 per person (one card)
will be held. Bring a friend and both receive a
second card.
Cloverdale and Delphos councils are invited.
The committee is Joan Bockey, Kate Smith,
Thelma Hoersten, Dorothy Miller and Sue
Holtz.
1
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THE DELPHOS HERALD ON June 20, 2013.
DEADLINE IS JUNE 14, 2013.
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To run
Saturday, June 15
Deadline: June 13
Send us a photo with
a short write-up of
“What I learned
from Dad”.
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00066410
TODAY
9 a.m. - noon — Putnam
County Museum is open, 202
E. Main St., Kalida.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
Noon — Rotary Club
meets at The Grind.
6 p.m. — Shepherds of
Christ Associates meet in the
St. John’s Chapel.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos
Kiwanis Club meets at the
Eagles Lodge, 1600 E. Fifth
St.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
Delphos Civil Service
Commission meets at
Municipal Building.
7:30 p.m. — Hope Lodge
214 Free and Accepted
Masons, Masonic Temple,
North Main Street.
9 p.m. — Fort Jennings
Lions Club meets at the
Outpost Restaurant.
THURSDAY
9-11 a.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shop-
ping.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos
Ladies Club, Trinity United
Methodist Church.
7 p.m. — Delphos
Emergency Medical Service
meeting, EMS building,
Second Street.
7:30 p.m. — Delphos
Chapter 23, Order of Eastern
Star, meets at the Masonic
Temple, North Main Street.
CL of C gives scholarship, sets Summer Fling
The Landeck Catholic Ladies of Columbia Council 84 awarded Katrina Etzkorn,
daughter of Ron and Sherry Etzkorn, one of 15 $1,000 scholarships. Each applicant
must currently hold a CL of C life insurance policy or annuity for three years to qualify.
Etzkorn, center, receives her check from CL of C insurance agent Velma Wehri, right,
and Rosie Hilvers, her grandmother. Both have been lifelong members of CL of C.
(Submitted photo)
6 – The Herald Wednesday, June 5, 2013
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
Nathan Miller Memorial Tournament goes to Kalida
BY LARRY HEIING
DELPHOS — The fourth annual Nathan Miller Memorial
Baseball Tournament was played under dark clouds for the
entire three days last weekend at Delphos Stadium Park.
Nathan passed away in 2009 from a sudden dissecting
aorta at the age of 13. This memorial tournament was cre-
ated the next year to keep his memory alive. The parents of
Nathan, Angie and Sam, received a gift in the form of a quilt
made up of T-shirts from past tournaments during the open-
ing ceremony Friday night.
The tournament began under threatening skies that cast
a cloud over the hard work put into planning for this large
event. Despite that, a pair of scholarships from proceeds of
the tournament were awarded to graduating seniors Seth
Wollenhaupt (Jefferson) and Curtis Geise of St. John’s.
It was a rough night on the diamond as all four Delphos
City teams were defeated in the opening round: the Delphos
Reds lost 4-3 to the Van Wert Dons in the closest game of the
night; the Delphos V.F.W. fell 9-2 to St. Marys; the Delphos
Braves lost 6-3 to a good Shawnee squad; and in the final
action of the evening, the Delphos Pirates fell 11-7 to Elida
in a slugfest.
Overnight storms early Saturday dumped nearly two
inches of rain on the Delphos area, causing the parking lots
and ball diamonds at the park to look more like the pool that
was opening than ball fields. Sam Miller spoke with Craig
Mansfield of the Delphos Parks Department and the threat of
more storms caused the cancelation of all games for the day.
When the impending storms never developed, they again
talked and decided that the fields could be ready for play.
“Craig and the Delphos Parks staff worked hard to dry out
the diamonds and did a great job getting the fields ready in a
short time,” Sam commented.
The games resumed at 4 p.m. with Van Wert defeating
St. Marys 4-1 and Shawnee beating Middle Point 6-3. In the
evening, Ft. Loramie outslugged Van Wert 11-2 and Kalida
shut out Elida 2-0. Delphos squads returned to action with
a pair of shutouts: the Braves blanked Middle Point 3-0 and
the V.F.W. fell 12-0 to Van Wert.
Angie Miller was relieved: “Getting those six games in
Saturday night was big. Otherwise, we would have to move
the schedule back with 24 games on Sunday and that would
make a long day for the ball players. We can’t thank the
Delphos Parks crew enough for all their efforts.”
Pool-play games picked up again early Sunday morning
with action on all four diamonds. The Delphos Reds defeated
Leipsic 7-5 and the Delphos Braves made a lone run stand
up in blanking Leipsic 1-0. Van Wert’s 12-year-olds squad
outscored Columbus Grove 9-2 and Spencerville defeated
Kalida 4-3.
As a light rain fell, the competition continued into the
afternoon. St. Marys fell to Columbus Grove 5-2 and Middle
Point gave Miller City a goose egg, 8-0. The Delphos Pirates
survived Spencerville 10-0 and Ft. Loramie got by Leipsic
with a slim 2-1 victory.
The final round of pool play saw the weekend come to an
end for the city ball clubs in the double-elimination tourna-
ment. The Reds went out with a 3-2 victory over Ft. Loramie
and the V.F.W. bested Columbus Grove 6-2. Kalida ran over
the Pirates 6-1, Van Wert defeated Leipsic 11-3, Elida beat
Spencerville 4-3 and Shawnee homered its way to a 11-1
victory over Miller City.
After three days of games, the final four came down to
Ft. Loramie defeating Shawnee and Kalida knocking off Van
Wert to move onto the finals. In the consolation matchup,
Shawnee survived Van Wert to take third place. The 2013
Nathan Miller Memorial Tournament championship went
to Kalida as they used outstanding pitching to knock off Ft.
Loramie.
The weekend concluded with the closing awards cer-
emony. Angie came onto the Little League field and the
sky cleared as if Nathan was saying “no rain on my mom
at my celebration,” leaving only blue skies, tears and happy
memories.
Dan Grothouse and Barb Kline of Delphos Park Inc.
present a check to Sam and Angie Miller.
Sam and Angie Miller display the quilt made up of past Nathan Miller Memorial T-shirts that they received during
a presentation at the start of the tournament. (Delphos Herald/Larry Heiing)
Seth Wollenhaupt of Jefferson (left) and St. John’s
Curtis Geise are the 2013 Nathan Miller Memorial
Scholarship winners that were present Friday evening
during opening ceremonies.
Lucas Metcalfe and Hunter Haehn of the Delphos
Pirates talk strategy during their game Friday night
against Elida.
Kalida defeated the Ft. Loramie Redskins to win the 4th annual Nathan Miller Memorial Baseball Tournament.
Team members include: Owen Recker, Grant Laudick, Trevor Lambert, Luke Erhart, Zack Vonderembse, Josh Recker,
Branden Recker, David Peck, Ethan Schmenk, Matthews Kehres, Conner Krouse and Logan Langhals.
The Nathan Miller Memorial Baseball Tournament 2013 All-Star Team: Johnny
Caprella (Shawnee), Brady Welker (Braves), Lawson Blackmore (Van Wert Dons 12), Eli
Rosengarten (Ft.Loramie), Jaden Youtsey (Middle Point), Zach Ringwald (Spencerville),
David Peck (Kalida), Conner Anspach (Pirates), Lincoln Mueller (Reds), Cole Niese
(Miller City), Jacob Hutchins (Shawnee) and Ryan Hollingsworth (Van Wert 12).
Coach Donnie Anspach of the Delphos Pirates offers advice to his son, Conner, during
action of the Nathan Miller Memorial Baseball Tournament. 1
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EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business June 4, 2013
Veteran Stoller no-nos Wildcats in
ACME opener
By JIM METCALFE
Staff Writer
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
VAN WERT — With both teams having to
replace a number of players from the spring
edition, either via graduation or being else-
where for whatever reason, Van Wert opened
the summer Van Wert County ACME baseball
season behind veteran right-hander Nathan
Stoller fanning 10 and throwing a 5-inning
no-hitter, shutting out visiting Jefferson 10-0
on the Russell Fisher Field inside Smiley
Park on a brilliant and comfortable Monday
evening.
