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9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Post-Test Tuesday, Sept. After 4 n/a you Test Bring have next in the week!

Signed by textbooksParent for over ora Guardian week! Chapter Review #20,7, 4,5,15,22 Q's On same n/a paper: n/a p.n/a 66: 10-14, 43, 44, 50. Section 1.1 Review #2-7; 1-2 On Q's 2,4,8 #1,2,5 separate n/a paper n/a from n/a your notebook: p. 53: #3, 5, 6, 8 Figure Figures 6 ,7,8 2+ (caption caption Figures n/a only), 8 and n/a 14. n/a Tables 2 and 3 key physical vocab matter, states Scientific volume, Turn of n/a in Method, signed Holt Chemistry paper to matter, quantity, physical hypothesis, unit, Mr. theory, Q Textbook ASAP! law change, conversion chemical factor changes (identify four), physical properties, chemical properties, homogeneous, heterogeneous, mixture, compound, molecule, pure substance, element, atom Chapter-Section HW Check 1-2, Outline + Outline 1-1, Chemistry p.4-8; p. n/a 10-13, Review Holt with Text: n/a your 1-2, p.15,18; Red-blue 1-3, Chapter p. 21parent/guardian 2-2, p. 46-48, 26 50-53 (Red Heading: Blue sub-Heading Identify Activities/Labs 1. types UsingWork of the matter Balance: n/a in Make small Share a groups foldable your responses offor in box: homogeneous Arrange4: values safetywith using Make your any a partner. of the If mixture, Hundreds-Tens-Onesheterogeneous Compare and called, topics. Contrast reframe what mixture, Tenths-Hundredths compound, Chart for: 1. your 2. Hypothesis partner stated. Measuring element Lengths: vs. Theory; 2. 1cm=10mm Conclusion ->record vs Theory; 3. cm and multiply Theory byvs. 10;Law; 4. Use metric rulers Qualitative to vs. measure lengths Quantitative of lines; estimate observations; value 5.

#REF! #REF! #REF! #REF! #REF! #REF! #REF! #REF! Boiling, Melting, Freezing Breaking

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#REF! boiling point, melting point density, color, shiny/dull appearance #REF! Physical Properties boiling point, melting point

9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Post-Test Tuesday, Sept. After 4 n/a you Test Bring have next in the week! Signed by textbooksParent for over ora Guardian week! Chapter Review #20,7, 4,5,15,22 Q's On same n/a paper: n/a p.n/a 66: 10-14, 43, 44, 50. Section 1.1 Review #2-7; 1-2 On Q's 2,4,8 #1,2,5 separate n/a paper n/a from n/a your notebook: p. 53: #3, 5, 6, 8 Figure Figures 6 ,7,8 2+ (caption caption Figures n/a only), 8 and n/a 14. n/a Tables 2 and 3 key physical vocab matter, states Scientific volume, Turn of n/a in Method, signed Holt Chemistry paper to matter, quantity, physical hypothesis, unit, Mr. theory, Q Textbook ASAP! law change, conversion chemical factor changes (identify four), physical properties, chemical properties, homogeneous, heterogeneous, mixture, compound, molecule, pure substance, element, atom Chapter-Section HW Check 1-2, Outline + Outline 1-1, Chemistry p.4-8; p. n/a 10-13, Review Holt with Text: n/a your 1-2, p.15,18; Red-blue 1-3, Chapter p. 21parent/guardian 2-2, p. 46-48, 26 50-53 (Red Heading: Blue sub-Heading Identify Activities/Labs 1. types UsingWork of the matter Balance: n/a in Make small Share a groups foldable your responses offor in box: homogeneous Arrange4: values safetywith using Make your any a partner. of the If mixture, Hundreds-Tens-Onesheterogeneous Compare and called, topics. Contrast reframe what mixture, Tenths-Hundredths compound, Chart for: 1. your 2. Hypothesis partner stated. Measuring element Lengths: vs. Theory; 2. 1cm=10mm Conclusion ->record vs Theory; 3. cm and multiply Theory byvs. 10;Law; 4. Use metric rulers Qualitative to vs. measure lengths Quantitative of lines; estimate observations; value 5.

#REF! #REF! #REF! #REF! #REF! #REF! #REF! #REF! Boiling, Melting, Freezing Breaking

#REF!
#REF! boiling point, melting point density, color, shiny/dull appearance #REF! Physical Properties boiling point, melting point

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1. Write Standard, Main Idea, Key Vocab; Objecives; Questions-CST, Figures; 2. Participate in class discussion about demos/observations Think-Ink-Pair-Share; write your ideas reached with a partner that can be shared during class discussion Listen to ideas and information from classmates and teacher; write brief notes, define vocabulary with labelled diagrams; complete chaptersection outline

Explore

Explain

Participate in Activities; Record observations; Elaborate hypothesis-dataconclusions; complete assigned problems Write '321': 3-Things you learned + 2-Questions you Evaluate now have + 1-Thing you already knew

Folder Use Agreement: 1. I/We agree to organize the science folder as asked by Mr. Q. 2. I/We agree to use the same folder number assigned to me/us each time 3. I/We agree to keep the folder organized, without loose papers. 4. I will not tear, rip or write on papers or the folder itself (no doodles, tags, or signs.) 5. If I notice a problem, I will let Mr. Q know ASAP. 6. Each group is responsible for keeping these folders well-kept. 7. If a problem occurs, Mr. Q will freeze my/our grade (and a note goes home) until the folder is repaired and/or replaced. 8. By signing out a specific folder, I/we will be held responsible all year for that number. 9. I will show Mr. Q the folder any time he asks. 10. I will treat all materials, books, equipment, and supplies appropriately. Partner #1 Name: Partner #2 Name: Signature: Signature: Date Date

Folder Use Agreement: 1. I/We agree to organize the science folder as asked by Mr. Q. 2. I/We agree to use the same folder number assigned to me/us each time 3. I/We agree to keep the folder organized, without loose papers. 4. I will not tear, rip or write on papers or the folder itself (no doodles, tags, or signs.) 5. If I notice a problem, I will let Mr. Q know ASAP. 6. Each group is responsible for keeping these folders well-kept. 7. If a problem occurs, Mr. Q will freeze my/our grade (and a note goes home) until the folder is repaired and/or replaced. 8. By signing out a specific folder, I/we will be held responsible all year for that number. 9. I will show Mr. Q the folder any time he asks. 10. I will treat all materials, books, equipment, and supplies appropriately. Partner #1 Name: Partner #2 Name: Signature: Signature: Date Date Items (place in this order!) Syllabus Dimensional Analysis Scientific Method/Experiment Discovery Lab Compare/Contrast Kinematics-Scalars/Vectors Safety Rules/Quiz Kinematics-Speed/Velocity Article/Video Worksheet Kinematics-Acceleration Safety in the Laboratory Pre-Test Lab Report Format Writing a Laboratory Report Graphing Skills What are common SI Units

Physics A Standard: Diagnostic Test.StdRev I:E: Use appropriate tools and technology I/E: Use appropriate tools and technology Scientific Method: 1. Distinguish Safety between Hypothesis and Theory; 2. Formulate Explanations by using logic and evidence. Apply the Scientific Method in Recognize laboratory risks, and know Experiments and Research how to avoid and respond to dangers in a lab. Understand each step in the Scientific Safety First! Method What is the first step in the Scientific Method? What are three essential safety items or habits?

Main Idea

Objectives

Question

Self-assessment: answer questions you know pretty well and leave others blank. See what you know about physics so far, write unfamiliar terms on bottom of "answer sheet" What do you want to know about physics? ____________ Use Physics CST-Released Questions

Scientific language

Write scientific numbers

Writing and using scientific numbers

Use SI (System International) units in measurements and calculations

Which has the most significant figures? Which means morea giga-byte or a 1.00, 1.001, 0.001 micro-meter? _____________ Convert the measurements using the factor method on the worksheet (one page) How far does light travel in one year? 3.0x10^8m/s SI Measurements _______________ n/a

My Answer: Pre-Test

Describe Demo notes

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Take Quiz on overhead/handout: write Take Safety Quiz on handout: Use a half "____Research the problem, etc. & sheet of paper; #1-35. order #1-#6.; b, write the "__hypothesis + letter (a-g), etc. n/a Using format on handout, write: Describe what happens to the egg! Hypothesis 1. ___2.____ SI units, measurements, and equipment Experiment: Data Table: Draw Visuals: Read the six safety sections on the Lab Before to water/oil Afterto Safety Agreement--write short water/oil; Beforeto milk/ Afterto summaries for each section. Milk Conclusions: 1. __2. __ 3. __ 4. __ 1. Go work in groups and check/correct your note's equipment names 2. using folder handout, read or measure length, mass, volume, and temperature. Write measurements (1m = __mm) in notebook. Work in small groups of 4: Make a Compare and Contrast Chart for: 1. Hypothesis vs. Theory; 2. Conclusion vs Theory; 3. Theory vs. Law; 4. Qualitative vs. Quantitative observations; 5. Experiment vs. Scientific Method; 6. Independent variable vs. Dependent Variable Physics: Conceptual Physics: p. 25(example: Section 1.3 The Scientific Method) Scientific Method, hypothesis, theory, fact, law 1.2 + caption On separate paper from your notebook: p. 4 (one question) On same paper: p. 8, #4 and 5. After you have the textbooks for over a week! Watch video; review safety rules; review safety quiz

Activities/ Labs

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Write Title; Method; Example; and problems in notebook (1.0=2sigfigs,etc); Two labs in Physics Lab Experiments, Ch. 1 (on Twitter): The Circumference-Diameter Ratio of a Circle

ChapterSection Outline key vocab Figures Section Review Q's Chapter Review Q's Post-Test

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Review with your parent/guardian

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n/a n/a n/a n/a Tuesday, Sept. 4


Cylinder Measurements

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Turn in signed paper to Mr. Q ASAP! n/a n/a n/a Test next week!

6, 20.5 4.6, 15

7 25 6 1 20 5 0.9

6, 20.56

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Physics Syllabus

Understand the course objectives, grading, and rules. Learn and explain the course to your parent or guardian Why is physics important? Who needs to learn about motion, and energy, and heat? Write on back of syllabus n/a

Two clear liquids added to the same solid! Observation: n/a

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Conceptual Physics n/a n/a n/a Bring in Signed by Parent or Guardian

Standard Main Idea Objectives Question My Answer:

Equipment I/E: a. Select and use appropriate tools and Diagnostic Test.StdRev technology perform tests, collect data, analyze Self-assessment: answer questions you know pretty Chemicals Common lab to equipment well and leave others blank. Describe objects (very small and large) around you Use SI (System International) units in See what you know about chemistry so far, write measurements and calculations unfamiliar terms on one bottom "answer sheet" Observe/Make slime: What is slime? A solid, liquid, Which means morea giga-byte or a micro-meter? Number sideof #1-50. or gas? Which one does it resemble? __________________________________________ __________________________________________ _____________

9 Matter

Chemistry A Scientific Method: 1. Distinguish between Hypothesis and Theory; 2. Formulate Apply the Scientific Method in Experiments and Research Understand each step in the Scientific Method What is the first step in the Scientific Method?

Pre-Test

Quickly draw and Identify the lab equipment (name), use (transfer, measure, hold) When ice and liquid water is heated to a boil, what Which equipment measures? Holds? Transfers? are the phases present?

Use Chemistry Spring Final 2010 (Front side only)

Take Quiz on overhead/handout: write "____Research the problem, etc. & order #1-#6.; b, write the "__hypothesis + letter (a-g), etc. Using format on handout, write: Hypothesis 1. ___2.____ Experiment: Data Table: Draw Visuals: Before to water/oil Afterto water/oil; Beforeto milk/ Afterto Milk Conclusions: 1. __2. __ 3. __ 4. __

Describe Demo

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demo / video notes: States of matter, classifying matter; physical changes and chemical changes

SI Units Ch 1.2: Tables 2 and 3; Lab Equipment Names; Estimates; Decimal places

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Activities/Labs

Identify types of matter in box: homogeneous mixture, heterogeneous mixture, compound, element

Chapter-Section Outline key vocab

HW Check + 1-1, p.4-8; 1-2, p.15,18; 1-3, p. 21-26

1. Using the Balance: Arrange values HundredsTens-Ones-Tenths-Hundredths 2. Measuring Lengths: 1cm=10mm ->record cm and multiply by 10; Use metric rulers to measure lengths of lines; estimate value between lines; 3. Measure volumes estimate value at bottom of curve (meniscus); 4. Measure temperatures - estimate values between lines at top of curve 1-2, Outline p. 10-13, Red-blue

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Work in small groups of 4: Make a Compare and Contrast Chart for: 1. Hypothesis vs. Theory; 2. Conclusion vs Theory; 3. Theory vs. Law; 4. Qualitative vs. Quantitative observations; 5. Experiment vs. Scientific Method; 6. Independent variable vs. Dependent Variable

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physical states of matter, physical change, chemical matter, volume, quantity, unit, conversion factor changes (identify four), physical properties, chemical properties, homogeneous, heterogeneous, mixture, compound, molecule, pure substance, element, atom 6 ,7,8 (caption only), Tables 2 and 3 2,4,8 4,5,15,22

Chemistry Holt Text: Chapter 2-2, p. 46-48, 50-53 (Red Heading: Blue sub-Heading Scientific Method, hypothesis, theory, law

Figures Figure 2 + caption Section Review Q's 1.1 #2-7; 1-2 #1,2,5 Chapter Review Q's #20,7, Post-Test Tuesday, Sept. 4

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Figures 8 and 14. On separate paper from your notebook: p. 53: #3, 5, 66: 6, 810-14, 43, 44, 50. On same paper: p. After you have the textbooks for over a week!

Safety Recognize laboratory risks, and know how to avoid and respond to dangers Safety First! in a lab. What are three essential safety items or habits?
__________________________________________

1 Chemistry Syllabus Understand the course objectives, grading, and rules. Learn and explain the course to your parent or

Physical Changes Boiling, Melting, Freezing Breaking

Physical Properties boiling point, melting point density, color, shiny/dull appearance malleable(sheets),ductile(form wires) chemical property Forms rust, reacts with oxygen; reacts with water; reacts with acid

guardian Who needs to learn Chemical change: Why is chemistry important? about chemicals? Write on back of syllabus change color, temperature change, evolution of a gas, formation of a precipitate n/a

Take Quiz on handout: Use a half sheet of paper; #135. Describe what happens to the egg!

