P. 1
06-05-13 Edition

06-05-13 Edition

|Views: 95|Likes:
06-05-13 Edition
06-05-13 Edition

More info:

Published by: San Mateo Daily Journal on Jun 05, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
See more
See less

06/13/2014

www.smdailyjournal.

com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Wednesday • June 5, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 250
ANOTHER BLOW
NATION PAGE 7
RAISE THE BAR
FOR COCKTAILS
FOOD PAGE 17
IRS OFFICIALS ENJOYED LUXURY ROOMS AT
CONFERENCE
Feds: District
practices not
discriminatory
Changes made to help
non-English speaking
families with enrollment
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
While the San Mateo Union High School
District’s enrollment policies were not dis-
criminatory based on race, information
wasn’t widely available in Chinese at the
time the complaint filed was in 2012,
according to a year-long investigation by
the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of
Civil Rights.
In February 2012, the Office of Civil
Rights began investigating a claim that the
district discriminated against Chinese stu-
dents when it came to school assignments.
On May 31, results of the year-long investi-
gation were released. The district was not
found to be discriminating against Chinese
students, however, it was also not fully
complying with the federal rules of making
information accessible in a variety of lan-
guages. Changes were made to rectify most
of the concerns noted by the Office of Civil
Rights and Superintendent Scott Laurence
signed an agreement allowing for monitor-
County honor
stripped from
former doctor
Supervisors rescind
Ayres’ lifetime award
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
As a show of support to
his victims, county
supervisors unanimously
stripped former San
Mateo child psychiatrist
William Hamilton Ayres
of a lifetime achievement
honor awarded 11 years
ago just as police were launching the child
molestation investigation that would ulti-
mately end this year with a conviction on
several felonies.
Ayres, 81, pleaded no contest in May to
eight counts of molestation connected to
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Aperson familiar with the
Biogenesis of America case tells the
Associated Press that Anthony Bosch, the
founder of a Miami anti-aging clinic, has
agreed to talk to Major League Baseball
about players linked to performance-
enhancing drugs.
The person declined to be identified
Tuesday night because the investigation
was still ongoing.
The information that Bosch provides
MLB on any players who came to the now-
closed clinic could lead to player suspen-
sions.
Among the players
whose names have been
tied to the clinic are:
Ryan Braun, Brewers;
Everth Cabrera, Padres;
Melky Cabrera, Blue
Jays; Francisco Cervelli,
Yankees; Bartolo Colon,
Athletics; Nelson Cruz,
Rangers; Fautino de los
Santos, free agent; Gio
Gonzalez, Nationals; Yasmani Grandal,
Padres; Fernando Martinez, Astros; Jesus
Montero, Mariners; Jordan Norberto, free
agent; Jhonny Peralta, Tigers; Cesar Puello,
Mets; and Alex Rodriguez,Yankees.
The agreement between Bosch and MLB
was first reported by ESPN.
In mid-April it was reported that Major
League Baseball paid a former employee of a
Florida anti-aging clinic linked to perform-
ance-enhancing drugs for documents accord-
ing to The New York Times.
The newspaper reported that two unidenti-
fied people briefed on the matter said at least
one player linked to now-closed Biogenesis
of America purchased documents from a for-
mer clinic employee in order to destroy
them, and that other players made efforts to
buy potentially incriminating documents.
Baseball dopes?
MLB nears deal with informant for doping details
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The San Carlos Parks and Recreation
Commission tonight will choose one of
two designs for its $1.7 million makeover
of Crestview Park and decide if it will rec-
ommend the City Council opt for artificial
turf on the athletic field.
Although the Wednesday night meeting is
about the overall concept for the park locat-
ed on Crestview Drive north of Brittan
Avenue, the controversial recommendation
to use synthetic grass rather than natural
sod is expected to be a key part of the dis-
cussion. Asimilar debate over the material’s
use in other San Carlos parks — namely
Highlands where it was eventually installed
— dragged through city decision-making
for roughly a decade.
For the overall renovation, the commis-
sion is asked to choose between two final
concepts winnowed down from four created
City weighing park design, turf options
See AYRES, Page 18
See PARK, Page 20
See DISTRICT, Page 20
William Ayres
CALDERON’S OFFICE
RAIDED BY THE FBI
STATE PAGE 16
See BOSCH, Page 16
Anthony Bosch
FOR THE RECORD 2 Wednesday • June 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
smdailyjournal.com scribd.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal facebook.com/smdailyjournal
Phone:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290
To Advertise: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ads@smdailyjournal.com
Events: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . calendar@smdailyjournal.com
News: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . news@smdailyjournal.com
Delivery: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . circulation@smdailyjournal.com
Career: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . info@smdailyjournal.com
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Jazz musician
Kenny G is 57.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1963
Britain’s Secretary of State for War,
John Profumo, resigned after
acknowledging an affair with a call
girl, Christine Keeler (who was also
involved with a Soviet spy), and
lying to Parliament about it; while
there was no finding of a security
breach, the scandal helped bring down
the Conservative government of
Prime Minister Harold Macmillan.
“A lie has no leg,
but a scandal has wings.”
— Thomas Fuller, English clergyman (1608-1661)
Broadcast journalist
Bill Moyers is 79.
Actor Mark
Wahlberg is 42.
Birthdays
PHOTO COURTESY OF LIZ ROSINSKI
St.Matthew’s Episcopal Day School students wore yellow hard hats at the groundbreaking ceremony held yesterday morning
in downtown San Mateo.
Wednesday: Cloudy. Patchy fog. Highs
in the upper 50s. Southwest winds 5 to 10
mph.
Wednesday night: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming cloudy. Patchy
fog. Lows around 50. West winds 5 to 10
mph... Becoming south after midnight.
Thursday: Cloudy in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog.
Local Weather Forecast
The story “Project Hope looking for help” in the June 3
edition of the Daily Journal had incorrect information. The
Burlingame High School students are working to support
Project Hope.
Correction
(Answers tomorrow)
DOUSE APART OUTING EXPERT
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: He became one after telling his wife how to
drive — A PEDESTRIAN
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
COTTE
REPSS
KABREY
HEVIRT
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
J
u
m
b
le

p
u
z
z
le

m
a
g
a
z
in
e
s

a
v
a
ila
b
le

a
t

p
e
n
n
y
d
e
llp
u
z
z
le
s
.
c
o
m
/
ju
m
b
le
m
a
g
s
A:
I n 1794, Congress passed the Neutrality Act, which pro-
hibited Americans from taking part in any military action
against a country that was at peace with the United States.
I n 1884, Civil War hero Gen. William T. Sherman refused
the Republican presidential nomination, saying, “I will
not accept if nominated and will not serve if elected.”
I n 1916, the Arab Revolt against Turkish Ottoman rule
began during World War I.
I n 1933, the United States went off the gold standard.
I n 1940, during the World War II Battle of France,
Germany attacked French forces along the Somme line.
I n 1947, Secretary of State George C. Marshall gave a
speech at Harvard University in which he outlined an aid
program for Europe that came to be known as The Marshall
Plan.
I n 1950, the U.S. Supreme Court, in Henderson v. United
States, struck down racially segregated railroad dining
cars.
I n 1967, war erupted in the Mideast as Israel raided mili-
tary aircraft parked on the ground in Egypt; Syria, Jordan
and Iraq entered the conflict.
I n 1968, Sen. Robert F. Kennedy was assassinated in Los
Angeles’ Ambassador Hotel after claiming victory in
California’s Democratic presidential primary. Gunman
Sirhan Bishara Sirhan was immediately arrested.
I n 1976, 14 people were killed when the Teton Dam in
Idaho burst.
Actor-singer Bill Hayes is 88. Former Canadian Prime
Minister Joe Clark is 74. Author Margaret Drabble is 74.
Country singer Don Reid (The Statler Brothers) is 68. Rock
musician Fred Stone (AKA Fred Stewart) (Sly and the Family
Stone) is 67. Rock singer Laurie Anderson is 66. Country
singer Gail Davies is 65. Author Ken Follett is 64. Dr. Jill
Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden, is 62. Financial guru
Suze Orman is 62. Rock musician Nicko McBrain (Iron
Maiden) is 61. Rock singer Richard Butler (Psychedelic Furs)
is 57. Actor Jeff Garlin is 51. Actress Karen Sillas is 50. Actor
Ron Livingston is 46. Singer Brian McKnight is 44.
Texas has more beef cows than any
other state. Wisconsin has the most
dairy cows.
***
National Football League (NFL) foot-
balls are made out of cowhide leather,
not pigskin. College teams also use
leather footballs.
***
Unopened bottles of ketchup can be
stored for one year on a cool, dark shelf.
Tightly covered opened bottles of
ketchup will last a month in a cool,
dark, dry place.
***
George Stephen designed his first ket-
tle-shaped barbecue grill in 1951. At
the time, he worked for Weber Brothers
Metal Works near Chicago. He devel-
oped a barbecue with a lid on it. He added
three legs to the bottom, a handle to the
top, and the Weber grill was born.
***
The grill ranks as the fifth most popular
appliance in American homes. Seventy-
six percent of U.S. households own a
barbecue grill.
***
Steamboat Willie, starring Mickey
Mouse, was the first animated cartoon
to use sound. It was the first Mickey
Mouse cartoon. It debuted on Nov. 18,
1928.
***
Walt Disney’s (1901-1966) middle
name was Elias. Norman Rockwell’s
(1894-1978) middle name was
Percevel.
***
Do you know the middle names of the
following presidents? George W. Bush,
John F. Kennedy, Dwight D.
Eisenhower, Franklin D. Roosevelt,
Rutherford B. Hayes, Ulysses S. Grant.
See answer at end.
***
Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
(BSE) is the medical term for Mad Cow
Disease. BSE is a progressive disease
that affects the cow’s nervous system.
BSE kills all infected cattle. There is no
treatment or vaccine. More than 97 per-
cent of all BSE cases have been in the
United Kingdom.
***
In 1888 Dr. James H. Salisbury, an
English physician, believed that eating
well-cooked chopped beef three times a
day, with large glasses of hot water,
would cure almost any disease or ail-
ment including anemia, asthma,
rheumatism and tuberculosis. Salisbury
steak is so called because of that doctor.
***
There used to be a cow pasture at the
western edge of what is now San
Francisco International Airport. It was
part of the Millbrae Dairy, established
in 1870. The Millbrae Dairy was con-
sidered the best dairy west of the Rocky
Mountains. Borden’s Dairy Delivery
Company took over the Millbrae Dairy
in 1938.
***
McDonald’s Big Mac was introduced in
1968. The cost was 49 cents. The Egg
McMuffin was introduced in 1973 and
McDonald’s started offering Happy
Meals in 1979.
***
The hamburger debuted at the 1904
World’s Fair in St. Louis. Fletcher Davis
made them famous by selling them on
the midway. His fried ground beef pat-
ties served between two slices of home-
made bread caused a sensation at the fair.
***
The 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis, also
known as the Louisiana Purchase
Exposition, ran for seven months from
April 30 to Dec. 1. Twenty million peo-
ple visited the fair, for the most part
traveling by horse and carriage.
***
Answer: George Walker Bush (born
1946), 43rd president; John Fitzgerald
Kennedy (1917-1963), 34th president;
Dwight David Eisenhower (1890-
1969), 33rd president; Franklin Delano
Roosevelt (1882-1945), 31st presi-
dent; Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822-
1893), 19th president; Ulysses
Simpson Grant (1822-1885), 18th
president.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners areLucky Star, No.
2,in first place;Solid Gold,No.10,in second place;
and Gold Rush,No.1,in third place.The race time
was clocked at 1:48.63.
0 3 9
10 11 12 20 55 19
Mega number
June 4 Mega Millions
22 28 33 53 59 14
Powerball
June 1 Powerball
2 4 13 28 30
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
6 7 7 2
Daily Four
6 3 8
Daily three evening
6 9 10 25 45 4
Mega number
June 1 Super Lotto Plus
3
Wednesday • June 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
* Frescriptians & Bame
MeJicaI 5uppIies 0eIivereJ
* 3 Fharmacists an 0uty
{650} 349-1373
29 west 257B Ave.
{ßear EI 0amina}
5an Matea
Peninsula
º Loog |ast|og post0ra| chaoge
º |ocrease ath|et|c perIormaoce
º Treat repet|t|ve stress |oj0r|es
º |ocrease mob|||ty & ßex|b|||ty
$50 OFF 3 Session
Mini-Series
º Look 8etter
º Fee| 8etter
º |mprove Post0re
º |mprove 8a|aoce
º 8e||eve 0hroo|c Pain
Pa0| F|tzgera|d
™ r e f l o R d e c n a v d A d e fi i t r e C
www.peo|os0|aro|hog.com
448 h. Sao Nateo 0r|ve, Ste 3 º Sao Nateo º 650-343-0777
Yo0 doo't
have to ||ve
||ke th|s!
Justbeage62+andownyourownhome:
✓ Turn home equity into cash
✓ Pay off bills & credit cards
✓ No more monthy mortgage payments
✓ Remain in your home as long as you live
✓ You retain ownership (title) to your home
✓ FHA insured program
Calltodayforafree,easytoreadquote
650-453-3244
R
EVERSE
MORTGAGE
CALL FOR A FREE BROCHURE OR QUOTE
SERVING THE ENTIRE BAY AREA
CarolBertocchini,CPA
NMLS ID #455078
Reverse Mortgage
Specialist and a CPA
with over 25 years
experience as a
financial professional
Homeowner must maintain property as primary residence and remain current on
property taxes and insurance
Security 1 Lending.
NMLS ID #107636. Loans will be
made or arranged pursuant to CA
Dept of Corp Residential Mortgage
Lending Act License #4131074
BURLINGAME
Arre s t. A woman was arrested for driving
under the influence and being involved in an
accident on Broadway and Carolan Avenue
before 9:24 p.m. Thursday, May 30.
Disturbance. Aperson received a threaten-
ing email relating to a classified ad on the
first block of El Quanito Way before 5:41
p.m. on Thursday, May 30.
Burglary. Electronics were stolen from a
store on the 1300 block of Burlingame
Avenue before 4:53 p.m. Thursday, May 30.
Arre s t. Awoman was arrested for shoplift-
ing cosmetics on the 1800 block of El
Camino Real before 3:45 p.m. Thursday,
May 30.
BELMONT
Assaul t. Aperson was pushed to the ground
during a road rage incident on El Camino
Real before 4:22 p.m. Sunday, June 2.
Arre s t. Aman was arrested for driving with-
out a license on Ralston Avenue and Old
County Road before 5:05 a.m. Saturday,
June 1.
Police reports
Playing in traffic
Awoman was seen running through an
intersection several times on El
Camino Real and Ralston Avenue in
Belmont before 2:10 a.m. Sunday,
June 2.
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Stephen Langi grew up pretty unaware of
his physical limitations.
The 17-year-old lives with congenital
cerebral palsy, a disorder affecting brain and
nervous system function. It was the side
effect from an emergency cesarean during
which the umbilical cord wrapped around his
neck, cutting off circulation for a bit and
causing physical challenges. Langi isn’t
the kind of person to focus on that. He is
realistic about how cerebral palsy affects
his life. For example, he accepts that his
childhood dream of becoming a police offi-
cer isn’t a reality. But that’s not Langi’s
focus. Instead, he’s the kind of guy who is
open to challenges, loves words and pushed
himself to try new things at Sequoia High
School.
Marilyn Vandenbroeck, Langi’s speech
teacher for the past four years, said he’s
always willing to take a risk.
“Rather than focus on what he can’t do,
Stephen directs time, energy and effort into
what he can do. His outgoing, friendly and
positive attitude make him a favorite among
students and staff who know and love this
dedicated and enthusiastic young man,” said
Vandenbroeck.
Langi attended special education classes
offered by the County Office of Education
throughout elementary school. As a result,
he bounced around to different campuses
each year. That changed in seventh grade
when he enrolled at Kennedy Middle School
in Redwood City. The shift was a challenge,
but one Langi embraced. Moving to
advanced special education classes helped
Langi become a better reader. Now, he’s a
word lover with plans to become either an
author or possibly a teacher. Staying at one
school for two years also let Langi make
friends and start to bond with students who
didn’t have disabilities — something that
had previously been a challenge for him.
Langi chose to go to Sequoia, noting a
few of his friends were going to the school.
It was a difficult transition for Langi who
often uses a walker to get around. Freshman
year mostly included going straight home
after school, he said.
Sophomore year was different. Langi
decided it was time to reinvent himself and
achieve a longtime goal of being part of a
team. He joined the track and field team,
because he had always excelled at running
during physical education. Unsure if it was
the right place for him, Langi started to feel
part of the team after completing his first
meet. He stuck with participating in the 100
meter and 200 meter dashes until this year,
when a running injury to his quad resulted in
Langi taking a break.
Junior year, Langi added leadership class
to his activities. He’s enjoyed learning
more about the school and school spirit. It
was through leadership that Langi had the
chance to be part of a drama performance —
something he wasn’t sure he would want to
try. Support from others resulted in Langi
making his debut as Max, the club owner, in
“Cabaret.”
Vandenbroeck said, “Stephen doesn’t see
Limitless outlook despite limitations
Age: 17
City: Redwood City
College: Foothill College
Major: English or
philosophy
Favorite subject in high
school: Physical education
Biggest life lesson
learned thus far: Always
take on responsibility
Stephen Langi
See GRAD, Page 20
4
Wednesday • June 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
Hottest temps so far this
year expected this weekend
The hottest temperatures so far this year
will arrive in the Bay Area this weekend, a
National Weather Service forecaster said
Tuesday.
The temperatures will rise Thursday and
Friday with the hottest day expected on
Saturday, National Weather Service fore-
caster Ryan Walbrun said.
The inland valleys in the North and East
Bay, including areas near Santa Rosa,
Livermore and Concord, can expect to see
the warmest temperatures in the region,
projected to reach into the 90s and 100s on
Friday and Saturday, Walbrun said.
Many cities will be about 10 degrees
short of their record highs, he said.
Cooler but warm temperatures around the
high 70s are expected Saturday in San
Francisco and in the low 80s in Oakland,
Walbrun said.
The South Bay will get into the low 90s,
he said.
The North Bay hills in Napa and Sonoma
counties will be dry Friday and Saturday
evenings, which may pose a threat for fires,
according to Walbrun. The National Weather
Service advises people to stay hydrated,
wear light clothing and avoid strenuous
activities outdoors during peak hours.
“Whatever happens will be relatively short-
lived,” Walbrun said.
Two birds test positive for
West Nile virus in San Mateo
Two dead birds found in San Mateo have
tested positive for West Nile virus, the San
Mateo County Mosquito and Vector Control
District announced Tuesday.
AScrub Jay was reported Thursday in the
Hillsdale area east of Alameda de las Pulgas
and an American Crow was reported Sunday
in the Hayward Park area, said Theresa
Shelton, Mosquito and Vector Control
District vector ecologist.
They are the county’s first cases of West
Nile virus this year, according to the dis-
trict.
As of Friday, 20 cases of West Nile virus
were found in seven counties statewide,
which includes one human case in
Sacramento County, according to the
California Department of Public Health.
The San Mateo County Mosquito and
Vector Control District reported five posi-
tive cases of West Nile virus found in birds
last year.
Birds are the primary hosts of the virus,
which are transmitted by an infected mos-
quito’s bite.
To prevent mosquito breeding, people are
advised to drain standing water in flower
pots, rain gutters, pet bowls and other
places where mosquitoes lay their eggs.
Anyone who finds bird or tree squirrel car-
casses are advised to report them to the West
Nile virus hotline at (877) 968-2473 or
online at www.westnile.ca.gov.
Local briefs
5
Wednesday • June 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Freeze your fat away.
<

Stubborn fat
has met
its match.
Transform yourself without
diet, exercise or surgery.