Stoller only gave up three base-runners:
free passes to Austin Jettinghoff and Tyler
Talboom and an error on a grounder by hit by
Jettinghoff. Neither reached as far as second
base.
Jefferson senior-to-be Tyler Rice took the
loss in four innings of work (7 hits, 8 runs, 5
earned, 1 BB, 2 strikeouts).
Tyler Williams led the 7-hit Cougar attack
by going 2-for-2 (3 runs scored), while Justin
Tussing and Jake Braun each scored a pair.
Van Wert scored twice in each of the first
two frames, four in the fourth and another
two in the home fifth to end the contest on
the run-rule.
Jettinghoff walked with two down in the
visitor first.
Van Wert got two unearned tallies in the
bottom half on an error on leadoff hitter
Tussing’s grounder, a stolen base, a fielder’s
choice (Cody Keirns), a run-scoring double
to center (Brandt Henry), a passed ball and an
RBI groundout by Stoller.
Talboom walked to open the Delphos
second.
Van Wert went up 4-0 in the bottom half on
back-to-back doubles by Williams and Jake
Braun, a wild pitch and a ground-ball out by
Jake Williamson.
Jettinghoff got aboard on an error in the
fourth and was eliminated on a Talboom
grounder with one down.
Van Wert made it 8-0 in the home half on
three hits — including a 2-run rip to right
by Shawn Miller (Williams and Williamson)
and a run-scoring knock to center by Tussing
(Miller) — two wild pitches, a free pass, a hit
batter, a stolen base and an error that plated
Tussing for the eighth run.
Van Wert put it away with a pair of tallies
in the fifth against Jettinghoff: three straight
walks to start the frame (Williams, Braun and
Andrew Dingle); an RBI groundout (pinch-
hitter Ethan Williams) that plated T. Williams;
and a grounder by Tussing to third base,
where senior-to-be Jordan Herron threw home
from his backside to try and get Braun but
Adam Rode didn’t tag the runner to score the
run and end the contest.
Van Wert entertains St. John’s 6 p.m.
today, while Jefferson scrimmages Crestview
the same time (not a game with the Knights in
the Division IV State semifinals).
JEFFERSON (0)
ab-r-h-rbi
Josh Teman cf/ss 2-0-0-0, Tyler Rice p/
rf 2-0-0-0, Austin Jettinghoff ss/p 1-0-0-0,
Jordan Herron 3b 2-0-0-0, Tyler Talboom lf
1-0-0-0, Adam Rode c 2-0-0-0, Jesse Stemen
2b 1-0-0-0, Christian Stemen ph/cf 1-0-0-0,
Ryan Goergens dh 2-0-0-0, Damien Dudgeon
rf/2b 0-0-0-0, Ryan Bullinger 1b 2-0-0-0.
Totals 16-0-0-0.
VAN WERT (10)
ab-r-h-rbi
Justin Tussing ss 3-2-1-2, Cody Keirns 2b
3-0-0-0, Brandt Henry cf 2-1-1-1, Nate Stoller
p 3-0-1-1, Kevin Agler 1b 3-0-0-0, Tyler
Williams rf 2-3-2-0, Jake Braun 3b 2-2-1-1,
Jake Williamson lf 1-1-0-1, Andrew Dingle
lf 0-0-0-0, Shawn Miller c 2-1-1-2, Ethan
Williams ph 1-0-0-1. Totals 22-10-7-9.
Score by Innings:
Jefferson 0 0 0 0 0 - 0
Van Wert 2 2 0 4 2 - 10
One out in bottom of fifth when game
ended
E: J. Stemen 2, Jettinghoff, Keirns; LOB:
Jefferson 3, Van Wert 5; 2B: Henry, T.
Williams, Braun; SB: Tussing, Williamson.
IP H R ER BB SO
JEFFERSON
Rice (L, 0-1) 4.0 7 8 5 1 2
Jettinghoff 0.1 0 2 2 3 0
VAN WERT
Stoller (W, 1-0) 5.0 0 0 0 2 10
WP: Rice 4; HBP: Henry (by Rice); PB:
Rode 2.
——-
Bulldogs pound Musketeers in summer
baseball
By Dave Boninsegna
DHI Correspondent
news@delphosherald.com
COLUMBUS GROVE — If the remain-
ing players from the Columbus Grove spring
baseball team were upset about the surprise
season-ending loss in the tournament, they
took it out on the Fort Jennings Musketeers
on Monday night as the Bulldogs put up eight
runs in the first inning on their way to a 20-4
ACME-opening victory.
Riley Brubaker excelled on the mound and
in the field; the Grove lefty had a no-hitter
through four innings while going 3-for-4 at
the plate with three runs batted in. He struck
out seven and walked four in getting the win.
Josh Verhoff had a 3-for-5 performance
with a pair of singles and a double as the hosts
routed their PCL foe.
Fort Jennings was held scoreless for the
first four innings before putting up four in
the fifth: Mark Metzger and Alex Sealts had
run-scoring singles for the guests to avoid the
shutout.
The Bulldogs sent 12 batters to the plate in
the bottom of the first as the guests commit-
ted four errors in the inning. Brubaker singled
and doubled in the inning, Verhoff had a
2-base hit, Jake Utendorf drew a bases-loaded
walk to bring in one of the runs and Zack
Brinkman also singled in a run. The big hit of
the frame came off the bat of Brubaker when
he doubled home two, making it an 8-0 score.
Grove threatened again in the second, get-
ting the first two batters on before Jennings
starting pitcher Dylan Vanloo settled down to
retire the next three batters.
Brubaker struck out the side in the top of
the third, then the Bulldogs came back and
put three across in the bottom of the frame.
Elisha Jones, Brubaker and Verhoff had con-
secutive singles before Marcos Olivo singled
home two runs to put the Grove lead at 11-0
heading into the fourth.
The hosts duplicated their first-inning bat-
ter total in the bottom of the fourth but added
one more run to the Total, getting nine across
the plate in the inning. Mark Metzger came
on to pitch for the Musketeers, giving up all
nine runs.
Brinkman led off the inning with a walk,
followed by a Jones single. Metzger then
balked twice with Jones scoring on one of
the mistakes. Mason Smith delivered a 1-out
single to score a run; Tanner Neu brought
Smith around with a base hit to add to the
Bulldog total.
Olivo delivered a base hit to bring Smith to
third, putting runners on the corners with just
one out. Metzger then balked again, bring-
ing home Smith. Before the inning was over,
Jones and Verhoff both delivered run-scoring
singles, the latter bringing in run number 20.
The guests sent nine batters to the plate in
the fifth as Ryan Rau led off the inning with
a pop to the Grove shortstop but a dropped
ball allowed Rau to reach. Jared Horstman
followed with a double. Metzger and Sealts
followed with base hits, bringing in a run
each and after back-to-back walks — the lat-
ter issued to Alex Vetter that made it a 20-4
contest — Neu came on in relief of Brubaker
and struck out the next two batters to seal the
victory for the home team.
Fort Jennings (4)
Mark Metzger cf/p 3-1-1-1, Alex Sealts 2b
3-1-1-1, Bret Clay ss/p 1-0-0-0, Alex Vetter
3b 2-0-0-1, Conner Wollenhorst lf 2-0-0-0,
Caleb Bankey rf 3-0-0-0, Ryan Rau 1b/p/1b
3-1-0-0, Josh Vetter c 1-0-0-0, Jared Hoersten
ph 1-1-1-0, Dylan Vanloo p 0-0-0-0, Kyle
Hellman ph 1-0-0-0. Totals 20-4-3-3.