Two clear liquids added to the same solid! Observation:

Read the six safety sections on the Lab Safety Agreement--write short summaries for each section. Make a foldable for safety using any of the topics.

Listen to discussion about the syllabus. Then write 321 on the back

Share your responses with your partner. If called, reframe what your partner stated.

Review with your parent/guardian Turn in signed paper to Mr. Q ASAP!

n/a Holt Chemistry Textbook

n/a n/a n/a Test next week!

n/a n/a n/a Bring in Signed by Parent or Guardian

1.2

1
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Chemistry Standard 1g Know how to relate the position of an element in the periodic table to its electron configuration Position of spdf orbitals Identify and group elements based on the element's electron configurations. Students relate the number of val Chemistry Standard 1d Use the Periodic Table to determine the number of electrons available for bonding. Bonding Electrons Identify the number of electrons available for bonding according to location on the periodic table. How can the number of bonding Chemistry Standard 1c Use Periodic Table to identify trends in ionization energy, electronegativity, and the relative sizes of ions and atoms What patterns are present for the elements? Draw 3 rectangles; label Atomic size, Electronegativity, Ionization e

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Chemistry Standard 1g Know how to relate the position of an element in the periodic table to its electron configuration Position of spdf orbitals Identify and group elements based on the element's electron configurations. Students relate the number of val Chemistry Standard 1d Use the Periodic Table to determine the number of electrons available for bonding. Bonding Electrons Identify the number of electrons available for bonding according to location on the periodic table. How can the number of bonding Chemistry Standard 1c Use Periodic Table to identify trends in ionization energy, electronegativity, and the relative sizes of ions and atoms What patterns are present for the elements? Draw 3 rectangles; label Atomic size, Electronegativity, Ionization e

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Chemistry Standard 1g Know how to relate the position of an element in the periodic table to its electron configuration Position of spdf orbitals Identify and group elements based on the element's electron configurations. Students relate the number of val Chemistry Standard 1d Use the Periodic Table to determine the number of electrons available for bonding. Bonding Electrons Identify the number of electrons available for bonding according to location on the periodic table. How can the number of bonding Chemistry Standard 1c Use Periodic Table to identify trends in ionization energy, electronegativity, and the relative sizes of ions and atoms What patterns are present for the elements? Draw 3 rectangles; label Atomic size, Electronegativity, Ionization e

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Chemistry Standard 1g Know how to relate the position of an element in the periodic table to its electron configuration Position of spdf orbitals Identify and group elements based on the element's electron configurations. Students relate the number of val Chemistry Standard 1d Use the Periodic Table to determine the number of electrons available for bonding. Bonding Electrons Identify the number of electrons available for bonding according to location on the periodic table. How can the number of bonding Chemistry Standard 1c Use Periodic Table to identify trends in ionization energy, electronegativity, and the relative sizes of ions and atoms What patterns are present for the elements? Draw 3 rectangles; label Atomic size, Electronegativity, Ionization e

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Standard 1

Chemistry Standard 1b Use Periodic Table to identify Metals, Semi-metals, NonMetals, and Halogens

Chemistry Standard 1c

Chemistry Standard 1f

Chemistry Standard 1h

Chemistry Standard 1e

Chemistry Standard 1a

Use Periodic Table to Identify Alkali Classify elements as lanthanide, Metals, Alkaline Earth Metals, and actinide, and transactinide based transition metals on location on the periodic table; understand that transuranium elements are manmade.

Know the experimental basis for Know the nucleus of the atom is Relate the position of an element in the Periodic Thomsons' discovery of the much smaller than the atom yet Table to its Atomic # and Atomic Mass electron, Rutherford's nuclear contains most of its mass. atom, Einstein's Photo-Electric Effect

Main Idea

Types of Elements

Periodic Table: Groups/Families;

Elements on the bottom of the Periodic Table Know locations of lanthanide, actinide, and transuranium elements

Sub-atomic Discoveries

Describe mass and volume of atoms Recognize that the volume of the nucleus is much smaller than the volume of the atom, but also makes up most (99.99%) of the atom's mass

Order of elements in the Periodic Table

Objectives

Classify elements as metals, semimetals, nonmetals, and halogens based on the periodic table

Classify elements as alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, and transition metals, based on their locations on the periodic table

Analyze the historical development of experimental findings for various subatomic particles

Understand and recognize that the positions of the elements in the periodic table are determined by their atomic number and, with a few exceptions, by atomic mass.

Question

Is the Periodic Table mostly How are metals organized on the Name one lanthanide, actinide, metals, non-metals, or something Periodic Table? What patterns are and Transuranium elements in-between (semi-metals)? present for the elements? What does malleable mean? Ductile? Conductor of electricity/energy? Watch/describe short videos (8) of Draw Nuclear Reaction; Write 3 each group: 1. Type of elements: elements produced by synchtron ______ 2. Data (From Video) _________; 3. One Question I now have is ____

What sub-atomic particles were discovered by whom?

How is the atom organized with sub-atomic particles?

How is the periodic table arranged? What is odd about Cobalt and Nickel?

Describe Demo

Balloon Demo: What do opposites do? Where is the negative charge?

Describe the volume and mass of Periodic Table is arranged by increasing Atomic atoms Number; ATOMIC NUMBER= # protons or # electrons; ATOMIC MASS = #protons + neutrons; atomic mass - atomic number = # neutrons; ISOTOPE-same element w/different # of neutrons&atomic mass (Carbon-12, Carbon-13, Carbon-14)

video notes: Which phase (gas, liquid, or solid) appears most often? Activities/Labs

The Elements: http://vimeo.com/46311616; notes/visuals about the types of elements in the periodic table. With your Periodic Table, color code the metal, semi-metals, and non-metals.

Alkali Metals http://vimeo.com/46311802

lanthanides: http://vimeo.com/46311803

Cathode Ray Tube, Rutherford's Experiments, James Chadwick's Experiments

Addams Family

History of Periodic Table

Chapter-Section Outline key vocab

4.2 metal; non-metal, semi-metal; halogen; chemical properties; physical properties; malleable, ductile, conductor; nonconductor, semi-conductor ch.4: #5-13 on blank periodic table; ch.5: #3, 5 #2,3, 13, p. 131

Make compare/contrast chart for: 1. Alkali vs. Alkaline Earth Metals 2. Halogens vs. Noble Gases 3. Transition Metals vs. TransUranium Metals 4.2 Outline (done in Standard 1b!) 4.2, 4-4 alkali metal; alkaline earth metal, transition metal;

see standard 1f !

Using Excel chart in Folder, make Using the Periodic Table, Complete chart on handout in blue folder in a Foldable that will be kept in complete Matterville worksheet your notebook. In a group of six using a periodic your notebook (for points!) table, examine/arrange the elements with atomic mass and atomic number in the box (do not touch them!) Complete the rest with 3-2. 3-2. Outline: 3.2, p. 84-88, 4-1 nucleus; electron shell; location of protons, neutrons, and electrons Vocabulary:atomic number, atomic mass (mass number); isotope

lanthanide, actinide, transuranium Cathode Ray Tube, Gold Foil element Experiment; proton, neutron, electron; JJ Thomson, Ernest Rutherford, James Chadwick

Figures Section Review Q's

Same as Standard 1b; ch.4: #5-13 ch.4: #5-13 on blank periodic table; 6, 8a, 8b, 9 on blank periodic table; ch.5: #3, 5 ch.5: #3, 5 #4,7, p. 131 #1,3, 4, 10, p. 147 1, 3 Same as standard 1b: 1-3, 5, 7, 13, 19-26, 41, 44-46, 48, 50, 51, 55 2, 4, 18, 48, 54-55, 65

figures 11, 12 section review #1, 2, 4, 5, 6 chapter review #17

Draw Figures: #11,12 section 3.2: #2-5 Chapter Review: #1,5,18, 30-37, 60-61, 71

Chapter Review Q's 1-3, 5, 7, 13, 19-26, 41, 44-46, 48, 50, 51, 55

Chemistry Standard 1i

Chemistry Standard 1g

Chemistry Standard 1d

Chemistry Standard 1c Use Periodic Table to identify trends in ionization energy, electronegativity, and the relative sizes of ions and atoms VALENCE ELECTRON-outer shell electrons involved in bonding; OCTET RULE--Elements with 8 electrons (filled s and p orbitals) are Stable and are not reactive (noble gases), and the next electron is in the next period in the s-orbital. ION-element that has lost e-s(metals, CATION) or gained e-s(non-metals,ANION) to bond with another element, and have electron configuration like a noble gas (before or after element).

Know the experimental basis for the development Know how to relate the position of an Use the Periodic Table to determine the number of electrons of the quantum theory of atomic structure and element in the periodic table to its electron available for bonding. the historical importance of the Bohr model of the configuration atom

Drawing Bohr Atoms

Position of spdf orbitals

Bonding Electrons

Explain the spectral evidence of energy levels in the Bohr Model; Explain that the spectral pattern in a bright-line spectrum of any element is unique and is produced from the changes in energy levels of electrons according to the formula, E=hv

Identify and group elements based on the element's electron configurations. Students relate the number of valence electrons in an atom of an element to its reactivity and bonding characteristics.

Identify the number of electrons available for bonding according to location on the periodic table.

ATOMIC SIZE: 2 x Atomic Radius, Fr (Francium) is largest; F(Fluorine) is smallest; trend increases from right to left, top to bottom; ELECTRONEGATIVITY-attraction for electrons; inversely proportional to size; higher for small atoms(F), smaller for large atoms(Fr); trend incr. from bottom to top, left to right; IONIZATION ENERGY-energy required for an element to lose an electron; inversely related to size; higher for smaller atoms(F), and smaller for large atoms(Fr); trend incr. bottom to top, Left to Right

How are Bohr Diagrams drawn for small, medium, How can the electron configuration of and large elements? every element be written?

How can the number of bonding electrons be predicted for Main What patterns are present for the Group Elements? elements?

How many elements are in Period #1? Period 2 and 3? Period 4?

Write Chart + fill in blank periodic table

VALENCE ELECTRON-outer shell electrons involved in bonding; OCTET RULE--Elements with 8 electrons (filled s and p orbitals) are Stable and are not reactive (noble gases), and the next electron is in the next period in the s-orbital. ION-element that has lost e-s(metals, CATION) or gained e-s(non-metals,ANION) to bond with another element, and have electron configuration like a noble gas (before or after element).

Draw Bohr atoms

p. 160

Complete spdf electron configuration worksheets in notebook.

Draw/Complete chart in folder; make simplified periodic table with valence electrons in your notebook;

standard 1i: Outline: 3.3, p. 94-97 vocabulary: electron shells, nucleus

Standard 1g Outline 3.3, p. 94-97 Vocabulary: s-orbitals; p-orbitals, dorbitals; f-orbitals

Standard 1d Outline: 5.1, p. 158-165 Main Group elements; valence electrons, ions, cations, anions, octet rule

Draw 3 rectangles; label Atomic size, Electronegativity, Ionization energy; draw trends with arrows starting from smallest to largest, showing increasing trend Standard 1c Outline 4-3 (trends) vocabulary: ionization energy, electronegativity; atomic size

Draw Figures: 20, 22 Section Review: #1, 3-8, 10, 11 Chapter Review #6,7, 20, 23

Draw Figure: #22, ch.3; #3, ch. 4 Section Review #4-7 Chapter Review #10,11,24, 38-41,51,64, 78

Draw Ch.4-Figure #5, and ch.5-figures #4,5 Section Review: 5.1: #1-5, 7,8,10-12 Chapter 5 Review: #2-4, 13

Draw Figures: ch.4: #16-24 Section Review #3,8,12,14 p. 131 Chapter Review: #4, 9,12,31,49

Orbitals- hold electrons

Sub-orbitals (spdf) -vary in #, shape, and energy level --each "s" orbital holds 2 e-; each period has one s-orbital; 2 e- maximum

--each "p" orbital holds 2 e-; Periods #2-7 have 3 p-orbitals; 6 e- maximum

--each "d" orbital holds 2 e-; Periods #3-6 have 5 d-orbitals; 10 e- maximum

--each "f" orbital holds 2 e-; Periods #4-5 have 7 f-orbitals; 14 e- maximum Scientist Order by Energy Level: 1s2s2p3s3p4s3d4p5s4d5p6s5d6p4f5d6p7s5 f6d7p Experiment Cathode Ray Tube Gold Foil Experiment Beryllium JJ Thomson Ernest Rutherfod James Chadwick

Filled Orbitals: 1s22s22p63s23p64s23d104p65s24d105p66s24f14 Drawing: 5d106p67s25f146d107p6 spdf Regions: Groups 1-2 "s" Groups 13-18 Discovery: "p" Transition Metals "d" Lanthanides/Actinides "f"

Rays have a negatively-charged particles called electrons

The alpha particles bounced off of a positively charged proton in the nucleus, atom mostly empty space

Unabbreviated version: chlorine: Sub-Atomic Particle: 1s22s22p5 (9e-s) Abreviated version: Write noble gas before Symbol + s-orb,etc ex.: Oxygen: 2 Numbers [He]2s 2p4 in superscripts represent the Relative Mass number of electrons in an element, and are added. chlorine: 1s22s22p5 (9e-s)

Electron e1/2000 mass of Hydrogen atom

Proton p+ 1 atomic mass unit

Neutrons, with no charge have a mass similar to Neutrons n 1.01 atomic mass unit

Orbitals- hold electrons Sub-orbitals (spdf) -vary in #, shape, and energy leve --each "s" orbital holds 2 e-; each period has one s-o --each "p" orbital holds 2 e-; Periods #2-7 have 3 p-o --each "d" orbital holds 2 e-; Periods #3-6 have 5 d-o --each "f" orbital holds 2 e-; Periods #4-5 have 7 f-or Order: 1s2s2p3s3p4s3d4p5s4d5p6s5d6p4f5d6p7s 2 2 6 2 6 2 10 6 2 10 Filled Orbitals: 1s 2s 2p 3s 3p 4s 3d 4p 5s 4d 5p
Cylinder Measurements
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0 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8

Diameter(cm) or 2xRadius

and energy level riod has one s-orbital; 2 e- maximum #2-7 have 3 p-orbitals; 6 e- maximum #3-6 have 5 d-orbitals; 10 e- maximum #4-5 have 7 f-orbitals; 14 e- maximum 6s5d6p4f5d6p7s5f6d7p d104p65s24d105p66s24f145d106p67s25f146d107p6 diameter circumference 6.00 cm 6.15cm 4.60cm 4.56cm
Series1 Series2

20.50cm 20.53cm 15.00cm 14.90cm

Points? Data Table + graph=50/100 Each Section Procedure + Analysis = 100/100

1.2

adius

100/100

Standard 1 1st Set Main Idea Objectives Physics Standard 1a One Dimensional Kinematics know how to solve problems that involve constant speed and average speed.