CoolSculpting
TM
is the revolutionary body contouring
treatment that freezes and naturally eliminates fat
from your body. There are no needles, no special
diets, no exercise programs and best of all-
no downtime. Developed by Harvard scientists to
eliminate fat, CoolSculpting
TM
is FDA-cleared, safe
and clinically proven.
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Avenue, Downtown San Mateo 94401
alluraskin.com
Results and patient experience may vary. Ask us if CoolSculpting is right for you. CoolSculpting for non-invasive fat reduction is
cleared for the flank and abdomen. CoolSculpting is a registered trademark and the CoolSculpting logo and the Snowflake
design are trademarks of ZELTIQ Aesthetics, Inc. © 2012. All rights reserved. IC0529-C
• We are a CoolSculpting
TM

Certified Center
• Treatments Available
Everyday Monday to Friday
• Call Us Now at
(650) 344-1121 for
your Complimentary
Consultation so we can
answer all your questions!
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE – Our
country’s economic
roller-coaster ride
has been interesting
and historic for
sure, but also very
troubling for many
families who’ve not
been as financially stable as others.
Recently though I’ve been observing a
phenomenon with those we serve at the
CHAPEL OF THE HIGHLANDS. It may
be too early to confirm, but it appears that
there is a general state of confidence with
many families, along with the decisions and
choices they make during funeral
arrangements. Yes, I know you are thinking
that “confidence” is not a term you would
use to coincide with “funeral arrangements”,
but it appears to me that people I see are
tending to be more financially assured than
during the deepest years of “The Great
Recession”.
They say that the two things you can’t
avoid are “death and taxes”. With that in
mind, during the economic downturn I saw a
very noticeable sense of “thrift” and
“prudence” with a lot of families who
experienced a death during that period.
Still, those who tended to “cost shop” at
various funeral homes selected CHAPEL
OF THE HIGHLANDS to handle funeral or
cremation arrangements. These families
found comfort with our service, and notably
with our more economic cost structure.
Now, lately the trend with families and
their funeral choices reminds me of the days
way before the recession hit. It’s not that
people are utilizing their funds differently,
spending more or spending less, but that
they are more assertive and confident when
using their wallet. Seeing this over and over
gives me a good indication that something in
the economic climate is changing compared
to not that long ago.
Even though many of our honorable
elected officials in Sacramento and
Washington D.C. appear to be as inflexible
with economic issues as always, the air of
confidence with the families I’ve been
dealing with means to me that these people
are feeling less pressured financially.
It is well known that when businesses do
well they hire more employees, and when
those employees are confident they will
spend their money on goods and services.
In turn, the companies that provide goods
and services will need competent employees
to create more goods, give more services,
and so on…making a positive circle for a
healthy economy. In relation to that, after a
long period of U.S. manufacturing jobs
being sent over-seas there is news of a
growing number of companies bringing this
work back to the United States. Real Estate
values on the Peninsula remained in a good
state during the recession, but houses here
are now in demand more than ever.
“Encouraging” “Hopeful” and “Positive”
are words to describe the optimistic
vibrations that people are giving off. If the
community is becoming more comfortable
with spending, that indicates good health for
business and the enrichment of our
economic atmosphere. I hope I’m right, so
let’s all keep our fingers crossed.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Funeral Trends Indicate
Upswing in the Economy
Advertisement
Four arrested in drug sting
Four people were arrested in San Carlos
yesterday by the San Mateo County
Narcotics Task Force for selling metham-
phetamine and other drugs.
Four children were also taken into custody
by San Mateo County Child and Family
Services, according to the task force.
The busts were the result of a two-month
investigation, according to the task force. A
search of a home on the 100 block of Manor
Drive in San Carlos resulted in the seizure of
prescription medication, packaging, scales
and narcotics paraphernalia as well as
methamphetamine.
Arrested were John Lindt, 41, of San
Carlos; Danielle McMahon, 44, of San
Carlos; Joyce Michael, 44, of San Mateo;
and Angela Garcia, 40, of San Carlos.
The charges range from child endanger-
ment, possession of prescription medication
without a prescription, committing a felony
while out on bail and possession of metham-
phetamine for sale.
After the arrests, a San Carlos building
inspector found the condition of the resi-
dence to be uninhabitable and restricted occu-
pancy until the home is brought up to code,
according to the task force.
Audit: PG&E didn’t
spend $50M for safety
Pacific Gas & Electric Co. did not use more
than $50 million it collected from ratepayers
that was meant to improve its gas pipeline
network in the decade leading up to a deadly
explosion in a San Bruno an audit shows.
From 1999 to 2010, the utility regularly
failed to use all the money to fix and maintain
small gas distribution lines that deliver natu-
ral gas to homes and businesses, according
to the audit by Leawood, Kan.-based
Overland Consulting for the California
Public Utilities Commission.
Overland could not say exactly how PG&E
spent the money, but it blamed ineffective
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Seven of the original 12 applicants
remain in the running to fill a short-term
vacancy on the San Mateo County
Community College District Board created
by the departure of longtime trustee Helen
Hausman.
Hausman, who stepped down April 30 due
to health problems, was set to finish her
term in November. Twelve applied to fill the
vacancy. On Monday, the board held a spe-
cial meeting to discuss the process from
here. As a result, five of the applicants —
Christopher Allen Miller, Joshua Becker,
Natalie Gore, R. Brian Irion and Victor
James — received notification Tuesday
morning that they would not be asked to
come in for the interview.
“As a part of the discussion [Monday], the
board determined that candidates who indi-
cated either that they would not run or they
were undecided about running for the full
term in November would not be asked to
interview for the position. The board made
this determination because of the need for
continuity beyond the interim period and
the substantial investment made in the
training and orientation process for a new
trustee,” according to the email sent, which
included a thank you for the person’s inter-
est.
By law, the board has until June 29 to
make a provisional appointment. If the
board doesn’t act by June 29, the county
superintendent of schools will order an elec-
tion. The application indicates candidate
interviews will take place on June 5 and
June 12, after which a decision will be made.
Here’s a bit about each of the remaining
candidates from their applications.
Barbara Noriko Jabba, a Redwood City
resident, has more than 25 years of experi-
ence in real estate transactions, asset man-
agement, land use, nonprofit development,
volunteering and community relations,
according to her application.
Genevieve Jopanda, executive director of
SF Hep B Free, is a Daly City resident who
said community colleges offered benefits to
herself and siblings that she would like to
Seven hopefuls remain for
college board appointment
Local briefs
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Aman accused of trying to rape a woman
studying inside a Redwood City motel more
than two years ago is mentally fit to stand
trial on sexual assault charges, according to
two court-appointed doctors who concluded
he was faking and exaggerating his symp-
toms which have included post-traumatic
stress disorder, writhing in court due to
phantom pain and hearing voices.
The decision reinstates criminal proceed-
ings against Maurice Banks and a new jury
trial date will be scheduled today.
The competency ruling is the latest in a
lengthy back and forth over Banks’ ability
to aid in his own defense. He was scheduled
Monday for a jury trial on the issue but
instead opted to submit
the doctors’ reports to
Judge Robert Foiles for a
ruling.
Banks faces life in
prison on charges includ-
ing assault with the
intent to sexually
assault, causing great
bodily injury, assault,
attempted oral copula-
tion, first-degree burglary, indecent expo-
sure and maliciously dissuading a witness.
Officers arrested Banks after responding
to reports of a woman screaming for help at
the Garden Motel at 1690 Broadway in
Redwood City. The woman told police she
was using the motel as a quiet studying
venue when a man she later identified as
Banks entered the window, grabbed her and
threw her on the bed. The suspect punched
her several times in the face and strangled
her into unconsciousness. When she awoke,
her pants were pulled down to her knees and
the suspect was standing over her demand-
ing oral sex. The woman said she consented
but ran from the room after he turned his
head. Police found Banks three to four hours
later at the motel and DNAlinked him to the
crime.
The woman was hospitalized for her
injuries, which included fractured eye orbital
bones and sinus fractures requiring surgery,
and has lingering vision problems.
Banks remains in custody in lieu of
$250,000 bail.
Rape suspect mentally fit for trial
Maurice Banks
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
See BOARD, Page 18
6
Wednesday • June 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
$12.00
Eat Lunch Downtown and
get your Hair Cut!
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
SAIGON BARBER SHOP
35 South B Street / 1st Ave.
(Next to China Bee)
Downtown San Mateo 94401
(650)340-8848
Mention this ad- Daily Journal Special
MENS
HAIRCUT (reg.$14)
STATE GOVERNMENT
• A bill guaranteeing financial man-
agement training for local officials
authored by Assembl yman Ri ch
Gordon, D-Menlo Park, passed the
Assembl y 56-19 and now heads to the
Senate. The bill would allow an entity like a local gov-
ernment or association of governments to develop a fis-
cal curriculum and require officials to attend training once
per term in office.
Helga Ruth Marga Stripp-Campos
Helga Ruth Marga Stripp-Campos, born Jan. 26,1938,
died peacefully at home in Daly City May 29, 2013 sur-
rounded by all of her children.
She was born in Charlottenburg-Berlin, Germany, the
daughter of: Gerhard August Richard Stripp and Cacilie
Geboren Krawczik and sister to Helmut, Gertrude, Walter and
Crystal. In 1958, at the age of 20, she left her homeland and
moved to the United States.
She is survived by her six children (Kathy, Raymond,
Irene, George, Denise and Teresa), 14 grandchildren (Lisa,
Nichol, George, Tiffany, Anthony, Andre, Melina,
Brandon, Walter, Michaela, Rayanna, Nathan, Craig Jr. and
Tatiana) and four great-grandchildren (Luca, Elijah, George
III and Payton). Services will be held 3 p.m.-9 p.m. Friday,
June 7 at Duggan’s, 500 Westlake Blvd., Daly City.
Arrangements by Colma Cremation and Funeral Services.
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of
approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on
the date of the family’s choosing. To submit obituaries,
email information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdai-
lyjournal.com.
Obituary
By Laura Olson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Health care
providers rallying at the Capitol on
Tuesday warned that a Central Valley
medical center could shut down and
doctors throughout California could
stop accepting Medicaid patients if a
state funding cut is not reversed.
Thousands of people representing
doctors, hospitals and unionized
health care workers filled the Capitol
grounds to rally against a 10 percent
reduction in the amount the state
pays for Medicaid reimbursements.
The reduction would jeopardize care
for the low-income patients who
depend on the program, known as
Medi-Cal, according to the
California Medical Association, one
of the leaders of the “We Care for
California” coalition.
The association says ongoing cuts
have left doctors with little option
but to stop taking qualified patients
because the reimbursements do not
meet the cost of overhead and sup-
plies to treat them.
Without restorations, Dr. Ruth
Haskins, an OB-GYN in the
Sacramento suburb of Folsom, said
she’ll have to cut back on the number
of Medi-Cal patients she accepts.
Haskins takes on 18 to 20 women
due to give birth nine months later.
Reimbursement rates mean no more
than five of those can be Medi-Cal
patients, she said, a figure that would
drop to three or four under the cuts.
Her office already turns away at
least two Medi-Cal patients each day.
“I can only take so many, and then I
gotta say, sorry, I gotta keep my
lights on,” Haskins said.
The 10 percent rate reduction for
Medi-Cal providers was adopted two
years ago to deal with the state
deficit. The U.S. Department of
Health and Human Services approved
the cut, but a court battle prevented it
from going into effect in June 2011 .
The state prevailed in a federal
appeals court ruling issued last
month. Democratic Gov. Jerry
Brown will soon have the authority
to begin implementing the cuts
retroactively.
Sharon Spurgeon, CEO and admin-
istrator for Coalinga Regional
Medical Center, said in an interview
during Tuesday’s rally that the center
would owe in excess of $5 million if
the state enacts retroactive cuts. The
cost would force the facility, located
about 70 miles southwest of Fresno,
to shut down.
“If this is not rescinded, we won’t
be in operation,” Spurgeon said.
Providers: Medi-Cal cuts
will limit health access
NATION 7
Wednesday • June 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Stephen Ohlemacher and Alan Fram
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Already heavily criti-
cized for targeting conservative groups, the
Internal Revenue Service absorbed another
blow Tuesday as new details emerged about
senior officials enjoying luxury hotel
rooms, free drinks and free food at a $4.1
million training conference. It was one of
many expensive gatherings the agency held
for employees over a three-year period.
One top official stayed five nights in a
room that regularly goes for $3,500 a
night. Another official, Faris Fink, stayed
four nights in a room that regularly goes for
$1,499.
Fink was later promoted to head the IRS
division that staged the 2010 conference in
Anaheim a position he still holds. He also
has the distinction of playing Mr. Spock in
a cheesy but slickly-produced “Star Trek”
video that IRS employees filmed for the
conference.
Atotal of 132 IRS officials received room
upgrades at the conference, according to a
report by J. Russell George, the Treasury
Department inspector general for tax
administration. The tax agency paid a flat
daily fee of $135 per hotel room, the report
said, but the upgrades were part of a package
deal that added to the overall cost of the
conference.
The report was made public on the same
day leaders of six conservative groups tes-
tified at a congressional hearing, where
they told lawmakers they had endured abuse
from IRS agents as they spent years trying
to qualify for tax-exempt status.
In often-emotional testimony, the con-
servatives described IRS demands for
details about employees’ and group offi-
cials’ political activities and backgrounds,
for comments they’d posted on websites,
for videos of meetings and information on
whether speakers at such sessions voiced
political views. Some said it took three
years to get their tax-exempt status; others
said they were still waiting.
“I’m a born-free American woman,”
Becky Gerritson, president of the
Wetumpka Tea Party of Alabama, tearfully
told the lawmakers. “I’m telling my gov-
ernment, ‘You’ve forgotten your place.”’
IRS officials enjoyed luxury rooms at conference
REUTERS
U.S. Deputy Treasury Secretary Neal Wolin, right, rubs his head during a lengthy hearing with
U.S. Treasury Inspector-General for Tax Administration J. Russell George, left, and former IRS
Commissioner Douglas Shulman as they testify before a House Oversight and Government
Reform Committee hearing on targeting of political groups seeking tax-exempt status from
by the IRS, on Capitol Hill.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — U.S. senators dressed
down senior military leaders Tuesday, led by
female lawmakers, combat veterans and former
prosecutors who insisted that sexual assault in
the ranks has cost the services the trust and
respect of the American people as well as the
nation’s men and women in uniform.
Summoned to Capitol Hill, Army Gen.
Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff, and the beribboned four-star
chiefs of the service branches conceded in an
extraordinary hearing that they had faltered
in dealing with sexual assault. One said
assaults were “like a cancer” in the military.
But they strongly opposed congressional
efforts to strip commanders of their tradition-
al authority to decide whether to level
charges in their units.
Members of the Senate Armed Services
Committee, especially the panel’s seven
female senators, grilled the chiefs about
whether the military’s mostly male leader-
ship understands differences between rela-
tively minor sexual offenses and serious
crimes that deserve swift and decisive justice.
“Not every single commander necessarily
wants women in the force. Not every single
commander believes what a sexual assault is.
Not every single commander can distinguish
between a slap on the ass and a rape because
they merge all of these crimes together,” said
Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y.
Senators blast military response to sex assaults
STATE/NATION 8
Wednesday • June 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Judge accepts insanity
plea in Colorado shooting case
CENTENNIAL, Colo. — Ajudge accepted James Holmes’
long-awaited plea of not guilty by reason of insanity
Tuesday and ordered him to undergo a mental evaluation —
an examination that could be a decisive factor in whether the
Colorado theater shooting suspect is convicted and sen-
tenced to die.
The judge also granted prosecutors access to a hotly con-
tested notebook that Holmes sent to a psychiatrist shortly
before the July 20 rampage, which left 12 people dead and
70 injured in a bloody, bullet-riddled movie theater in subur-
ban Denver.
Taken together, the three developments marked a major
step forward in the 10-month-old case, which at times has
inched along through thickets of legal arguments or veered
off on tangents.
Holmes faces more than 160 counts of murder and attempt-
ed murder, and prosecutors are seeking the death penalty.
He will now be examined by the Colorado Mental Health
Institute in Pueblo, but it’s not certain when the evaluation
will begin or how long it will take. Hospital officials have
said that before they meet with Holmes, they want to review
evidence in the case, which prosecutors said totals nearly
40,000 pages.
Top Obama appointees
using secret email accounts
WASHINGTON — Some of President Barack Obama’s
political appointees are using secret government email
accounts to conduct official business, the Associated Press
found, a practice that complicates agencies’ legal responsi-
bilities to find and turn over emails under public records
requests and congressional inquiries.
White House spokesman Jay Carney on Tuesday acknowl-
edged the practice and said it made eminent sense for Cabinet
secretaries and other high-profile officials to have what he
called alternative email accounts that wouldn’t fill with
unwanted messages. Carney said all their email accounts,
public and otherwise, were subject to congressional over-
sight and requests by citizens under the U.S. Freedom of
Information Act.
“There’s nothing secret,” Carney said.
The AP reviewed hundreds of pages of government emails
released under the federal open records law and couldn’t inde-
pendently find instances when material from any of the
secret accounts it identified was turned over.
Around the nation
By Angela Santi
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TRENTON, N.J. — Republican Gov.
Chris Christie on Tuesday set an
October special election to fill the
U.S. Senate seat made vacant by
Democrat Frank Lautenberg’s death,
giving voters the quickest possible
say on who will represent them in
Washington but preserving Christie as
the top attraction on November’s bal-
l ot .
The move means there will be
statewide elections three weeks apart,
a rare occurrence that Democrats imme-
diately criticized as wasteful and
designed to help the governor’s polit-
ical position by preventing the possi-
bility he would be on the ballot with a
well-known Democrat, Newark Mayor
Cory Booker, who’s expected to pursue
the Senate seat.
“It’s as if he gave the residents of
this state the finger” by adding elec-
tion expenses, Democratic state Sen.
Richard Codey said. “Instead of hold-
ing an expensive special election that
tries to protect the governor’s politi-
cal vulnerabilities, the voters should
have the opportunity to have their say
in the regular election in November. ”
Christie also said he would appoint
someone by next week to fill the
Senate seat until the special election
but didn’t say who it might be.
Gov. Christie says October
vote for Lautenberg’s seat
REUTERS
Gov. Chris Christie has set an October special election to fill the U.S. Senate seat
made vacant by Democrat Frank Lautenberg’s death.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — More than
200,000 Californians will each
receive checks worth nearly $1,500
this month as part of the national
mortgage settlement, the state attor-
ney general’s office said Tuesday.
The money is going to homeowners
who successfully filed claims saying
they were the victims of wrongful fore-
closures.
Attorney general spokesman Nick
Pacilio said that the national settle-
ment administrator, Rust Consulting,
will mail checks of about $1,480 start-
ing next week to about 207,000
Californians who lost their homes.
That amounts to more than $307
million in settlement money
statewide, and is part of the $1.5 bil-
lion in settlement checks that will be
sent to nearly 1 million borrowers
nationwide.
Those who were eligible for the
checks had their mortgage serviced by
one of the settlement’s five major
banks and lost their homes to foreclo-
sure between Jan. 1, 2008 and Dec. 31,
2011.
California foreclosure victims will get $1,500 checks
OPINION 9
Wednesday • June 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
F
or those who fell victim to the
molestation of Dr. William
Ayres, there might be some sol-
ace in his no contest plea May 16.
There may be some solace when he is
sentenced for his crimes in early
August. And there may be some solace
by the San Mateo County Board of
Supervisors rescinding his lifetime
achievement award it bestowed upon
him in 2002.
But it is the right thing to do. At the
time of the award, the board clearly did
not know what he was accused of and
what he ultimately pleaded no contest
to two weeks ago. At the time of the
award, the board thought it was honor-
ing the work of a role model, a man
who who has heralded for his work as
head of the American Academy of Child
and Adolescent Psychiatry and for his
work with the county’s youth. For
decades, he received referrals from
schools and the county’s juvenile court
system. During his long career, howev-
er, Ayres held a dark secret. And that
secret was revealed through years of
police and court action that amounted to
a sad and sordid saga for all. And on
May 16, he pleaded no contest to alle-
gations he molested children in his
care.
The Board of Supervisors regularly
bestows awards for a lifetime of work
so it is not as if Ayres is one of only a
handful to receive such recognition.
But there is no way this man deserves
any honor. Taking it away in a public
setting with public testimony and a
public vote was simply the right thing
to do.
Aman once lauded was revealed to be
one of society’s worst. Though he
fought the allegations, there was such a
large pile of evidence that it is hard not
to think of him as anything but a mon-
ster.
The lives that he forever damaged
will never be the same and the stain on
this county will always be here. And
while taking the honor away is merely
symbolic, it was a necessary step
toward making amends.
With Ayres’ no contest plea to eight
counts of molestation, he faces up to
22 years in prison. At the age of 81,
his future is ruined. As it should be.
There can be no real justice for what he
did but the sentencing slated for Aug. 6
and yesterday’s vote to disavow any
semblance of honor for him are appro-
priate and necessary steps.
And as we take our collective steps
away from this disgusting court case
and black mark on our county, we
should also take solace that there
might be some sense of closure. No
words or action can change what Ayres
did to his victims, but we offer our sup-
port as part of the community and hope
that, in whatever way possible, we can
assist them in healing.
The dishonor of William Ayres
It’s algebra again
“O
pportunity is shaped, more than anything
else, by access to education and the direction
we have been going can be reversed ... and it
will take a NATIONAL effort.” — Joseph Stiglitz, “The
Price of Inequality.”
It has been reported that the group, “Innovate Public
Schools” is out to “make sure every kid in Silicon Valley
gets the education necessary
to reach college and the mid-
dle class” by working to
open a charter K-8 school.
Seems this is another group
that blames the schools for
their failure to make Latinos
and African Americans pass
Algebra 1 “by the time they
leave eighth grade” which is
apparently the be-all and end-
all of preparation for college.
They claim it is the “greatest
single predictor of college
success.”
The article about this,
titled, “Latino children left behind,” in the May 29 issue of
the Times and the accompanying editorial, explained, “In
the two counties” (Santa Clara and San Mateo) “only 20
percent of Latinos, and 22 percent of African-Americans,
graduate having passed all of the courses required to qualify
for University of California and California State University
admission. The figures are 71 percent for Asians and 53 per-
cent for whites.”
Apparently “Innovate” is determined to cram more alge-
bra into these kids without taking into consideration the
problems and differences that may be behind such discrep-
ancy. Of course the schools have some responsibility, but a
greater onus is on the family and our culture. It’s hard to
believe that there was no mention in the article of innate
ability, family background or parental involvement, which
can vary widely among differing cultures. These things can
make a big difference in a child’s success (or not) in school.
Children who have high IQs, who come from a long line of
well-educated achievers who encourage and expect their
children to do well in school, who are born to healthy par-
ents and who have been nourished well all of their lives,
will have a much better chance of doing well in school. In
many cases, there is a big sociological and cultural gap,
which no one seems to want to talk about. But until reality
is faced, there is little hope for much improvement.
You’d think that these innovators would also be aware of
the fact every child does not have the kind of mind that
absorbs algebraic concepts (I know that from experience.
Oldest granddaughter is about as algebra-challenged as you
can get, but she got her college degree). What comes
through from the pronouncements by IPS is that children
who do not make it in algebra are somehow inferior — not
as valuable. Also, maybe they should consider that possi-
bly for generations their culture and background has not
been conducive to intellectual achievement. Maybe Mom
and Dad do not have a clue and are really not there for their
child. Maybe the family barely has enough to live on. As
Stiglitz wrote: “Inequality of opportunity begins even
before school — in the conditions that poor people face
immediately before and after birth, differences in nutrition
and the exposure to environmental pollutants that can have
lifelong effects.”
So where are the studies that investigate why Asian chil-
dren do so well, whites mediocre and why Latinos and
African-Americans have so much trouble learning? What are
the cultural differences that make learning difficult? What
are the differences in the brains of kids who take to math
and those who don’t get it? Why isn’t the education hierar-
chy facing reality instead of blaming the schools for these
discrepancies? Of course, our schools aren’t perfect, but
they have a tough row to hoe. Seems like every little glitch
that comes up about achievement scores is blamed on them.
They’re pressured to prepare all children for college no mat-
ter what. Apparently, vocational programs and apprentice-
ships are not even considered.
But why does every child have to be prepared for college?
How many who are pushed into it actually graduate? Aren’t
there many good trade and service jobs that students can be