Columbus Grove 20
Elisha Jones c 5-3-3-2, Riley Brubaker p/
cf 4-3-3-3, Josh Verhoff 3b 5-2-3-1, Mason
Smith 4-2-2-2, Tanner Neu cf/p 4-2-1-1,
Marcos Olivo ss 3-2-2-2, Eli Schroeder 2-1-0-
1, Jake Untendorf 2b 3-2-1-2, Zach Brinkman
rf 3-3-1-1. Totals 34-20-16-15.
Score by Innings:
Fort Jennings 000 04 - 4 3 6
Columbus Grove 803 9x - 20 16 2
Pitching
IP R ER BB SO
Fort Jennings
Vanloo (L, 0-1) 2.1 8 3 1 2
Rau 0.2 3 3 1 1
Metzger 0.1 9 8 2 0
Clay 0.2 0 0 0 1
Columbus Grove
Brubaker (W, 1-0) 4.1 4 3 4 7
Neu 0.2 0 0 0 2
Monday ACME Round Up
The Associated Press
Rockies 5, Reds 4
CINCINNATI — Troy
Tulowitzki hit a 2-run homer
in the eighth inning — a call
changed after the umpires
initially ruled fan interfer-
ence — and the Colorado
Rockies held on for a 5-4
victory Tuesday night that
ended their streak of six con-
secutive losses to the Cincinnati Reds.
A fan with a glove in left field reached and grabbed
Tulowitzki’s fly ball off Sam LeCure (1-1). The umpires
initially ruled fan interference but changed the call and
awarded Tulowitzki his 13th homer after reviewing video
that showed the ball had cleared the wall.
The Reds took a 4-3 lead in the seventh on Edgmer
Escalona’s balk for a third-to-first pickoff fake — a play that
was outlawed this season. Josh Outman (2-0) fanned Joey
Votto and Jay Bruce to end that rally.
Rex Brothers pitched a perfect ninth.
Colorado pulled ahead 3-0 against Homer Bailey but
couldn’t hold on. Juan Nicasio gave up three runs in six
innings, with Ryan Hanigan driving in a pair.
Bailey had another bad inning against the Rockies, who
scored three times in the second. Jonathan Herrera doubled
home two runs and Dexter Fowler singled home another run
with two outs.
Todd Frazier led the Reds’ comeback. He extended his
hitting streak to five games with a double in the second and
scored on Hanigan’s groundout. Frazier doubled again, driv-
ing home a run in the fourth, and came around on Hanigan’s
double to tie it 3-all.
Michael Cuddyer singled and scored the Rockies’ first
run. Herrera finished with three hits.
Yankees 4, Indians 3
NEW YORK — David Phelps
followed the worst start of his
young career with his best, allow-
ing a mere infield single in six
shutout innings and getting home
run help from Mark Teixeira as
the New York Yankees beat the
Cleveland Indians 4-3 Tuesday
night.
Teixeira hit his second homer of
the season since coming off the DL
last Friday, a 3-run shot that made
it 4-0 in the third inning.
Drew Stubbs hit a 3-run homer
in the seventh off Joba Chamberlain. But Nick Swisher lined
into a key double play in the eighth and the Indians dropped
their third in a row — they also lost shortstop Asdrubal
Cabrera, putting him on the DL after he strained his right
quadriceps Monday night.
Phelps (4-3) wound up fanning seven with four walks.
The lone hit against him came when Stubbs beat out a slow
roller to shortstop in the third.
David Robertson escaped a first-and-second, no-out jam
in the eighth when Swisher lined to second baseman Jayson
Nix, whose flip doubled Jason Kipnis off second.
Mariano Rivera struck out two in the ninth for his 21st
save.
Scott Kazmir (3-3) breezed through the first two innings,
then gave up five straight hits to open the third. Teixeira
capped the burst with his homer.
Lyle Overbay opened the Yankees’ third with a double
and Chris Stewart singled but was caught trying to advance.
Ichiro Suzuki followed with an RBI single, Nix singled and
Teixeira homered down the left-field line.
Ohio MLB Capsules
8 – The Herald Wednesday, June 5, 2013 www.delphosherald.com
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Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
Construction
AMISH
CARPENTERS
ALL TYPES OF
CONSTRUCTION
Build or Remodel
For all your metal siding and
roofing needs contact us.
FOR FREE ESTIMATE
260-585-4368
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
Joe Miller
Construction
Experienced Amish Carpentry
Roofing, remodeling,
concrete, pole barns, garages
or any construction needs.
Cell 567-644-6030
AT YOUR
S
ervice
Is Your Ad Here?
Call Today
419 695-0015
Advertise Your
Business
DAILY
For a low, low
price!
HELP WANTED
STORAGE ASSISTANT
High School diploma/GED. Courteous, friend-
ly, able to follow directions, and to multi-task.
Some lifting. Assist with custodial work when
needed. Flexible hours, 20-24 hours/week.
SHOP CUSTODIAN
High school diploma/GED. Some lifting.
Courteous, friendly and interpersonal skills
required. Ability to perform a wide variety of
custodial duties in order to provide a clean
and orderly environment and able to perform
related work as required. 35 hours/week.
Send resume to P.O. Box 111, c/o The Delphos
Herald, 405 N. Main St., Delphos, OH 45833
105 Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU
can place a 25 word
classified ad in more
than 100 newspapers
with over one and a half
million total circulation
across Ohio for $295. It’s
easy...you place one or-
der and pay with one
check through Ohio
Scan-Ohio Advertising
Network. The Delphos
Herald advertising dept.
can set this up for you.
No other classified ad
buy is simpler or more
cost effecti ve. Cal l
419-695-0015 ext. 138
110 Card Of Thanks
WE WISH to thank eve-
ryone who sent cards,
gifts, phone calls, good
wishes and especially
our children and all the
grandchildren for our
60th anniversary.
All of you made the day
perfect.
Elmer & Raylene Fischer
210 Child Care
ARE YOU looking for a
child care provider in
your area? Let us help.
Call YWCA Child Care
Resource and Referral
at: 1-800-992-2916 or
(419)225-5465
210 Child Care
WOULD YOU like to be
an in-home child care
provider? Let us help.
Call YWCA Child Care
Resource and Referral
at: 1-800-992-2916 or
(419)225-5465
305
Apartment For
Rent
DELUXE 1 & 2 bedroom
apartments for rent.
Quiet, secure setting,
appliance and utilities in-
cluded. Starting at $675.
419-233-3430
325
Mobile Homes
For Rent
1 BEDROOM mobile
home for rent. Ph.
419-692-3951
RENT OR Rent to Own.
2 bedroom, 1 bath mo-
bile home. 419-692-3951
555
Garage Sales/
Yard Sales
1201 CAROLYN Dr.
Thur 6/6 9:00am-6:00pm
Fri 6/7 9:00am-6:00pm
Clothes -various sizes,
toys, games, decor, fur-
ni ture, beddi ng and
much more. Everything
in good condition.
555
Garage Sales/
Yard Sales
127 E. Cleveland.
Thursday thru Saturday
9am-5pm. Puzzles, yarn,
motor hoist, golf clubs,
doiles, clothes, lots of
misc. Everything cheap!
132 MICHELE Drive,
Lehmann’ s Woods.
Thur s June 6t h
5:30-8:00pm, Fri June
7th 8:00am-6:00pm.
Girls, Junior, Ladies
clothing. Used furniture,
miscellaneous dishes,
dart board, girls bike,
knick-knacks, and lots of
misc.
21536 STATE Rd.
Multi-Family. Boys &
girls clothes size 3-5,
toys, shoes & household
items. Thursday & Friday
9am-6pm.
22440 LINCOLN Hwy
2mi west of Delphos.
Collector items: books,
NASCAR, Franklin Mint,
dolls, records. Also:
tools, clothes, small ap-
pliances & much more.
Thurs -Fri 8am-6pm, Sat
8am-2pm
328 S. Pierce. Thurs-Fri
8am-6pm, Sat 8am-?.
Mens, Womens and
Childrens clothes (lots of
girls). Toys, home decor,
household items, bed-
ding and misc.
9 FAMILY Garage Sale.
June 6th-7th 9am-7pm,
June 8th 9am-12pm.