Question

Which one fluctuates over time--constant speed or average speed?

My Answer: Pre-Test Describe Demo

___________ Physics classroom tutorial-physicsclassroom.com: tutorial

video notes:

Write short definitions, figures and equations

Activities/Labs

Using a "truck" or a ball (steel or marble) measure the average speed over 0.5 meters. Physicslessons: x-labs

ChapterSection Outline key vocab

2.2-2.3 speed, instantaneous speed, average speed, velocity,

Figures Section Review Q's Chapter Review Q's

2.3 Review Questions #2-8 @ end of chapter Plug & Chug #1-2

Open Notebook Test We

Circumference(cm) or 2 x Radius
0.8

0.2

0.4

0.6

1.2

0 0 0.2 0.4

physics standard 1b.1 Forces 1. Distinguish between balanced (equilibrium) forces and unbalanced forces; 2. Explain Newton's First Law in terms of balanced forces

What does a force on an object do to that object?

Acceleration; physicsclassroom.com

physicslessons.com; acceleration; reaction time; complete lab reports (individually); complete outline + vocab + figures + Review problems & plug/chug (show all 5 for credit); Make Compare/Contrast Chart for: 1. speed vs. velocity; 2. instantaneous vs. average velocity; 3. vector vs. scalar; 4. distance vs. displacement; 5. velocity vs. acceleration Outline: 2.4-2.5 Checking Today, Friday 9/21 Vocabulary: acceleration

Draw Table 2.2, and 2.3 Review Q's #9-18, p. 25 Chapter 2: Plug & Chug #3-8 Open Notebook Test Wed. 9/19: Measurements, speed/velocity, acceleration

Cylinder Measurements

0.6 Diameter(cm) or 2xRadius

0.8

1.2

physics standard 1b.2 Forces 1. Distinguish between balanced (equilibrium) forces and unbalanced forces; 2. Explain Newton's First Law in terms of balanced forces

How is mass related to movement of objects?

mass~inertia; 9.8 N=1kg Newtons=Mass 9.8N/kg; 1kg=2.2lbs (1) __N/(9.8N/kg) = __kg or (2) __Kg x9.8N/kg = __N (3) ___kg x 2.2lbs/kg=__lbs Acceleration; physicsclassroom.com

Newton's First Law of Motion: Objects at rest tend to stay at rest, and objects in motion tend to stay in motion, unless acted upon by an unbalanced force; FREE FALL: accelerating objects only affected by gravity; GRAVITATIONAL ACCELERATION (g)=9.8 m/s/s; VELOCITY(v) v=g x t, so m/s=m/s/s x s; NORMAL FORCE: force balances book's weight and produces a net force of zero. Ex: the table pushes up on the book with a force equal to the book's weight. EQUILIBRIUM: when an object is at rest, and the net force is zero. physicsclassroom.com: Newton's first law of motion, free fall, balanced and unbalanced forces

Outline: 4.7 Vocabulary: Newton's First Law of Motion, normal force, acceleration, support force, elapsed time, free fall Draw Figures 4-11 and 4-12 Review Q's #17, p. 57

Series1

Series2

1.2

Physics Standard 1c Newton's Laws know how to apply the law F = ma to solve one-dimensional motion problems that involve constant forces (Newtons second law).

Use kinematic equations to solve one dimensional motion problems. Identify the effect of force on acceleration. How does force affect acceleration?

Spring scale pull

Acceleration~net force (~ is "in direct proportion to"); Acceleration ~1/mass (inversely related); Force=mass x acceleration or F=m x a

doing physics, p. 61: Acceleration-Which way?; problem solving p. 62, physicslessons.com Newton's second law lab; complete problems in textbook; use spring scale pull one group at a time

5.1, 5.2,5.3 Newton's second law, inversely

Draw observations from Doing Physics Lab RQ#1-3, 5-7 PC#1-2

Physics Standard 1d Newton's Third Law know that when one object exerts a force on a second object, the second object always exerts a force of equal magnitude and in the opposite direction (Newtons third law). Identify the equal and opposite forces in an interaction (action reaction pairs)

_________ Balloon Rocket

Newton's Third Law: For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.

physicslessons.com; http://www.bitesizephysics.com/Resources/N's%203rd.pdf

Outline 6.2-6.4 Vocabulary: Newton's Third Law, reaction force, Action force

Figures 6.5-6.9 + captions RQ#3-8 Think/Explain Q's: #1-12 Group Project: Five/group: Each person answers one of #1-4,10 and one of # 5-9, show visually (format up to you). Show as many equations and diagrams as possible.

Physics Standard 1e Newton's Laws know the relationship between the universal law of gravitation and the effect of gravity on an object at the surface of Earth.

Distinguish between mass and weight Calculate weight at the Earths surface. EXIT TICKET: What does the earth's Force of gravity depend upon? Directly? Inversely?

Read 12.4-12.5, 13.1, 13.3

Ch. 12: think&solve: #2, 3, 4,

12.4-12.5, 13.1, 13.3 law of universal gravitation, inverse square law, universal gravitational constant, force field, gravitational field, weightlessness Figures: 12.7, 9, 10, 11 ch. 12: RQ#8-12; Ch. 13 #2,3,5,9,10 ch.12: pc#1-6 & ch. 13 Think/solve #1-3

Physics Standard 1f Circular Motion & Gravity know applying a force to an object perpendicular to the direction of its motion causes the object to change direction but not speed (e.g., Earths gravitational force causes a satellite in a circular orbit to change direction but not speed). Explain how a perpendicular force can change the direction but not the speed of an object. Exit ticket: With a diagram, compare and contrast centripedal force, and centrifugal force. Which one shows Newton's 3rd law (action-reaction) and which one is a ficticious force?

read 9.1-9.6

Two Circular labs: Roll cylinder and can. Why are their paths different? Twirl a metal piece on a string (carefully!:)). What is the direction of the force on the metal piece? What is the action-reaction pair?

Outline 9.1-9.6, 12.2 vocab: ch. 9: axis, centrifugal force, centripedal force, linear speed, revolution, rotation, rotational speed; ch. 12: tangential speed Figures: 9.2-9.13; 12.3 Review Questions: 1-5, 7, 9-16 Think and Explain: 1-2, 7

Physics Standard 1g Circular Motion & Gravity know circular motion requires the application of a constant force directed toward the center of the circle. Explain the force that causes an object to move in uniform circular motion. Relate the centripetal force to mass,

9.3

td

Topics: Syllabus, Rules, Safety, Scientific Method, Lab Equipment, Measurements, Metrics, Conversions, Units, Scientific Notation, Significant Figures, Density, Graphing ___/___/_____ to ___/___/_____ Pre-test (CST + sample problems-answer questions you feel you know & leave others blank); Left-side: Write Questions-CST, : Objectives; Assigned Vocabulary & Figures; Participate in class discussion about demos/observations Think-Ink-Pair-Share; Left-side: write your ideas reached with a partner that can be shared during class discussion Listen to ideas and information from classmates and teacher (summaries, ChemQuest, etc); write brief notes, define vocabulary with labelled diagrams; Participate in Activities; Record observations; hypothesis-dataconclusions Write '321': 3-Things you learned + 2Questions you now have + 1-Thing you already knew; Post-Test after notebook items are COMPLETED Monday Tuesday Wednesday

Week #___

Engage

Explore

Explain

Elaborate

Evaluate

Thursday

Friday

td 5 11 17 23 29 35 39

2 6 12 18 24 30 36 40

3 7 13 19 25 31 37 41

4 8 14 20 26 32 38 42

9 15 21 27 33

10 16 22 28 34

Standard 2

Main Idea Objectives Exit Ticket Question

My Answer:

Pre-Test Describe Demo

video notes:

Activities/Labs

ChapterSection Outline

key vocab Figures Review Q's Plug & Chug Think & Explain:

2d. Students know how to calculate momentum as the product mv. 2f. Students know an unbalanced force on an object produces a change in its momentum.

momentum, p=mv

Why is momentum called "Mass in motion?" Problems #1-5 on Momentum.questions; Wednesday: How do you lessen the force of an impulse? Provide an example.

Read 7.1 + describe demo (http://physicslessons.com/exp5b.htm) How can an item with lower mass have similar momentum with a larger item (higher mass)?

Force is prop to velocity; Force over more time provides more momentum (Michigan momentum!); Impulse = Force x time; Ft=d.mv, Impulse = change in momentum; Increase momentum--increase force that is applied (follow thru) Impulse=impact force x time; Decrease momentum--change in momentum over long periods of time have smaller forces; Fxt= chg. m x v Nx s=kg x m/s

1. Momentum.problems; 2. Egg catch--Toss back and forth outside :)) Observe-er/Catch-er--->what do you(catchers) do with (your) hands to keep the egg from breaking to provide a "good" impulse? 3. What does bouncing do to the momentum?

Outline 7.1-7.2, 7.3

momentum, impulse, 7.1-7.5 #1-10 #1-3 Think & Explain: 2-4 Think and solve: 2

2e. Students know momentum is a separately conserved quantity different from energy. 2g. Students know how to solve problems involving elastic and inelastic collisions in one dimension by using the principles of conservation of momentum and energy. Main Idea: momentum is transferred

EXIT TICKET: When two marbles collide, how does momentum transfer in elastic collisions? In inelastic collisions?

Conservation of Momentum-systems have the same momentum at the beginning and end of an event (gun shooting) via Newton's Third Law (Action-Reaction). When momentum is the same, it is conserved. In the absence of an external force, the momentum of a system remains unchanged. NET MOMENTUM (before collision) = NET MOMENTUM (after collision) ELASTI C COLLISION - when objects collide w/o being permanently deformed and w/o generating heat. INELASTIC COLLISION - OBJECTS become tangled or coupled together Marble Track: Describe what happens when two similar marbles (or cars) 1) collide with one moving and the other stationary; 2) collide moving toward each other; 3) collide moving in the same direction; 4) Repeat #1-3 with marbles/cars of different masses. If the mass is less, how is momentum conserved? 5) Collide a moving car that sticks to a stationary car. How does the velocity change if the mass increases? Outline 7.4,7.5

vocab: law of conservation of momentum; elastic collision; inelastic collision; draw figures 7.9 and 7.10 Review Q's #14-17 Plug & Chug #4 Think & Explain #10 In a group, answer #20-23 from Physics CST Released Q's. net momentum.before=net momentum.after 6kg x1m/s +2kgx 0m/s= 8kg x V.after 6kgm/s=8kgV.after 0.75m/s=V.after 6x1=6 and 0.75x8 =6 Mass is _____ to velocity, because as mass goes up, velocity goes ______. Momentum is ______(conserved, lost, gained) 6kgx1m/s + 2kgx-2m/s=8kgxV.after 2kgm/s=8kgV.after 0.25m/s=V.after 6kgx1m/s + 2kgx-4m/s=8kgxV.after

-2kgm/s=8kgxV.after -0.25m/s =v.after

2b. Students know how to calculate changes in gravitational potential energy near Earth by using the formula (change in potential energy) =mgh (h is the change in the elevation).

Main Idea: Energy of position Objective: Energy is relative to height EXIT TICKET: What is the Potential energy of a 75 kg student at 10 meters? 20 meters? 5 meters?

LAB: Using pendulum with a mass of 0.25 kg and g = 9.8 N/kg, calculate the Potential Energy (PE=mgh) at 1) Rest (bottom of swing); 2) 30 degrees up; 3) 60 degrees 4) 90 degrees; and PE=mgh->Find at 5 heightsup; 1) 0cm PE__=mxg___ When does the swinging pendulum have the most energy--at a low height or a higher height? Explain using Newton's Cradle.

Notes: Work = Force x distance; W=Fd in Joules; 1 Joule = 1 Newton x meter; J=Nm; 1kJ=1000J or 1kJ=1000Nm; Power = Work done/time interval in Joules/sec; P= J/s or Watt=1 J/s; 1KW=1000W or 1kW=1000J/s; Mechanical Energy: the energy of position (potential energy) or energy of movement (kinetic energy); Potential Energy (PE) = m x g x h; mg=kgxm or Newtons; gravitational potential energy = work done against gravity = weight x height or PE=mgh; energy stored and held in readiness; it has the potential to do work. Ex.: stretched/compressed spring; bow/arrow

Outline 8.1-8.4

Vocab: work, joule, Power, Watt, energy, mechanical energy, potential energy Figures 8.1-8.3 Review Q's: #1-7 Plug & Chug: #1-6 Exit Ticket: Calculate efficiciency = [mgh/Fxd]x100 (m=0.5kg, g=9.8 N/Kg, h= 0.01m, F=4.8 N, and d=0.04m) Also, complete #14-19 on cst review with partners-each person writes one!

2a. Students know how to calculate kinetic energy by using the formula E= (1/2)mv2 . 2c. Students know how to solve problems involving conservation of energy in simple systems, such as falling objects.