trained for? And how are most of those kids who are expect-
ed to attend college going to manage to pay tuition, etc.
without mounting a huge debt that will be haunting them
for years?
We all want all of our children to be successful in school
and in life. We want more Latinos and African-Americans
(and also “whites”) to be successful in college. But won’t
increasing more pressure on those who find algebra unintel-
ligible do nothing but alienate more students from school
and education and add to the problems we face every day
with dropouts roaming the streets?
This reminds us of another big problem, as Ashleigh
Brilliant so brilliantly put it: “School is bad enough — but
at least I’m not letting them teach me anything.”
Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 700
columns for various local newspapers. Her email address is
gramsd@aceweb.com.
Editorial
By Carole Groom
T
he Affordable Care Act is a his-
toric opportunity to increase
the number of individuals and
families with health insurance as well
as access to critical services that can
prevent serious illnesses in the first
place.
The governor and Legislature should
be commended for positioning
California to take advantage of federal
funding that will help launch health
care reform in January 2014. Yet local
funding for the very services that health
care reform promises to provide is under
threat by state budget proposals that
would redirect $300 million currently
spent on local health care to
Sacramento. That number could rise to
more than $2 billion over three years.
California’s counties are concerned
this shift will cut into health care pro-
grams and services, threaten the local
health care safety net and reduce coun-
ties’ ability to invest in preventive care
that will improve residents’ lives and
reduce health care costs overall.
It’s assumed that the state’s counties,
which currently provide health care for
those who either cannot afford or can-
not obtain health insurance, will save
money as more individuals and families
move into coverage programs. But no
one knows with any degree of certainty
what will happen. One thing is certain,
however: Any savings to counties
won’t happen immediately.
That’s why it’s critical to stop a raid
on local health care funding. We need to
see the actual results of the Affordable
Care Act before we start shifting money
around. Ashift that would cause coun-
ties to cut into existing programs and
services at precisely the time more peo-
ple will want to get access to care. This
could undermine the
very success of the
Affordable Care Act
in California.
Using a formula
proposed by Gov.
Jerry Brown, San
Mateo County could
lose $32 million in
three years. This
would occur at the
very same time that we are trying to
make enough services available to meet
our waiting list for primary care (cur-
rently at 1,500 people) and trying to
increase appointments for people who
will be newly insured.
If this funding is not protected,
important programs in San Mateo
County could be in jeopardy such as
insurance for children — San Mateo
County is one of only two counties
with universal insurance coverage for
children due to county funding of the
Healthy Kids programs. Other vital
services that are threatened are the
Keller Center, which provides expert
care and evidence collection for chil-
dren and adults who have been physical-
ly or sexually abused and neighbor-
hood-based health clinics which serve
some of our community’s most vulnera-
ble.
That’s why we urge lawmakers in
Sacramento to support the following
actions as they consider the state budg-
et in the coming weeks:
• Leave county health funding alone
for at least three years so that we all can
see how many people actually enroll
and how many people remain unin-
sured. The federal government is paying
100 percent of the cost during this
time. Why should the state take away
money from the counties? It makes no
sense to force us to offer fewer appoint-
ments and fewer services at precisely
the time more newly insured people will
be seeking care. If people enroll and
then find they cannot get an appoint-
ment, you can be sure they will not re-
enroll the following year.
• Share any savings between the
counties and the state. San Mateo
County puts in tens of millions of
county dollars into health care each
year. Why should the state take this
money and benefit from any savings? If
county health systems have savings
once the Affordable Care Act is fully
implemented, counties and the state
should share evenly in the savings,
with the county able to redirect these
dollars to cost-saving preventive meas-
ures.
• Ensure that public hospitals and
clinics, like San Mateo Medical Center,
can continue to serve the public and
new Medi-Cal enrollees with adequate
funding. If public hospital and clinics
are relegated to only serving uninsured
residents, county public hospitals and
clinics will not survive financially.
Brown’s proposal to take an estimat-
ed $32 million in San Mateo County
funding in the next three years is nei-
ther necessary nor appropriate. With
100 percent federal reimbursement for
three years for new Medi-Cal recipients,
California lawmakers should take the
time to see how things unfold before
taking county health funding for their
own purposes.
Carole Groom is a member of the San
Mateo County Board of Supervisors.
She represents District Two.
Protect health care safety net funding
Guest
perspective
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal
Onlineeditionat scribd.com/smdailyjournal
OUR MISSION:
It is the mission of the Daily Journal to be the most
accurate, fair and relevant local news source for
those who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
By combining local news and sports coverage,
analysis and insight with the latest business,
lifestyle, state, national and world news, we seek to
provide our readers with the highest quality
information resource in San Mateo County.
Our pages belong to you, our readers, and we
choose to reflect the diverse character of this
dynamic and ever-changing community.
SMDAILYJOURNAL.COM
Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
Michelle Durand, Senior Reporter
REPORTERS:
Julio Lara, Heather Murtagh, Bill Silverfarb
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events
Carrie Doung, Production Assistant
BUSINESS STAFF:
Charlotte Andersen Charles Gould
Gale Green Kathleen Magana
Jeff Palter Kevin Smith
INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:
Paniz Amirnasiri Carly Bertolozzi
Elizabeth Cortes Rachel Feder
Darold Fredricks Natalia Gurevich
Ashley Hansen Tom Jung
Jason Mai Nick Rose
Andrew Scheiner Sally Schilling
Kris Skarston Samantha Weigel
Chloee Weiner Sangwon Yun
Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
• Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters
will not be accepted.
• Please include a city of residence and phone number
where we can reach you.
• Emailed documents are preferred:
letters@smdailyjournal.com
• Letter writers are limited to two submissions a
month.
Opinions expressed in letters, columns and
perspectives are those of the individual writer and do
not necessarily represent the views of the Daily Journal
staff.
Correction Policy
The Daily Journal corrects its errors.
If you question the accuracy of any article in the Daily
Journal, please contact the editor at
news@smdailyjournal.com
or by phone at: 344-5200, ext. 107
Editorials represent the viewpoint of the Daily Journal
editorial board and not any one individual.
BUSINESS 10
Wednesday • June 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 15,177.54 -76.49 10-Yr Bond 2.137 +0.003
Nasdaq3,445.26 -20.11 Oil (per barrel) 93.45
S&P 500 1,631.38 -9.04 Gold 1,399.10
By Matthew Craft
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The Federal Reserve
guessing game threw the markets for
another loop Tuesday.
Comments from a Fed official raised
expectations that the central bank
could start easing its support for the
economy soon, sending the stock mar-
ket sharply lower in the late afternoon.
The market recovered in the last hour of
trading to end with slight losses.
Snippets from a prepared speech by
Esther George, president of the Kansas
City branch of the Federal Reserve,
were reported in the early afternoon.
George pointed to “improving eco-
nomic conditions” as well as evidence
that financial markets were getting
dependent on the Fed’s support. “I sup-
port slowing the pace of asset purchas-
es as an appropriate next step for mon-
etary policy,” she said.
“History suggests that waiting too
long to acknowledge the economy’s
progress and prepare markets for more-
normal policy settings carries no less
risk than tightening too soon,” accord-
ing to her prepared remarks. George
didn’t give the speech because she was
sick, but news outlets still reported her
comments, and the Kansas City Fed
posted the speech on its website.
It was the latest volatile turn in stock
trading as investors try to figure out
when the Fed will make a move. While
George’s comments were consistent
with her previously stated views, they
were enough to reignite the debate on
Wall Street over when the Fed will act.
While it’s well known that the Fed’s
next step will be to pare its bond buy-
ing, nobody is sure when that will hap-
pen. As a result, traders have been try-
ing to out-guess each other in anticipa-
tion of the Fed’s decision. They have
seized on comments from bank offi-
cials and minutes from a recent meeting
of policymakers, sending stock and
bond prices swinging sharply over the
past two weeks.
On Monday, for example, stocks
rose as traders interpreted an unexpect-
ed slowdown in U.S. manufacturing as
the latest sign that the Fed wasn’t close
to winding down its stimulus program.
The next big data point for investors
is the Labor Department’s monthly
employment survey due out Friday.
“My sense is that all bets are off until
we see the jobs number Friday,” said
Jack Ablin, the chief investment offi-
cer at BMO Private Bank in Chicago.
“That’s the ultimate barometer.”
The Fed has been buying $85 billion
in bonds each month, helping to keep
bond prices high and the yields they
pay low. In theory, that should lead
people to borrow and also shift money
out of bonds and into other invest-
ments.
Many investors expect long-term
interest rates to rise when the Fed
scales back its bond-buying. If they
climb high enough, more investors
may be tempted to buy bonds instead of
stocks. Trying to anticipate that out-
come, many traders are pre-emptively
selling stocks on the slightest signs
that the Fed may be closer to slowing
its stimulus.
The current yield of 2.15 percent on
the benchmark 10-year Treasury note is
extremely low by historical standards.
It’s also nearly identical to the average
dividend payment of 2.14 percent for
stocks in the S&P 500.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell
9.04 points to close at 1,631.38, a
drop of 0.6 percent. It had lost as much
as 16 points, or 1 percent, around 2:30
p.m.
The Dow Jones industrial average
lost 76.49 points to 15,177.54, a drop
of 0.5 percent. The Dow had gained for
the previous 20 Tuesdays in a row.
The Nasdaq composite fell 20.11
points to 3,445.26, down 0.6 percent.
It looked like the stock market was
headed for a second straight day of
gains at the start of trading Tuesday.
Encouraging news about home prices
and trade helped push the S&P 500 up
0.4 percent in the early going. It turned
flat shortly before noon, slid 1 percent
an hour later and then spent the rest of
the day climbing back.
Stocks head lower on Fed stimulus worries
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Tuesday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Dollar General Corp., down $4.91 at $48.64
The discount retailer’s fiscal first-quarter net income rose 3 percent, but
the company cut the high end of its full-year forecasts.
ExactTarget Inc., up $11.59 at $33.69
Online software service Salesforce.com said that it will spend more than
$2.3 billion to buy the marketing software company.
Ryman Hospitality Properties Inc., down $3.12 at $35.47
The owner of Gaylord Opryland and the Grand Ole Opry is lowering a key
full-year forecast partly because of slowing hotel bookings.
General Motors Co., up 54 cents at $34.96
S&P Dow Jones Indices said that it will add the automaker to its S&P 100
and 500 indices on Thursday.
Nasdaq
G-III Apparel Group Ltd., up $9.07 at $51.81
The clothing company posted a first quarter profit that beat Wall Street
expectations. It also raised its full-year forecast.
Rigel Pharmaceuticals Inc., down 82 cents at $3.71
The drug developer said partner AstraZeneca will not seek regulatory
approval for a potential rheumatoid arthritis treatment.
Rosetta Genomics Ltd., up 30 cents at $3.95
The diagnostic test maker said it plans to expand in the U.S. to 12 sales
territories from five, beginning in July.
The Carlyle Group LP, down $1.57 at $27.82
The nation’s largest public pension fund plans to sell all of its 4 percent
stake in Carlyle, the private equity firm.
Big movers
By Michael Liedtke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — A decade ago,
the mere idea of cloud computing was a
difficult concept to explain, let alone
sell. Today, the technology is spurring
a high-stakes scramble to buy some of
the early leaders in the cloud-comput-
ing movement.
The latest examples of the trend
emerged Tuesday as two major technol-
ogy companies announced acquisitions
aimed at seeding their own clouds.
Cloud-computing pioneer
Salesforce.com Inc. said it will spend
about $2.5 billion to buy ExactTarget
Inc., a specialist in helping other com-
panies manage marketing campaigns
and other business functions through
email, social networks and a variety of
digital services that can be reached on
any device with an Internet connec-
tion.
The more time-tested IBM Corp. is
snapping up SoftLayer Technologies
Inc., a privately held company that
leases extra computing horsepower to
startup companies and medium-size
businesses that don’t have the
resources or desire to build their own
data centers.
IBM didn’t disclose the financial
terms of the deal, but The Wall Street
Journal pegged the cost at about $2 bil-
lion. The Journal cited an unidentified
person familiar with the matter.
ExactTarget, based in Indianapolis,
and SoftLayer, based in Dallas, are just
the latest in a batch of billion-dollar
babies hatched by what was once
viewed as a kooky craze.
Cloud computing rains billion-dollar deals
CLOUD DEALS:
Two deals Tuesday highlighted the high-stakes scramble to buy some of
the early leaders in the cloud-computing movement.
BILLION-DOLLAR TARGETS:
Salesforce.com Inc.said it will spend about $2.5 billion to buy ExactTarget
Inc. Meanwhile, IBM Corp. is snapping up SoftLayer Technologies Inc. IBM
didn’t disclose the financial terms of the deal, but The Wall Street Journal
pegged the cost at about $2 billion.
NO KOOKY CRAZE:
Cloud computing refers to the practice of renting software and other
computing accessories over the Internet.It has moved to the mainstream
in the past six years as the popularity of powerful smartphones and tablet
computers has driven the demand for services that can be reached from
any Internet-connected device.
Cloud computing rains deals
ITC rules for Samsung, bans iPhone 4 imports
NEWYORK — AU.S. trade agency on Tuesday issued a
ban on imports of Apple’s iPhone 4 and a variant of the
iPad 2 after finding the devices violate a patent held by
South Korean rival Samsung Electronics.
Because the devices are assembled in China, the import
would end Apple’s ability to sell them in the U.S.
However, President Barack Obama has 60 days to
invalidate Tuesday’s order from the U.S. International
Trade Commission in Washington. Obama is against
import bans on the basis of the type of patent at issue in
the Samsung case. On Tuesday, the White House issued a
recommendation to Congress that it limit the ITC’s abil-
ity to impose import bans in these cases.
Apple Inc. said it was “disappointed” with the ruling
and will appeal.
Samsung and Apple are engaged in a global legal battle
over their smartphones, with Apple arguing that
Samsung and its Android phones copy vital features of
the iPhone. Samsung is fighting back with its own com-
plaints.
U.S. home prices jumped
in April by most in seven years
WASHINGTON — U.S. home prices soared 12.1 per-
cent in April from a year earlier, the biggest gain since
February 2006, as more buyers competed for fewer
homes.
Real estate data provider CoreLogic says prices rose in
April from the previous April in 48 states. Prices also
rose 3.2 percent in April from March, much better than
the previous month-to-month gain of 1.9 percent.
Prices in Nevada jumped 24.6 percent from a year earli-
er, the most among the states. California’s gain was next
at 19.4 percent, followed by Arizona’s 17.3 percent,
Hawaii’s 17 percent and Oregon’s 15.5 percent.
More people are looking to purchase homes. But the
number of homes for sale is 14 percent lower than it was
a year ago.
Business briefs
<< Lincecum deals in Giants win, page 13
• Federer out at French Open, Serena into semis, page 13
Wednesday, June 5, 2013
COOLED OFF: BREWERS BEAT OAKLAND IN 10 INNINGS >> PAGE 12
KARA KETCHUM
Matt Page, former baseball player for Serra High and Skyline College, was a standout for Oklahoma Baptist University this season, leading all
NAIA schools with 85 RBIs and ranking in the top-20 in five categories nationally.
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Matt Page’s sophomore year at Skyline
College was ruined by injuries which all but
derailed his Division I baseball prospects.
But being a firm believer of things hap-
pening for a reason, Page did not let the sub-
par season ruin his career. He got a full
scholarship to Oklahoma Baptist
University, a National Association of
Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) school in
Shawnee, Okla., and translated it into the
season of his life.
Not only was he named the Sooner
Athletic Conference Player of the Year, he
was honored as the national NAIAPlayer of
the Year.
“You can never expect to have this great a
year and all these awards,” Page said. “I
always felt I was capable
of this. I just went out and
played and everything
took care of itself.”
Page said he was sit-
ting in his grandmother’s
home in Medford, Ore.
when he got the news of
the national award.
“I was in my grandma’s
living room when my
coach called. I thought it was weird. I
thought he was calling about a recruit I
might know,” Page said. “I was shocked to
hear I was the conference player of the year.
I thought my teammates were messing with
me. (Finding out I won the national award)
was pretty insane.”
Page’s numbers are eye-popping. He hit
.385 with a .498 on-base percentage this
season and his 85 RBIs led all NAIAschools
this season. He hit 15 home runs, which
tied for fifth in the nation. Overall, he was
top-20 in the nation five categories.
Not bad for a guy who struggled —
mightily — last year at Skyline. He got hit
on the elbow a few weeks before the start of
the 2012 season with the Trojans, suffering
a massive muscle contusion. He declared
himself ready just two days before the start
of the season, despite knowing otherwise.
“I was a singles hitter (in 2012),” Page
said.
As his elbow finally started feeling better,
he strained his Achilles tendon.
“I was wrapped up like a mummy,” Page
said.
He finally started to find his groove late in
National award for Page
Former Serra and Skyline College player named NAIA Player of the Year
Matt Page
See PAGE, Page 14
By Michael Wagaman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTACLARA— Eric Mangini is back in
the NFL — and back to his coaching roots.
The former coach of the Cleveland
Browns and New York Jets was introduced as
a senior offensive consultant for the San
Francisco 49ers on Tuesday, one day after he
formally began his new job with the defend-
ing NFC champions.
While the move surprised many around
the NFL because Mangini’s background is
on defense, the 42-year-old spent his first
two seasons in the NFLworking as an offen-
sive assistant.
So after working as an
analyst at ESPN for the
past two years, Mangini
is diving into his new gig
with the hope of helping
quarterback Colin
Kaepernick and Co. take
the next step after losing
to the Baltimore Ravens
34-31 in the Super Bowl
in February.
“To be able to do something new like this
is really exciting. To be able to do it in a
place like San Francisco, to me that was a
49ers hire Mangini as
offensive consultant
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN ANTONIO — Hours away from drawing
the toughest defensive assignment of his two-
year career with the San Antonio Spurs, Kawhi
Leonard wasn’t feverishly taking mental
notes of how to guard LeBron James.
The second-year pro was simply relaxing at
home Monday night, watching Miami rout
the Indiana Pacers 99-76 to set up a showdown
with San Antonio in the NBA Finals. Seeing
how Paul George and Lance Stephenson
defended James wasn’t as important to
Leonard as the outcome.
“I was just laying (down), seeing who we
were going to play,” he said.
Leonard means no disrespect. He is just
happy to know who the
Spurs will play after a
week’s wait following
their sweep of the
Memphis Grizzlies in the
Western Conference finals.
The 6-foot-7 Leonard will
draw the primary defensive
assignment against
James, the reigning NBA
Finals MVP and two-time
league MVP who is aver-
aging 26.2 points, 7.3 rebounds and 6.4
assists in the playoffs.
James is also shooting 51 percent overall
Spurs’ Leonard eyes
matchup with LeBron
Eric Mangini
See 49ERS, Page 15 See NBA, Page 14
Kawhi Leonard
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
The big question was pretty universal
among baseball fans when the St. Louis
University baseball team went primetime as
the ESPN2 featured game Friday in Regional
playoff action.
What is a Billiken?
“I always describe him as a little Buddhist
elf,” Billikens senior Grant Nelson said of the
unique St. Louis mascot.
With the direction the Billikens are head-
ing, it won’t be long before Nelson’s spot-on
description is common knowledge among col-
lege baseball fans. The program has come a
long way since Nelson transferred to St. Louis
out of Skyline College two years ago. Last
year, the team set an all-time program record
with 41 wins. This year the Billikens matched
that total, and advanced to the NCAARegional
playoffs for the just the fourth time in the
school’s history.
St. Louis went two-and-out in the South
Carolina bracket, falling 7-3 to host South
Carolina in Friday’s opener, before being
eliminated Saturday with a 10-2 loss to
Clemson. Nelson closed his collegiate career
going 3 for 8 in the tournament.
“We were very, very fortunate to be there,
and it really was an incredible experience that
I never thought I would go through,” Nelson
said. “It was just a huge stage that I never
thought I’d make in terms of college baseball
at St. Louis. But we did make it there, and it
was really exciting.”
Nelson had two outstanding seasons at the
plate, posting a career .326 batting average
for St. Louis. What’s more remarkable, after
spending the previous three seasons as a third
baseman, he converted to catcher this year.
The last time Nelson played the position was
as a bullpen catcher at Serra.
One of three high-school catchers recruited
by Skyline in 2010 — the Trojans also
brought in Jeff Thomas from Woodside, and
Devin Kelly from El Camino — Nelson was
promptly moved to the hot corner. After play-
ing part-time as a freshman, Nelson slugged
his way into a starting role as a sophomore,
becoming the only Skyline player to start all
35 games in 2011. He hit .400 while his six
home runs and 30 RBIs each paced the squad en
route to earning Team MVP honors.
Upon transferring to St. Louis, Nelson said
he didn’t know what to expect. The university
is renowned for its men’s soccer program —
the one-time soccer juggernaut has won more
national championships than any other
school in NCAA history — but it had only
recently become known for baseball, having
advanced to Regional play as recently as
2010.
Nelson makes his
mark for Billikens
See NELSON, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Wednesday • June 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Joe Totoraitis
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MILWAUKEE — Carlos Gomez scored
from first on Yuniesky Betancourt’s line
drive in the gap between center and right in
the bottom of the 10th inning, lifting the
Milwaukee Brewers to a 4-3 victory over the
Oakland Athletics on Tuesday night.
John Axford (2-3) got the win with a
scoreless 10th. He retired Yoenis Cespedes,
whose first career multi-homer game had
given the Athletics a 3-0 lead through seven
innings, and after walking Jed Lowrie he
struck out Josh Donaldson and got Josh
Reddick on a flyout.
Pat Neshek (1-1) took over in the bottom
of the 10th and retired Ryan Braun on a
grounder to third before Aramis Ramirez
blooped an 0-2 pitch into short left and was
replaced by pinch-runner Jeff Bianchi.
Gomez reached on a fielder’s choice and
scored with a head-first slide on
Betancourt’s line drive.
After being shut out by Oakland starter
A.J. Griffin for seven innings, the Brewers
tied the game with three runs in the eighth
off reliever Sean Doolittle.
Rickie Weeks, who came on in a double
switch in the top of the eighth, singled and
went to second on Norichika Aoki’s single.
Both scored when Jean Segura tripled to the
right-field corner. Ryan Cook then came on
to face Braun and retired him on a grounder
to third. Ramirez followed with a broken-
bat bloop to short center that scored Segura.
Gomez hit into a double play to end the
threat.
Cespedes hit the first pitch he saw from
Milwaukee starter Kyle Lohse for his 10th
home run of the season in the first and then
connected again off Lohse for a solo shot
leading off the sixth.
Griffin retired the first eight batters before
Lohse looped a single into short center
field. Then the right-hander worked out of
trouble in the fifth.
Gomez beat out a bunt single and Juan
Francisco walked, but Griffin got Martin
Maldonado to hit into a fielder’s choice.
Scooter Gennett and Lohse struck out
swinging as Griffin escaped any harm.
Griffin allowed four hits, walked one and
struck out five, including Gennett three
times. Griffin has gone six or more innings
in nine of his 12 starts this season.
Lohse, signed to a three-year contract the
last week of spring training, was supposed
to help bolster an inexperienced pitching
staff, but his lone victory came April 22 at
San Diego. Since then, often pitching with
little run support, he’s lost seven of his
eight starts.
He missed one scheduled start due to right
elbow irritation and then allowed four home
runs in 4 2-3 innings against Minnesota on
May 30 — his shortest start of the season.
Against the Athletics, Lohse gave up
three runs on seven hits in six innings. He
struck out three, but has allowed six home
runs in his last two starts.
Juan Francisco made his first ever start at
first base for the Brewers, who acquired the
career third baseman from Atlanta on
Monday for minor league pitcher Thomas
Keeling. Francisco, in his fifth season,
played 209 games with Atlanta and
Cincinnati, but none at first. Milwaukee
plans to have Francisco and Betancourt pla-
toon at first until Corey Hart returns from
the 60-day disabled list.
Brewers rally in 10th for victory over A’s
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Tim Lincecum ended a
three-start losing streak, Andres Torres hit a
two-run homer and the San Francisco Giants
beat Melky Cabrera and
the Toronto Blue Jays 2-1
on Tuesday night.
Cabrera had two hits in
his return to AT&T Park
with Toronto for the first
time since his 50-game
suspension for a positive
testosterone test last Aug.
15.
Lincecum (4-5) allowed
Edwin Encarnacion’s first-inning solo home
run, then retired the next 14 Blue Jays in
order.
Coming off his shortest outing of the year
of 4 1-3 innings last Wednesday in a 9-6 loss
to Oakland, Lincecum allowed three hits and
one run, struck out six and walked one in
seven impressive innings.
The Giants handed Josh Johnson (0-2) a
loss in his return from the disabled list.
Torres connected for his second homer in
the second, and he also made a couple of nice
catches in left field behind Lincecum.
The struggling right-hander looked more
like his old self after losing four of five starts
and five of his last six decisions — in which
he had allowed 27 earned runs in 42 1-3
innings for a 5.74 ERA.
The two-time NL Cy Young Award winner
quickly regrouped after Encarancion’s 17th
home run and found a groove.
Cabrera apologized to the Giants and their
fans during a dugout news conference before
the game. He was eligible to return for the NL
championship series, but the Giants decided
in late September 2012 to keep him off the
postseason roster the entire way.
Cabrera, the 2012 All-Star game MVP who
produced a 51-hit May last year, received his
World Series ring when the Giants visited
Toronto last month.
Booed — with no sign of the “Melk Men”
who used to cheer him — by the sellout crowd
of 41,981 each time he stepped into the bat-
ter’s box, Cabrera went 2 for 4 with a leadoff
single in the first and another base hit in the
sixth but flied out with the tying run at first
for the first out in the ninth.
The Blue Jays missed a chance in the sixth.
