Interprovincial Crossings Environmental Assessment Study Phase 2B

Mr. André Leduc, ing., M. ing.
Project Manager GENIVAR

Mr. Raynald Ledoux, Ing., M.Sc.A.
Project Director Roche Limited

Ottawa Transportation Committee
June 5, 2013

Interprovincial Crossings Environmental Assessment Study

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Meeting Purpose
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Review Evaluation Process, Results, Sensitivity Testing Present Technically Recommended Corridor Present Fairness Auditors Report

Agenda
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

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Background and Study Area Evaluation Methodologies and Results Technically Recommended Corridor Fairness Auditors Report Round 3 Public Consultation Summary of Results Next Steps

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1.1 Backgrounder
• The study is a project funded equally and directed by the Ministries of Transport of Ontario and Quebec as well as the NCC since it began in 2006. • The cities of Ottawa and Gatineau are providing technical support. • The five organizations are part of the Study Team and the Study Steering Committee.

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1.1 Background (continued)
• Phase 1 and Phase 2A (Completed) • Phase 1 verified the need and justification for a new interprovincial crossing and assessment of several different solutions, technologies, and corridors. • Phase 2A prepared a Scoping Document to direct a federal environmental assessment (EA); and a Study Design Report describing the activities to be undertaken in Phase 2B. • Phase 2B • Phase 2B will complete the EA: • Round 1: Priorities and Values • Round 2: Corridor-specific Input • Round 3: Ranked Corridor Input We are here • Round 4: Review of EA Study Report and Preliminary Design

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1.1 Backgrounder (continued)
• The Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) made a decision in 1999 for the removal of King Edward Avenue and Rideau Street from the regional truck route network as soon as a new bridge is built in the East in order to limit the impacts of trucks circulating in downtown Ottawa. This decision has been integrated into Ottawa’s Official Plan. • Following a Ottawa City resolution, several options ranging from status quo (“No Truck Prohibition”, i.e., the current regulation) to full prohibition (a.k.a. “truck ban”) in the downtown area have been incorporated in Phase 2B with the Study Design Report Addendum 1 developed in Phase 2A. • In 2009, the Ville de Gatineau adopted resolution CM-2009-48, which expressed the City Council’s opposition to transferring all truck traffic from the Macdonald-Cartier Bridge to the new corridor, and asking the City of Ottawa to maintain the truck route designation on King Edward Avenue.

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1.2 Study Area

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2.1 Evaluation Methodologies
Two evaluation methods were utilized to determine the Technically Recommended Corridor (TRC). Pair-wise Comparison (primary weighted method): • Preference relationships with respect to each evaluation factor and sub-factor were determined. The relative importance of these preferred relationships were taken into account through weighting. This methodology used both qualitative and quantitative measurements. Reasoned Argument (second method for validation ) • Corridors were ranked based upon an examination of the relative differences in net impacts.

2.2 Evaluation Results
Evaluation Committee Weights
• The evaluation committee completed a pair-wise weighting exercise to provide an independent technical perspective of the relative importance of factors and sub-factors. The committee included a diverse group of technical representatives from all levels of government, technical stakeholders and consultant staff. 58 Short listed sub-factors were prioritized based on measured effects.

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2.2 Evaluation Results (continued)
Evaluation Committee Corridor Ranking

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- Corridor 5: Kettle Island (montée Paiement) - Corridor 6 : Lower Duck Island (Lorrain Boul.) - Corridor 7 : Gatineau Airport / McLaurin Bay

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2.2 Evaluation Results (continued)
The stacked bars representation adds the weight of each factor group for which a corridor scores a better performance compared to the other.

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2.2 Evaluation Results (continued)
The stacked bars representation adds the weight of each factor group for which a corridor scores a better performance compared to the other.

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2.2 Evaluation Results (continued)
The stacked bars representation adds the weight of each factor group for which a corridor scores a better performance compared to the other.

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2.2 Evaluation Results (continued)
Sensitivity Analysis
To validate the weighting exercise a sensitivity testing program was undertaken to determine how sensitive the evaluation is with respect to the deviation of the assigned weights (i.e. would the result have changed if a perspective of importance were used from a committee member that was higher or lower than the group average). This ensures greater confidence in the selection process.
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2.2 Evaluation Results (continued)
Reasoned Arguments Results (Overall Factor Group Summary)

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Reasoned Arguments Results (Overall Factor Group Summary)

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Reasoned Arguments Results (Overall Factor Group Summary)

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2.2 Evaluation Results - Highlights
Corridor 5 was recommended from the EC’s perspective because it performs very well for the most valued factor groups: • • • • • Traffic and Transportation; Natural Environment; Economic Environment; Land Use and Property; and Costs.