Notes: Kinetic Energy (energy of motion), capable of doing work; depends on mass and speed of object; kinetic energy = 1/2 mass x velocity2; KE=1/2mv2; if a moving object hits another object, it does work on what it hits; net force x distance = kinetic energy; Fd=1/2mv2;

Outline 8.5, 8.6

Vocab: Kinetic energy, Law of conservation of energy Review Q's 8,9, 10-13 Plug & Chug: #7

2c. Students know how to solve problems involving conservation of energy in simple systems, such as falling objects.

Outline 8.6

Vocab: law of conservation of energy

#10-13

2h*. Students know how to solve problems involving conservation of energy in simple systems with various sources of potential energy such as capacitors and springs.

Outline 8.7

Vocab: machine, lever, fulcrum, mechanical advantage, pulley figures: Review #14-17 #8-9

td

Examine the following tables. Following the name of each element or compound is the chemical formula of the element or compound; please see the periodic table for the meaning of some of the symbols (i.e. Na = sodium). Italics tell you that substance is organic. Elements Sodium (Na) Chlorine (Cl) Carbon (C) Oxygen (O) Hydrogen (H) Compounds Water (H2O) Methane (CH4) Sodium chloride, salt (NaCl) Carbon dioxide (CO2) Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2)

Pure Substances Mixtures Salt (NaCl) Salt water (NaCl and H2O) Hydrogen (H) Sand Carbon dioxide (CO2) Hydrogen (H) and Oxygen (O) Water (H2O) Sodium (Na) and Chlorine (Cl) Aluminum (Al) Kool-aid (sugar, water, etc.)

Critical Thinking Questions

4. How are elements different from compounds?

5. How are compounds different from mixtures?

6. How are pure substances different from mixtures?

7. Can something be both a mixture and a pure substance? Explain using examples from the tables.

8. Is it always possible to identify something as an element, compound, pure substance or mixture just by looking at it? Exp

9. Formulate a definition for each of the following terms. a) element:


25.00

Cylinder Measurem
Circumference(cm)
20.00 15.00 10.00 5.00 0.00

b) compound:

c) mixture:

d) pure substance:

0.00

5.00 Diameter(cm)

10. Categorize each of the following as an element, compound, mixture, or pure substance. If more than one label applies, th a) b) Popsicle Sugar c) d) Gold Dishwater

11. If you have a container with hydrogen gas and oxygen gas in it do you have water? Why or why not?

12. Give an example of something that is an element. Your example should not already be on this sheet.

13. Give an example of something that is a compound. Your example should not already be on this sheet.

14. Give an example of something that is a mixture. Your example should not already be on this sheet.

15. What do all organic substances have in common?

mixture just by looking at it? Explain using examples from the tables.

Circumference vs. Diameter

Cylinder Measurements

Small Cylinder

diameter (cm) 4.56 4.60 15.00 6.00 6.15

Circumference (cm) Large Cylinder 14.90 15.00 20.50 20.53

10.00 Diameter(cm)

20.00

. If more than one label applies, then include both labels. (You will need more than one label sometimes.)

y or why not?

on this sheet.

on this sheet.

td 1. a. Students know how to relate the position of an element in the periodic table to its atomic number and atomic mass. Use the Periodic Table to answer Questions #1-5: 1. The atomic number in the periodic table is highest in the A. upper left corner. B. upper right corner. C. lower left corner. D. lower right corner. 2. The atomic mass in the periodic table is highest in the A. upper left corner. B. upper right corner. C. lower left corner. D. lower right corner. 3. When moving across a period of the periodic table, the A. atomic masses of the elements decrease. B. atomic numbers of the elements increase. C. reactivity of the elements decreases. D. number of electrons available to be given up for bonding increases. 4. Which element has the highest atomic mass? A. copper (atomic number 29) B. gold (atomic number 79) C. platinum (atomic number 78) D. silver (atomic number 47) 5. As one moves across a period of the periodic table, the A. atomic masses of the elements increase. B. atomic numbers of the elements decrease. C. the electronegativity of the elements decreases. D. the number of valence electrons decreases. 6. Which of the following ordered pairs of elements shows an increase in atomic number but a decrease in average atomic mass? A Ag to Pd B Co to Ni C Ge to Sn D Cr to Mo 7. Why is cobalt (Co) placed before nickel (Ni) on the

Standard 1b Quiz: b. Students know how to use the periodic ta to identify metals, semimetals, nonmetals, a halogens. Use the Periodic Table to answer Questions # 1. In the periodic table, metals are best desc as located A. on the left side. B. on the right side. C. in the first two rows. D. in the last two columns. 2. In the periodic table, which column (group contains the most nonmetals? A. 1 B. 2 C. 17 D. 18 3. In the periodic table, which column (group contains the most halogens? A. 1A B. 2A C. 7A D. 8A 4. Most elements located against the diagon line in the periodic table are A. halogens. B. metals. C. nonmetals. D. semimetals (metalloids).

5. Iodine would have chemical properties mo A manganese (Mn). B tellurium (Te). C chlorine (Cl). D xenon (Xe).

6.Which of the following elements is classifie A bromine B helium C sulfur D lithium Write SI unit for the measurements below: 7 Mass _____________ 8 Volume: __________ 9 Temperature: _____

periodic table of the elements even though it has a higher average atomic mass than nickel? A Nickel has one more proton. B Cobalt was discovered first. C Nickel has fewer electrons. D Cobalt has a lower density. 8. Generally, how do atomic masses vary throughout the periodic table of the elements? A They increase from left to right and top to bottom. B They increase from left to right and bottom to top. C They increase from right to left and top to bottom. D They increase from right to left and bottom to top.

10

Length:__________

s know how to use the periodic table metals, semimetals, nonmetals, and

riodic Table to answer Questions #6-9: eriodic table, metals are best described

Standard 1c Quiz: 1. c. Students know how to use the periodic table to identify alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and transition metals, trends in ionization energy, electronegativity, and the relative sizes of ions and atoms. Use the graph to answer #1-2:

st two rows. st two columns. eriodic table, which column (group) e most nonmetals? 1. The electronegativity of an element indicates the relative ability of its atoms to attract electrons in a chemical bond. According to the graph, as you move across a period in the periodic table, the atomic number A. increases and the electronegativity increases. B. increases and the electronegativity decreases. C. decreases and the electronegativity increases. D. decreases and the electronegativity decreases. 2. According to the graph, which of these elements has the strongest attraction for electrons? A. Boron (atomic number = 5) B. Calcium (atomic number = 20) C. Hydrogen (atomic number = 1) D. Sulfur (atomic number = 16) 3. The ionization energy of an element indicates the energy it takes to remove an electron from the outermost level. As you move down a group in the periodic table, the ionization energy A. decreases because the electron is farther from the nucleus. B. increases because the number of protons increases. C. decreases because the number of neutrons increases. D. increases because the size of the atom increases.

eriodic table, which column (group) e most halogens?

ments located against the diagonal periodic table are

tals (metalloids).

ould have chemical properties most like

the following elements is classified as a metal?

it for the measurements below: Mass _____________ Volume: __________ Temperature: _____

Length:__________

4.The chart above shows the relationship between the first ionization energy and the increase in atomic number. The letter on the chart for the alkali family of elements is: A W. B X. . C Y. DZ 5.Which of the following atoms has the largest atomic radius? A barium (Ba) B chlorine (Cl) C iodine (I) D magnesium (Mg)

Standard 1d Quiz: 1. d. Students know how to use the periodic table to determine the number of electrons available for bonding. 1. Alkali metals belong to a group of elements whose atoms have only one electron in their outer energy level. According to this definition, which of these is an atom of an alkali metal? A. B.

Standard 1e Quiz 1. e. Students know the nucleus of the atom much smaller than the atom yet contains most of its mass. Use the illustration below to answer questio

C.

D.

2. How many electrons does the element found in the second row and second column of the periodic table have available for bonding? A. 0 B. 1 C. 2 D. 4 3. How many electrons does the element found in row 2 and group 16 of the periodic table have in the outer shell? A. 0 B. 6 C. 8 D. 12 4. Why are the elements in column 17 of the periodic table particularly reactive? A. They have only one electron in their outer electron shells, so they frequently form singly charged positive ions. B. They have only two electrons in their outer shells, so they frequently bond with doubly

1. How does the nucleus compare to the ent atom? A. It is slightly smaller than the atom. B. It is the only part of the atom that has a charge. C. It contains most of the atoms mass. D. It contains all of the atoms mass. 2. Which part of the atom has the least amou of mass? A. electrons B. neutrons C. nucleus D. protons 3. When a hydrogen atom loses its electron, do its density and weight change? A. Its density and weight both decrease slightly. B. Its density decreases significantly, and its weight decreases slightly. C. Its density and weight both decrease significantly. D. Its density increases significantly, and its weight decreases slightly. 4. An atom A. is much larger than its nucleus. B. is much lighter than its nucleus. C. is much denser than its nucleus. D. has a higher positive charge than its nucleus.

5. What information do the experimental res reveal about the nucleus of the gold atom? A The nucleus contains less than half the ma B The nucleus is small and is the densest par

charged negative ions. C. They need only two electrons to complete their outer shells, so they easily bond with doubly charged positive ions. D. They need only one electron to complete their outer shells, so they easily bond with many types of elements. 5. Which of the following atoms has six valence electrons? A magnesium (Mg) B silicon (Si) C sulfur (S) D argon (Ar)

C The nucleus contains small positive and ne D The nucleus is large and occupies most of t

nts know the nucleus of the atom is ler than the atom yet contains

stration below to answer question 1.

es the nucleus compare to the entire

tly smaller than the atom. only part of the atom that has

ns most of the atoms mass. ns all of the atoms mass. art of the atom has the least amount

hydrogen atom loses its electron, how ity and weight change? ty and weight both decrease

ty decreases significantly, and its reases slightly. ty and weight both decrease

Standard 1f Quiz 1. f. Students know how to use the periodic table to identify the lanthanide, actinide, and transactinide elements and know that the transuranium elements were synthesized and identified in laboratory experiments through the use of nuclear accelerators. 1. The lanthanide and actinide elements are located together on the periodic table because they utilize the A. s orbital. B. p orbital. C. d orbital. D. f orbital. 2. Where are the lanthanide and actinide elements located on the periodic table? A. the first row B. the first two rows C. two rows normally shown as an insert D. the middle columns 3. Transuranium elements A. have outer electrons only in the s orbital. B. have an atomic number greater than 92. C. are inert. D. are nonmetals. 4. Which elements are not found naturally? A. actinide elements B. lanthanide elements C. transuranium elements D. uranium elements

Standard 1g Quiz 1. g. Students know how to relate of an element in the periodic tab quantum electron confi guration reactivity with other elements in 1. The periodic table is organized representing the energy sublevel with valence electrons. In the per which sequence lists the blocks in

ty increases significantly, and its reases slightly.

larger than its nucleus. lighter than its nucleus. denser than its nucleus. gher positive charge than its

ormation do the experimental results ut the nucleus of the gold atom? eus contains less than half the mass of the atom. eus is small and is the densest part of the atom.

A. W, Z, Y, X B. X, Y, Z, W C. Y, W, Z, X D. Y, Z, W, X 2. In the periodic table, which blo the d sublevel? A. W B. X C. Y D. Z 3. An atom with the electron con 1s22s22p63s23p64s2 is most like A. a metal that forms a positive io B. a metal that forms a negative i C. a nonmetal that forms a positi D. a nonmetal that forms a negat 4. An atom with the electron con 1s2 2s2 2p4 is most likely A. a metal that forms a positive io B. a metal that forms a negative i C. a nonmetal that forms a positi D. a nonmetal that forms a negat

eus contains small positive and negative particles. eus is large and occupies most of the atoms space.

Standard 1g Quiz 1. g. Students know how to relate the position of an element in the periodic table to its quantum electron confi guration and to its reactivity with other elements in the table. 1. The periodic table is organized into blocks representing the energy sublevel being filled with valence electrons. In the periodic table, which sequence lists the blocks in s-p-d-f order? Y Z

X A. W, Z, Y, X B. X, Y, Z, W C. Y, W, Z, X D. Y, Z, W, X 2. In the periodic table, which block represents the d sublevel?

Standard 1h Quiz 1. h. Students know the experimental basis for Thomsons discovery of the electron, Rutherfords nuclear atom, Millikans oil drop experiment, and Einsteins explanation of the photoelectric effect. 1. By measuring the effects of magnetic and electrical fields on cathode rays, J.J. Thomson discovered that these particles A. had no mass. B. were heavier than hydrogen atoms. C. have a negative charge. D. were easily broken apart. 2. Ernest Rutherfords gold foil experiment showed that some alpha particles beamed at a thin sheet of gold foil were severely deflected, contrary to his expectations. What caused the deflection? A. an electrical field B. magnetism C. an inner nucleus D. electron shells 3. Albert Einstein proposed that electromagnetic energy is contained in A. electrons. B. photons. C. protons. D. quarks.

3. An atom with the electron configuration 1s22s22p63s23p64s2 is most likely A. a metal that forms a positive ion. B. a metal that forms a negative ion. C. a nonmetal that forms a positive ion. D. a nonmetal that forms a negative ion. 4. An atom with the electron configuration 1s2 2s2 2p4 is most likely A. a metal that forms a positive ion. B. a metal that forms a negative ion. C. a nonmetal that forms a positive ion. D. a nonmetal that forms a negative ion.

Standard 1i Quiz 1. i. Students know the experimental basis for the development of the quantum theory of atomic structure and the historical importance of the Bohr model of the atom. 1. The Bohr model of the atom contained A. neutrons and electrons in the nucleus. B. protons and electrons in the nucleus. C. electrons scattered throughout the nucleus. D. electrons contained in energy levels. 2. The Bohr model of the atom was also known as the A. balloon model. B. igneous rock model. C. planetary model. D. plum pudding model. 3. Niels Bohrs model of the atom helped to explain A. particles passing through foil. B. spectral lines. C. the formation of isotopes. D. the properties of hydrogen. 4. Niels Bohr proposed that atoms A. were put together like plum pudding. B. had a negatively charged nucleus. C. had protons scattered throughout the atom. D. contained electrons in specific energy levels.

Standard 1e Quiz 1. e. Students know the nucleus of the atom is much smaller than the atom yet contains most of its mass. Use the illustration below to answer question 1.