With Johnson aboard on a walk and at second
following Cabrera’s single, Jose Bautista hit
into his second double play of the game with
a liner to Pablo Sandoval at third base.
Sandoval fired to second and Marco Scutaro
made the play but dropped the ball as he tum-
bled forward, bringing Blue Jays manager
John Gibbons out to argue.
Lincecum, knocked out of his only other
start against the Blue Jays after 3 2-3 innings
in 2007, pumped his fist as he walked off the
mound.
The pitcher’s recent problems raised spec-
ulation of a possible move to the bullpen
like the one last fall that was so successful
for the club’s run to a second World Series
championship in three years.
Jeremy Affeldt pitched the eighth and
Sergio Romo finished for his 16th save in 18
chances to end the 2-hour, 16-minute game.
It was the Giants’ fastest game of the year.
The Blue Jays snapped a three-game losing
streak with Sunday’s win at San Diego, but
dropped their seventh in 11 overall Tuesday
and ninth of 13 on the road.
Johnson looked strong in his fifth start of
the year and first back from since being side-
lined April 22 with right triceps inflamma-
tion. He struck out six in seven innings and
didn’t walk a batter, but dropped to 0-4 in
eight career starts against the Giants.
Sandoval was back in the Giants’ lineup
after missing three games with a strain in his
left foot, while center fielder and leadoff hit-
ter Angel Pagan sat out for the ninth straight
game with a strained left hamstring.
But Sandoval was replaced late in the
game by Joaquin Arias.
Lincecum reverts to Cy Young form
Brewers 4, A’s 3
Giants 2, Blue Jays 1
Tim Lincecum
SPORTS 13
Wednesday • June 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
650-365-1668
By Andrew Welsh-Huggins
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
COLUMBUS, Ohio — Ohio State
University President Gordon Gee
abruptly announced his retirement
Tuesday after he came under fire for
jokingly referring to “those damn
Catholics” at Notre Dame and pok-
ing fun at the academic quality of
other schools.
The remarks were first reported
last week by The Associated Press,
and Ohio State at the time called
them unacceptable and said it had
placed Gee on a “remediation plan”
to change his behavior.
Gee, 69, said in a teleconference
that the furor was only part of his
decision to retire, which he said he
had been considering for a while. He
said his age and
the start of a
long-term plan-
ning process at
the university
were also fac-
tors.
“I live in tur-
bulent times and
I’ve had a lot of
headwinds, and
so almost every occasion, I have
just moved on,” he said. Gee
explained away the abrupt timing by
saying he was “quirky as hell” and
hated long transitions.
He also said he didn’t regret the
way he conducted himself as a high-
er education leader.
“I have regrets when I have said
things that I shouldn’t have said, but
I have no regrets about having a
sense of humor and having a thick
skin and enjoying life,” Gee said.
According to a recording of a Dec.
5 meeting obtained by the AP under
a public records request, Gee, a
Mormon, said Notre Dame was
never invited to join the Big Ten
athletic conference because “you
just can’t trust those damn
Catholics.”
Gee also took shots at schools in
the Southeastern Conference and the
University of Louisville, according
to the recording of the meeting of
the school’s Athletic Council.
Gee apologized when the com-
ments were disclosed, saying they
were “a poor attempt at humor and
entirely inappropriate.”
His decision to retire was first
reported by The Columbus Dispatch.
Robert Schottenstein, who as
chairman of the university’s board
of trustees condemned the remarks
last week as “wholly unacceptable”
and “not presidential in nature,”
deflected questions about whether
Gee had been forced out by the
board.
“It’s really about a decision to
retire for the reasons that Gordon
has articulated,” Schottenstein said.
Ohio State, one of the biggest
universities in the nation, with
65,000 students, named provost
Joseph Alutto as interim president.
Gee, a familiar figure on campus
with his bowties and owlish eye-
glasses, has repeatedly gotten in
trouble over the years for verbal
gaffes. Tuesday’s news lit up Twitter,
with numerous posts using the hash-
tag (hash)savethebowtie.
Ohio State trustees learned of
Gee’s latest remarks in January and
created the remediation plan. In a
March 11 letter, the trustees warned
any repeat offenses could lead to his
firing and ordered him to apologize
to those he offended. But it appeared
that several of Gee’s apologies came
only in the last week or so as the
school prepared to respond to the
AP’s inquiries.
Gee said Tuesday he waited until
recently to apologize in person to
the Notre Dame president, Rev.
John Jenkins, because they had a
long-scheduled meeting.
Schottenstein said the board was
satisfied with Gee’s response to the
letter.
Ohio St. president retires after Notre Dame jabs
Gordon Gee
By Howard Fendrich
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PARIS — Apoint from losing the
first set of his French Open quarterfi-
nal, Roger Federer shanked a routine
forehand, sending the ball 10 feet
beyond the opposite baseline.
The Court Philippe Chatrier crowd
roared with approval, then loudly
chanted the last name of Federer’s
opponent, Frenchman Jo-Wilfried
Tsonga.
That shot was a clear indication
that Federer was hardly Federesque
on this day. There were plenty of
others: He argued with the chair
umpire about a call. He dumped over-
head smashes into the net. And in a
truly rare ungraceful moment, he
failed to put a racket to — or get out
of the way of — a backhand flip by a
sliding Tsonga, instead getting hit
on the back.
All in all, Federer looked lost out
there Tuesday against the sixth-
seeded Tsonga, who pounded his
way to a 7-5, 6-3, 6-3 victory over
the 17-time Grand Slam champion
in a 1-hour, 51-minute mismatch
remarkable for its lopsidedness and
brevity.
“I struggled a little bit every-
where. To be honest, personally,
I’m pretty sad about the match and
the way I played. But that’s how it
goes. I tried to figure things out, but
it was difficult. And Jo does a good
job keeping the pressure on,”
Federer said.
“He was just ... better in all
areas,” continued Federer, whose
lone French Open title, in 2009,
allowed him to equal Pete Sampras’
then-record of 14 major champi-
onships. “He returned better than I
did. Served better than I did. I strug-
gled to find my rhythm.”
While Federer quickly faced a big
deficit Tuesday and never recovered,
Serena Williams was able to get out
of a much smaller spot of trouble.
Like Federer, Williams is 31. Like
Federer, she’s won more than a
dozen Grand Slam titles, 15. And
like Federer, only one of those tro-
phies came at Roland Garros, in
2002. Trailing in the third set
against 2009 French Open winner
Svetlana Kuznetsova, the No. 1-
seeded Williams won five games in a
row en route to a 6-1, 3-6, 6-3 vic-
tory that put her back in the semifi-
nals at Paris after a decade’s absence.
Williams had lost four consecu-
tive quarterfinals at Roland Garros
— in 2004, 2007, 2009 (to
Kuznetsova), 2010 — and so when
she was serving while down 2-0 in
the final set Tuesday, “I thought, you
know, ‘Can’t go out like this
again.”’
That was a pivotal game, featur-
ing 16 points and three break
chances for Kuznetsova, who
flubbed the last with a drop shot that
floated wide. After finally holding in
that game with an inside-out fore-
hand winner as Kuznetsova stum-
bled to the clay, Williams broke
right away with a backhand winner
that had her yelling and shaking her
fist.
“Unbelievable competitor, ”
Kuznetsova said. “She turns on (her)
game when she needs it.”
Kuznetsova winced a few times
after slow serves, and said afterward
she strained an abdominal muscle
earlier in the tournament.
“I did push her to the limit, I
think, today, even without my
serve,” Kuznetsova said. “I was
serving like, I don’t know, a grand-
mother.”
Federer out, Serena into semis at French
SPORTS 14
Wednesday • June 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
these
outstanding
Events!
Coming
to you
soon
San Mateo County Event Center
1346 Saratoga Drive, San Mateo
650.574.3247
T
o
A
t
t
e
n
d
Your
Chance
San Mateo County Fair - June 8-16
www.sanmateocountyfair.com
Where Tradition Meets Innovation – From Rides to Robots, DIY
projects and Contests galore, a whole lotta family fun!
The Birth and Baby Fair - June 22
Te Birth and Baby Fair showcases local businesses and resources as
well as independent designers with the aim to educate and expose
new & expecting parents and young families to unique & benefcial
products & services. info@birthandbabyfair.com (415) 967-0223
Arrive early! Te frst 150 families will receive a free gif bag and we
will have rafe prizes
Palo Alto Concours d’Elegance – June 30
47th Annual Classic Car Show
www.paconcours.com
Debuting at the San Mateo County Event Center!
Your chance to see all the dream machines!
Discover the Dinosaurs
July 5, 6, 7 and July 12, 13, 14
www.discoverthedinosaurs.com
Come experience up to 60 replica dinosaurs and
moving museum quality dinosaurs.
(651)-766-2800
D
o
n
t
m
i
s
s
www.smeventcenter.com – Signup for our SMCEC newsletter and enter for a chance to win Free Admission and Parking to shows!
the season, hitting his only three home
runs over the final couple weeks.
As such, college scouts and managers
weren’t beating down his door.
But then fate intervened. Page attended a
camp at Sacramento State, where his
Skyline manager Dino Nomicos said Page
might get a chance to walk on. But he did
not enjoy his experience.
“I texted my mom saying how I really did-
n’t like it (at Sac State) and that I guess
we’re back to square one,” Page said.
“Literally five minutes later, I got a call
from the Oklahoma Baptist coach. He want-
ed to talk to me that night. He offered me (a
scholarship) that night and I signed it.
“That was the only (four-year) offer I got.”
Despite the fortuitous turn of events,
Page’s time in Oklahoma got off to a rocky
start. He still wasn’t himself and performed
miserably during fall ball.
“When I got there for the fall, my body
felt good, but my swing was awful,” Page
said. “I think I was 5 for 40 (during scrim-
mage games).”
He said he never lost his confidence, but
did have some heart-to-heart talks with the
Oklahoma Baptist hitting coach and man-
ager. With his hitting coach, they talked
about their philosophies toward hitting
each had and worked to find a middle ground.
His manager never lost confidence in Page
either.
“[He] basically said, we’re counting on
you to be in the middle of our order. … We
have full confidence in you.”
But just to add to Page’s abysmal 2012
year, he suffered a hamstring injury late in
the fall ball season that cost him another
couple months of rehab time.
When the calendar finally turned to 2013,
Page turned the page as well. After going,
by his estimation, oh-fer in his Bison
debut, he finally got locked in during the
second game of the season, hitting the first
of his 15 homers and just never stopped.
Page will spend the summer playing for
the Medford Rogues in the West Coast
League, a collegiate wood-bat league. He
doesn’t anticipate being drafted in this
week’s Major League Baseball Amateur
Draft and plans on returning Oklahoma in
the fall to help the Bison to the NAIAWorld
Series.
“The best way is to take everything as it
comes,” Page said. “I’m not going to
change anything. Hopefully I can have a
similar year (next season).”
Continued from page 11
PAGE
and 39 percent on 3-pointers.
“It’s just a great challenge for me to try to help
my team win by playing good defense on him,”
Leonard said. “I just accept the challenge and am
ready to play.”
Facing a player on a hot streak isn’t new to
San Antonio this postseason following show-
downs with Golden State’s Stephen Curry and
Memphis’ Zach Randolph.
After averaging 24 points and 10 assists in an
upset of the Denver Nuggets, sweet-shooting
Curry was held to 18.2 points and 6 assists
against the Spurs — excluding a 44-point, 11-
assist effort in a Game 1 loss by the Warriors.
Randolph averaged 18.4 points and 10.8
rebounds while bullying the Oklahoma City
Thunder in the paint, but was limited to 11
points and 12 rebounds against the Spurs. His
production included a two-point, seven-rebound
effort in a Game 1 loss to San Antonio.
In some respect, the Spurs are facing a hybrid
of Curry and Randolph in the 6-foot-8, 250-
pound James.
“He’s great on offense and defense,” said
Leonard, who has a 7-3 wingspan. “He can pass,
he can shoot the ball, gets offensive rebounds
and defensive rebounds and he can guard the best
player on the other team.”
Continued from page 11
NBA
“I was just focused on making the team,”
Nelson said. “But you start to look around at
the players around you and start to realize
you’re pretty good.”
Not only did Nelson make the team, he
quickly became one of its top hitters. As a jun-
ior transfer, he ranked second among St. Louis
hitters in hits (66), RBIs (34), and batting
average (.314). That was all as a third baseman
though. And all the while, Nelson had no idea
he would be catching the following year, let
alone proving one of the top backstops in the
nation.
But last summer while playing with the
Menlo Park Legends, an injury to teammate
Travis Bonner created an opportunity for
Nelson. Nelson said he offered to catch as a
joke. After all, the last time he remembered
being in the squat was as a senior at Serra dur-
ing the Central Coast Section championship
game, and that was as a bullpen catcher. He
hadn’t caught regularly since the frosh-soph
ranks. But the next thing he knew, he was
making 14 starts behind the dish for Menlo
Park.
“I just jumped in there and it felt really
good,” Nelson said. “It felt really natural.”
For his efforts, Nelson earned Far West
League Defensive Player of the Summer hon-
ors, and was ranked the No. 4 prospect in the
league. USF outfielder Bradley Zimmer was the
league’s top prospect that summer.
“I knew I going to catch, but I didn’t know
how good I was, just because I hadn’t done it in
so long,” Nelson said. “And then once I did it
last summer, I really believed I had a shot at
excelling at it, and helping my team this
spring, and also helping myself get to the
next level.”
Nelson not only turned catching into a full-
time gig at St. Louis, he flourished. He earned
Atlantic 10 Player of the Week honors the first
week in March, hitting .467 through five
games. The same day he received the award, he
was one of 48 catchers in the nation named to
the Johnny Bench Award Watch List. He didn’t
make the cut for the semifinalist list, however,
when it was announced in mid-May.
“It would have been nice to be a semifinal-
ist, but I didn’t quite put up the monster num-
bers that would have qualified me for it,”
Nelson said.
He still posted an impressive season, hit-
ting .338 with five home runs and 32 RBIs,
while pacing the Billikens with a .433 on
base percentage.
Next up for Nelson is the Major League
Baseball draft, which starts Thursday. Among
the top local amateur prospects this season are
Stanford superstar Mark Appel, Serra outfield-
er Jordan Paroubeck, and St. Ignatius pitcher
Matt Krook. While Nelson doesn’t figure into
the top rounds on Day 1, he will almost cer-
tainly be drafted as a catcher, although one
American League scout did ask him if he would
still be comfortable playing third. Nelson
said: “Yes.”
But Nelson’s place in St. Louis’ historic
back-to-back seasons is set in stone. And no
matter where he ends up playing professional-
l y, he has helped shed light on the whole
Billiken mystery. What is a Billiken? Grant
Nelson is.
Continued from page 11
NELSON
COURTESY OF BILL BARRETT, SLU ATHLETICS
Grant Nelson, who played at Serra and
Skyline College, helped lead St. Louis Univer-
sity to two of the best seasons in program
history.
SPORTS 15
Wednesday • June 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FAST PICK UP s RUNNING OR NOT s TAX DEDUCTION
800-818-4661
Live Operators Every Day!
pollyklaas.org
Drive Change.
Donate a car today.
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 36 23 .610 —
Baltimore 33 25 .569 2 1/2
New York 33 25 .569 2 1/2
Tampa Bay 31 26 .544 4
Toronto 24 34 .414 12
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 31 25 .554 —
Cleveland 30 28 .517 2
Minnesota 26 29 .473 4 1/2
Chicago 24 31 .436 6 1/2
Kansas City 23 32 .418 7 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 35 22 .614 —
Oakland 35 25 .583 1 1/2
Los Angeles 25 33 .431 10 1/2
Seattle 25 33 .431 10 1/2
Houston 21 38 .356 15
Tuesday’s Games
N.Y. Yankees 4, Cleveland 3
Detroit 10, Tampa Bay 1
Boston 17, Texas 5
Baltimore 4, Houston 1
Minnesota 3, Kansas City 0
Milwaukee 4, Oakland 3, 10 innings
Chicago Cubs at L.A. Angels, late
Chicago White Sox at Seattle, late
Toronto at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Cleveland (Kluber 3-3) at N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia
5-4), 10:05 a.m.
Oakland (Colon 6-2) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 4-5),
11:10 a.m.
Chicago White Sox (Axelrod 3-4) at Seattle
(Iwakuma 6-1), 12:40 p.m.
Toronto (Dickey 4-7) at San Francisco (Zito 4-3),
12:45 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Garza 1-0) at L.A. Angels (Vargas
5-3), 4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Cobb 6-2) at Detroit (Fister 5-2), 4:08
p.m.
Texas (Ogando 4-2) at Boston (Lackey 3-5), 4:10
p.m.
Baltimore (F.Garcia 2-2) at Houston (Keuchel 2-2),
5:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Walters 2-0) at Kansas City (Guthrie
5-3), 5:10 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
Tampa Bay at Detroit, 10:08 a.m.
Baltimore at Houston, 11:10 a.m.
Texas at Boston, 4:10 p.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 36 22 .621 —
Washington 29 29 .500 7
Philadelphia 29 30 .492 7 1/2
New York 22 33 .400 12 1/2
Miami 16 43 .271 20 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 38 19 .667 —
Cincinnati 36 23 .610 3
Pittsburgh 35 24 .593 4
Chicago 23 32 .418 14
Milwaukee 22 35 .386 16
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 32 25 .561 —
San Francisco 31 27 .534 1 1/2
Colorado 31 28 .525 2
San Diego 26 31 .456 6
Los Angeles 24 32 .429 7 1/2
Tuesday’s Games
Philadelphia 7, Miami 3, 11 innings
Washington 3, N.Y. Mets 2
Colorado 5, Cincinnati 4
Atlanta 5, Pittsburgh 4, 10 innings
Milwaukee 4, Oakland 3, 10 innings
SanFrancisco 2, Toronto 1
Arizona at St. Louis, late
Chicago Cubs at L.A. Angels, late
San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, late
Wednesday’s Games
Pittsburgh (W.Rodriguez 6-3) at Atlanta (Teheran
3-2), 9:10 a.m.
Miami (Ja.Turner 1-0) at Philadelphia (Hamels 1-
9), 10:05 a.m.
Oakland (Colon 6-2) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 4-5),
11:10 a.m.
Toronto (Dickey 4-7) at San Francisco (Zito 4-3),
12:45 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Garza 1-0) at L.A. Angels (Vargas
5-3), 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Gee 3-6) at Washington (Haren 4-6),
4:05 p.m.
Colorado (Garland 3-6) at Cincinnati (Cueto 3-0),
4:10 p.m.
Arizona (Miley 3-5) at St. Louis (J.Kelly 0-2), 5:15
p.m.
San Diego (Marquis 6-2) at L.A. Dodgers
(Kershaw 5-3), 7:10 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
N.Y. Mets at Washington, 4:05 p.m.
Arizona at St. Louis, 4:15 p.m.
Philadelphia at Milwaukee, 5:10 p.m.
San Diego at Colorado, 5:40 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
@Colorado
CSN-CAL
6/15
@D.C.United
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/22
vs.Galaxy
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/29
@Chicago
5:30p.m.
CSN-PLUS
7/3
@NERev
4:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/6
@CWS
5:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/6
vs. Toronto
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/4
vs. Toronto
12:45p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/5
@Arizona
6:40p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/7
@Arizona
7:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/8
@Arizona
1:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/9
@Brewers
5:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/4
@Brewers
11:10a.m.
6/5
@CWS
5:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/7
vs.Seattle
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/13
NFL
ARIZONA CARDINALS—Signed LB Alex Okafor
and G Earl Watford to four-year contracts.
CHICAGOBEARS—Announced TE Gabe Miller re-
ceived a four-game suspension for violating the
NFL’spolicyonperformanceenhancingsubstances.
DETROITLIONS—Signed G/C Leroy Harris,G Jake
Scott and WR Micheal Spurlock. Released WR Troy
Burrell,TE Nathan Overbay and CB Lionel Smith.
PITTSBURGH STEELERS—Signed DE Nick
Williams to a four-year contract.
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS—Named Eric Mangini
senior offensive consultant.Signed WR Kassim Os-
good to a one-year contract. Waived WR Joe
Hastings.
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Signed WR Arceto Clark.
Released DT Myles Wade.
TRANSACTIONS
@Pittsburgh
4:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/11
@Pittsburgh
4:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/12
@CWS
1:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/8
@CWS
11:10a.m.
CSN-CAL
6/9
vs. Yankees
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/11
vs.Norwich
City
7:30p.m.
7/20
big part of wanting to come back,”
said Mangini following the 49ers’
two-hour OTApractice. “I just want
to help. Whatever that means, what-
ever that evolves into, the most
important thing to me is to help.”
Just how the former Browns and
Jets head coach ended up on Jim
Harbaugh’s staff in San Francisco is
almost as interesting as the new job
the 49ers created for him.
Mangini had never met Harbaugh
until last September when the 49ers
— in the midst of back-to-back
games near the East Coast — stayed
in Youngstown, Ohio to practice
rather than flying back to
California. Mangini attended one of
the workouts and struck up a friend-
ship with Harbaugh. The two men
stayed in contact until meeting
together two weeks ago, and shortly
thereafter Harbaugh reached out with
a job offer.
“I feel like we added a really tal-
ented, knowledgeable coach,”
Harbaugh said. “He’ll look at how
defenses prepare for us and where we
can attack defenses. That’s what his
role will be.”
Mangini had been out of the NFL
since being fired by the Browns in
January 2011 following a pair of 5-
11 seasons. That came only two
years after he lost his job in New
York. Mangini coached the Jets
from 2006-08, leading them to the
playoffs in his first season with the
team.
The time off from coaching
helped give Mangini a different per-
spective on football — and life.
“I’ve got three little boys so it
gave me a chance to spend time with
them and to just get refreshed,”
Mangini said. “But I missed it. I
missed the competition, the strate-
gy, the guys.”
Although he has spent the major-
ity of his coaching career on defense
— Mangini was the defensive coor-
dinator for New England in 2005 —
he spent his first two seasons in the
NFL working as an offensive assis-
tant with Cleveland and Baltimore.
With the 49ers, Mangini will
break down opposing defenses as an
advance scout and will aid Harbaugh
in developing game plans each
week.
His first order of business will be
finding a place to live. Mangini has
been staying at a local hotel since
getting hired and has yet to bring
his wife and children to the Bay
Area.
Once that’s done, Mangini will
initially immerse himself in San
Francisco’s offense before starting
to scout teams on the 49ers’ 2013
schedule.
“This is a good system. They went
to the Super Bowl last year, they
went to the NFC championship the
year before,” Mangini said.
“They’re doing so many things
right I just want to find a way to
complement them.”
Continued from page 11
49ERS
16
Wednesday • June 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE/WORLD
650-354-1100
By Don Thompson and Tom Verdin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — The FBI searched
the offices of a California state senator
and the Legislature’s Latino caucus on
Tuesday but would not disclose the rea-
son for the investigation.
Laura Eimiller, a spokeswoman for
the FBI office in Los Angeles, said the
warrants were served at about 3 p.m.
and that agents remained inside the
state Capitol into the evening.
She would not disclose the target of
the search warrants, but Senate Chief
Sergeant-at-Arms Tony Beard told the
Associated Press it was Sen. Ron
Calderon, a Democrat from the Los
Angeles County city of Montebello.
“It’s a federal
search warrant
served on Sen.
Calderon’s office.
It’s a sealed search
warrant. I don’t
know what it relates
to,” Beard said.
He said Calderon
was not present dur-
ing the search and
he did not know if the agents had
removed any material. At about 8
p.m., two people carrying file folders
were seen going into Calderon’s
office.
Calderon did not immediately return
a message left on his cellphone. His
spokesman, Rocky Rushing, said he
could not comment and referred calls
to Los Angeles attorney Mark
Geragos. Geragos did not immediately
return messages left on his office and
cellular phones.
Beard also told reporters who gath-
ered outside Calderon’s office Tuesday
night that the office of the Latino
Legislative Caucus, which is across
the street from the Capitol in the
Legislative Office Building, also was
searched. Aspokeswoman for the cau-
cus, Lizette Mata, did not immediately
return telephone and email messages.
The warrants were being served as
lawmakers who are part of the 23-
member Latino caucus held an event
with reporters at the Capitol to dis-
cuss the group’s legislative priorities.
FBI raids officeof state lawmaker
By Greg Keller and Karin Laub
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PARIS — France said Tuesday it has
confirmed that the nerve gas sarin was
used “multiple times and in a localized
way” in Syria, including at least once
by the regime. It was the most specific
claim by any Western power about
chemical weapons attacks in the 27-
month-old conflict.
Britain later said that tests it con-
ducted on samples taken from Syria
also were positive for sarin.
The back-to-back announcements
left many questions unanswered, high-
lighting the difficulties of confirming
from a distance whether combatants in
Syria have crossed the “red line” set by
President Barack Obama. The regime of
Syrian President Bashar Assad has
refused to allow U.N. investigators
into the country.
The French and British findings,
based on samples taken from Syria,
came hours after a U.N. team said it had
“reasonable grounds” to suspect small-
scale use of toxic chemicals in at least
four attacks in March and April.
The U.N. probe was conducted from
outside Syria’s borders, based on inter-
views with doctors and witnesses of
purported attacks and a review of ama-
teur videos from Syria. The team said
solid evidence will remain elusive until
inspectors can collect samples from
victims directly or from the sites of
alleged attacks.
France, Britainconfirm use of sarin gas in Syria
Turkish government offers
apology as protests continue
ANKARA, Turkey — Turkey’s deputy
prime minister offered an apology
Tuesday for the government’s violent
crackdown on an environmental
protest, a calculated bid to ease days of
anti-government rallies in the coun-
try’s major cities.
The message was a bit mixed, howev-
er, as hundreds of riot police deployed
with water cannons around the prime
minister’s office in Ankara, the capital.
Bulent Arinc, who is standing in for
the prime minister while he is out of
the country, said the crackdown was
“wrong and unjust.”
Around the world
Ron Calderon
In January, the Miami New Times, an alternative week-
ly newspaper, reported that New York Yankees slugger
Alex Rodriguez was among the big leaguers listed in
Biogenesis of America’s records.
New Times said it obtained records detailing purchases
by Rodriguez, 2012 All-Star game MVP Melky Cabrera,
2005 AL Cy Young Award winner Bartolo Colon and 2011
AL championship series MVP Nelson Cruz.
Other baseball players the newspaper said appeared in
the records include Gio Gonzalez and Yasmani Grandal.
Later, Yahoo Sports reported that 2011 NL MVP Ryan
Braun’s name also appeared in the records.
The players have denied they obtained banned drugs
from the clinic that operated out of an office park in
Coral Gables, Fla.
Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig declined to comment
on Biogenesis at the time, other than to say it is the sub-
ject of a “very thorough investigation’’ by MLB.
The Times said the payments by the commissioner’s
office did not exceed more than “several thousand dol-
lars.”
MLB officials decided to take the unusual step of pay-
ing for the documents because, with no subpoena power,
its investigators would likely have no access to the
material if it wound up in the players’ hands, The Times
reported.
In March, Major League Baseball sued Biogenesis, and
its operators, accusing them of scheming to provide
banned performance-enhancing drugs to players in viola-
tion of their contracts.
The lawsuit in Miami-Dade Circuit Court seeks unspec-
ified damages from Biogenesis and its operator, Anthony
Bosch. Several other Bosch associates are named in the
lawsuit.
Among the banned drugs supplied, the lawsuit said, are
testosterone, human growth hormone and human chori-
onic gonadotropin.
Continued from page 1
BOSCH