Health & beauty, plants,
ant i ques , book s ,
dresser, 2 microwaves,
clothes: Misses 14,
large, girls 0-5T. Longa-
berger baskets, purses,
hair accessories, Harley
shirts, 15”tires.
560
Home
Furnishings
BEDROOM DRESSER
set: Broyhill 5 drawer
dresser and matching 7
drawer triple dresser
w/mirror. Good Condition
-Solid Wood -$150.
Call 419-695-2129 after
3:00pm.
577 Miscellaneous
FOR SALE: Sunsetter
Awning. 17’ x 10’. Very
good condition. $190.00.
Call 419-695-3995
583
Pets and
Supplies
ADORABLE, SMALL,
finally ready Yorkie pup-
pies. Also Shihtzu/Hava-
nese, Boxers. One male
adult Maltese. Garwick’s
t he Pet Peopl e
419-795-5711.
garwicksthepetpeople.com
FREE TO a good home:
Orange male tiger kitten,
13 weeks old. Born to a
female house cat with
shots. Ph: 419-233-1907
or 419-692-0423
592 Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
640 Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
(419) 223-7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities,
or work at home oppor-
tunities. The BBB will as-
sist in the investigation
of these businesses.
(This notice provided as
a customer service by
The Delphos Herald.)
670 Miscellaneous
LAMP REPAIR
Table or Floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
810
Auto Parts and
Accessories
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders, Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
930 Legals
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING ON TAX
BUDGET
Two copies of the Tax
Budget as tentatively
adopted for the Delphos
Public Library of Del-
phos, Ohio, in Allen and
Van Wert Counties, Ohio
are on file in the office of
the Clerk of the Delphos
Public Library. These are
for public inspection. A
Public Hearing will be at
the First Addition Build-
ing on First St. on
Wednesday June 12,
2013 at 4:00 p.m.
Janet L. Bonifas
Clerk/Treasurer
Delphos Public Library
080 Help Wanted
DANCER LOGISTICS is
looking for Class-A CDL
driver with at least 2
years experience for
home daily runs, over
the road and regional.
Great Benefits and great
home time and your
weekends off. Also look-
ing for Teams to run
West Coast. Please ap-
ply at 900 Gressel Dr.,
Delphos, OH or call
419-692-1435
DIESEL-TRAILER ME-
CHANIC with own tools
for Van Wert operation.
Experience with Class 8
tractor/trailer, having a
CDL class A is a plus.
Salary based on experi-
ence. Fax resume to
419-623-4651 or call
419-238-2155
HIRING DRIVERS
with 5+years OTR expe-
rience! Our drivers aver-
age 42cents per mile &
higher! Home every
weekend!
$55,000-$60,000 annu-
ally. Benefits available.
99% no touch freight!
We will treat you with re-
spect! PLEASE CALL
419-222-1630
HOME HEALTH AIDE
Par t - t i me, Put nam
County. Must be flexible,
work weekends, pick up
extra shifts. Prompt, reli-
able, dependable, good
work ethic. Application
online or pick-up at:
Community Health
Professionals
602 E. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH 45833
ComHealthPro.org
LOCAL RETAI LER
needs part-time delivery
and warehouse person
with valid driver’s li-
cense. Send replies to
Box 110 c/o Delphos
Herald, 405 N. Main St.,
Delphos, OH 45833
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k.
Home weekends, & most
nights. Call Ulm’s Inc.
419-692-3951
303 Duplex For Rent
NEWER 1/2 Duplex. 2
bedroom, 1.5 bath, 1 car
attached garage. 707
Euclid. References & de-
posit required. $575/mo.
Call Cindy 419-234-7208
FOR SALE: Love Seat,
blue, like new. $30.00
Cal l af t er 2pm.
419-695-8751
953
Free and Low
Priced Merchandise
Answer to Puzzle
Today’s Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Alas,toHelmut
4 Oretruck
8 Hummus,e.g.
11 Chopweeds
12 Hitch----
13 Dory’sneed
14 Long-armed pri-
mate
16 Psyche compo-
nent
17 Blandpudding
18 Pointer
20 Poet’sbefore
21 Slick
22 GirlfromBaja
25 Highestbranch
29 Assistant
30 Jr.’sson,maybe
31 IvyLeaguer
32 Puborder
33 Mantrachants
34 Philosopher
35 A p p o i n t m e n t
breakers(hyph.)
38 Fineviolin,briefy
39 Ms.Hagenofflms
40 --Jima
41 Boastabout
44 Lovey-dovey
48 Fallmo.
49 Settingsail
51 Prefxfor“dent”
52 Govern
53 Afre
54 Sushifsh
55 Cloy
56 Ave.crossers
DOWN
1 “Cat on -- -- Tin
Roof”
2 Dagwood’s boss’s
wife
3 Mound
4 Cease-fre
5 Comic--Rudner
6 Tooth-fllers’org.
7 Threat
8 Activesort
9 Villain in Shake-
speare
10 Figurehead’sspot
12 Socrates’hangout
15 Familymember
19 Blendedwhiskey
21 Latespringfower
22 “Misery”co-star
23 PortnearKilauea
24 Caesar’s worst
day
25 Holt and Consi-
dine
26 Ripopen
27 Gymnast--Korbut
28 Dappled
30 Captain Kirk’s
home
34 Chimneynester
36 Romewrecker
37 Web-footed mam-
mals
38 Avowed
40 Snapshot
41 Useaballot
42 Ranchsegment
43 Tel.orelec.
44 Just slightly (2
wds.)
45 Oldmasters
46 Voltorwatt
47 Baneofpvts.
50 “Call----cab”
Planning a
garage sale?
Advertise it
here!
419-695-0015
DEAR DOCTOR K: I tore my
ACL.Issurgeryinevitable?
DEAR READER: The anterior
cruciateligament(ACL)isabandof
tissue that runs through the middle
of the knee joint and keeps the
shinbone from sliding forward past
the thighbone. The ACL can tear
during a sudden or awkward twist,
turn or stop. More often than not,
it’s these non-contact injuries that
injure an ACL. Between 100,000
and200,000ACLinjuriesoccureach
yearintheUnitedStates.
Women are more vulnerable to
ACL injuries than men, but it’s not
clearwhy.Theanatomyofawoman’s
kneeisdifferentfromaman’s.When
a woman pivots or stops suddenly
whilerunning,herkneeisbentmore
inwardthanaman’s.Thisputsmore
strainontheACL.
Obesity and weakness of the
hamstringmusclesinthebackofthe
thigh also appear to be associated
withACLinjury.
For elite athletes, the treatment
isfairlyclear:reconstructivesurgery
to replace the ACL, plus intense
physical therapy. The sports that
most often are associated with
ACL injuries are skiing, football and
gymnastics.
I’massumingthat,likemostofus,
you’rearecreationalathlete.Ifso,the
answerisoftendifferent.IfyourACL
is only partially torn, then forgoing
surgery in favor of rehabilitation
through physical therapy is worth
considering.Surgerycouldstillbean
optiondowntheroad.
Physical therapy can strengthen
the muscles around your knee
enough so they compensate for
the non-workingACL.A knee brace
could protect your ACL during an
occasionaltennisorsoccergame.
Without surgery, you should
recover enough to be active again
within two or three months. That’s
comparedwithaboutsixmonthsfor
surgery patients. On the flip side,
surgery will make your joint more
stable than physical therapy rehab
alone.
OnceyourACLhashealed,these
exercisescanhelppreventre-injury:
--Strengthenthemusclesaround
the knee. Keeping your quadriceps
(front of the thigh) and hamstring
muscles strong and flexible will
make the knee more stable. One
exercisethatstrengthensthequads
and hamstrings is a walking lunge.
This involves taking a large step
forwardanddroppingthebackknee
downtowardthefloor,keepingyour
frontkneeoveryourankle.
-- Keep your hip muscles strong.