1. How does the nucleus compare to the entire atom? A. It is slightly smaller than the atom. B. It is the only part of the atom that has a charge. C. It contains most of the atoms mass. D. It contains all of the atoms mass. 2. Which part of the atom has the least amount of mass? A. electrons B. neutrons C. nucleus D. protons 3. When a hydrogen atom loses its electron, how do its density and weight change? A. Its density and weight both decrease slightly. B. Its density decreases significantly, and its weight decreases slightly. C. Its density and weight both decrease significantly. D. Its density increases significantly, and its weight decreases slightly. 4. An atom A. is much larger than its nucleus. B. is much lighter than its nucleus. C. is much denser than its nucleus. D. has a higher positive charge than its nucleus. 5. What information do the experimental results reveal about the nucleus of the gold atom? A The nucleus contains less than half the mass of the atom. B The nucleus is small and is the densest part of the atom.

C The nucleus contains small positive and negative particles. D The nucleus is large and occupies most of the atoms space.

f the atom is

er question 1.

Standard 1j Quiz 1. j. Students know that spectral lines are the result of transitions of electrons between energy levels and that these lines correspond to photons with a frequency related to the energy spacing between levels by using Plancks relationship (E = hv). 38. The figure below shows the bright line spectra of four elements and a spectrum from a star. According to the spectrum, which elements are present in this star?

to the entire Element A Element B Element C least amount Element D Star A. elements A and B B. elements B and C C. elements A and C D. elements B, C, and D 39. Plancks constant (h) equals 6.626 1034 Js. According to Albert Einstein, Ephoton = hv. What is the energy of a photon if it has a frequency (v) of 6.82 1014 s1? A. 4.52 1019 B. 1.03 1020 C. 4.52 1020 D. 9.72 1020 40. Based on the equation E = hv, which is not a possible value for an energy change? A. hv C. 2hv D. 22hv B. 6.626hv

s electron, how

mental results

alf the mass of the atom. ensest part of the atom.

ive and negative particles. es most of the atoms space.

Periodic Table Metals Nonmetals Semi-metals Halogens Alkali metals Alkaline earth metals Transition metals Nucleus Protons & location Neutrons & location Electrons & location Trend for electronegativity Trend for ionization energy Trend for atomic size Bohrs Energy levels Valence electrons Electron configurations Atomic number Atomic mass JJ Thomsons discovery E. Rutherfords discovery Octet rule

Covalent Ionic Metallic Lewis dot structures Crystal structures Intermolecular forces Hydrogen Van der Waals/London Dispersion Polar molecules Nonpolar molecules Electrical conductivity Shared electrons Unshared electrons

Mole Avogadros # Steps for Balancing Equations Coefficient Subsscript Law of Conservation of Mass Naming Ionic compounds Naming Covalent compounds

Standard 2

Standard 2a, 2c, 2g, 2e Students know (2a) atoms combine to form molecules by sharing electrons to form covalent or metallic bonds or by exchanging electrons to form ionic bonds; (2c) salt crystals, such as NaCl, are repeating patterns of positive and negative ions held together by electrostatic attraction; (2g) how electronegativity and ionization energy relate to bond formation. (2e) how to draw Lewis electron dot structures Metallic and Ionic Bonding

Standard 2a,2b,2e Students know (2a) atoms combine to form molecules by sharing electrons to form covalent bonds; (2b) chemical bonds between atoms in molecules such as H2, CH4, NH3, H2CCH2, N2, Cl2, and many large biological molecules are covalent. (2g) how electronegativity and ionization energy relate to bond formation. (2e) how to draw Lewis electron dot structures; (2f)* Students know how to predict the shape of simple molecules and their polarity from Lewis dot structures. Main Idea: Covalent Bonding

Standard 2c, 2h, 2d h.* Students know how to identify solids and liquids held together by van der Waals forces or hydrogen bonding and relate these forces to volatility and boiling/ melting point temperatures. d. Students know the atoms and molecules in liquids move in a random pattern relative to one another because the intermolecular forces are too weak to hold the atoms or molecules in a solid form. Rank forces, from weakest to strongest and relate to boiling/melting points. Understand intra-molecular and intermolecular forces

Standard 2f f.* Students know how to predict the shape of simple molecules and their polarity from Lewis dot structures.

Main Idea

Main Idea: Draw valence electrons and predict polarity

Objectives

Predict ionic bonding from electrical conductivity, melting points, electronegativity, and electron dot structure List ionic or metallic bonding for: Zn: _____, ZnCl:_____

Objectives: Describe characteristics and examples of covalent bonds

Predict polar/non-polar forces based on valence electrons

Question

Exit Ticket(turn in + keep for next time) Q: Make three bubble maps (Metallic, Ionic, Covalent bonds) Match: Conduct electricity; high melting point(MP); low MP; electronegativity range; Forms Crystals; Shiny; Sea of electrons; cations/anions; metals only; metal/non-metal; non-metals only; e-s lost/gained; e-s shared; diatomic molecules; biological molecules; CHONPS, polar/nonpolar

INTRAMOLECULAR(within a molecule)>>INTERMOLECULAR(bet ween) BONDS: IONIC>>COVALENT>>HYDROGEN>>L ONDON DISPERSION /VAN DER WAALS Bonds: Intra-molecular are STRONGEST: Ionic (hi MP!)->then Covalent (low MP, BP,weaker); >> Intermolecular (between molecules): Hydrogen Bonds (substances with H and O, N, or F), then London Dispersion/Van der Waals (between nonmetals) are the WEAKEST:

Metals: 1)______2)_______3)_______4)____ ___ 5) ______ Ionic: 1)_______2)_______3)_______4)___ ___ 5)_________6)_________7)_______ __ Covalent: 1)_______2)_______3)_______4)___ ___ 5)_________6)_________7)_______ __8)_______ Understanding How and Why Elements Bond: Define in notes: Valence e-s; Stable elements (noble gases); Metal (plus Hydrogen & Boron); Non-metals; 2 Nonmetals; Complete Worksheet What is meant by "Polar Opposites?" Which is polar, carbon dioxide (CO2, O=C=O, linear) or water (H2O, Bent)?_______

My Answer:

________________________________ _____________________________________ ___ _

Pre-Test

How are electrons held together in a bond? Intramolecular Force (IMF, between atoms) - Single bondsC-C (C:C), long, lower bond energy; small IMF; Double bonds C=C (C::C), medium length, medium bond energy, medium IMF; Triple bonds C C (C:::C), short length, high bond energy, high IMF;

Describe Demo

What determines the Melting Point or Boiling Point? Intermolecular Forces - molecule-tomolecule; Forces of Attraction is greater with proximity (closeness)of atoms; SOLID > LIQUID > GAS; STRONG Hydrogen bond : H bonded to N, O, or F (NH3, H2O, HF) interact with other N, O, or F (NH3, H2O, HF) molecules; DNA (double helix); London Dispersion Forces(Van der Waal) are weaker; Non-polar covalent molecules, O=C=O, CH4; stronger LDF/VDW Forces with increasing molecule size.

Draw (1) Predicting Polarity Shapes(Polar and Nonpolar); (2) Five Common Molecular shapes + an example. (3) examples of Dipole Moments. 4) Polar/Nonpolar chart; (5) Complete Polarity worksheet Check out 3-D Shapes

video notes:

Metallic bonding-electrons are shared in a sea of electrons between metals only; Ionic bonding-electrons are lost by metals/positively-charged groups, or gained by non-metals/negativelycharged groups forming ions: cations(+, lost), or anions(-, gained). Electrical Conductivity happens when electrons move to complete a circuit.

Covalent bonding-electrons are shared between two non-metals. Electrical conductivity happens when electrons complete a circuit. Polar - unequal sharing of electrons (more e-s around partially negative element); Non-Polar - equal sharing of e-s (diatomic molecules)

Draw 1) Hydrogen Bonding between Water Molecules; 2) Hydrogen Bonding between a Solute and a Solvent

Draw the Lewis Dot Structures for: LiCl; BeCl2; BH#; CH4; NH3; H2O; HCl . Label each one correctly: 1) linear, triangular, tetrahedral, pyramidal, or bent; 2) polar or nonpolar; 3) ionic or covalent); 4) Draw dipole moment (arrow toward more negative element, if one;

Activities/Labs (1)Test metals, ionic solid, and ions in solution for electrical conductivity; (2)Draw crystal structure for NaCl; (3)Test the melting point (if possible) for ionic solids - is it less than 100C? (sodium chloride and magnesium sulfate). (4)Write/Draw electronegativity difference for ionic bonds; (5) draw/make Lewis electron dot structures for metals and nonmetals.

(1)Test solid and liquid covalent molecules Complete Types of Intermolecular for electrical conductivity; (2)Draw Forces problems in notebook. Formation of a Covalent Bond; (3) Draw Covalent Bonding; (4) Draw chart of elements that are DI-ATOMIC molecules; (5)Draw CHONPS Bubble Map; (6) Compare electronegativity difference for covalent vs. ionic bonds; (7) Draw Three Bond Types (8)Test the melting point (if possible) for covalent solids - is it less than 100C? (paraffin wax). (9) Test boiling point/evaporation of covalent/ionic solutions (on overhead). (10) draw/make Lewis electron dot structures for simple structures (linear, triangular, pyramidal, tetrahedral).

In a group of 4, Draw the same boxes on a EXIT TICKET paper to turn in. Choose two of the substances (4 people choose two different substances) + write your name in box + collaborate. Turn in @ end of the period. Choices: H2, BeF2; BF3; CF4; NF3; OCl2; F2, HBr

Chapter-Section Outline chapter 5.2 p.166-173 (ionic), Chapter Outline: 6.1 (covalent, bond types), 11.2(forces), Outline 6.2 p. 199-200(e- dot) 6.2(dots), 6.3(shapes) key vocab ionic, salt, crystal lattice, unit cell, crystal, vocabulary: covalent bond, molecular orbital, polar and nonpolar covalent bonds, shapes (linear, triangular, pyramidal, tetrahedral), Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion(VESPR) Theory Single, Double, Triple bonds, Intramolecular bonds (ionic, covalent, metallic), Inter-molecular bonds (London Dispersion Forces, Hydrogen bonding), dipole-dipole force, polarity Figures:#10,14 Section Review 1,2,3,5-12 Chapter Review: #8, 23, 29, 35, 48

No new homework! !:))

ch. 5: figure 11, skills Toolkit p. 173; ch 6 figure 7; Section Review Section Review: 5.2 #1-4,8; 6.1 #6,6.2 Q's #1, Chapter Review Chapter Review-5: #16,29 ch-6 Q's #20,22 Metallic bonding-electrons are shared in a sea of electrons between metals only; EX: Al, Cr, Fe, Cu metals; Opposites attract-form STRONG Bonds; Ionic Bonds between ions of opposite charge = Cations(+)-()Anions; Ionic bonding-electrons are lost by metals/positively-charged groups, or gained by nonmetals/negatively-charged groups forming ions: cations(+, lost), or anions(-, gained). SALT - formed by ions, Na-Cl, electrically neutral (+ = charges); Lewis Dots- represent valence electrons (1-8)

Figures

Figures: 2, 6, 15-18; Predicting Molecular Shapes (p.211) Section Review: 6.1: #1, 7, 11, 14; 6.2: #7, 6.3: #1-3, 6-11 Chapter Review: #2, 5,7,9,11,15,17,27, 30,33, 38, 41,42, Exit Ticket(turn in + keep for next time) Q: Make three bubble maps (Metallic, Ionic, Covalent bonds) Match: Conduct electricity; high melting point(MP); low MP; electronegativity range; Forms Crystals; Shiny; Sea of electrons; cations/anions; metals only; metal/non-metal; non-metals only; e-s lost/gained; e-s shared; diatomic molecules; biological molecules; CHONPS, polar/nonpolar

#25 Polar or nonpolar shapes? Linear1(2 different elements)?____ Linear2 (MgCl2)_____Triangular, BH3_____Tetrahedral , CH4 _____Pyramidal, NH3____ Bent, H2O, Linear-3, Diatomic, Br2___

1a know periodic table arranged by increasing atomic number and know the atomic mass atomic number = number of protons (!) or H-1, He-2, C-6, Ne- XXX C-12, He-4, O-16 number of electrons 10 atomic number trend increases from left to right, top to bottom atomic mass = # protons + # neutrons atomic mass trend increases from left to right, top to bottom period horizontal rows, left to right, 7 periods group (family) Vertical, Top->bottom columns, 18 groups 1b know metals, nonmetals, semimetals, and halogens metals elements left of staircase nonmetals elements right of staircase semi-metals elements along (against) staircase halogens (family) Elements in Group 17

1c know alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, transition metals; 1 c know trends in atomic size, electronegativity, and ionization energy alkali metals elements in group 1 alkaline earth metals elements in group 2 transition metals elements in group 3-12 atomic size trend incr. from right to left, top to bottom electronegativity incr. from left to right, bottom to top ionization energy incr. from left to right, bottom to top 1d use periodic table to find electrons available for bonding valence electrons outer e-s # of e-s lost lost by metals cations elements lose e-s (+) charge # of e-s gained gained by non-metals anions elements gain electrons (-) charge octet rule elements lose or gain e-s to have 8 valence e-s (stable) like noble gases

1e nucleus is much smaller than atom, contains most of its mass nucleus center of atom, holds protons and neutrons = most of mass protons neutrons (+) charge particle = atomic number neutral charged particle, mass similar to mass of proton (-) charged particle, mass = 1/2000 mass of proton

electrons

1f know lanthanides & actinides are in bottom rows, lanthanides Elements La to Lu

14 elements XXX Cr, Cu, Co across/ horizontal 14 elements XXX K, Ar, Y across/ horizontal Np, Es Lanthanides '4f' Actinides '5f' XXX Tl, Ta XXX F, Fr

Actinides

elements Ac to Lr

1f transuranium (atomic # >92) are made in a lab 1f lanthanides/actinides occupy 'f' orbitals

1g know electron configuration orbitals (s, p, d, f) s- orbital Groups 1 and 2 p-orbital Groups 13-18 d-orbital Groups 3-12 (transition metals) f-orbitals order Lanthanides & Actinides 1s22s22p63s23p64s23d104p65s24d105p66s24f145d106p67s25f146d107p6

