Caries Management in Infants at High  Risk for Early Childhood Caries

Gerardo Martinez UCLA Venice Pediatric Dentistry  Community Health and Advocacy  Training

Prevalence of ECC
Estimates can vary from 5% to 72%, depending on  diagnostic criteria, age, race and population.5 A 2007 CDC publication noted that even though caries  prevalence had declined in school aged children since the  1970’s caries rate among 2‐5 year olds had increased.7 This confirms ECC as the most common chronic childhood  disease in the US.7
25% of Children have 80% of the disease.9 Disproportionately affects Minorities and disadvantaged  populations.
5, 7 Ramos‐gome z, 9 Surgeon's General report 
7

Current treatment of ECC
Focus on intervention after disease has been detected.8 Follows the surgical model. Treatment under IV/GA in a clinical setting or in the OR. Surgical approach does not address the underlying condition.
59% of children treated under IV/GA and 74% of children treated under  sedation required further treatment1.

8‐ramos‐gomez, 1‐Gluck

Cost of Dental Neglect 
ER visit without hospitalization $172 (median)10 ER visit with hospitalization $ 5,044 (median)10 ER visits by children 0‐12 years old in California10
2005‐‐ 281 2006—315 2007– 306

Cost of restorative care ranges from $170‐$2,212, plus  anesthesia costs may add $1,000 to $6,000 if  hospitalization is required11
10‐california healthcare foundation 11‐Udin

Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infant and  Children (WIC)
Federally funded health and nutrition program13.  Provides checks for buying healthy supplemental foods13. FY 2010 the number of women, infants and children  receiving WIC benefits each month reached  approximately 9.17 million15
4.86 million children15 2.17 million infants15 2.14 million women15
13‐WIC

WIC 
Over 1/3 of infants born in the US are  enrolled in WIC16 >60% of all children born in California are  served by WIC.14 Santa Monica WIC:
Average 1, 500 infants and children per  month.
15‐FNS, 16‐Lee

Santa Monica WIC and Simms Mann  Health and Wellness Center 

Project Objectives: 
Establish an Infant Oral Health clinic at a WIC center in  Santa Monica. Conduct early infant oral care visits to provide preventive  services:
Caries risk assessment using CAMBRA Knee‐to‐Knee examination Prophylaxis Fluoride varnish based on risk Anticipatory guidance

Improve compliance with dental visit by age one.  Determine prevalence of ECC  Determine number of patients requiring immediate referral for  treatment

Methods:
Patients were assigned to one of 4 groups  depending on age at their first dental exam 
Group # 1   [6‐18] months old at first dental  exam.   Group # 2  (18‐30] months old at first dental exam.  Group # 3  (30‐42] months old at first dental exam. Group # 4  (42‐60] months old at first dental exam.

Clinical Protocols  Recall Visits 
Recall every 1 month if high caries‐risk. Recall every 3 months if moderate caries‐risk. Recall every 6 months if low caries‐risk

Results:

Dental History 

91%

1st Dental Exam Pevious Dental Exam

N: 66

Mean age: 26.3months

Health Care Coverage 

77.3%

Medi‐Cal Private  No Coverage

Number of Patients per Intervention  Group
25 20 15 Number of Patients 10 5 0 [6-18] (18-30] (30-42] (42-60] 21 22

12

11

Percent of Patients per Caries Risk  Category at Initial Visit 
70
% of Patients

60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Low Moderate
Caries Risk

Low Moderate High
N:66

High

Percent of Patients per Caries Risk  Category at Final Visit 
70
% of Patients

60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Low Moderate
Caries Risk

Low Moderate High
N:66

High

Distribution of WS and Cavities 
100%

1

1 2

1 1 2

80%

4

60%

2 20 19 8 5

40%

20%

0% 6‐18 18‐30 30‐42 42‐60 Number  of children with Cavities  Only Number  of children with White Spots  Only Number  of children with White Spots  & Cavities Number  of children with healthy teeth