FOOD 17
Wednesday • June 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Michelle Locke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bartender Tony Conigliaro’s new
beverage book is called “The
Cocktail Lab,” and he’s not speak-
ing figuratively.
Among the equipment at his
London-based Drink Factory con-
sulting business are a centrifuge
(the better to filter macerated liq-
uids), a cold smoker and smoke gun
(for smoking garnishes as well as
syrup ingredients), and a refrac-
tometer to measure exact alcohol
levels. Not quite your standard issue
bar gear.
And an ordinary day in the lab
“can involve thermo-mixing, sous-
viding, dehydrating — even strip-
ping bark from trees,” Conigliaro
writes in the introduction to the
book, due out in July.
Conigliaro, a renowned British
bartender, is a pioneer in so-called
molecular mixology, but he’s got a
lot of company these days as more
bartenders on both sides of the
Atlantic work on elevating the art
of the cocktail into a science.
“All of the regular tools of molec-
ular cooking are in play: they’re
Cryovacing (putting in vacuum-
sealed packaging) and slow cook-
ing ingredients, smoke-infusing
liquors, carbonating drinks, barrel-
aging cocktails, centrifuging juices
to get clear liquids, infusing liquors
with unexpected ingredients, and
using rotary evaporators to get
strongly flavored distillates,” says
Erica Duecy, cocktail historian and
author of the upcoming book
“Storied Sips.” “The high-end bar
has become as devoted to this
equipment and these techniques as
the kitchen.”
For Conigliaro, molecular
mixology started with people ask-
ing questions. “And the more ques-
tions people asked you kind of got
to points where the only places
where you could find the answers
were either in the chemistry of food
or the science of how it works,” he
says.
“For years and years all we’ve
ever had is recipes passed down and
you get shown how to make them
and shown what they should be like
and how they should taste, but it
was scratching below the surface of
that and seeing what was actually
going on that really proved to be of
interest for us.”
Kevin K. Liu, author of “Craft
Cocktails at Home,” sees cocktail
chemistry as something that fit s
into his overarching interest in
how science can improve everyday
life, something he began exploring
while studying technology policy
at the Massachusetts Institute of
Technology. “I wrote the book
about cocktails because I thought
this was a field where bartenders and
customers alike could benefit from
some simple scientific knowledge,
but I think the concept applies to
many other fields as well,” he says.
The best of the new breed of
drinks look like regular cocktails
but “taste like nothing you’ve tried
before,” says Duecy. Bartenders
like Dave Arnold at Booker & Dax
in New York are developing new
techniques like nitro-muddling
(flash-freezing fresh herbs with liq-
uid nitrogen, then crushing them
into a powder and incorporating it
into the cocktail). What you get —
intense herb flavor. What you don’t
get — herbs stuck in your teeth.
And in San Diego, Erick Castro
of Polite Provisions, a new bar,
works with carbonation so the
cocktails are premixed and come
out of a kegerator, a refrigerated dis-
penser, like beer or soda.
One of the best molecular cock-
tails Duecy has tried was at Eleven
Madison Park in New York, where
bartenders used liquid nitrogen to
make a frozen gin sorbet, which
they then mixed with bing cherry
syrup and grapefruit juice and
topped with Pop Rocks. “The drink
is refreshing and clean, yet invig-
orating and fun with those Pop
Rocks crackling in your mouth.
Surprise and delight is the reaction
molecular mixologists are going
for, and that’s what this drink deliv-
ered.”
New tools open up new possibil-
ities. For instance, a rotary evapo-
rator is a piece of lab equipment
that lets you “boil” water or alcohol
at low temperatures. You can put
orange juice in and end up with
orange water and orange-flavored
jam, “both of which would taste
Molecular mixologists raising the bar on cocktails
The best of the new breed of drinks look like regular cocktails but taste like nothing you’ve tried before.
See COCKTAILS, Page 18
18
Wednesday • June 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FOOD/LOCAL
EXPIRES: June 30, 2013
JACK’S RESTAURANT & BAR: SAN BRUNO
1050 Admiral Court, Suite A
San Bruno, CA 94066
Phone: (650) 589-2222 | Fax: (650) 589-5042
iLoveJacks.com
No matter how you slice it...
Our pizza is the BEST!
Menlo Park
1001 El Camino Real
324-3486
San Carlos
560 El Camino Real
486-1487
Pizzza-2-Go
989 El Camino Real
328-1556
We Deliver!
Online ordering available
www. applewoodbistro. com
Lunch Special 11am-2pm
Personal Pizza, Salad & Soda
Burger, Fries & Soda
Your choice $9.00 +tax
H
A
P
P
Y