1h know Thompson and Rutherford Discoveries Thompson discovered electron (-) charged particle Rutherford discovered protons (+) charge in nucleus 1i know Bohr Diagrams orbitals planetary model with nucleus in the center, and e-s around the outside in specific shells

used Cathode ray tube Gold Foil Experiment

Quantized Energy level Electrons occupy specific energy levels 2a know covalent, ionic, and metallic bonding covalent ionic metallic intra-molecular bond intra-molecular forces ionic and covalent bonding 2b know biological molecules, diatomic molecules, and hydro-carbons are covalent diatomic biological molecules hydrocarbons CHONPS 2c know ionic compounds form salt crystals crystal lattice 2d know atoms or molecules are held together by weak intermolecular forces in liquids melting point boiling point intermolecular bond intermolecular forces Hydrogen bonds and London Dispersion/van der Waals forces Hydrogen Bonds Inter-molecular van der Waals forces 2e know how to draw electron dot structures shared electrons unshared electrons single bond double bond triple bond 2f predict shape of molecules and polarity from Lewis Dot structures linear triangular planar tetrahedral pyramidal bent 2g know how electronegativity and ionization energy relate to bond formation electronegativity ionization energy non-polar covalent

polar covalent partial positive partial negative ionic bond strength

Ionic > Covalent > Hydrogen > Van der Waals 2h identify solids and liquids held together by Van der Waals forces and Hydrogen bonding 2h relate Van der Waals and hydrogen bonding to boiling/melting points polar compounds solids held together by electrostatic (positive attracted to negative charges)

3a know how to write balanced equations reactants products balanced equation coefficient subscript rules for balancing identify atoms on both sides of equation multiply coefficient x subscript count atoms on both sides of reaction change coefficients to balance equation 3b know one mole is set by one mole of carbon 12 atoms to have a mass of exactly 12 grams one mole the number of carbon atoms in 12 grams of carbon-12 (6 p+, 6 no ) 3c know one mole equals 6.02 x 1023 atoms or molecules (Avogadro's number) Mole Triangle # of atoms or molecules

moles Moles to number Number to moles

6.02 x 10^23/mol

___mol x 6.02 x 10^23 atoms/mol = _________ atoms or molecules 5.0 mol x 6.02 x 10^23 atoms/mol = 30 x 10^23 or 3.0 x 10^24 atoms _________ atoms 6.02 x 10^23/mol = ____ mol 9.0 x 10^23 6.02 x 10^23/mol = 1.5 mol

3d know how to find molar mass of a molecule from atomic masses from chemical formula molar mass

Molar Mass, Atomic mass Unit: g/mol (weighted average of isotopes) from Periodic Table substance # - Unit - Substance Oxygen 16.0 g/mol O Find molar mass: Na H2 = 2xH NH3 = N +3xH # (element ) x ___g/mol___ = ___g/mol ___ 1(Na) x 23.0 g/mol Na = 23.0 g/mol Na 2(H) x 1.0g/mol H = 2.0 g/mol H2

1(N) x 14.0g/mol N = 14.0 g/mol N 3(H) x 1.0g/mol H = 3.0 g/mol H 17.0 g/mol NH3 Mg(OH)2 = 1xMg + 2xO + 2xH 1xMg 1(Mg) x 24.3 g/mol Mg = 24.3 g/mol Mg 2xO 2(O) x 16.0 g/mol O = 32 g/mol O 2xH 2(H) x 1.0g/mol H = 2.0 g/mol H 58.3 g/mol Mg(OH)2 Grams/Mole Triangle

_____ # of grams

_____ moles x ____grams/mol (from Periodic Table) Number unit substance # of grams to moles ______ g ___ _____ g/mol ___ = ____ mol ___ # mol to grams LAB! 10.0 g H2 2.0 g/mol H2 = 5 mol H2 ____mol ___x ___ g/mol ___ = ___g ___ 4.0 mol H2 x 2.0 g/mol H2 = 8.0 g H2

Number of Molecules Triangle

______

# of atoms or molecules

_____ moles x 6.022 x 10^23 atoms or molecules/mol Number unit substance Number of particles _________ atoms _____ 6.02 x 10^23/mol_____ = ____ mol ____ to moles 9.0 x 10^23 atoms Na 6.02 x 10^23 atoms/mol Na = 1.5 mol Na Moles to number of particles ___mol__ x 6.02 x 10^23 atoms/mol___ = ___ atoms or molecules___ 5.0 mol NaClx6.02x10^23molecules/mol NaCl=30x10^23 molecules NaCl or 3.0 x 10^24 molecules NaCl =3.0 x 10^24moleculesNaCl WARM-UP How many Cl atoms are in one molecule of CaCl2 Hint: one molecule of Cl-Ca-Cl CaCl2 molecules are in one mole of CaCl2? How many moles F2 are in __mol unknown/mol known Converts from moles known to moles of any unknown substance in a balanced equation.

Warm Up: Mole Ratio:

Using Number of Particles Triangle,

Change from ___mol to ______of molecules or atoms a) 2 mol CaO x 6.022 x 10^23 molecules/mol CaO = 12x10^23 molecules =1.2 X 10^24 molecules CaO b) 5 mol NaBr c) 10 mol KF Change from _____molecules or atoms to ____mol a) 9.0 x 10^23 molecules KF 6.022 x 10^23 molecules/mol KF= 1.5 mol KF b) 3.0 x 10^23 atoms Au c) 4.8 x 10^24 molecules H2O

Standard 3

3a Students know how to describe chemical reactions by writing balanced equations.

Main Idea

Balance # of atoms on both sides of an equation

Write "Naming Ionic Objective: Use Periodic Objective: Use Grams/mol Compounds rules + practice Table to Find molar mass Triangle to Convert from problems on sheet in folder; moles to grams and grams AND Write "Naming Covalent to moles Compounds pre-fixes + practice EXIT TICKET What is the difference between a coefficient and EXIT Ticket: 1. What Exit Ticket: Name these: H2(g) Exit Ticket: 1. Find molar Exit Ticket: 2. draw Question a subscript? Identify each with an example of element and mass is a mole _____O2(g)______OH- _____ mass (in grams/mol) for DOUBLE TRIANGLE three water molecules. based on? 2. Write/fill in elements or compounds DIAGRAM: Show one CO ______ CO2 _______ CO3-2 Balancing Act paragraph (in in S-He-Li-K-EsCAl-IF-ORnY- correct conversion (two _______ NO ________ NO2-1 folder). 3. What is La-WS example: S=32.0 total). -1 _________ NO3 _________ SO4 g/mol S He=___g/mol He Avogadro's Number? 2 ________ Li=__g/mol are My Answer: molar mass Li units grams/mol or g/mol Watch Demo: Watch Happy Mole Day! Watch demo: Write Notes Use grams/mol triangle to (in Folder) in your find moles or grams using notebook molar mass from periodic Describe Write Equation: Reactants -(form)-> Products: In 12.0 g of Carbon-12, 1. Using "Handy methods for Write Molar Mass notes table Write notes (in folder) Demo NaHCO3(s) + HC2H3O2(aq) --> NaC2H3O2(aq) + Avogadro determined naming IONIC compounds", with examples there are 6.02 x 10^23 write BOLD Rules: #1-4 Use H2O(l) + CO2(g) Carbon atoms; this is ONE Common Monatomic Ions Chart MOLE. One mole of for Transition metals. SWITCH anything (atoms, Subscript of one for Charge of molecules, pennies) is 6.02 the other: Fe2O3 gives Fe a +3 video notes: "Word Equations" Name substances: Sodium 2. Write names + formulas for: Write all examples in Hydrogen carbonate + Acetic Acid -(form)-> hydroxide____, nitrate______, notebook Sodium acetate + water + carbon dioxide nitrite_____, sulfate______, sulfite______, carbonate_______, phosphate_____, Activities/Labs Coefficient: # in front of substance = How many 3. Write Naming Covalent Molar Mass DRAW DOUBLE TRIANGLE (above they are all "one"; 2NaCl is two Sodium Compounds: Number of Atoms Activities/Labs: DIAGRAMS + Insert + Prefix + Mr Q's notes. 1. Using periodic table numbers and substances atoms and two Chlorine atoms); Subscript: and the 1/2-sheet @ your as you get them: Number follows element or group it describes lab, find the molar mass To go from #grams to # (above, in reactants: three Oxygen atoms: two of an element (Cu, Fe, Zn, of atoms or # molecules, Carbon atoms, three Hydrogen atoms, two or Al) or a compound FIRST find mol by dividing Oxygen atoms; 2MgCl2 is two Magnesium atoms (H2O, FeO, NaCl, Al2O3, grams by g/mol; then and four (2x2) Chlorine atoms; Conservation of 23 CO2) multiply mol x 6.02x10 mass- matter (atoms) is not created or destroyed 2. Use grams/mol triangle atoms/mol or mol x (must be equal in reactants and products) to change from a mass of 6.02x1023 molecules/mol BALANCING ACT w/s: write Steps + practice; then 50.0 grams to moles; with partner, race against another team! __ # grams 3. Use grams/mol triangle __# atoms to change from 4.0 moles to grams of that substance. Switch from __g/mol x __ element to molecule or mol x 6.02x1023 molecule to element and atoms/mol repeat steps (2) and (3). 4. What is the mass of To go from #atoms or 3.45 moles of aluminum #molecules to # grams, sulfate? Al2(SO4)3 FIRST find mol by dividing

Objectives

Adjust Coefficients(if necessary) to balance each element

3b, 3c (3b) Students know the quantity one mole is set by defining one mole of carbon-12 atoms to have a mass of exactly 12 grams. (3c) know one mole 23 The number carbon equals 6.02 xof 10 particles atoms in one mole is large 23 (6.02 x 10 ), and the mass of carbon-12 is used as a standard for hydrogen (1/12th mass of carbon)

3a.pt2 Naming Ionic substances and Covalent substances from formulas, and writing formulas from names.

3d.2 Students know how to determine the molar mass of a molecule from its chemical formula and a table of atomic masses

3d.3 Students know how to convert the mass of a molecular substance to moles, or number of particles.

3d.1 Students know how to convert the moles of a substance to/from the number of particles

3d.4 Convert from grams to numbers of particles, and from number of particles to grams.

Learn anion endings, polyatomic Main Idea: Molar Mass ion group names, and pre-fixes for non-metals.

Main Idea: Grams, moles, Main Idea: Number of Atoms or and grams per mol molecules (grams/mol, g/mol)

Objective: Use Number of Molecules Triangle to Convert from moles to number of atoms or molecules and number of atoms or particles to Draw molesNumber of Exit Ticket: Particles Triangle: (1)Find the number of molecules in 3 moles of NaF? (2)How many moles are in 3.6 x 10^24 (36x10^23) molecules NaF? NUMBER UNIT SUBSTANCE

3e know how to calculate the masses of reactants and products in a chemical reaction from the mass of one of the reactants or products and the relevant atomic masses. Main Idea: Use mass of one substance in a balanced equation to calculate the mass of another substance using mole ratio use Objective: grams/mole triangle and mol ratios Exit Ticket: Write all mole ratios for: 2H2 + O2--> 2H2O

divide or multiply by 6.022 x 10^23 Watch demo for: 3H2 + N2 - Take notes: Mole Ratios atoms or molecules/mol from BALANCED -> 2NH3 __substance__ EQUATION Write Number of Particles Triangle in your notebook Mole ratios From 1. Write Equation BALANCED EQUATION: 3 H2 + N2 --> NH3 mol H2/2 mol NH3; 3mol H2/1mol N2;

Write examples for both calculations

2. Balance: 3H2 + N2 --> 2NH3 3. What reacts? 3mol H2 + 1mol N2 forms 2MOL NH3. Exit Ticket 11/5/12: 4. Write Mole Ratios: mol unknown/mol known Find __mol H2(unknown) from mol NH3(known): 3 mol H2/2 MOL NH3 From mol N2(known): 3 mol H2/1mol N2 Find __mol N2(unknown) from mol H2(known): 1mol N2/3 mol H2 From mol NH3(known): 1mol N2/2 MOL NH3 Find __mol NH3(unknown) From mol H2(known) 2MOL NH3/3 mol H2 From mol N2(known): 2MOLNH3/ 1 mol N2 Complete Stoichiometry

Using the Number of Particles Triangle, in a group, complete problems on overhead.

ChapterSection Outline key vocab

Outline Chapter: 8.1 (p.263-266) vocab: chemical reaction, coefficient, subscript vocab: mole

Ch5. p. 176-180; Ch 6-p.206-207 Outline 7.2 Ch. 5: monatomic ion, polyatomic ion; Ch. 6: pre-fixes (#1-10) Ch. 5: Table 2 Ch. 6: Table 5 average atomic mass

Outline 7.1, p, 230-232 molar mass

Outline 7.1 Avogadro's Number,

Outline Chapter 9.1, p. 302-311. Vocab: Stoichiometry

Figures

Draw Figures: Table 2, p. 265

No Figures:))

No figures :))

Figures #1,

Figures: SkillsToolkit, p.303; Skills toolkit, p. 306 Section Review: #1-4

Section Review Section Review #3, 8, 17 Q's Chapter Review Q's Chapter Review #2, 4, 15 chapter review: none (!:))

Section Review Ch. 5.3#5-8; Ch. Section Review: #10,12,16 Section Review: #10,11,13 Section Review: #1-3, 5-8 6.2: #9, 10 Chapter Review: Ch. 5: #17-22, 24, 25; Ch. 6: #25 Chapter Review: #15, 3134, 38-41, 45-48 Chapter Review: #2, 9,10, Chapter Review: #1,6-8, 19-20,24,27 Chapter Review: #29, 35, 12,13, 28, 29, 35, 37 37,

Chapter Review: #1, 6-9, 12, 21-26

Find molar mass:

# (element ) x ___g/mol___ = ___g/mol ___ All groups: Practice drawings and problems on plastic papers with overhead markers Molar Mass, Atomic mass Unit: g/mol (weighted average of isotopes) Balance Group: Present Steps to Balance Chemical Equation (#1, #2,) + Solve probems on transparency or whiteboard #78, 81 Grams/mol Group: Draw Grams/mol Triangle Completely on Transparency ->project on to whiteboard + solve problems #82, 79 Exit Ticket: Draw DOUBLE TRIANGLE DIAGRAMS. Show one correct conversion (two total) Exit Ticket: Draw Number of Particles Triangle: Find the number of molecules in 3 moles of NaF. How many moles are in 3.6 x 10^24 (36x10^23)molecules NaF?