Distribution of tooth decay

Average number of Lesions per Infected  Child
12.0 Average number  of WS & CAV per  infected child 10.0 Average number  of WS only per  infected child Average number  of CAV only per  infected child 8.0

6.0

10.5
4.0

6.0
2.0

2.0
0.0 6 ‐18

3.0

4.0 1.0

4.0 1.5
42 ‐60

18 ‐30

30 ‐42

Number of WS and Cavitations per Infected Child

Ages 30 months to 42 months
12 10 8 6 4 2 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Ages 42 months to 60 months
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Number of Cavities

Number of White Spots

Prevalence of ECC
# of Children % of Total % Sub# group of Teeth % Total % SubGroup

Total

66

965

ECC Teeth
Severe ECC

14 7

21.2% 10.6% 50%

56 43

5.8% 4.5% 76.8%

Observations 
Establishing an infant clinic at a WIC site can  provide access to patients at a young age  (Avg. Age:26.3m) By providing early dental exams and preventive  services caries risk can be reduced Early detection can lead to timely referral for  restorative treatment 

Observations 
Most patients participating in WIC are active  Medi‐Cal recipients  WIC  should be considered a key partner to  improve access to care for high risk populations This preliminary data shows success on a  prevention disease model that can be replicated  in  other non‐clinical settings on ECC prevention

THANK YOU

References 
1. 2. 3. Gluck, George. Jong's Community Dental Health, 5th Edition. Mosby, 012003. p. 157). vbk:0‐323‐01467‐ 4#outline(7.3) (Pinkham, Jimmy R.. Pediatric Dentistry: Infancy Through Adolescence, 4th Edition. Mosby, 042005. p.  204).  <vbk:0‐7216‐0312‐2#outline(12.5.6)> American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry: Defitition of Early Childhood Caries   (ECC), Pediatr Dent V32 No 6:pg 15(Reference manual 2010‐2011). RJ Berkowitz: Etiology of nursing caries: a microbiologic perspective. J    Public Health. 56, 1996, 51 Ramos‐Gomez F.  Cost effective Model for the Prevention of Early Childhood Caries.  J CDA.  July 1999 Mulligan R, Seirawan H, et al.  Dental Caries in Underprivileged Children of Los Angeles.  J Health Care for  the Poor and Underserved.  22, (2011) 648‐662. Ramos‐Gomez F.  Pediatric Dental Care: Prevention and Management Protocols Based on Caries Risk  Assessment.  J CDA. 38, 2010, 746‐761 Ramos‐Gomez F., Jue B., Bonta Y.  Implementing an Infant Oral Care Program.  J CDA 2002 Surgeons general report 2007 Emergency department visits for preventable dental conditions in California. California healthcare  foundation. 2009 Udin, R. Newer approaches to Preventing Dental Caries in Children. J CDA 1999

4.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

References 
7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. Ramos‐Gomez F.  Pediatric Dental Care: Prevention and Management Protocols Based on Caries Risk  Assessment.  J CDA. 38, 2010, 746‐761 Ramos‐Gomez F., Jue B., Bonta Y.  Implementing an Infant Oral Care Program.  J CDA 2002 Surgeons general report 2007 Emergency department visits for preventable dental conditions in California. California healthcare  foundation. 2009 Udin, R. Newer approaches to Preventing Dental Caries in Children. J CDA 1999 Perry, D “Mommy, it hurts to chew” The California smile survey An oral Health Assessment of California’s  Kindergarten and 3rd Grade Children.  Dental Health Foundation 2006 WIC Home page www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/wicworks/pages/default.aspx Center for Oral Health.  WIC Programs.  www.Centerfororalhealth.org/programs/wic‐programs Food and Nutrition Services.  US Department of Agriculture www.fns.gov.wic/faqs/faq.htm#3 Lee Y J. Roizer G. et al. Effects ofWIC participation on Children’s Use of Oral Health Services.  American  Journal of Public Health.  May 2004.  Vol. 94, No. 5