H
O
U
R

M
-F 4-7pm
Sa-Su
Noon-7pm
2011
B E ST OF
2011-2013
clean and fresh,” says Liu.
Alternatively, you could put in bourbon
and end with a super high-proof distil-
late of bourbon and bourbon-flavored
powder.
Still, while gadgetry can produce new
flavors, it takes a skilled bartender to
balance those flavors, notes Liu.
Conigliaro would agree. He may cre-
ate his cocktails in a lab-like setting,
but he serves them in an atmosphere
that’s anything but clinical. The menu
at his Bar 69 in Islington, North
London, has just 12 cocktails, three
wines and Champagnes, and one beer.
The gee-whiz techniques are generally
out of sight, though customers who
want to know what went into a drink are
welcome to ask.
Want to up your home bartending
game? Here are some tips.
• Duecy: Make sure you’re using top
quality ingredients, i.e., no shriveled
limes. Try infusing liquors or wines
with fruit, herbs and even vegetables.
Start with vodka until you get familiar
with the length of time and results
you’ll get from certain ingredients. To a
vodka-filled jam jar, just drop in some
ingredients, and leave the infusion on
the counter. Try spices (cardamom,
black pepper, horseradish), fruit
(pineapple, lemon peel, berries), and
vegetables (beets, celery).
• Liu: Get some gear. Start with a water
filter (Why would you fill up half a cock-
tail with poor-tasting water?). Then get
a dual infrared/probe thermometer. Use
it to check temperatures, from how cold
your freezer gets to whether you’ve
stirred a drink long enough.
• Conigliaro: Source your ingredients
well. Look at not just what you find on
the supermarket shelf, but go that little
bit further and find those spirits and cor-
dials. Compare one gin to another.
Compare your Beefeater to your
Tanqueray and see how the drink works
and make choices off the back of that.
That’s how you really kind of understand
how things work.
SWEET BROILED
LEMON MARGARITA
Unused lemon juice can be refrigerated
for several weeks.
Start to finish: 25 minutes
Servings: 1
5 Sicilian lemons
Sugar
Ice cubes
1 1/2 ounces reposado tequila
2/3 ounce triple sec liqueur
Heat the oven to broil.
Slice the lemons in half, then arrange
cut side up on a rimmed baking sheet.
Broil at the center of the oven for about
10 minutes, or until the lemons are
golden brown. Set aside until cool
enough to handle, then juice the lemons
into a bowl or 2-cup liquid measuring
container. Using a mesh strainer lined
with cheesecloth, strain the lemon juice
into a blender. Blend for four 25-second
bursts. Set aside.
Sprinkle a few tablespoons of sugar
on a small plate. Use one of the squeezed
lemon rinds to moisten the rim of a
coupette or other suitable glass for a
margarita. Overturn the glass into the
sugar and gently move around to coat
the rim. Refrigerate the glass until ready
to fill.
To prepare the cocktail, in cocktail
shaker filled with ice, combine the tequi-
la, 3/4 ounce of the broiled lemon juice
and the triple sec. Shake well, then
strain into the prepared glass.
Continued from page 17
COCKTAILS
five male former patients between the
ages of 9 and 13 under the guise of med-
ical exams. He faces between eight and
22 years in prison when sentenced in
August and, shortly after his plea
change, Supervisor Dave Pine requested
his county honor be reversed.
Friends and advocates of Ayres’ vic-
tims have pushed various supervisors
for years to make the unusual move of
rescinding an action by the prior board
which had honored the once-prominent
doctor for work including referrals by
the county and courts. On Tuesday, a few
took turns expressing both gratitude for
Pine’s recommendation and offered
some insight to the board of what it has
been like waiting for justice from the
initial crimes decades ago through three
trials, Ayres’ mental commitment and
finally his decision to resolve the case
and face prison.
One victim, referred to as J.D., over-
came alcoholism sparked by his 1972
molestation at age 11 by Ayres but
killed himself in August 2011 after pub-
lic news of the allegations sank him
back into a hard place, family friend
Jonathan Huddleston told the board.
“This type of crime is the deepest,
darkest side of humanity, ”
Huddleston said.
Prior to his 2007 arrest, Ayres was
well-known as president of the
American Academy of Child and
Adolescent Psychiatry and for hosting
the sex education series “Time of Your
Life.” Ayres also received juvenile court
referrals, all of which contributed to the
Board of Supervisors in January 2002
adopting the resolution honoring his
“efforts to improve the lives of children
and adolescents.”
But the board didn’t know that behind
the “facade of accomplishment” was a
“child predator” with upward of 50
alleged victims, Pine said.
Most of the victims fell outside the
statute of limitations and prosecutors
were left charging Ayres originally with
abusing six patients between 1988 and
1996. After his 2009 trial hung and
Ayres returned from Napa State Hospital
where doctors concluded he was exag-
gerating dementia to avoid a second
trial, prosecutors dropped one count out
of concern about a victim’s testimony.
Pine said while the board’s revocation
in no way fixes the past, it can at least
correct the mistake of previous leaders
who unknowingly lauded Ayres.
The families “have gone through so
much pain and I wish, I wish we could do
more to help but hopefully our action
here today along with his conviction
will bring some sense of closure and
assist the families in the healing
process,” Pine said.
Along with thanking the board,
speakers yesterday also highlighted
victims advocate Victoria Balfour who
worked tirelessly on their behalf to see
Ayres to justice after learning a man who
came to her for journalism career advice
in 2002 had been abused by the psychi-
atrist. She later felt shock to find out the
doctor was still practicing and “sheer
horror” to learn of his psychiatric asso-
ciation presidency. Balfour, who trav-
eled from New York state for yesterday’s
meeting and has no other connection to
the county other than the Ayres case,
pushed police and prosecutors to arrest
and try him.
Her “dedication to see that justice is
done has been a ray of hope for the
many victims of this criminal,” an
unidentified victim’s mother wrote in a
statement read by board President Don
Horsley.
Assemblyman Rich Gordon, the then-
supervisor who introduced the 2002
ordinance, wrote in an email to the
Daily Journal his hope the rescission
“will bring some sense of closure to the
victims and their families.”
San Mateo state Sen. Jerry Hill, who
also sat on the board at the time, previ-
ously told the Daily Journal he too
endorses Pine’s request.
Ayres’ defense attorney, Jonathan
McDougall, did not respond to a request
for comment about the board action.
Continued from page 1
AYRES
ensure are available for others.
Ravi Kapur, a Redwood City resident who owns and oper-
ates television stations in San Francisco and Chicago, said
his professional successes were reached using skills he
honed as an adult attending the College of San Mateo and
Skyline College.
William Lock, a retiree from South San Francisco who
worked with Wells Fargo for 36 years, has, along with this
wife, been focusing on health, family and community.
Thomas Mohr, a San Mateo resident, has worked locally in
education in 1961 starting as a high school chemistry and
math teacher and most recently serving as the president of
Cañada College — a position he held for six years through
June 2011.
San Mateo resident Stan Watkins has worked for nearly 30
years with Bank of America focusing on corporate finance.
Lastly, South San Francisco resident Alvin Zachariah has
been in the medical profession for 12 years but also has a
background in IT and a master’s degree in computer science.
Interviews will start 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 5 at the
District Office board room, 3401 CSM Drive, San Mateo.
heather@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 5
BOARD
FOOD 19
Wednesday • June 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Now Open!
856 North Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
856 North Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
Burlingame’s #1 Choice!
º 0reat food º Hicroorews
º full ßar º Sports TY
º fool º ßanquet facilities
º family friendly Ðining since 1995
By Mary Clare Jalonick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Alcoholic beverages
soon could have nutritional labels like
those on food packaging, but only if the
producers want to put them there.
The Treasury Department, which regulates
alcohol, said this past week that beer, wine
and spirits companies can use labels that
include serving size, servings per container,
calories, carbohydrates, protein and fat per
serving. Such package labels have never
before been approved.
The labels are voluntary, so it will be up to
beverage companies to decide whether to use
them on their products.
The decision is a temporary, first step
while the Alcohol and Tobacco Trade and Tax
Bureau, or TTB, continues to consider final
rules on alcohol labels. Rules proposed in
2007 would have made labels mandatory, but
the agency never made the rules final.
The labeling regulation, issued May 28,
comes after a decade of lobbying by hard
liquor companies and consumer groups, with
clearly different goals.
The liquor companies want to advertise
low calories and low carbohydrates in their
products. Consumer groups want alcoholic
drinks to have the same transparency as
packaged foods, which are required to be
labeled.
“This is actually bringing alcoholic bev-
erages into the modern era,” says Guy
Smith, an executive vice president at
Diageo, the world’s largest distiller and
maker of such well-known brands as
Johnnie Walker, Smirnoff, Jose Cuervo and
Tanqueray.
Diageo asked the bureau in 2003 to allow
the company to add that information to its
products as low-carbohydrate diets were
gaining in popularity.
Almost 10 years later, Smith said he
expects Diageo gradually to put the new
labels on all of its products, which include a
small number of beer and wine companies.
“It’s something consumers have come to
expect,” Smith said. “In time, it’s going to
be, why isn’t it there?”
Not all alcohol companies are expected to
use labels. Among those that may take a
pass are beer companies, which don’t want
consumers counting calories, and winemak-
ers, which don’t want to ruin the sleek look
of their bottles.
The Wine Institute, which represents more
than a thousand California wineries, said in
a statement that it supports the ruling but
“experience suggests that such information
is not a key factor in consumer purchase
decisions about wine.”
Spokeswoman Gladys Horiuchi said the
group knows of no wine companies that
plan to use the new labels.
The beer industry praised the agency for
acknowledging that labels should take into
account variations in the concentration of
alcohol content in different products.
The industry has opposed the idea of defin-
ing serving size by fluid ounces of pure alco-
hol — or as 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of
wine or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor — on
the grounds that you may get more than 1.5
ounces of liquor in a cocktail depending on
what else is in the drink and the accuracy of
the bartender.
The ruling would allow the labels to
declare alcohol content as a percentage of
alcohol by volume, the approach favored by
the beer industry.
“We applaud the TTB’s conclusion that
rules be based on how drinks are actually
served and consumed,” said Joe McClain,
president of the Beer Institute.
Are nutritional labels coming to alcoholic drinks?
Not all alcohol companies are expected to use labels. Among those that may take a pass are beer companies, which don’t want consumers
counting calories, and winemakers, which don’t want to ruin the sleek look of their bottles.
McDonald’s CEO: I lost weight by being more active
NEWYORK — They might start calling it the McDiet.
McDonald Corp.’s CEO Don Thompson revealed at an
analyst conference this week that he shed about 20 pounds
in the past year by getting his “butt up” and “working out
again.” But he said he hasn’t changed his habit of eating at
McDonald’s “every, single day. ”
Thompson, who has been on the job for less than a year,
was responding to a question about how the world’s biggest
hamburger chain is adapting amid growing concerns about
obesity.
Thompson said that he lost the weight by getting active
again. He noted that Europeans walk a lot and that it’s rare
to see Europeans that are “very, very heavy. ”
“And so I think that balance is really important to peo-
ple,” he said.
Thompson did not provide any other details about his
weight or diet. A representative for McDonald’s did not
immediately respond to a request for more details.
The remarks come as fast-food chains and packaged food
companies face criticism about making products that fuel
obesity rates. Coca-Cola Co., for example, recently started
a campaign seeking to highlight its healthier, low-calorie
drinks as well as the importance of physical activity in a
balanced lifestyle.
For its part, McDonald’s in recent years has boosted its
marketing to highlight healthier menu options, including
salads, chicken wraps and egg white breakfast sandwiches.
At the Sanford Bernstein conference on Wednesday,
Thompson noted that customers have many options at
McDonald’s, which has more than 34,000 locations world-
wide.
Food brief
DATEBOOK 20
Wednesday • June 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon to
1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E. Fourth
Ave., San Mateo. Free admission but
lunch is $17. For more information call
430-6500.
Skype: Online Video Conferencing.
10:30 a.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Learn
how to open a free account, set up
your equipment and software, make
simple conference calls over the
Internet, create and maintain a contact
list and use other provided features.
For more information call 591-8286.
Teen Summer Reading Cooking
Demo.3:30 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Reading is so delicious! Join us for an
interactive cooking demo where you’ll
get good eats and the opportunity to
sign up for Summer Reading! For ages
12 to 19. For more information call 591-
8286.
Needles and Hooks Club: AKnitting
and Crocheting Group. 6:30 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Join instructor Olivia
Cortez-Figueroa who both crochets
and knits. Cortez-Figueroa is a member
of several online knitting forums and
plans to invite guest visitors such as
the editor of Crochet Magazine. For
more information call 591-8286.
Terry Hiatt and Friends. 7 p.m. Club
Fox, 2209 Broadway, Redwood City. $5.
For more information go to
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
THURSDAY, JUNE 6
Dewey and the Peoples
performance at San Carlos Hot
Harvest Nights. 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Laurel
at Olive streets, San Carlos. Dewey and
the Peoples is a rock reggae band
performing new material at San Carlos
Hot Harvest Nights. For more
infromation call 593-1068.
A‘Writing toHeal from Loss’ Group.
6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sutter Care at Home,
700 S. Claremont Blvd., San Mateo. An
open, on-going writing group for
adults grieving the death of a family
member or friend. Using structured
writing assignments and sharing
stories with the group, participants will
explore their lives and facets of grief
with the goal of deeper understanding
and healing. No previous writing
experience necessary. Bereaved can
drop in and out of sessions as fits their
schedule. Participants must have
internet access to retrieve writing
exercises prior to each session. Every
Thursday through July 25 during same
time. Sliding scale suggested donation
of $5 to $20. No one will be turned
away due to lack of funds. For more
information call 685-2852.
Foothill College Presents: ‘Nickel
andDimed.’7:30 p.m. Foothill College,
Smithwick Theatre, 12345 El Monte
Road, Los Altos Hills. Tickets are $18,
general admission; $14, seniors,
students and all Foothill-De Anza
District personnel; and $10, students
with OwlCard and Foothill College
personnel (in-person purchase only).
Group discounts available. For more
information or to order tickets go to
www.foothill.edu/theatre or call 949-
7360.
MoviesontheSquare: Gremlins.8:45
p.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City.The movie is
rated PG. Free. For more information
call 780-7311.
FRIDAY, JUNE 7
Business Behaving Well. 7:30 a.m. to
8:30 a.m. 6650 Golf Course Drive,
Burlingame. $15. For more information
call 515-5891.
San Mateo County HistoryMuseum
continues ‘Free First Fridays’
program. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. San Mateo
County Museum, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Admission is free the
entire day. At 11 a.m., preschool
children will be invited to learn about
ocean life. At 2 p.m., museum docents
will lead tours of the Museum for
adults. Free admission. For more
information call 299-0104.
Organic Beauty Consult and Facial.
Noon to 5 p.m. New Leaf Community
Markets, 150 San Mateo Road, Half
Moon Bay. Preregistration is required.
$5 will hold your spot and be refunded
in the form of a New Leaf gift card at
the consultation. For more information
and to register go to
www.newleaf.com.
Friends of the Millbrae Library Big
Book/Media Sale. 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave., Millbrae.
Large selection of books and media at
bargain prices. Supports activities of
the Millbrae Library. $5 admission. For
more information call 697-7607.
‘Fur, Feathers and Fins’ Opening
Reception and The Beats — Back
WhereIt All Began PoetrySlam. 5:30
p.m. to 8 p.m.The Pacific Art League of
Palo Alto, 227 Forest Ave., Palo Alto.
Main gallery will feature ‘Fur, Feathers
and Fins’ through June 28. Also special
performance presented by Leah Lubin
titled ‘The Beats — Where It All Began.’
Gallery hours 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday. Complimentary
refreshments will be served. Free. For
more information email
gallerymanager@pacificartleague.org.
Steelhorse: BonJovi Tribute. 6 p.m. to
8 p.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Free. For
more information call 780-7311.
First Friday Flicks: Escape from the
Planet Earth. 7 p.m. Belmont Library,
1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
In Escape from Planet Earth, astronaut
Scorch Supernova finds himself caught
in a trap when he responds to an SOS
from a notoriously dangerous alien
planet. PG, 89 minutes. For more
information call 591-8286.
Colony of Coastside Artists 2013
Member Show Reception. 7 p.m. to
10p.m. Coastal Arts League Museum,
300 Main St., Half Moon Bay.The exhibit
will be open through June 24. For more
information call 726-6335.
Jazz, blues and adult contemporary
music.7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Luceti’s, 109 W.
25th Ave., San Mateo. Music performed
by Eric Van James on piano and vocals.
For more information call 574-1256.
Foothill College Presents: ‘Nickel
and Dimed.’ 8 p.m. Foothill College,
Smithwick Theatre, 12345 El Monte
Road, Los Altos Hills. Tickets are $18,
general admission; $14, seniors,
students and all Foothill-De Anza
District personnel; and $10, students
with OwlCard and Foothill College
personnel (in-person purchase only).
Group discounts available. For more
information or to order tickets go to
www.foothill.edu/theatre or call 949-
7360.
Almost Happy by Jacob Marx Rice.
8 p.m. Dragon Productions, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. Doors open
at 7:30 p.m. The show continues
through June 9. $10 per ticket. For
more information and tickets go to
http://www.dragonproductions.net.
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue and Cha
Cha Cha with DJ Hong, DJ Rula and
DJ DannyG. 9 p.m. Club Fox, 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. $10. For more
information go to
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
SATURDAY, JUNE 8
Walk with a Doc. 10 a.m. Orange
Memorial Park, 781 Tennis Drive, South
San Francisco. A free program of the
San Mateo County Medical
Association’s Community Service
Foundation that encourages healthy
physical activity for county residents
of all ages. Walkers enjoy one-hour
walks with physician volunteers and
can ask questions about general health
topics along the way. Free. To sign up
visit www.smcma.org.
Disaster Preparedness Day. 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m. San Mateo County Event
Center, 1346 Saratoga Ave., San Mateo.
Free admission and parking. Learn how
to prepare your family for disaster with
a free course in CPR as well as putting
together a disaster kit and making a
disaster plan. For more information go
to
www.smcsheriff.com/sites/default/files
/downloads/DisasterPrep2013_CMYK_
English_flyer.
SanMateoCountyFair FreeConcert
Series. 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. San Mateo
County Event Center, 2495 S. Delaware
St., San Mateo. $6 to $22. The concert
series will feature Three Dog Night,
Starship featuring Mickey Thomas and
more. The San Mateo County Fair will
run from June 8 through June 16.
Affordable Booksat the BookNook.
Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage Lane, Twin
Pines Park, Belmont. Paperbacks are
three/$1. Trade paperbacks are $1.
Hardbacks are $2 and up. Children’s
books are 25 cents and up. Get $1 off
your total purchase during the
Summer Concert Series. For more
information call 593-5650 or go to
www.thefobl.org.
Book Signing with Joann Semones.
1 p.m. The San Mateo County History
Museum, 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City. $5 for adults, $3 for children and
seniors. For more information call 299-
0104.
World Oceans Day at the Marine
Science Institute. 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Marine Science Institute, 500 Discovery
Parkway, Redwood City. Prices start at
$15. For more information call 364-
2760.
Animal Connections. 1:30 p.m. and
2:30 p.m. Tuesdays through Sundays.
CuriOdyssey, 1651 Coyote Point Drive,
San Mateo. Free. For more information
go to www.CuriOdyssey.org.
‘Bike with Mike’ Mall Fair. 2 p.m. to 4
p.m. 3 Serramonte Center, Daly City.
Council member Mike Guingona will
be present to discuss his goals to
increase health and bike ability in Daly
City. RSVP and invite friends and family
on our Facebook event. For more
information email
communicationteam@designedbyyou
th.org.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
himself as someone with special
needs, and so, neither do others.
Despite what anyone else might have
believed, he believed in himself. He
grabbed onto each opportunity, used
each to his own advantage and devel-
oped potential to be someone who
could do whatever he dreamed he could
do.”
For Langi, the opportunity to work
with such a diverse student body has
been a great experience. It’s been a
great opportunity to bond with others,
he said.
The Sequoia High School graduation
will be held at 10 a.m. Friday, June 7 at
Terremere Field, which is on campus.
Great Grads is in its eighth year profil-
ing one graduating senior from each of
our local schools. Schools have the
option to participate. Those that
choose to participate are asked to nom-
inate one student who deserves recogni-
tion.
heather@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 3
GRAD
ing to ensure the changes are made.
“We are pleased that the OCR has
affirmed that the district did not engage
in any discriminatory practices. The
district is committed to providing
excellent services to English learners
and their families. The district is confi-
dent that these additions to existing
services will be of benefit to students
throughout the district,” Laurence said
in a prepared statement.
Those who made the complaint were
happy to see the improved practices
but Jenny Huang of Justice First, a
civil rights attorney who advocated for
students in the case, said the changes
only came after much work by the
Asian Pacific Islander community.
“To say that the school district
adopted those policies on their own
initiative is outright deceptive,” said
Huang.
While details of the February com-