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Corridor 5 also performs moderately for Social Environment (it could not be preferred compared to Corridor 7 - Community Impacts) and for Water Use and Resources (risk to the Gatineau plant - considered manageable, spills can be captured by the stormwater management system).
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2.2 Evaluation Results – Highlights (continued)
Corridor 6 was judged the least preferred by the EC: it performed moderately for some of the most valued factor groups (Traffic and Transportation, Natural Environment) but is least preferred for Land Use and Costs but mostly Social which is considered to have high not mitigable impacts (high number of buyouts and severe community disruption). Corridor 7 was judged also the least preferred by the EC: it performed poorly for Traffic and Transportation, Natural Environment, Land Use and Property and Costs. Although this corridor was preferred for Social Environment (in the absence of any established communities) and Water Use and Resources (furthest downstream of Gatineau Water Treatment Plant intake) these were not considered to be as significant factors in this evaluation.
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3. Technical Recommendation - Corridor 5
Bridge design features common to Corridors 5, 6 and 7 at ultimate : • • • • • One reserved lane for transit in each direction; Two lanes of traffic (non-commercial vehicles and trucks) in each direction; Multi-use pathways (pedestrians and cyclists) on both sides (one in each direction); Median separating opposing traffic; Left and right turning lanes at intersections where needed on land sections.

3. Technical Recommendation Corridor 5
Conceptual view of Montée Paiement looking south

Conceptual view of the Ottawa River from the Québec shoreline

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3. Technical Recommendation Corridor 5

Conceptual view of Aviation Parkway looking south, toward Hemlock Road

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4. Fairness Auditor Conclusion
The NCC retained a Fairness Auditor who has reported on the openness, fairness, integrity, transparency and impartiality of the process. The Fairness Auditor has reported that: “It is our opinion that the evaluation process we observed was carried out in compliance with the methodology described in the Evaluation Methodology Report, and the process was conducted in an equitable, credible, defendable and traceable manner that was in the broad public interest.” “In accordance with its mandate, the Fairness Auditor observed the conduct of the evaluation process of the Environmental Assessment Study, Phase 2B, related to the selection of a corridor for a future interprovincial crossing in the National Capital Region.”

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5. Round 3 Public Consultation Summary of Results
As of June 3rd, 2013:
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May 27th – Shenkman Arts Centre (Orleans)
– 167 people registered (182 people were counted) – 85 comment sheets received at Open House – 1 petition was handed in at the Open House, signed by 15 residents

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May 30th – Maison du Citoyen (Gatineau)
– 15 people registered – 3 comment sheets received at Open House

10 comments (all via e-mail) have been received since May 15th, 2013 z 98 Total Comment Sheets / Emails Received z 321 Total Comments
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Types of Concerns: z Technically Related Issues : 123 comments (38%)
– Noise / Vibration: 21 comments – Impact to Communities: 20 comments – Montfort Hospital: 13 comments – Costs: 14 comments – Air Quality / Emissions: 10 comments – Urban Sprawl/Land Use: 8 comments – Social: 7 comments – Human Health / Safety: 7 comments – Recreation: 7 comments – Property: 5 comments – Cultural & Heritage: 4 comments – Documentation: 3 comments – Political: 2 comments

Types and Area of Concerns (continued): z Transportation : 92 comments (29%)
– Aviation Parkway/ Rockcliffe Parkway: 17 comments – Light Rail Transit / Public Transportation: 16 comments – Traffic/Truck Traffic in KERWN Corridor: 12 comments – Tunnel: 11 comments – Congestion / Increased Traffic: 8 comments – Other Transp. (Recreational paths, Speed limits, intersections, …): 19 comments

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Alignments : 65 comments (21%)
– Do Not Support Corridor 5: 31 comments – Support Corridor 5: 13 comments – No Bridge: 11 comments

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Natural Environment : 17 comments (5%) z EA / Consultation Process : 14 comments (4%) z Evaluation Methodology : 10 comments (3%)

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6. Next Steps
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Study Steering Committee endorsement of TRC (Decision 1) : July 2013 EA Study Report and Preliminary Detailed Design of TRC: Summer-Fall 2013 Round 4 Consultation: Fall 2013 Present EA Study Report and project to the NCC Board, City of Ottawa and Ville de Gatineau: Fall 2013 Study Steering Committee and the NCC Board endorsement (Decision 2) of the Recommended Project: Winter 2013 Proceed and seek environmental authorities approvals for the project: 2014

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Questions