Na

1(Na) x 23.0 g/mol Na = 23.0 g/mol Na

H2

2(H) x 1.0g/mol H = 2.0 g/mol H2

from Periodic Table

H20 = 2xH + O

2(H) x 1.0g/mol H = 2.0 g/mol H2

substance

# - Unit - Substance

1(O) x 16.0g/mol O = 16.0 g/mol O 18.0 g/mol H2O Mg(OH)2 = 1xMg + 2xO + 2xH

Number of Molecules Group: Draw Number of Molecules triangle Completely on Transparency-->project on to whiteboard + solve problems #87, 80 Oxygen Grams to Number of Molecules/Atoms Group: Draw Double Triangles completely on transparency onto Grams to Grams-->project Group: Draw Grams/mol mole ratio-Grams/mol Triangles completely -->project on to whiteboard + solve problems #88, 89, 90

16.0 g/mol O

1xMg

1(Mg) x 24.3 g/mol Mg = 24.3 g/mol Mg

2xO

2(O) x 16.0 g/mol O = 32 g/mol O

2xH

2(H) x 1.0g/mol H = 2.0 g/mol H

58.3 g/mol Mg(OH)2 Grams/Mole Triangle _____ # of grams

_____ moles x

Number unit substance

# of grams to moles

______ g ___ _____ g/mol ___ = ____ mol ___

10.0 g H2 2.0 g/mol H2 = 5 mol H2

# mol to grams ____mol ___x ___ g/mol ___ = ___g ___ 4.0 mol H2 x 2.0 g/mol H2 = 8.0 g H2

Number of Molecules Triangle ______ # of atoms or molecules

_____ moles Number unit substance Number of particles to moles

_________ atoms _____ 6.02 x 10^23/mol_____ = ____ mol ____ 9.0 x 10^23 atoms Na 6.02 x 10^23/mol Na = 1.5 mol Na

Moles to number of particles

___mol__ x 6.02 x 10^23 atoms/mol___ = ___ atoms or molecules___ 5.0 mol NaClx6.02x10^23molecules/mol NaCl=30x10^23 molecules NaCl or 3.0 x 10^24 molecules NaCl

Standard 4 a. Students know the random motion of molecules and their collisions with a surface create the observable pressure on that surface. d. Students know the values and meanings of standard temperature and pressure (STP). Main Idea Pressure occurs on all surfaces by gases

e. Students know how to convert between the Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales f. Students know there is no temperature lower than 0 Kelvin. Celsius and Kelvin are the main temperature scales used by scientists Know how to convert between Celsius and Kelvin temperatures, from measured to calculated temperatures.

Objectives

Understand pressure and its units.

EXIT TICKET ? Temperature Conversions add your age to ____ = ___Kelvin; Convert 100C to Kelvin; 100K to Celsius.

key vocab

Figures Section Review Q's Chapter Review Q's

Exit Tickets:KWL-I KNOW gases are;3 properties of gases (1- 2- 3-); Pressure, Newton, Pascal, Standard Temperature and Pressure, Kinetic Molecular theory; Figures #1-6, 8 Section Review #1-4 Chapter Review: #1-4, 11-19, 70 Exit Tickets:KWL-I KNOW gases are;3 properties of gases (1- 2- 3-);

temperature, absolute zero none :)) #7-8 #8 Temperature Conversions add your age to ____ = ___Kelvin; Convert 100C to Kelvin; 100K to Celsius.

b. Students know the random motion of molecules explains the diffusion of gases. Gases move randomly

4c. Students know how to apply the gas laws to relations between the pressure, temperature, and volume of any amount of an ideal gas or any mixture of ideal gases. Ideal Gas Law, Boyle's Law, Charles' Law, Gay-Lussac's Law, and Combined Gas Law Input all variables and solve for changes in gas conditions to calculate new values.

Understand how the strength of gases decreases in air

Exit Ticket-Take home: Choose 5 Elements on Adopt-anelement--Letter in Symbol must be in your first or last name (ex. Quinlan-Uranium, Iodine, Nitrogen, Lanthanum, Neon). Show Mr. Q for Points --Take home=ExtraCredit Boyle's Law, Charles' Law, Gay-Lussac's Law, Ideal Gas, Combined Gas Law Draw Figures 10, 12, 14. Section Review (12-2)-#5-10; (12-3)-#7-9 Chapter Review: #35,36,39, 41,42,43, 48,49,50, 54,55,56 Exit Ticket: Identify 5 Gas Laws + Equations: _____Law: ________=_______

Directions: KEEP everything you write on your paper (name + symbol) in your possession. KEEP all of your papers/notebooks, please! Write missing/new agendas below (preferably in order) in your notebook. They will be checked early Feb. Outline chapter sections (preferably in order). They will be checked in early Feb. Complete visual vocab booklet (word on front + definitions & diagrams/examples on back for full credit) KEEP these! Complete Exit tickets (preferably in order--they will be collected in early Feb) Complete problems & keep in your possession (name + symbol on all sheets; scribbled sheets need to be re-written) Turn in assignments from handouts and quiz questions to the sub. Sub: Plesase read assigned chapter/sections to students; write names of on-task students (textbook open on desk/completing tasks/few distractions); Questions? Email me at patrick.a.quinlan@lausd.net thx!:)) 1/22-23/13 1/24-25/2013 1/28/2013 ch-15 15-1 15-2 15-3 15-1 Standard: 5a know the properties Acids & of acids, bases, and salt Bases solutions. Name three examples objectives of each: Strong Acid, /exit Weak acid, strong base, ticket weak base, salt 5b Acids and bases react to form neutral solutions, measured by pH explain self-ionization of water, showing a chemical reaction Understand and measure pH of Describe neutralization reactions substances, describe amphoteric ions and pH + pOH =14.00 Read p. 564 "Antacids" &Write 3 Things you learned, 2 questions you now have, and one thing you already knew.

complete lab with Mr. Q in class

visual vocab

pH, indicator, neutral, strong acid, weak acid, concentration of H3O+ and OHtwo neutralization reactions (on strong base, weak base, diagram (p.540), pH values at p. 549), pH values of human body Bronsted-Lowry Acids, specified [H3O+], Using fluids (p. 561), buffers Bronsted-Lowry Base logarithms in pH calculations, pH of substances (Figure 12) Section Review: #1-3, 5 , 6 Chapter Review:# 8,9, 24-28 Section Review: #4,5 Chapter Review: #11, 15, 29, 39

lab data, results, and conclusions

Section Review: problems #1,3,5,7 ; Chapter Review: #1,16, 18, 20, .

Directions: KEEP everything you write on your paper (name + symbol) in your possession. KEEP all of your papers/notebooks, please! Write missing/new agendas below (preferably in order) in your notebook. They will be checked early Feb. Complete visual vocab booklet (word on front + definitions & diagrams/examples on back for full credit) KEEP these! Complete Exit tickets (preferably in order--they will be collected in early Feb) Complete problems & keep in your possession (name + symbol on all sheets; scribbled sheets need to be re-written) Turn in assignments from handouts and quiz questions to the sub. Sub: Plesase read assigned chapter/sections to students; write names of on-task students (textbook open on desk/completing tasks/few distractions); Questions? Email me at patrick.a.quinlan@lausd.net thx!:)) 8-Jan 10-Jan 14-Jan 15-Jan ch-13 13-1 13-3 6c Describe how temperature, pressure, and surface area affect the dissolving process Write 3 things you learned, two questions you now have, and one thing you already knew 6d calculate concentration in moles per liter (mol/l or M), and parts per million (ppm)

Standard: Solutions

6a: Know solute and solvent

6b: Describe dissolving process

6e Describe freezing point depression (FPD) and boiling point elevation (BPE)

Compare solutions, suspensions, and objectives/exit ticket colloids

Describe solutions and mixtures miscible, immiscible, soluble, insoluble, saturated, unsaturated, high surface area, low surface area, effect of temperature

visual vocab

solute, solvent, solution, suspension, colloid, homogeneous, heterogeneous mixtures

concentration, parts per million, molarity

problems

Section Review: #1Section Review: #1-6; 3,7; Chapter Review: Chapter Review: #1-3, #25-30(#28-30 use 15,16,19, 20. Table 2 in book)

Section Review: #5, 8; Chapter Review: #4, 21, 37, 40

these!

tten)

1/17-18/2013

For twenty words on Foldable handout, on a piece of paper to turn in, show definitions and diagrams/examples

Directions: KEEP everything you write on your paper (name + symbol) in your possession. KEEP all of your papers/notebooks, please! Write missing/new agendas below (preferably in order) in your notebook. They will be checked early Feb. Complete visual vocab booklet (word on front + definitions & diagrams/examples on back for full credit) KEEP these! Complete Exit tickets (preferably in order--they will be collected in early Feb) Complete problems & keep in your possession (name + symbol on all sheets; scribbled sheets need to be re-written) Turn in assignments from handouts and quiz questions to the sub. Sub: Plesase read assigned chapter/sections to students; write names of on-task students (textbook open on desk/completing tasks/few distractions); Questions? Email me at patrick.a.quinlan@lausd.net thx!:)) ch2-1 2-1 11-1 10-1, 10-2 7d: Students know how to solve problems involving heat flow and temperature changes, using known values of specific heat and latent heat of phase change. 10-3 10-4

Standard: Solutions

7b: Students know chemical processes can either release (exothermic) or absorb (endothermic) thermal energy.

7c: Students 7a: Students know energy is know how to released when a describe material temperature and condenses or heat flow in freezes and is terms of the absorbed when a motion of material molecules (or evaporates or atoms). melts.

7e: Students know how to apply Hesss law to calculate enthalpy change in a reaction.

7f: Students know how to use the Gibbs free energy equation to determine whether a reaction would be spontaneous.

objectives/exit ticket

In the ice cream experiment, the When energy is mixture is _____, absorbed, it is In the melting ice and the salty ice _________. When experiment, the water is ______. Energy is ice is ______, and The salt ______ released, it is the hot plate is the temp of the _____________ ______. ice water. surface tension, evaporation, condensation, boiling point, heat, kinetic melting point, energy, melting, freezing, temperature, freezing point, specific heat sublimation Section Review: Section Review: Section Review: #1-15; Chapter #5, 9-11; Chapter #3,4,6-8, 12, 13; Review: #1,3, 9, Review: Chapter Review: # 11-13 energy, physical change, chemical change, endothermic, exothermic, law of conservation of energy

The specific heat of water is _____ J/g C. The specific heat of my metal, H is ________; ____, is T is ________, ________J/g C S is ________;

+ G is _______; G is _________.

visual vocab

heat, specific heat, Joule, heat equation Problems on Board (left of Agenda)

calorimeter, calorimetry, Hess'Law

entropy, Gibb's Energy

problems

Section Review: #1-7

Section Review: #1-14

ch-16

16-1: 576-580

16-1: 581-584 8b: Reaction Rates depend on factors: concentration, temperature, and pressure

16-2: 590-595

8a: Rate is decrease in concentration of Standard: reactants or increase Reaction in concentration of Rates products with time

8c: Role the catalyst plays in increasing the reaction rate Draw Energy vs. Time for endothermic and exothermic reactions with and without a catalyst

Draw Concentration objectives vs. time (x-axis) for /exit reactants and Complete Factors ticket products Lab: Effect of increased concentration, increased visual temperature, vocab rate, reaction rate increased pressure problems 16-1: #1-4 16-1: #5-7

activation energy, activated complex, catalyst, enzyme 16-2: #4,5,9, 12

Directions: KEEP everything you write on your paper (name + symbol) in your possession. KEEP all of your papers/notebooks, please! Write missing/new agendas below (preferably in order) in your notebook. They will be checked early Feb. Complete visual vocab booklet (word on front + definitions & diagrams/examples on back for full credit) KEEP these! Complete Exit tickets (preferably in order--they will be collected in early Feb) Complete problems & keep in your possession (name + symbol on all sheets; scribbled sheets need to be re-written) Turn in assignments from handouts and quiz questions to the sub. Sub: Plesase read assigned chapter/sections to students; write names of on-task students (textbook open on desk/completing tasks/few distractions); Questions? Email me at patrick.a.quinlan@lausd.net thx!:)) 1/29-30/2013 1/31-2/1/2013 ch-14 14-1 14-3 9b: know equilibrium is established when forward and reverse reaction rates are equal 9a: know how to use Le Chateliers principle to predict the effect of changes in concentration, temperature, and pressure.