plaint remain sparse, the allegation is
that “the San Mateo Union High
School District discriminates against
students of Chinese descent in enroll-
ment, by holding them to different
standards — for demonstrating residen-
cy or guardianship — than students of
other races or national origins,”
according to a U.S. Department of
Education spokesman.
Those who have met the families
who lodged the complaint previously
explained it stems from students who
live in Millbrae and had hoped to
attend Mills High School. Instead, stu-
dents were sent to Capuchino High
School in San Bruno.
The school assignment policy gen-
erally calls for students to attend the
school of residency. Students living in
Millbrae and those who went through
the Millbrae Elementary School
District, for example, are most often
assigned to attend Mills.
According the report, the placement
rules are different for students who live
in a “shared residency or caregiver situ-
ation.” Previously, those students were
universally placed in one of two
schools with lower enrollment rather
than their neighborhood school.
During the investigation, the Office of
Civil Rights found 93 students
throughout the district who had a
shared residency/caregiver status and
were assigned to a non-neighborhood
school. Those students represented a
variety of ethnic groups — Chinese,
white, Hispanic, black, Southeast
Asian and Pacific Islander, according to
the report. While the rules were applied
consistently regardless of a family’s
ethnicity, the district could not provide
documentation that it consistently
notified parents/guardians of the rea-
sons for the change in school assign-
ment.
During the 2012-13 school year, the
district policy changed to allow more
opportunities for students who are in a
shared residency/caregiver situation to
attend neighborhood schools.
Also, the federal requirements seek to
assure families can access information
in a language they can understand. The
district’s website, which includes
enrollment information, was available
in multiple languages. However, paper
documents as well as signs in the
Attendance and Welfare office were only
available in English and Spanish,
according to the report. In addition,
interpreters were often not available.
It was the lack of information in
Chinese that contributed “to the per-
ception that policies were discrimina-
tory,” Team Leader Zachary Pelchat,
from the Office of Civil Rights, wrote
in a May 31 letter to Marion Kong,
who made the original complaint.
The district has since updated infor-
mation to be available in English,
Spanish and Chinese as well as created
a book with instructions to get inter-
pretation help in other languages.
Kong, a tutor and director of Daily
Academic Support Systems, was happy
about the changes that resulted from
the investigation.
“By providing language access to
families with limited English speaking
abilities, the school district will ensure
that its policies and practices are
applied in a consistent and fair man-
ner,” Kong said in a press release.
San Mateo Mayor David Lim released
a statement echoing Kong’s statement.
“While it took a federal investiga-
tion to bring about the necessary
improvements, I am hopeful moving
forward that our school leaders will
work with the community to ensure
equal access to education for all,” Lim
wrote in the press release.
Continued from page 1
DISTRICT
by landscape architects Callander
Associates.
The city held community meetings
to collect input prior to tonight’s com-
mission meeting and some of what
they heard is opposition to what some
have deemed “a plastic park.” Other
public comments included emulating
the Heather Field design, creating a
sports park elsewhere to accommodate
demand and that the park should pro-
vide open space for the neighborhood
instead of just soccer capacity.
Other non-turf concerns include
reconfiguration of the volleyball and
basketball courts or the track configu-
ration but none of those worries have
spurred an opposition group like Save
San Carlos Parks which formed to pre-
vent synthetic grass at Crestview.
If used, the synthetic turf will likely
be the same organic infill used at
Highlands which is made of coconut
husk, peat and sand or a combination
of coconut fiber, cork and sand.
The benefits, according to city staff,
is the lack of “rest” time required which
allows synthetic fields to be used year-
round and provide more playing hours.
The Crestview field in 1.1 acres and
offers approximately 750 hours of use
which is calculated as only 46 percent
of the available daylight hours. The
natural grass can’t withstand more use,
according to the staff report by former
parks and recreation director Doug
Long.
Annual park maintenance is approx-
imately $45,000 but synthetic turf
would drop that to $8,000 per year — a
$370,000 savings over the 10-year
expected life span of the turf field, the
report concludes.
The Parks and Recreation
Commission meets 7 p.m. Wednesday,
June 5 in Council Chambers, City
Hall, 600 Elm St., San Carlos.
Continued from page 1
PARK
COMICS/GAMES
6-5-13
tuesday’s PuZZLe sOLVed
PreViOus
sudOku
answers
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids across/Parents down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
K
e
n
K
e
n
®
is
a
r
e
g
is
te
r
e
d
tr
a
d
e
m
a
r
k
o
f N
e
x
to
y
, L
L
C
. ©
2
0
1
3
K
e
n
K
e
n
P
u
z
z
le
L
L
C
. A
ll r
ig
h
ts
r
e
s
e
r
v
e
d
.
D
is
t. b
y
U
n
iv
e
r
s
a
l U
c
lic
k
fo
r
U
F
S
, In
c
. w
w
w
.k
e
n
k
e
n
.c
o
m
6
-
5
-
1
3
aCrOss
1 Carpet pile
4 Fugue composer
8 Pet lovers’ grp.
12 Rope-a-dope boxer
13 Peter Gunn’s girl
14 Noted diamond surname
15 Ties
17 Domain
18 Hearty soup
19 Stadium hoverer
21 AAA suggestions
23 Mineral deposits
24 Damage
27 Pierre’s head
29 Owl’s query
30 Employ
32 Carpenter’s wedge
36 Sturdy lock
38 Yard tool
40 Lyric poem
41 Skinny
43 Fragrant wood
45 Yokel
47 Actress Arlene —
49 Quebec school
51 Hannibal’s foes
55 Discern
56 Check in
58 Cowboy — Autry
59 Bard’s river
60 Feedbag bit
61 Road curve
62 Warbled
63 School org.
dOwn
1 Prefx with second
2 Author Haley
3 Early Briton
4 Enchant
5 Astaire sister
6 FBI counterpart
7 Sage or basil
8 Jonathan Swift works
9 Peacock feather
10 Esprit de —
11 — Wiedersehen
16 Syrup brand
20 Parcel of land
22 Maroon
24 I-70 or I-90
25 Gotcha!
26 Library abbr.
28 Meek’s pal
31 Rollover subj.
33 Mortar trough
34 Ms. Tarbell
35 Cousteau’s domain
37 Nudged
39 Repeating
42 Electric fsh
44 Stately trees
45 “Walk Away —”
46 Storrs sch.
48 Inert gas
50 Hurlers’ stats
52 Standing on
53 Uncluttered
54 Mex. miss
55 Former spy grp.
57 — Marie Saint
diLBert® CrOsswOrd PuZZLe
future sHOCk®
PearLs BefOre swine®
Get fuZZy®
wednesday, June 5, 2013
GeMini (May 21-June 20) — You might fnd it
necessary to make a small but signifcant sacrifce
for a loved one. Don’t make a big deal out of it.
CanCer (June 21-July 22) — You should concentrate
on your latest interest, because that’s where you’re
likely to make your greatest strides. It won’t hurt to put
your other hobbies on the back burner.
LeO (July 23-Aug. 22) — If you’re properly
motivated, you can make some outstanding
achievements. If you just coast along, however,
you’ll actually lose ground.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Try to fnd time to
spend with friends who share your philosophical
beliefs. You can help one another to think bigger and
better.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Your ability to uncover
things that others are trying to keep hidden is
unusually keen. Now is the time to investigate a
work matter that hasn’t seemed right to you.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — One-on-one
relationships will require grace and tact. To appease
a certain individual, you might have to make a few
concessions that you normally would balk at.
saGittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Don’t think your
self-esteem won’t suffer if you fritter your time
away. Many of your friends might get away with
being unproductive, but you won’t.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — A group project
will fare better if you take a leadership role. The
current commander might not be as talented as you.
aQuarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — You are presently in
an excellent cycle, so don’t waste this day. Visualize the
results you want and work for them with all your might.
PisCes (Feb. 20-March 20) — If you fnd yourself a
bit restless, either mentally or physically, check out
new project that has aroused your curiosity. It might
be just what you’re looking for.
aries (March 21-April 19) — Don’t be surprised
if you are unusually focused on your material
interests. Even when you’re just having some fun,
it’s likely to have something to do with money.
taurus (April 20- May 20) — You’ll have no trouble
asserting yourself in any kind of situation that calls
for it, but you won’t go so far as to push others
around to get your way.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Wednesday • June 5, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Wednesday • June 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
FOOD SERVICE WORKERS NEEDED
Starting June 8
Cashiers and Kitchen Workers
for part time and on-call positions
Please apply at
2495 South Delaware Street, San Mateo
Please ask for Ovations when applying.
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CONSTRUCTION -
Lead, with Experience in door and win-
dow installation, new construction style.
Call 650-369-0698.
DRY CLEANERS / Laundry, part time,
Saturday 7am-4pm. Counter, wash, dry
fold help. Apply LaunderLand, 995 El Ca-
mino, Menlo Park.
HELP WANTED - PERSONAL ASSIS-
TANT (PT) - $400. weekly, maintaining
supplies/equipment. receiving, preparing
and transmitting communication.
Pickup/Delivering items, cash handling,
computer knowledgable HS, Contact
Brian Harris at: bhallie94@hotmail.com
110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
LEAD COOK, CASHIERS, AND DRIV-
ERS Avanti Pizza. Menlo Park.
(650)854-1222.
UBER AND Limo and Taxi Driver
Wanted, Living in south bay making $600
to $900 a week, Fulltime, (650)766-9878
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
SOFTWARE QUALITY Analyst, Sr. MS
& 1 yr or BS & 5 yr exp reqd. Redwood
City, CA job. Resume to Endurance Intl
Group-West, 8100 NE Parkway Dr,
#300, Vancouver, WA 98662.
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
180 Businesses For Sale
GAS STATION for sale! Excellent in-
come, call Peter, (707)815-3640
203 Public Notices
AMENDED FICTITIOUS
BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255516
The following person is doing business
as: Winesavage.com, 440 Talbert St.
DALY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Savage
Wine, LLC, NV. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ David Shefferman /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/25/13, 05/02/13, 05/09/13, 05/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256137
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: 1) Vlahos, Vozikes & Vlahos, 2)
Vlahos & Vozikes, 533 Airport Blvd., Ste.
225, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owners:
Pauline Vozikes, Trustee, 689 Barneson
Ave., San Mateo, CA 94402, Eugene A.
Vlahos and Susan R. Vlahos, 1080 Lake
View Dr., Hillsborough, CA 94010, John
B. Vlahos and Cynthia Vlahos, 10980
Miramonte Cupertino, CA 94010. The
business is conducted by a General Part-
nership. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
01/01/1985.
/s/ Eugene A. Vlahos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/31/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/05/13, 06/12/13, 06/19/13, 06/26/13.)
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 521026
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Chad Eric Overholt
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Chad Eric Overholt filed a pe-
tition with this court for a decree chang-
ing name as follows:
Present name: Chad Eric Overholt
Proposed name: Candise Erica Overholt
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on June 20,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 05/08/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 04/30/13
(Published, 05/15/13, 05/22/13,
05/29/13, 06/05/13)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255865
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Peninsula Appliance Installa-
tions, 1712 Peck Ave., SAN MATEO, CA
94401 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Juan Lazo, same address
and Christian De La Cruz, 37 Maryland
Pl., San Bruno, CA 94066. The business
is conducted by a General Partnership.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Juan Lazo /
/s/ Christian De La Cruz /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/15/13, 05/22/13, 05/29/13, 06/05/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 521149
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Shi Young
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Shi Young filed a petition with
this court for a decree changing name as
follows:
Present name: Shi Young
Proposed name: Leo Yung Shi
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on June 26,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 05/06/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 04/30/2013
(Published, 05/29/13, 06/05/13,
06/12/13, 06/19/13)
CASE# CIV 521310
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Karen Skinner Walters
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Karen Skinner Walters filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Karen Skinner Walters
Proposed name: Karen Skinner
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on July 11,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 05/24/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 05/21/2013
(Published, 06/05/13, 06/12/13, 06/19/13
06/26/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255918
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: 1)JH Military Caps, 2)HMDC
Collectibles, 3550 Carter Dr., Unit 144,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Jennifer Gruela Dela Cruz & Harold
Malimban Dela Cruz, same address. The
business is conducted by a Married Cou-
ple. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
01/01/2013.
/s/ Jennifer G. Dela Cruz /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/22/13, 05/29/13, 06/05/13, 06/12/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 521537
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Maria Anatolievna Harms
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Maria Anatolievna Harms filed
a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Maria Anatolievna Harms,
aka Maria A. Harms, aka Maria Harms
Proposed name: Maria Anatolievna Bur-
ton
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on July 9, 2013
at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 05/24/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 05/21/2013
(Published, 05/29/13, 06/05/13,
06/12/13, 06/19/13)
CASE# CIV 521838
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Annie Wang
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Annie Wang filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Sophia Ann Salman
Proposed name: Sophia Ann Wang
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on July 18,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 05/28/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 05/28/2013
(Published, 06/05/13, 06/12/13, 06/19/13
06/26/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255854
The following person is doing business
as: Delsur Construction Enterprises, 331
Lux Ave., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Dilber Iraheta, 75 Mantilla
Ave., Hayward, CA 94544. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Dilber Iraheta /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/15/13, 05/22/13, 05/29/13, 06/05/13).
23 Wednesday • June 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255902
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: The Goods Guru, 1222 Oak
Grove Ave., #203, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Brett Finkelstein & Christie
Blair, same address. The business is
conducted by a Married Couple. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 05/13/13.
/s/ Brett Finkelstein /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/22/13, 05/29/13, 06/05/13, 06/12/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255969
The following person is doing business
as: Rolling Motors, 611 El Camino Real,
San Bruno, CA 94066 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Rolling Mo-
tors Automotive Inc., CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Demyan Smilovitsky /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/22/13, 05/29/13, 06/05/13, 06/12/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256010
The following person is doing business
as: Earth Mother Goods, 631 Masonic
Way, #1, BELMONT, CA 94002 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Marcelita E. Brandenburg, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Marcelita E. Brandenburg /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/23/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/29/13, 06/05/13, 06/12/13, 06/19/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255994
The following person is doing business
as: Aero Physical Therapy and Sports
Medicine, 1860 El Camino Real, Ste 420,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Corkish
and Lew, A Professional Physical Thera-
py Corporation, CA. The business is con-
ducted by Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 04/01/2007
/s/ Geoffrey Lew /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/29/13, 06/05/13, 06/12/13, 06/19/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255957
The following person is doing business
as: 2 Girls Vintage, 156 12th Ave., SAN
MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Valerie Gartner,
156 12th Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94402.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
05/08/2013
/s/ Valerie Gartner /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/29/13, 06/05/13, 06/12/13, 06/19/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255905
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Connect Leadership, 2) Supportive
Listening, 3323 Los Prados St., Apt. 3,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Paul Kona-
sewich, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 06/16/2008.
/s/ Paul Konasewich /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/29/13, 06/05/13, 06/12/13, 06/19/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255967
The following person is doing business
as: My Errand Services, 39 N. Rochester
St., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Angeli-
ca Baldovinos, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 05/20/2013.
/s/ Angelica Baldovinos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/05/13, 06/12/13, 06/19/13, 06/26/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256149
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Donas Hallmark & Fine Gifts,
717 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS, CA 94070
is hereby registered by the following
owners: Harshad I. Patel, 45670 Mon-
tclaire Ter., Fremont, CA 94539 and Atit
I. Patel, 34318 Sandburg Dr., Union City,
CA 94587. The business is conducted by
a General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Harshad I. Patel /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/05/13, 06/12/13, 06/19/13, 06/26/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256132
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: True Ethiopian Cuisine, 113
Garnet Ave., SAN CARLOS, CA 94070
is hereby registered by the following
owners: Trunesh Kassaye, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Trunesh Kassaye /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/31/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/05/13, 06/12/13, 06/19/13, 06/26/13.)
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: May 17, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
TAI WU ENTERPRISES INC
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
300 EL CAMINO REAL
MILLBRAE, CA 94030-2610
Type of license applied for:
47 - On-Sale General Eating Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
May 22. 29, June 5, 2013
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Wanda Janet McVey
Case Number: 123393
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Wanda Janet McVey. A
Petition for Probate has been filed by
Timothy M. McVey in the Superior Court
of California, County of San Mateo. The
Petition for Probate requests that Timo-
thy M. McVey be appointed as personal
representative to administer the estate of
the decedent.
The petition requests that the decedent’s
will and codicils, if any, be admitted to
probate. The will and any codicils are
available for examination in the file kept
by the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: July 10, 2013 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28,, Room 2F, Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo,
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. If you object to the granting of
the petition, you should appear at the
hearing and state your objections or file
written objections with the court before
the hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within four months from the date of first
issuance of letters as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 9100. The time for fil-
ing claims will not expire before four
months from the hearing date noticed
above. You may examine the file kept by
the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court
a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Kevin A. Taheny (State Bar # 88146)
Law Offices of Kevin A. Taheny, Inc
700 S. Claremont St.
SAN MATEO, CA 94402
(650)345-4000
Dated: May 24, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on May 29, June 5, 12, 2013.
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #M-237497
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Cam-
misa Hyundai. The fictitious business
name referred to above was filed in
County on 02/17/2010. The business
was conducted by: Cammisa Automo-
tive, Inc., CA.
/s/ Larry Cammisa /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 05/01/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 05/22/13,
05/29/13, 06/05/13, 06/12/2013).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #M-248638
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Cam-
misa Motorcars Hyundai. The fictitious
business name referred to above was
filed in County on 01/30/2012. The busi-
ness was conducted by: Cammisa Auto-
motive, Inc., CA.
/s/ Larry Cammisa /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 05/01/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 05/22/13,
05/29/13, 06/05/13, 06/12/2013).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #240089
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Spirit
Airport Service. The fictitious business
name referred to above was filed in
County on 07/23/2010. The business
was conducted by: Scientific Concepts,
Inc., CA.
/s/ Alex Morrison /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 05/01/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 05/29/13,
06/05/13, 06/12/2013 06/19/2013).
203 Public Notices
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CIV521915
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): All Persons Unknown, Claim-
ing Any Legal or Equitable Right, Title,
Estate, Lien, or Interest in the “Casey
Parcel” (APN 065-191-160) Adverse to
Plaintiff’s Title, or Any Cloud on Plaintiff’s
Tittle Thereto,
YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF:
(Lo esta demandando el demandante):
COASTSIDE LAND TRUST.
NOTICE! You have been sued. The
court may decide against you without
your being heard unless you respond
within 30 days. Read the information be-
low.
You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after
this summons and legal papers are
served on you to file a written response
at the court and have a copy served on