One-legged squats -- knee bends
donewhilestandingononeleg--are
a great way to strengthen the hips,
quadriceps and hamstrings and to
improveyourbalance.Whenyoudo
aone-leggedsquat,bendyourknee
slowly so it ends up just over your
toes.
(I’ve put an illustration of the
correct way to perform a walking
lunge and one-legged squat on my
website,AskDoctorK.com.)
You and your doctor will need to
carefullyconsidertheextentofyour
injury, your age, your activities and
other factors when determining the
best treatment for your ACL injury.
Whether you have surgical or non-
surgical treatment, studies have
foundthataftertherecoveryperiod,
you’llbemuchimproved.
(Dr. Komaroff is a physician
and professor at Harvard Medical
School. To send questions, go to
AskDoctorK.com, or write: Ask
Doctor K, 10 Shattuck St., Second
Floor, Boston, MA 02115.)
**
Distributed by Universal UClick
forUFS
Physical therapy is one
solution to torn ACL
Dr. Anthony Komaroff
On
Health
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS
Putnam County
TOALJO LLC, 28.0 acres,
Union Township, to Unverferth
ManufacturingCompanyInc.
Unverferth Manufacturing
Company Inc., 72.12 acres Sugar
Creek Township, 1.70 acres Sugar
Creek Township, .20 acre Sugar
CreekTownship 1.535 acres Sugar
Creek Township, .196 acre Sugar
Creek Township and .094 acre
Sugar Creek Township to TOALJO
LLC.
Dorothy A. Culp and Richard P.
Schey, Lot 914, Leipsic, to Melinda
S.HermillerandDerekR.Hermiller.
Mark G. Honigford and Shaunna
G. Honigford, 1.0820 acres,
Monterey Township and .401
acre Monterey Township to Mark
G. Honigford and Shaunna G.
Honigford.
Gilboa Riverside Rentals LLC,
Lot20,Gilboa,toGeraldJ.Hovest.
Howard L. Coleman Jr., Marilyn
Coleman,BobbyD.Coleman,Wanda
Coleman, Ronald S. Coleman,
RochelleColeman,TeresaL.Jones,
Larry Jones, Brenda S. Thedford,
William Thedford, Wanda J. Winkle
andRonaldWinkle,Lot123,Cityof
Hector, to Howard L. Coleman Jr.
andMarilynM.Coleman.
Shilo Systems LLC, Lot 120 and
Lot 119, Anderson Sub., Sugar
Creek Township to Lloyd C. Collar
LEandShirleeA.CollarLE.
Lloyd C. Collar LE and Shirlee
A. Collar LE, parcel Sugar Creek
TownshiptoShiloSystemsLLC.
LloydC.CollarTRandShirleeA.
Collar TR, Lot 120 and Lot
119, Anderson Sub., Sugar
Creek Township to Shilo
SystemsLLC.
Lisa Brenneman fka
Lisa Schulte an Robb
Brenneman, 24.97 acres
Greensburg Township to
Paul B. Schulte and Linda
MarieSchulte.
Danielle N. Deitering,
2.218 acres Monterey
Township to Scott L.
Deitering.
Terry L. Snyder and
Virginia K. Snyder, parcels
Jennings Township, .054
acre Jennings Township
and .523 acre Jennings
Township to Terry L. Snyder and
VirginiaK.Snyder.
Adam M. Montgomery and
Wendy L. Montgomery fka Wendy
L. Meyerholtz, Lot 181, Lot 182
and Lot 188, Pandora, to Brian A.
MeyerholtzandJodyR.Meyerholtz.
Donald R. Schroeder, Julia M.
Schroeder, Gilbert J. Kaufman,
JoyceA. Kaufman, John P. Siefker,
Patricia M. Siefker, Roger F.
Schroeder, Jo Ann Schroeder,
DennisJ.SchroederandCatherine
R. Schroeder, .047 acre, Glandorf
and .243 acre Ottawa Township,
to John P. Siefker and Patricia M.
Siefker.
Maria Puente, Lot 112, West
Leipsic,toBettyBerger.
Thomas E. Hermiller and Joyce
A. Hermiller, 3.034 acres, Pleasant
Township to Kenneth J. Hermiller
andDonnaJaneHermiller.
Thomas G. Brokamp and Joyce
Brokamp, 1.107 acres Jennings
Township, to Eric T. Brokamp and
KelseyR.Askins.
JeremyJ.GertenandBriannaL.
GertenfkaBriannaL.Higbie,3.974
acresOttawaTownshiptoMichaelJ.
Schroeder.
Roger Landin LE and Darlene
Landin LE, 37.09 acres Jackson
Township, 39.09 acres Jackson
Township 56.69 acres Jackson
Township and .589 acre Jackson
Township to Troy A. Landin and
ChadA.Landin.
Federal Home Loan Mortgage
Corporation, Lot 11, Lot 12, Lot 13
andLot14,WestLeipsic,andparcel
LibertyTownship,toDavidCochran
andCynthiaCochran.
Denise A. Schroeder, 1.772
acres Union Township to WayneA.
Schroeder.
CharlesC.NieseandTheresaD.
Niese,.608acrePalmerTownshipto
MartinR.NieseandAmyL.Niese.
Robert H. Hanneman, Jane
M. Hanneman, Christopher R.
HannemanandMelissaHanneman,
1.402acresUnionTownshiptoAlan
R.Brickner.
Christopher R. Hanneman and
MelissaHanneman,1.15acreUnion
TownshiptoAlanR.Brickner.
H & L Koenig Farms LLC, 1.250
acres Blanchard Township, to
MichaelKoenig.
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Wednesday Evening June 5, 2013
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WPTA/ABC Middle Family Mod Fam How-Live ABC's The Lookout Local Jimmy Kimmel Live Nightline
WHIO/CBS The American Baking Criminal Minds CSI: Crime Scene Local Late Show Letterman Ferguson
WLIO/NBC Dateline NBC Law & Order: SVU Chicago Fire Local Tonight Show w/Leno J. Fallon
WOHL/FOX MasterChef Local
ION WWE Main Event Flashpoint Flashpoint Flashpoint Flashpoint
Cable Channels
A & E Duck D. Duck D. Duck D. Duck D. Duck D. Duck D. Duck D. Duck D. Duck D. Duck D.
AMC National Lamp. Christmas Vegas Vacation National Lampoon's Vacation
ANIM Tanked Tanked Treehouse Masters Tanked Tanked
BET Secret of Bees Steve Harvey Wendy Williams Show
BRAVO Housewives/OC Million Dollar Chef Roblé & Co. Million Dollar Housewives/NJ
CMT Music Awards Redneck Island CMT Music Awards 2013
CNN Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Live Anderson Cooper 360 E. B. OutFront Piers Morgan Live
COMEDY Futurama Futurama South Pk South Pk Futurama South Pk Daily Colbert South Pk South Pk
DISC Acts of Science MythBusters MythBusters MythBusters MythBusters
DISN G-Force Gravity Jessie Dog Austin Shake It Cory Cory
E! E! News A-List Kardashian The Soup The Soup Chelsea E! News Chelsea
ESPN College Softball SportsCenter SportsCenter
ESPN2 MLB Baseball Baseball Tonight Nation at Night Baseball Tonight
FAM Melissa Daddy Dancing Melissa The Fosters The 700 Club Prince Prince
FOOD Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Restaurant Stakeout Mystery D Mystery D Restaurant: Im.
