Attitude Measurement Techniques

Sasmita Mishra

What is Attitude?
s Attitude is a behavioural disposition which is part of the 

structure of human perception

s It is an enduring organisation of motivational, emotional, 

perceptual and cognitive processes with respect to some  aspects of the individual’s world. tendencies.

s It is an enduring system of one’s belief, feeling and action 

Belief

feeling Action

Fig. Components of Attitude
1

What is Measurement
s The term measurement refers to obtaining symbols to represent 

properties of objects, events or states. These obtained symbols  have the same relevant relationship to each other as do the  things which are represented by them. entities and format model of abstract elements (e.g., number),  relationship among these elements, and operations which can  be performed on them. Such a rule of correspondence  determines a scale. attributes

s It is concerned with the correspondence between empirical 

s There are different numerical scales to measure certain 

      Nominal scales       Ordinal scales       Interval scales       Ratio Scales

1

Scales
s Nominal scale is otherwise known as categorical scale

Ex. Family types: nuclear, joint, extended/ gender: male and female
s Ordinal scale arrange the objects as per the attributes.

Ex. A consumer may be asked to rank a group of washing powder  brands according to their washing ability
s Interval scales refer to those scales where specific values are 

assigned to objects and the intervals between these values are  equal. There is no true zero point

Ex.Fahrenheit and Centigrade scales used to measure temperature
s An absolute zero exists is ratio scales. These scales represent the 

‘elite’ of the scales, in that all arithmetic operations are permissible  on ratio scale measurement.

Ex. If salesman A sells 30 units per day and salesman B sells 60 units  per day then B’s output is twice that of A. This comparison can be  possible if we are using ratio scale
1

How attitudes can be measured?
    Since there is not any physical component of attitudes, so it is 

substantially difficult to measure these as compared to measuring  of physical characteristics like weight,length and volume. Inferences based on self­reports of beliefs, feelings, and  behaviours Inferences drawn from observations of overt behaviour Inferences drawn from responses to partially structured stimuli Inferences drawn from performances of objective tasks Inferences drawn from the psychological reaction to the attitudinal  objects

However, it can be measured in five different ways:

However, we are considering for discussion only the first of these  approaches

1

Self­report measures
s Rating scale: Non­comparative, comparative, Rank order rating 

scale

s Semantic Differential Scale s Thorstone’s equal appearing interval Scale s Likert’s Summated Scale s Guttman’s Scale s Q­Sort scale s Staple Scale

1

Rating scales
s The use of rating scales requires the rater to place the object being 

(perhaps himself) rated at some point along a numerically valued  continuum, or in one of a numerically ordered series of categories.

s There are two types of rating scales: non­comparative and comparative s Non­Comparative: In this case researcher does not make available to the 

respondent a comparison point such as “average brand” or “your favourite  brand. According to his or her judgment respondent uses a standard for  comparison

Ex. (i) Overall, how do you rate the brand X of toothpaste?            Excellent…………………………………..Very poor Ex. (ii) Overall how do you rate the brand X of toothpaste?     Probably       Very good     neither good        not at all good     probably      poor                                     nor bad                                       the very bad _________________________________________________________ 1    2      3      4    5     6    7    8     9     10      11     12     13     14      15    
1

Rating Scales
s Comparative rating scales: In comparative rating scales, the 
respondents apply different standards of their own in the absence of a  specific standard. When a respondent is asked to rate the overall  quality of a particular brand, he may compare it to his ideal brand, or to  his current brand, or to his perception of the average brand.

           This scale may provide accurate attitude of the individual  respondent, but it is very difficult in part of the researcher to interpret a  group’s score.
s Graphic Itemized Comparative rating scales: Here the researcher uses 

certain standard for all the respondents.

Ex. How do you like “Pepsi” as compared to “Coca Cola”?      like it         like it      like it about         like it less      like it          Don’t Know
much more                    the same                                    very less

1

Rating Scales
s Rank Order Rating Scale: This method requires the 
respondents to rank a set of objects according to some criterion. The  respondents may be asked to rank five brands of tooth paste on his  overall preference, taste, style, package design and so on.

     While using this method it is essential that the research includes at least  the most relevant competing brands, product versions, or  advertisements.

s Constant Sum Scales: This method forces the respondents to 
rate the attributes on the basis of their relative importance to him. 

Ex. Divide 100 points among characteristics listed as that the division will  reflect how important each characteristics is to you in your selection of  new automobile:                    Economy          ________                    Style                 ________                    Comfort            ________                    Safety               ________                    Social status    ________                    Price                 ________
1

Semantic Differential Scale
s Developed by Osgood. This scale stresses on the development of 

descriptive profiles that facilitate comparison of comparative items. The  respondent is asked to indicate his attitude towards a given subject  through a series of bipolar adjectives.
­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  ­ ­ ­ ­ Inexpensive Unreliable Unfriendly Old fashioned Inconvenient

________________________________________________________
Expensive Reliable Friendly Modern Convenient Wide selection   ­ ­         V.Limited selection

________________________________________________________________       Fig. Semantic differential used for measuring attitude of people towards  a retail store

1

Thorstone’s Equal Appearing Intervals
s A large number of statements are  developed relating to the 

attitude to be measured

s With the help of judges (20 or more) the statements are sorted out 

independently into eleven piles

s The statements are arranged in such a manner that the most 

unfavourable statements are kept in pile one, the nutral statements  are in pile six and the most favourable statements are in pile  eleven. statement, statements with widely scattered ratings are eliminated  as ambiguous computing the median of the distribution selection as being the most reliable

s After studying the frequency distribution of ratings for each 

s Scale value of each of the remaining statements is determined by  s Items with the narrowest range of ratings are preferred for  s The respondents are asked to indicate their agreement or 

disagreement with each of these statements

1

Thorstone’s Equal Appearing Intervals
Illustration: consumer’s attitude towards newspaper ads.
3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

All newspaper ads should be banned by law (rating­7.2) Reading newspaper ads is a complete wastage of time (8.6) Newspaper ads are completely monotonous (2.6) Most of the newspaper ads are pretty bad (7.1) Newspaper ads don’t interfere too much with the reading of news (4.0) I have no opinion for or against the newspaper ads (1.8) I like newspaper ads at times (3.0)

10. Most newspaper ads are farley interesting (2.0) 11. I like to buy products advertised in newspapers whenever possible (6.2) 12. Most newspaper ads help people select the best product available (5.0) 13. Newspaper ads are more fun to read than the regular news items (4.3)

Suppoese respondent A chooses statement 3, 6, 7 as the ones with which he  agrees. His average score would be 2.6 + 1.8 + 3.0 = 2.47. The higher the number the more positive the attitude.
1

Likert’s Summated Scale
s In comparison to Thurstone’s scale it asks the respondents to 

react to a series of statements. They are asked to rate each  statement on the basis of the strength of their personal feelings  towards it. The gradations are: Strongly agree (+2), agree (+1),  indifferent (0), disagree (­1), and Strongly disagree (­2).

_________________________________________________________                                                                   Interviewees       Statements                                                1 2 3 4 5 6 7 A +1 +2 +2 0 +2 +2 +1 B ­1 ­1 ­1 ­2 0 ­1 ­2 C 0 +1 +1 0 ­1 +2 +2 __________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________To Total Score +10 ­8 +5 1