the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not
protect you. Your written response must
be in proper legal form if you want the
court to hear your case. There may be a
court form that you can use for your re-
sponse. You can find these court forms
and more information at the California
Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
San Mateo County Superior Court
400 County Center
Redwood City, CA 94063
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Bryan Wilson, (Bar No. 138842)/
Cecilia Ziniti (Bar No. 270525)
Morrison & Foster, LLP, 755 Page Mill
Rd.PALO ALTO, CA 94304.
(650)813-4118
Date: (Fecha) May 31, 2013
John C. Fiton, Clerk (Secretario)
By R. Krill, Deputy (Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
June 5, 12, 19, 26, 2013.
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CIV521916
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): The unknown Heirs and devi-
sees of Charles Edwin Cooper, De-
ceased, and All Persons Unknown,
Claming Any Legal or Equitable Right,
Title, Estate. Lien, or Interest in the
“Cooper Parcel” (APN 065-023-130) Ad-
verse to Plaintiff’s Title, or Any Cloud on
Plaintiff’s Tittle Thereto
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): COAST-
SIDE LAND TRUST.
YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF:
(Lo esta demandando el demandante):
COASTSIDE LAND TRUST.
NOTICE! You have been sued. The
court may decide against you without
your being heard unless you respond
within 30 days. Read the information be-
low.
You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after
this summons and legal papers are
served on you to file a written response
at the court and have a copy served on
the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not
203 Public Notices
protect you. Your written response must
be in proper legal form if you want the
court to hear your case. There may be a
court form that you can use for your re-
sponse. You can find these court forms
and more information at the California
Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
San Mateo County Superior Court
400 County Center
Redwood City, CA 94063
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Bryan Wilson, (Bar No. 138842)/
Cecilia Ziniti (Bar No. 270525)
Morrison & Foster, LLP, 755 Page Mill
Rd.PALO ALTO, CA 94304.
(650)813-4118
Date: (Fecha) May 31, 2013
John C. Fiton, Clerk (Secretario)
By R. Krill, Deputy (Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
June 5, 12, 19, 26, 2013.
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CIV521917
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): All Persons Unknown, Clam-
ing Any Legal or Equitable Right, Title,
Estate. Lien, or Interest in the “Constantz
Parcel” (APN 065-034-070) Adverse to
Plaintiff’s Title, or Any Cloud on Plaintiff’s
Tittle Thereto
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): COAST-
SIDE LAND TRUST.
YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF:
(Lo esta demandando el demandante):
COASTSIDE LAND TRUST.
NOTICE! You have been sued. The
court may decide against you without
your being heard unless you respond
within 30 days. Read the information be-
low.
You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after
this summons and legal papers are
served on you to file a written response
at the court and have a copy served on
the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not
protect you. Your written response must
be in proper legal form if you want the
court to hear your case. There may be a
court form that you can use for your re-
sponse. You can find these court forms
and more information at the California
Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
203 Public Notices
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
San Mateo County Superior Court
400 County Center
Redwood City, CA 94063
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Bryan Wilson, (Bar No. 138842)/
Cecilia Ziniti (Bar No. 270525)
Morrison & Foster, LLP, 755 Page Mill
Rd.PALO ALTO, CA 94304.
(650)813-4118
Date: (Fecha) May 31, 2013
John C. Fiton, Clerk (Secretario)
By R. Krill, Deputy (Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
June 5, 12, 19, 26, 2013.
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CIV521918
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): The unknown Heirs and devi-
sees of Dennis W. McQuaid, Deceased,
and All Persons Unknown, Claming Any
Legal or Equitable Right, Title, Estate.
Lien, or Interest in the “Cooper Parcel”
(APN 048-155-130 and APN 048-137-
140) Adverse to Plaintiff’s Title, or Any
Cloud on Plaintiff’s Tittle Thereto.
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): COAST-
SIDE LAND TRUST.
YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF:
(Lo esta demandando el demandante):
COASTSIDE LAND TRUST.
NOTICE! You have been sued. The
court may decide against you without
your being heard unless you respond
within 30 days. Read the information be-
low.
You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after
this summons and legal papers are
served on you to file a written response
at the court and have a copy served on
the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not
protect you. Your written response must
be in proper legal form if you want the
court to hear your case. There may be a
court form that you can use for your re-
sponse. You can find these court forms
and more information at the California
Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
203 Public Notices
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
San Mateo County Superior Court
400 County Center
Redwood City, CA 94063
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Bryan Wilson, (Bar No. 138842)/
Cecilia Ziniti (Bar No. 270525)
Morrison & Foster, LLP, 755 Page Mill
Rd.PALO ALTO, CA 94304.
(650)813-4118
Date: (Fecha) May 31, 2013
John C. Fiton, Clerk (Secretario)
By R. Krill, Deputy (Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
June 5, 12, 19, 26, 2013.
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CIV521919
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): Blanche Chappell, and All
Persons Unknown, Claming Any Legal or
Equitable Right, Title, Estate. Lien, or In-
terest in the “Cooper Parcel” (APN 065-
025-010) Adverse to Plaintiff’s Title, or
Any Cloud on Plaintiff’s Tittle Thereto.
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): COAST-
SIDE LAND TRUST.
YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF:
(Lo esta demandando el demandante):
COASTSIDE LAND TRUST.
NOTICE! You have been sued. The
court may decide against you without
your being heard unless you respond
within 30 days. Read the information be-
low.
You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after
this summons and legal papers are
served on you to file a written response
at the court and have a copy served on
the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not
protect you. Your written response must
be in proper legal form if you want the
court to hear your case. There may be a
court form that you can use for your re-
sponse. You can find these court forms
and more information at the California
Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
24
Wednesday • June 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
203 Public Notices
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
San Mateo County Superior Court
400 County Center
Redwood City, CA 94063
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Bryan Wilson, (Bar No. 138842)/
Cecilia Ziniti (Bar No. 270525)
Morrison & Foster, LLP, 755 Page Mill
Rd.PALO ALTO, CA 94304.
(650)813-4118
Date: (Fecha) May 31, 2013
John C. Fiton, Clerk (Secretario)
By R. Krill, Deputy (Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
June 5, 12, 19, 26, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, $90.,
(650)610-9765
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
298 Collectibles
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
67 USED United States (50) and Europe-
an (17) Postage Stamps. Most issued
before World War II. All different and de-
tached from envelopes. All for $4.00,
(650)787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MENORAH - Antique Jewish tree of life,
10”W x 30”H, $100., (650)348-6428
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE – unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars
sealed boxes, $5.00 per box, great gift,
(650)578-9208
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
STAINED GLASS WINDOW - 30” x 18”,
diamond pattern, multi-colored, $95.,
SOLD!
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AT&T MODEM SID 2 wire Gateway cost
$100., asking $60., (650)592-1665
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HARMON/KANDON SPEAKERS (2)
mint condition, great, for small
office/room or extra speakers, 4 1/2 in.
high, includes cords $8., (650)578-9208
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
PS3 BLACK wireless headset, SOLD!
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
WIRELESS LANDLINE PHONE in good
condition, SOLD!
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center draw locks all comes with
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
2, 5 drawer medal cabinets 5' high 31/2'
wide both $40 (650)322-2814
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR (2), with arms, Italian 1988 Cha-
teau D'Ax, solid, perfect condition. $50
each or $85 for both. (650)591-0063
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COPENHAGEN TEAK dining table with
dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions. 48/88"
long x 32" wide x 30" high. $95.00
(650)637-0930
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 draw dresser 61" wide,
31" high, & 18" deep $50., (650)592-
2648
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
GLASS DINING Table 41” x 45” Round-
ed rectangle clear glass top and base
$100 (650)888-0129
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
LIGHT WOOD Rocking Chair & Has-
sock, gold cushions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK DINETTE set with 4 wheel chairs,
good condition $99 SOLD!
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECLINER ROCKER - Like new, brown,
vinyl, $99., (650)365-0202
RECTANGULAR MIRROR with gold
trim, 42”H, 27” W, $30., (650)593-0893
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR with wood carving,
armrest, rollers, and it swivels $99.,
(650)592-2648
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TALL OUTSIDE BISTRO TABLE -
glass top with 2 chairs $75 (firm)
(650)871-7200
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEAK TV stand, wheels, rotational, glass
doors, drawer, 5 shelves. 31" wide x 26"
high X 18" deep. $75.00 (650)637-0930
304 Furniture
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV BASE cabinet, solid mahogany, dou-
ble door storage, excellent condition,
24"D, 24"H x 36"W on casters, w/email
pictures, $20 SOLD
WICKER DRESSER, white, good condi-
tion, ht 50", with 30", deep 20". carry it
away for $75 SOLD
WOODEN DESK 31/2' by 21/2' by 21/2'
$25 (650)322-2814
306 Housewares
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $90.,
(650)596-0513
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
3 PIECE fireplace set with screen $25
(650)322-2814
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
BREVILLE JUICER - Like new, $65.,
obo (650)375-8021
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, (650)578-9208
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
1/2 HORSE power 8" worm drive skill
saw $40 OBO (650)315-5902
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTMANS PROFESSIONAL car buf-
fer with case $40 OBO (650)315-5902
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DEWALT 18 volt battery drill with 2 bat-
tery & charger $45 OBO (650)315-5902
ELECTRIC HEDGE trimmer good condi-
tion (Black Decker) $40 (650)342-6345
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LADDER - 24' aluminum 2 section ladder
$20., (650)342-7933
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MILLWAUKEE SAWSALL in case with
blades (like new) $50 OBO
(650)315-5902
NEW DRILL DRIVER - 18V + battery &
charger, $30., (650)595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SANDER, MAKITA finishing sander, 4.5
x 4.5"' used once. Complete with dust
bag and hard shell case. $35.00 SOLD!
SMALL ROTETILLER 115 Volt Works
well $99.00 (650)355-2996
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
TOOL BOX - custom made for long
saws, $75.,SOLD!
TOOLAND INC
Name brands * Huge inventory
Low prices
Personalized service
M-F 7"30 - 6; Sa: 9 - 4:30
1369 Industrial, San Carlos
(650)631-9636
www,tooland.com
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $65 (650)341-8342
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History,
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
5 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $9. for all
(650)347-5104
7' ALUMINUM ladder lightweight $15
firm (650)342-6345
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEO 75 with jackets 75 with-
out $100 for all (650)302-1880
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99., (650)580-
3316
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASTRONOMY BOOKS (2) Hard Cover
Cambridge Encyclopedia of Astronomy,
World of Discovery, $12., (650)578-9208
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14., (650)578-9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, excellent
condition, $43., (650)347-5104
BAY BRIDGE Framed 50th anniversary
poster (by Bechtel corp) $50
(650)873-4030
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection (650)574-4439
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY Jake AB Scissor Exercise Ma-
chine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
C2 MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES -
style wall mount, plug in, bronze finish,
12” L x 5”W , good working condition,
$12. both, (650)347-5104
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
(650)578-9208
DANIELLE STEEL Books, 2 had back @
$3 ea. and 1 paper back @ $1
(650)341-1861
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOOD HEALTH FACT BOOK - un-
used, answers to get/stay healthy, hard
cover, 480 pages, $8., (650)578-9208
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HABACHI BBQ Grill heavy iron 22" high
15" wide $25 (650)593-8880
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
310 Misc. For Sale
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
IBM SELECTRIC II typewriter self cor-
recting $25 (650)322-2814
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. SOLD!
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. SOLD!
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model", $250., (650)637-0930
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW COWBOY BOOTS - 9D, Unworn,
black, fancy, only $85., (650)595-3933
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., (650)578-9208
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
PET COVERS- Protect your car seat
from your dog. 2, new $15 ea.
(650)343-4461
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. White Rotary
sewing machine similar age, cabinet
style. $85 both. (650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLKSWAGON NEW Beatle hub cap,
3, $70 for All (650)283-0396
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
MARTIN D-18S 1971 Guitar $1500.
Great sound. Great Condition
(650)522-8322
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
1 MENS golf shirt XX large red $18
SOLD!
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
25 Wednesday • June 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 “Naughty!”
4 Zealous crusades
10 “Choosy __
choose Jif”
14 Physician’s org.
15 Leopardlike critter
16 Subj. for a vet
17 For example, to
Juan
19 Okla., on old maps
20 Ersatz butter
21 Gin maker
Whitney
23 Books expert:
Abbr.
24 Web prog. code
25 Idol worshipped in
Exodus
29 Reactions to
revelations
30 Acapulco gold
31 Preakness
horse’s age
32 Orbiter until 2001
33 Fox’s title
34 Seam-y stuff?
35 X Games
activities, and, in
a way, what can
be found in this
puzzle’s circles
40 Help out
41 Drummer Ulrich
42 “The Chocolate
__”: classic
young-adult novel
44 Stars, in Latin
47 Anti-pollution org.
48 Krakow native
49 Casserole holder,
perhaps
52 Did garden work
53 Crude abode
54 ’70s extremist gp.
55 Spare targets
56 Big bank
58 Armchair
quarterback’s
speed?
63 Philodendron’s
plant family
64 Lack of vitality
65 “China Beach”
setting
66 Team that moved
from New Jersey
to Brooklyn in
2012
67 Uncompromising
68 One of RSA’s 11
official languages
DOWN
1 Faucet
2 Blended beverage
3 “The Communist
Manifesto”
co-author
4 Mojo __:
“Powerpuff Girls”
villain
5 Arctic abundance
6 Skirt border
7 Jungfrau, e.g.
8 Handed (out)
sparingly
9 Made off with
10 Bath accessory
11 Like some
garages
12 Christie heroine
13 Attack from the air
18 Sinuous fish
22 Openings
24 Amateur radio
operator
25 Wounded by a
warthog, say
26 Utah County city
27 Rhine siren
28 Chastity’s mother
33 Prickly plants
34 Host who had a
“Favorite Things”
segment on her
show
36 Estate near
Twelve Oaks
37 Suckers
38 Fast break
advantage, in
basketball
39 Pro pitcher?
43 Checkers
side
44 Garbage
collector
45 Future knight
46 “Naughty!”
48 Dr. made popular
by 34-Down
50 “__ Dream”:
Wagner aria
51 Cow
55 H.S. junior’s
exam
57 AOL chats
59 __ capita
60 Brit. record co.
61 Guitarist Ocasek
62 Texter’s “Holy
moly!”
By Gareth Bain
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
06/05/13
06/05/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
ATTRACTIVE LADIES trench coat red,
weather proof size 6/8 $35
(650)345-3277
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS JACKET - size XXL, Beautiful
cond., med., $35., (650)595-3933
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW! OLD NAVY Coat: Boy/Gril, fleece-
lined, hooded $15 (415)585-3622
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. SOLD!
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
brand new, never worn for $25
(650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$25.(650)368-0748.
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FOR SALE medium size wet suit $95
call for info (650)851-0878
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels, $85.
obo, (650)223-7187
ROWING MACHINE. $30.00
(650)637-0930
SCHWINN STATIONARY RECUMBENT
BIKE, $45., (650)596-0513
318 Sports Equipment
STATIONARY EXERCISE BICYCLE -
Compact, excellent condition, $40. obo,
(650)834-2583
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40., (408)764-
6142
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
SLEEP APNEA breathing machine com-
plete in box sacrifice for $99,
(650)995-0012
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
381 Homes for Sale
SUPER PARKSIDE
SAN MATEO
Coming Soon!
3 bedroom, 1 bath
All remodeled with large dining room
addition. Home in beautiful condition.
Enclosed front yard. Clean in and out.
Under $600K. (650)888-9906
VOLUNTEER WITH
Habitat for Humanity and help us
build homes and communities in
East Palo Alto.
Volunteers welcome
Wed-Sat from 8:30-4pm.
415-625-1022
www.habitatgsf.org
435 Rental Needed
RETIRED VET. 57 looking for peaceful
room to rent. HIP (650)222-9111
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)592-1271
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
470 Rooms
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$59.-69.daily + tax
$350.-$375. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
509 Commercial for Sale
COMMERICAL DUPLEX for sale good
location, call Peter, (707)815-3640
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBIL”79Royal Delta 88, 122k
Miles, in excelleny Condition $1,800
(650)342-8510
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$2,500 Bid (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,800.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
HONDA 1983 ASOT 500 Motorcycle,
looks like 2012, must see. $1100, obo,
(650)784-3427
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
NEW MOTORCYCLE HELMET - Modu-
lar, dual visor, $69., (650)595-3933
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., SOLD!
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
670 Auto Service
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $60 for all
(650)588-7005
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1800 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Four steel
13in rims. Factory Hub Caps. $150. San
Bruno. 415-999-4947
JEEP TJ 2004-2006 (1) ALUMINUM
WHEEL & TIRE, brand new condition,
$90., (650)200-9665
670 Auto Parts
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Wednesday • June 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Bath
TUBZ
Over 400 Tubs on display!
World’s Largest “Hands-On, Feet-In”
Showroom
4840 Davenport Place
Fremont, CA 94538
(510)770-8686
www.tubz.net
Asphalt/Paving
AIM CONSTRUCTION
John Peterson
• Paving • Grading
• Slurry Sealing • Paving Stones
• Concrete • Patching
We AIM to please!
(831)207-9842
(408)422-7695
Lic.# 916680
Cabinetry
Contractors
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Concrete, decks, retaining
walls, fences, bricks, roof,
gutters, & drains.
Call David
(650)270-9586
Lic# 914544 Bonded & Insured
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Home repairs &
Foundation work
Retaining wall • Decks • Fences
No job too small
Gary Afu
(650)207-2400
Lic# 904960
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
Concrete
CHETNER CONCRETE
Lic #706952
Driveways - Walkways
- Pool Decks - Patios - Stairs
- Exposed Aggregate - Masonry
- Retaining Walls - Drainage
- Foundation/Slabs
Free Estimates
(650)271-1442 Mike
Concrete
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete • Brickwork • Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers • Landscaping
Tile • Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Solas
Electric
Best Rates
On all electrical work
7 days a week
Free Estimates
(650) 302-7906
CA License 950866
Bonded and Insured
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
ASP LANDSCAPING
• All kinds of Concrete • Stamp
• Retaining Wall • Tree Service
• Brick • Roofing • Fencing
• New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435
(650)834-4495
SERVANDO ARRELLIN
The Garden Doctor
Landscaping & Demolition,
Fences,
Interlocking Pavers
Clean-ups
Hauling
Retaining Walls
(650)771-2276
Lic# 36267
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
VICTOR’S FENCES
House Painting
•Interior •Exterior
Power Wash
•Driveways •Sidewalk •Houses
Free Estimates
(650)583-1270
or (650)808-5833
Lic. # 106767
Plumbing
HAMZEH PLUMBING
5 stars on Yelp!
$25 OFF First Time Customers
All plumbing services
24 hour emergency service
(415)690-6540
Plumbing
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Concrete Electricians Painting Tree Service
27 Wednesday • June 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
Food
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)888-8131
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
Health & Medical
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
MY ERRAND SERVICES
Help is on the way
• New Mother Assistance
• Senior Assistance • General Errands
• House & Pet Sitting • Event Help
• House Keeping • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
(650)201-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
Insurance
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GRAND OPENING
for Aurora Spa
Full Body Massage
10-9:30, 7 days a week
(650)365-1668
1685 Broadway Street
Redwood City
GREAT FULL BODY
MASSAGE
Tranquil Massage
951 Old County Rd. Suite 1,
Belmont
10:00 to 9:30 everyday
(650) 654-2829
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
Massage Therapy
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
UNION SPA & SALON
Grand Opening
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Printers
HP PHOTO SMART C7180 - All-in-one
printer, fax, scan, copy, b/w and color.
Wireless, Excellent condition, SOLD!
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Seniors
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT
SENIOR LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
28
Wednesday • June 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->