FX Salt Salt Deep Rising
HGTV Elbow Elbow Property Brothers Hunters Hunt Intl Property Brothers Property Brothers
HIST American Pickers Larry the Cable Guy Top Shot All-Stars Top Shot All-Stars American Pickers
LIFE Unsolved Mysteries Unsolved Mysteries Unsolved Mysteries Unsolved Mysteries Unsolved Mysteries
MTV Girl Code Girl Code The Real World The Real World The Real World Girl Code Girl Code
NICK Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se The Nanny The Nanny Friends Friends Friends Friends
SCI Haunted Collector Haunted Collector Paranormal Witness Haunted Collector Paranormal Witness
SPIKE Snakes on a Plane Piranha Never Ever Do This at Home
TBS Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan Office Conan
TCM The Far Country Winchester '73 Devil's Doorway
TLC Breaking Amish: Brav Toddlers & Tiaras The Good The Good Toddlers & Tiaras The Good The Good
TNT Castle Castle Castle The Mentalist Major Crimes
TOON NinjaGo Teen King/Hill King/Hill Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Chicken Aqua Teen
TRAV Burger Burger Toy Hntr Toy Hntr Mexican Food Paradis Sausage Paradise Toy Hntr Toy Hntr
TV LAND Cleveland The Exes Raymond Raymond Cleveland Soul Man King King The King of Queens
USA NCIS NCIS NCIS NCIS NCIS
VH1 Greatest Songs Greatest Songs Bringing Up Baby Model Employee Hit the Floor
WGN Rules Rules Rules Rules WGN News at Nine Funniest Home Videos Rules Rules
Premium Channels
HBO Trouble With the Curve Veep Game of Thrones Real Time/Bill Maher Family True
MAX Banshee Heat
SHOW All In: Poker 60 Minutes Sports The Borgias 60 Minutes Sports Jim Rome on Showtime
©2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
Wednesday, June 5, 2013 The Herald – 9
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
‘Seeing’ should
warn boss of
Nigerian scam
Dear Annie: I have
worked for many years at
a small family-owned com-
pany. I believe my boss has
been the victim of a scam,
but I can’t tell her.
For several years, my
boss has been communicat-
ing with a gentleman who
claims to be Nigerian. He
keeps telling her he is sup-
posed to come to America
in the near future and will
bring her a check
for $40 million. I
don’t see it hap-
pening. There are
three people send-
ing this man mon-
ey. By now, they
have probably
given him more
than $100,000.
When I am at
work, my boss
asks whether the
man has sent any
emails, and if not,
she wants me to write to
him. Every few weeks, he
says the trip has to be post-
poned, and then he needs
more money for a new tick-
et. How do I tell her I don’t
want to be involved with
this any longer? –Seeing a
Scam
Dear Seeing: The “Nige-
rian scam” has been around
for a very long time, and we
are surprised people still
fall for it. This man will
never come to this country
with $40 million, but he’s
certainly doing a good job
of collecting money from
naive people like your boss.
Not only should you stop
contacting this man, but
you also should protect your
boss by informing her that
this is a scam and she should
report it to the local FBI of-
fce or register a complaint
with the Federal Trade
Commission. Of course, if
she chooses to ignore you
and contact him on her own,
there is nothing you can do.
Some people have to learn
the hard way.
Dear Annie: My husband
and I live on a quiet dead-
end street. Quiet, that is, un-
til the neighbors rev up their
Harleys. They have two mo-
torcycles that have been al-
tered to be much louder than
the factory intended. These
neighbors often come home
well after midnight and
sometimes leave early on
Sunday mornings, making it
impossible to sleep with our
bedroom window open.
When they travel back
and forth during the day,
the thunderous noise is
quite disturbing. I realize
that some Harley owners
feel that the loud pipes and
leather are a form of pres-
tige, but I wonder whether
they ever consider their
neighbors. Please, Harley
owners, pipe down! –Hate
Those Harleys
Dear Hate: Have you
asked your neighbors di-
rectly whether they would
please muffe the noise un-
til they are out on the open
road? Does your neighbor-
hood have a noise ordinance
prohibiting such volume
at certain hours? Is there a
neighborhood association to
resolve conficts? Don’t give
up without frst checking to
see whether you
have any recourse
in the matter.
Dear Annie: I
read the letter from
“Helpless, Tired
Granny,” who is
raising her four
grandchildren, and
two of them are
terribly messed up.
That letter moved
me. My two old-
est sons were won-
derful little boys,
but something changed in
middle school, and they be-
came rebellious and angry.
They would skip school and
run away. They were so out
of control that we could not
have family events.
Counseling didn’t work
until we took our older boy
to a psychiatrist when he be-
gan using drugs. They even-
tually were both diagnosed
with bipolar disorder. Now,
even though we still have
our ups and downs, we have
our happy family back, and
my sons are preparing for
their futures.
My suggestion for “Help-
less” is to get help. She
should get a referral to a
psychiatrist and fnd out
whether her local health de-
partment has a program for
grandparents in her situa-
tion. Government programs
have a lot to offer, but you
have to ask. She needs to be
strong. –Been There
Annie’s Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
THURSDAY, JUNE 6, 2013
In the coming months, many
opportunities are likely to come
your way. Even if you don’t initiate
them, you’ll play a role in guiding
them to fruition and will reap the
rewards.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-- You’re in an exceptionally
good achievement cycle, but your
victories could come about in a
surprising way. It’ll be a last-minute
change that does the trick.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-- A friend might lean on you in
hopes that your capability will rub
off. Do your best to help this person
-- you’ll need similar assistance in
the near future.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- An
opportunity to make more money
from a work-related matter is yours
for the taking. You may need to
modify it somewhat, but it should
be easy.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-- Profit from past experience and
don’t fall into a trap that has snared
you before. Old mistakes don’t
have to be repeated.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
You are likely to fare better in a
joint endeavor than a solo effort.
Pick your ally wisely and you’ll do
quite well.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) --
Because you’re as much of a giver
as you are a taker, you’ll be in high
demand. Your good attitude will be
a boon to your team.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) -- To feel gratified, you’ll
need to engage in an activity that
produces real benefits for you and
others. Start the ball rolling quickly.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- You’ll instinctively know
how to arouse interest in your wares,
making you a good salesperson.
You’ll need to be careful when it
comes to actually handling money,
however.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- One of your greatest assets is a
desire to do things for others that
they can’t do themselves. If you
utilize this wonderful gift, you will
generate a plethora of good will.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- Mental tasks will be much easier
than work requiring physical effort.
If there is some type of heavy lifting
on the agenda, hire helpers.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- You’ll have some very good
chances to add to your material
resources if you assert yourself.
Don’t be afraid to make extra funds
by doing something new.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) --
If you’re permitted to use your own
ideas at work, you’ll stand a much
greater chance of success. Do what
you can on your own and don’t be
thwarted by outside forces.

COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature
Syndicate, Inc.
Answers to Monday’s questions:
A human’s chronotype is an individual’s body clock or
natural internal rhythm — the circadian factors that deter-
mine whether someone is a morning person, an evening
person, or neither.
Bette Midler jokingly said her film The First Wives
Club (1997) “had strong American values: divorce, alco-
holism, plastic surgery and revenge.”
Today’s questions:
Where did the Norway rat, also known as the brown
rat, originate?
Members of what popular rock group were the first
Western artists to receive royalties in the Soviet Union?
Answers in Thursday’s Herald.
Today’s joke:
A boy had reached four without giving up the habit of
sucking his thumb, though his mother had tried every-
thing from bribery to reasoning to painting it with lemon
juice to discourage the habit. Finally she tried threats,
warning her son that, “If you don’t stop sucking your
thumb, your stomach is going to blow up like a balloon.”
Later that day, walking in the park, mother and son
saw a pregnant woman sitting on a bench. The 4-year-
old considered her gravely for a minute, then spoke to
her saying, “Uh-oh … I know what you’ve been doing.”
10 – The Herald Wednesday, June 5, 2013 www.delphosherald.com
Chrysler refuses US
request to recall vehicles
TOM KRISHER
AP Auto Writers
DETROIT — A defiant Chrysler is refusing to recall about
2.7 million Jeeps the government says are at risk of a fuel tank
fire in a rear-end collision.
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration sent
Chrysler a letter asking that the company voluntarily recall
Jeep Grand Cherokees from 1993 through 2004 and Jeep
Libertys from 2002 through 2007.
Chrysler Group (NYSE:DCX) LLC, which is majority-
owned by Italy’s Fiat SpA, said in a statement Tuesday that the
Jeeps are safe and it “does not intend to recall the vehicles.”
Such a refusal by an auto company is rare. NHTSA can
order a recall but needs a court order to enforce it.
David Strickland, the agency’s administrator, said in a state-
ment that he hopes Chrysler will reconsider its decision. “Our
data shows that these vehicles may contain a defect that pres-
ents an unreasonable risk to safety,” Strickland said.
NHTSA opened an investigation into the Jeeps in August
2010 at the request of the Center for Auto Safety, a Washington,
D.C., advocacy group. Clarence Ditlow, the center’s director,
has repeatedly sent letters to Chrysler seeking a recall.
ITC rules for Samsung,
bans iPhone 4 imports
AP Technology Writer
NEW YORK — A U.S.
trade agency on Tuesday
issued a ban on imports of
Apple’s iPhone 4 and a vari-
ant of the iPad 2 after finding
the devices violate a patent
held by South Korean rival
Samsung Electronics.
Because the devices are
assembled in China, the
import would end Apple’s
ability to sell them in the U.S.
However, President Barack
Obama has 60 days to inval-
idate Tuesday’s order from
the U.S. International Trade
Commission in Washington.
Obama is against import bans
on the basis of the type of
patent at issue in the Samsung
case. On Tuesday, the White
House issued a recommenda-
tion to Congress that it limit
the ITC’s ability to impose
import bans in these cases.
Apple Inc. said it was “dis-
appointed” with the ruling
and will appeal.
Samsung and Apple are
engaged in a global legal bat-
tle over their smartphones,
with Apple arguing that
Samsung and its Android
phones copy vital features of
the iPhone. Samsung is fight-
ing back with its own com-
plaints.
Ohio St. president retires after Notre Dame jabs
Associated Press
COLUMBUS — Ohio State University
President Gordon Gee abruptly announced
his retirement Tuesday after he came
under fire for jokingly referring to “those
damn Catholics” at Notre Dame and pok-
ing fun at the academic quality of other
schools.
The remarks were first reported last week
by The Associated Press, and Ohio State at
the time called them unacceptable and said
it had placed Gee on a “remediation plan” to
change his behavior.
Gee, 69, said in a teleconference that the
furor was only part of his decision to retire,
which he said he had been considering for a
while. He said his age and the start of a long-
term planning process at the university were
also factors.
“I live in turbulent times and I’ve had a lot
of headwinds, and so almost every occasion,
I have just moved on,” he said. Gee explained
away the abrupt timing by saying he was
“quirky as hell” and hated long transitions.
He also said he didn’t regret the way he
conducted himself as a higher education
leader.
“I have regrets when I have said things that
I shouldn’t have said, but I have no regrets
about having a sense of humor and having a
thick skin and enjoying life,” Gee said.
According to a recording of a Dec. 5 meet-
ing obtained by the AP under a public records
request, Gee, a Mormon, said Notre Dame
was never invited to join the Big Ten athletic
conference because “you just can’t trust those
damn Catholics.”
Gee also took shots at schools in the
Southeastern Conference and the University
of Louisville, according to the recording of
the meeting of the school’s Athletic Council.
Gee apologized when the comments were
disclosed, saying they were “a poor attempt at
humor and entirely inappropriate.”
His decision to retire was first reported by
The Columbus Dispatch.
Robert Schottenstein, who as chairman of
the university’s board of trustees condemned
the remarks last week as “wholly unac-
ceptable” and “not presidential in nature,”
deflected questions about whether Gee had
been forced out by the board.
“It’s really about a decision to retire for
the reasons that Gordon has articulated,”
Schottenstein said.
Ohio State, one of the biggest universities
in the nation, with 65,000 students, named
provost Joseph Alutto as interim president.
Gee, a familiar figure on campus with his
bowties and owlish eyeglasses, has repeatedly
gotten in trouble over the years for verbal
gaffes. Tuesday’s news lit up Twitter, with
numerous posts using the hashtag (hash)
savethebowtie.
Ohio State trustees learned of Gee’s latest
remarks in January and created the reme-
diation plan. In a March 11 letter, the trustees
warned any repeat offenses could lead to his
firing and ordered him to apologize to those
he offended. But it appeared that several of
Gee’s apologies came only in the last week
or so as the school prepared to respond to the
AP’s inquiries.
Gee said Tuesday he waited until recently
to apologize in person to the Notre Dame
president, Rev. John Jenkins, because they
had a long-scheduled meeting. Schottenstein
said the board was satisfied with Gee’s
response to the letter.
On Monday, Gee withdrew as Saturday’s
commencement speaker at a Catholic high
school in Columbus, saying he wanted the
focus to remain on the students.
In the recording of his meeting with the
Athletic Council, Gee said that the top goal
of Big Ten presidents is to “make certain
that we have institutions of like-minded aca-
demic integrity. So you won’t see us adding
Louisville.” After laughter from the audience,
Gee added that the Big Ten wouldn’t add the
University of Kentucky, either.
When asked by a questioner how to
respond to SEC fans who say the Big Ten
can’t count because it now has 14 members,
Gee said: “You tell the SEC when they can
learn to read and write, then they can figure
out what we’re doing.”
Notre Dame and the SEC had no comment
on Gee’s retirement.
Gee also came under fire in 2011 for some
offhand remarks he made during a scandal
on football coach Jim Tressel’s watch. Asked
whether he had considered firing Tressel, Gee
said: “No, are you kidding? Let me just be
very clear: I’m just hopeful the coach doesn’t
dismiss me.”
Tressel, later forced out by the university,
said in a statement Tuesday it had been an
honor to work with Gee.
Last year, Gee apologized for saying that
coordinating the school’s many divisions was
like running the Polish army, a remark that a
Polish-American group called bigoted.
In 1992, in a moment of frustration over
higher-education funding, Gee referred to
then-Gov. George Voinovich as “a damn
dummy.” Voinovich said Tuesday there were
no hard feelings and he considered Gee one of
his best friends.
Gee didn’t edit himself much Tuesday
during a teleconference announcing his retire-
ment, joking about the imposition of “this
damn telephone call.”
“I’ve only got a month to ruin the univer-
sity,” he quipped. “I’ve got to get at it.”
Gee was named the country’s best college
president in 2010 by Time magazine. He has
held the top job at West Virginia University,
the University of Colorado, Brown and
Vanderbilt. He was Ohio State president from
1990 to 1997 and returned in 2007. He makes
about $1.9 million a year in base pay, retire-
ment benefits and other compensation.
He is a prolific fundraiser and is leading
a $2.5 billion campaign at Ohio State. He is
omnipresent on campus, attending everything
from faculty awards events to dormitory pizza
parties.
Allison Roda, 22, one of many Ohio State
students stunned by the news, lamented she’d
have to graduate without him.
“This is just so upsetting. He just repre-
sents everything great about college life,”
Roda, a fifth-year senior from Broadview
Heights in suburban Cleveland, said as she
walked on Ohio State’s giant green dubbed
the “Oval.” She said she is a Catholic who
considered attending Notre Dame and she
wasn’t offended by Gee’s remarks.
Gov. John Kasich praised Gee on Tuesday
as “a tremendous partner in transforming
Ohio’s fragmented higher education system
into one better focused on fueling Ohio’s
economic recovery and helping students meet
their goals.”
Judge accepts insanity plea
in Colo. shooting case
Associated Press
CENTENNIAL, Colo. — A judge
accepted James Holmes’ long-awaited plea
of not guilty by reason of insanity Tuesday
and ordered him to undergo a mental evalu-
ation — an examination that could be a
decisive factor in whether the Colorado
theater shooting suspect is convicted and
sentenced to die.
The judge also granted prosecutors access
to a hotly contested notebook that Holmes
sent to a psychiatrist shortly before the July
20 rampage, which left 12 people dead and
70 injured in a bloody, bullet-riddled movie
theater in suburban Denver.
Taken together, the three develop-
ments marked a major step forward in
the 10-month-old case, which at times has
inched along through thickets of legal argu-
ments or veered off on tangents.
Holmes faces more than 160 counts of
murder and attempted murder, and prosecu-
tors are seeking the death penalty.
He will now be examined by the Colorado
Mental Health Institute in Pueblo, but it’s
not certain when the evaluation will begin or
how long it will take. Hospital officials have
said that before they meet with Holmes, they
want to review evidence in the case, which
prosecutors said totals nearly 40,000 pages.
Judge Carlos Samour Jr. set a tentative
date of Aug. 2 for the exam to be complete
but said he would push that back if hospital
officials request more time. Samour indi-
cated he still hopes to begin Holmes’ trial
in February.
Holmes, 25, shuffled into court with his
wrists and ankles shackled, wearing a long,
bushy beard and dark, curly hair that was
slicked back.
Samour read Holmes a five-page list of
consequences of the insanity plea and asked
if he had any questions.
“No,” Holmes answered in a clear, firm
voice. It was only the second time since his
arrest that he has spoken in court, other than
occasional whispered exchanges with his
attorneys.
The findings of the mental evaluation
will become evidence in Homes’ trial, but
they are not the final word on whether he
was legally insane at the time of the shoot-
ings. The jurors will determine that.
If their verdict is not guilty by reason
of insanity, Holmes would be committed
to the Mental Health Institute indefinitely.
He could theoretically be released one day
if doctors determine his sanity has been
restored, but that is considered unlikely.
If their verdict is guilty, jurors would then
decide whether Holmes will be executed or
spend the rest of his life in prison without the
possibility of parole.
Colorado law defines insanity as the
inability to distinguish right from wrong
caused by a diseased or defective mind.
Marcus Weaver, who was wounded and
lost his friend Rebecca Wingo in the shoot-
ing, doesn’t believe Holmes is insane but is
grateful the case is moving forward.
“As we’ve seen evidence and seen the
case unfold, it’s become more evident that
Mr. Holmes did what he did, and it had
nothing to do with his mental state,” he said.
The insanity plea is widely seen as
Holmes’ best chance of avoiding execution,
but his lawyers delayed it for weeks, saying
Colorado’s laws on the insanity plea and the
death penalty could work in combination to
violate his constitutional rights.
The judge overruled their objections last
week, but on Tuesday he conceded one
point: Neither Holmes nor his lawyers had
to sign a statement or say in court that they
understood the five-page list of consequenc-
es of the insanity plea.
Property
Knippen
(Continued from page 1)
Councilman Joe Martz
asked if had considered any
decoration to the metal struc-
ture to make it more pleasing
to the eye or if he had con-
sidered a wooden structure
that would match his current
building.
Buettner answered that
he had not considered decor
and that a wooden structure
would be too expensive.
Council Rick Hanser
revisited the traffic issue and
asked if the main doors to
the new structure would face
State Street and if most of the
business’s traffic could enter
and exit from that street.
“I don’t know if I can hon-
estly answer that,” Buettner
said. “There would also be
doors on the back and most
of our traffic does exit the
property through the alley
out onto Second Street.”
He did add that he would
consider a two-sided fence to
obstruct the public view of
the portable toilets he keeps
on his current property.
The matter will be decid-
ed at the June 17 meeting.
Council heard on first
reading an ordinance to
approve the proposed 2014
Budget that needs to be filed
with the county by July
15. The budget shows the
General Fund with a $5,000
deficit at the end of 2014.
Also heard on first read-
ing was an ordinance approv-
ing Stolly Insurance as the
city’s provider of general,
property and fleet insurance
for July 1, 2013, through
June 30, 2014. The 1-year
contract will be for $73,095,
slightly less than last year’s
premium.
Counci l man Josh
Gillespie asked how much
less the figure was than last
year. Jettinghoff said he
would have to look it up and
would have the information
for the next meeting.
Council heard on sec-
ond reading an ordinance
amending section 145.03 of
the codified ordinances for
the city, modifying the age
requirement for firefighter
in accordance with the Ohio
Revised Code. The section
will now include language
stating, “No person shall be
eligible to receive an original
appointment as a firefighter
in the fire department, sub-
ject to the civil service laws
of this state, unless the per-
son is between the ages of 18
and 41.” Amended language
says: “No person shall be
eligible to receive an original
appointment on or after the
person’s 41st birthday.”
Council went in to execu-
tive session to discuss possi-
ble litigation concerning the
wastewater treatment plant
and adjourned with no fur-
ther business.
(Continued from page 1)
And students knew that if they have her class, much was
expected.
“I feel I’ve always set very high standards. I’ve always had
great expectations for my students,” she said. “If you have low
expectations, that’s what you’re going to get. I set my sights
high. The majority of students want to do well and they’ll rise
to the challenge. I have a strong sense of accomplishment from
teaching.”
Knippen will miss the camaraderie of her fellow teachers
the most.
“There have been a lot of great people here over the years,”
she said. “There is such a spirit here — a feeling pride in being
St. John’s.”
Now, Knippen would like to know what it’s like to have a
weekend with no papers to read or lesson plans to get ready
for Monday.
“Teaching is a lot of work,” the mother of three said.
“There’s a lot of preparation and then papers to grade. I’ve
been so busy I can’t imagine having free time. It will be nice.
However, my husband thinks I need to find something to do.”
That something to do is named Braden, Olivia, Ava and
Aiden, Knippen’s grandchildren.
“I see us spending more time making trips to Columbus to
see the grandchildren I have there,” she said. “I’ll more than
likely be babysitting more and now I’ll have time to take them
to the park and the movies, etc.”
She is also looking forward to spending more time with
friends from high school.
“Now that our kids are grown, we get together,” she added.
She also volunteers for funeral dinners at St. Joseph
Catholic Church in Fort Jennings and is glad she will no longer
have to juggle her schedule to do so.
And there’s just one more thing …
“Shopping. I love shopping,” she said. “Before, I always
had to consider if what I was buying could be worn to school.
Now, I can buy more casual clothes.”
Knippen resides in rural Fort Jennings with her husband,
Dan. Their son, Joe, resides in Fort Jennings and their daugh-
ters, Christine and Sandra, live in Columbus.
France, Britain
confirm use of
sarin gas in Syria
KARIN LAUB
Associated Press
PARIS — France said
Tuesday it has confirmed that
the nerve gas sarin was used
“multiple times and in a local-
ized way” in Syria, including
at least once by the regime.
It was the most specific claim
by any Western power about
chemical weapons attacks in
the 27-month-old conflict.
Britain later said that tests
it conducted on samples taken
from Syria also were positive
for sarin.
The back-to-back
announcements left many
questions unanswered, high-
lighting the difficulties of
confirming from a distance
whether combatants in Syria
have crossed the “red line”
set by President Barack
Obama. The regime of Syrian
President Bashar Assad has
refused to allow U.N. investi-
gators into the country.
The French and British
findings, based on samples
taken from Syria, came hours
after a U.N. team said it had
“reasonable grounds” to sus-
pect small-scale use of toxic
chemicals in at least four
attacks in March and April.
The U.N. probe was con-
ducted from outside Syria’s
borders, based on interviews
with doctors and witnesses of
purported attacks and a review
of amateur videos from Syria.
The team said solid evidence
will remain elusive until
inspectors can collect samples
from victims directly or from
the sites of alleged attacks.
Some experts cautioned
that the type of evidence cur-
rently available to investiga-
tors — videos, witness reports
and physiological samples
of uncertain origin — leaves
wide doubts.
At the same time, forensic
evidence of alleged chemical
weapons use is fading away
with time, and the longer
U.N. inspectors are kept out
of Syria, the harder it will be
to collect conclusive proof,
they said.
Okla. tornado widest
on record, rare EF5
Associated Press
OKLAHOMA CITY
— The deadly tornado that
plowed through an area near
Oklahoma City last week was
even larger and more powerful
than previously estimated —
a record 2.6 miles wide with
winds that reached nearly 300
mph, just shy of the strongest
winds ever measured.

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