Standard: Equilibrium

Write a reversible reaction. Describe the reaction in your own words in both the forward and reverse objectives/exit ticket directions. (Use figure 3)

Write three sentences describing changes to systems at equilibrium with changes to 1. concentration 2. temperature. 3. pressure with Le Chatelier's principle.

visual vocab

Completion Reaction (p. 496), Reversible reaction, chemical equilibrium , example (show/label figure 3)

Le Chatelier's Principle, concentration changes to Equilibrium, Temperature changes to equilibrium, Pressure changes to equilibrium Section Review: #1-3,6, 12 (see p. 518); Chapter Review: #7, 8, 18, 1921, 23, 55

problems

Section Review: #1-3; Chapter Review: #1, 2, 9

ch-19, 20 19-1: 678-682 712-16 Standard: Organic, 10a:large molecules Biochem (polymers) such as proteins, nucleic acids, and starch, are formed by repetitive combinations of simple subunits

725-

19-3: p. 696-701 10b: bonding characteristics of carbon relate to simple hydrocarbons and complex polymers and biomolecules

20-2: p. 71710c: Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins

16-2: 687-688 10d: system for naming hydrocarbons with single, double, and triple bonds; and a benzene ring

19-1: p. 683-686 10e: identify functional groups of hydrocarbons

objectives/exit ticket visual vocab

Draw/label these hydrocarbons, alkane, alkene, alkyne, aromatic hydrocarbon, benzene:

Draw/label these

Draw/label

draw/label substitution reaction, addition reaction, polymer, monomer, condensation reaction, elimination reaction,

draw/label protein, amino acid, polypeptide, peptide bond, primary structure, secondary structure, tertiary structure, quaternary structure, enzymes

draw/label table straight-chain alkanes( table 3): methane, ethane, propane, butane, pentane, hexane, heptane, octane, nonane, decane, saturated hydrocarbon, unsaturated hydrocarbon

draw/label table functional group, alcohols, ketones, ethers, amines, esters, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, amines, halide; table 4(p. 691)

(20-1) Carbohydrate, 20-3: nucleic acids, monosaccharide, DNA, RNA, gene disaccharide, polysaccharide, glucose, fructose, sucrose, hydrolysis, lipids, hydrophilic, hydrophobic

problems

ch-18 Standard: Nuclear Chem ch- 18 18-1 Standard: 11a: protons and Nuclear Chem neutrons are held together by strong forces that overcome electrostatic attraction objectives/exit Compare & contrast ticket electrostatic and strong nuclear forces 18-1 11b: energy released in nuclear reactions is much greater than in chemical reactions 18-2 11c: naturally occuring isotopes are radioactive 18-2 11d Types of radioactive decay (alpha, beta, gamma) & how the nucleus changes 18-2 11e: strength of alpha, beta, and gamma radiation 18-3 11f: Calculate amount of radioactive material remaining after a number of successive half-lives

Sample Problem A + Figure 12--Draw & practice problems #1- describe a nuclear 3 power plant

Sample problem B + practice problems #13; Sample Problem C + Practice problems #1-3 half-life, Figure 15 (Iodine -131 halflives), Figure 17 (Rate of Decay)

visual vocab

strong force, nucleons mass defect, E=mc^2 isotopes, radioactive, Radioactive decay Types of penetrations Radioactive decay (alpha, beta, gamma), by alpha, beta, and alpha particle, beta gamma (Table 1) particle, gamma ray, nuclear fission (Figure 12), nuclear fusion

problems

18-1: #1,2,4-6

18-2: #1,2,4

Write examples from Draw & describe text Table 1 with five sentences

Draw Table 2, and write about Carbon14, Iodine-131, and Uranium-238

a13x

syllabus syllabus

class rules class rules

sci method sci method solid.l.g, matter,mix, ph-ch prop.chg

a20 a27: 0135 x5

pretests.semester Set 1.1 1-d kinematics.ch 2 Set 1.2 Newton's 1st.1b laws ch4, Set1-3 Newton's 2nd.1c ch5

equip.measure

s12

s17x

set2.1 Newton's 3rd.1d ch6

s24.0135 O01

set2-2 gravit.law.1e ch12 set2-3 circular motion1f ch9

s26x

o8 o15 o22 o29 n5

set3-1.balance. Mole gravity.1g ch 10 3-2. 3-3. momentum ch7 4-1. impulse 4-2. Conservation of energy 4-3. c.e2 n20x 5-1. therma energy 5-2. entropy n21x

o18p'conf

n12 n19x n26 d3 d10finals d17 d24

n22x

d31 j7 j14 j21x j28 f4 f11 f18x f25 m4 m11 m18 m25 a1x a8 a15 a22 a29 ma6 ma13 ma20 ma27x Finals 10-2. 10-3. 11-1. 11-2. 11-3. 7-3. 8-1. 8-2. 8-3. x x 10-1. x x cahsee cahsee 7-1. electric field 7-2. 9-2. 6-1. waves1 6-2. waves2 9-1. waves3

safety safety

x31

PA#1Due PA#1Due

n23x

PA#2 Due

a 2.2-3

b 2.4-5

c 5.1,3

d 6.2-4

e 12.45,13.1,3

f 9.1-6

g 9.3

h 16.5

a 8.1-6

b 8.1-4

c 9.5-7

d 7.1-2

e 7.4

f 7.2

g 7.5

Standard 3

Main Idea Objectives EXIT TICKET ? My Answer:

Describe Demo video notes:

Activities/La bs ChapterSection Outline key vocab Figures Review Q's Plug & Chug Q's

3c. Students know the internal energy of an object includes the energy of random motion of the objects atoms and molecules, often referred to as thermal energy. The greater the temperature of the object, the greater the energy of motion of the atoms and molecules that make up the object. Read 21.1-5 Temperature and thermal energy understand internal energy Compare/Contrast Temperature and Heat

Thermometer demo; Celsius Scale (fig. 21.1) 0C=273K: 0K=-273C; heat absorbed=heat lost

Ch. 21.1-5

absolute zero, Celsius scale; Kelvin scale; Conversions From Celsius to Kelvin; Kelvin to Celsius; temperature; calorie, heat, internal energy; 21.1-2 K=C + 273; C=K-273 Review Q's: #1-8

3a. Students know heat flow and work are two forms of energy transfer between systems.

24.2

Effici

effici

effici

3b. Students know that the work done by a heat engine that is working in a cycle is the difference between the heat flow into the engine at high temperature and the heat flow out at a lower temperature (First Law of Thermodynamics) and that this is an example of the Law of Conservation 24.1-2 Main Idea: heat flow Objectives: follow flow of heat Exit ticket: compare/contrast: internal energy vs. work

Blow into your hands with puckered lips (close together). How is this different than blowing with a wide-opened mouth?

Rub your hands together. What type of energy is generated from the work done by your hands? Is this energy easily reversible? Outline: ch. 24:1-3

Vocab: thermodynmics, absolute zero, First Law of Thermodynamics, adiabatic Figures: 24:1-7 Review Q's: 1-12 Think & Explain: #2, 4

Exit ticket: compare/contrast: internal energy vs. work Efficiency=T.hot-T.cold/T.hot efficiency=0/400= 0% efficiency efficiency=400-0K/400K=1/1=100%

3d. Students know that most processes tend to decrease until thermal equilibrium regardless of the transfer mechanism the order of a system over time and that energy levels are eventually distributed uniformly. 24.6-7

3e. Students know that entropy is a quantity that measures the order or disorder of a system and that this quantity is larger for a more disordered system.

24.6-7 Main Idea: entropy Objectives: understand order and disorder Exit ticket: describe an area of instant entropy that you can influence

Outline ch 24.4-7

Carnot efficiency, Second law of thermodynamics, entropy Figures 9, 10, 13, 15, Review Q's: 13-25, Plug & chug: #1-4

Directions: KEEP everything you write on your paper (name + symbol) in your possession. KEEP all of your papers/notebooks, please! Write missing/new agendas below (preferably in order) in your notebook. They will be checked early Feb. Outline chapter sections (preferably in order). They will be checked in early Feb. Complete visual vocab booklet (word on front + definitions & diagrams/examples on back for full credit) KEEP these! Complete Exit tickets (preferably in order--they will be collected in early Feb) Complete problems & keep in your possession (name + symbol on all sheets; scribbled sheets need to be re-written) Turn in assignments from handouts and quiz questions to the sub. Sub: Plesase read assigned chapter/sections to students; write names of on-task students (book on desk/completing tasks/few distractions) Questions? Email me at patrick.a.quinlan@lausd.net thx!:)) 9-Jan 15-Jan 16-Jan 17-Jan Standard 4: a b c f Waves Conceptual Physics Chapter 22.1-5, 25.1-3 25.5-6 25.2-4 25.7-25.8

Standard

4a:Explain how waves 4b compare & carry energy, without contrast longitudinal net movement of and transverse matter waves

4c. Solve wave speed, frequency, and wavelength problems

Understand interference and standing waves

Show a solved What moves in a wave? problem identifying objectives/ exit What does "see the Matter? Energy? Both? & involving wave ticket new lamb" mean? Explain using models. speed, frequency, and wavelength conduction, conductor, convection, insulator, transverse wave, radiant energy, longitudinal wave, wave speed, speed radiation, vibration, wave speed of light, (frequency, crest, trough, period, equation, speed of v), wavelength, l) wave, wavelength, light (c ), frequency, amplitude, frequency, wavelength hertz Review Questions: #115 (ch. 22); #8 (ch. 25) Ch. 25 = RQ: #9-11; PC:#1-5; Think & Explain: #1-5 Ch. 25 = RQ: #9-11; PC:#1-5; Think & Explain: #1-5

Draw a diagram identifying visual vocab words below

visual vocab booklet

incident wave, in phase, out of phase, reflected wave, node, anti-node, standing wave, constructive interference, destructive interference

problems

Ch 25 = RQ 12-14

Directions: KEEP everything you write on your paper (name + symbol) in your possession. KEEP all of your papers/notebooks, please! Write missing/new agendas below (preferably in order) in your notebook. They will be checked early Feb. Outline chapter sections (preferably in order). They will be checked in early Feb. Complete visual vocab booklet (word on front + definitions & diagrams/examples on back for full credit) KEEP these! Complete Exit tickets (preferably in order--they will be collected in early Feb) Complete problems & keep in your possession (name + symbol on all sheets; scribbled sheets need to be re-written) Turn in assignments from handouts and quiz questions to the sub. Sub: Plesase read assigned chapter/sections to students; write names of on-task students (book on desk/completing tasks/few distractions) Questions? Email me at patrick.a.quinlan@lausd.net thx!:)) 22-Jan 23-Jan 24-Jan 25-Jan Standard 4: d f Sound Conceptual Physics Chapter 26.1-4 25.9-25.11 26.5-26.8 26.9-26.10

Standard

4d. Sound is a longitudinal Describe loudness, Describe the wave of regions of decibels, forced Doppler Effect, Bow compression and rarefaction vibrations, natural waves, Shock waves in a medium frequency, Resonance

Describe constructive and destructive Interference, beats

objectives/ exit ticket

Explain what happens to air (or sound) in a long room when a door opens/closes

Compare and contrast red shift and blue shift.

Compare and contrast loudness and intensity of sound

visual vocab booklet

compression, rarefaction, origin of sound, high pitch, low pitch, sound in air in a long room, media that transmit sound, speed of sound

Doppler Effect in water, Doppler effect in air, Bow waves in water, Shock waves from supersonic aircraft, red shift, blue shift, sonic boom

radio loudspeaker, sounding board, decibel, forced vibration, natural frequencies of small and large bells, resonance of tuning forks Ch. 26 = RQ:#10-16; Think & Explain #6-9

Wave interference for transverse and longitudinal waves,summarize Science, Technology, and Society: Noise and Your Health What are the dangers? What are damaging sources?

problems

Ch. 26 = RQ: # 1-9, Think & Ch. 25 = RQ: #15-20; Explain: #1-5; Think & solve: Think & Explain #6#1 10

Ch. 26 = RQ:#17-20: Think & Explain #10-12;

Directions: KEEP everything you write on your paper (name + symbol) in your possession. KEEP all of your papers/notebooks, please! Write missing/new agendas below (preferably in order) in your notebook. They will be checked early Feb. Outline chapter sections (preferably in order). They will be checked in early Feb. Complete visual vocab booklet (word on front + definitions & diagrams/examples on back for full credit) KEEP these! Complete Exit tickets (preferably in order--they will be collected in early Feb) Complete problems & keep in your possession (name + symbol on all sheets; scribbled sheets need to be re-written) Turn in assignments from handouts and quiz questions to the sub. Sub: Plesase read assigned chapter/sections to students; write names of on-task students (book on desk/completing tasks/few distractions) Questions? Email me at patrick.a.quinlan@lausd.net thx!:)) 29-Jan 30-Jan 31-Jan 1-Feb Standard 4: e f Light Conceptual Physics 27.1-3 27.4-6 27.7-8 ch. 28.1-3 ch.28.4-7 ch. 28.8-11 Chapter identify parts of Understand light, electromagnetic transparent, opaque spectrum and calculate materials and the index of refraction shadows Understand colors Understand how Understand the colors spectrum, colors by sunlight provides of the sky, sunsets, reflection, and colors for mixing, and water surfaces, and colors by complementary colors atomic spectra transmission Write a paragraph explaining the color of the sky, sunsets, and water surfaces. Keep it short so you can recite from memory.

ch. 31.1-2

Standard

Understand polarization

Understand diffraction

objectives/ exit ticket

Draw electromagnetic spectrum from radio waves to gamma rays

Show a diagram Compare and of two planes of contrast an umbra non-polarized and a penumbra light and polarized light

What is your favorite color?

what color can be added to your favorite color to get white light?

How does diffraction bend light?

visual vocab booklet

polarization, white light, colors electromagnetic effect of polaroid spectrum, colors by spectrum, opaque, penumbra, sunglasses at right reflection, and electromagnetic wave, ray, shadow, angles, rope colors by infrared, light year, transparent, umbra analogy of transmission, photon, ultraviolet, polarization, pigment, RQ:#9-19, Think & Explain:#4-8 RQ:#20-23, Think & Explain:#9-10 RQ: #1-7 Think & Explain:

additive primary colors, complementary colors, subtractive primary colors,

line spectrum, scatter, spectroscope,

Diffraction, Huyen's principle

problems

RQ:#1-8,

RQ: #8-15 Think & Explain: #1-11

RQ: #16-25 Think & Explain: #12-15

RQ: #1-5 Think & Explain: #1-3

Directions: KEEP everything you write on your paper (name + symbol) in your possession. KEEP all of your papers/notebooks, please! Write missing/new agendas below (preferably in order) in your notebook. They will be checked early Feb. Outline chapter sections (preferably in order). They will be checked in early Feb. Complete visual vocab booklet (word on front + definitions & diagrams/examples on back for full credit) KEEP these! Complete Exit tickets (preferably in order--they will be collected in early Feb) Complete problems & keep in your possession (name + symbol on all sheets; scribbled sheets need to be re-written) Turn in assignments from handouts and quiz questions to the sub. Sub: Plesase read assigned chapter/sections to students; write names of on-task students (book on desk/completing tasks/few distractions) Questions? Email me at patrick.a.quinlan@lausd.net thx!:)) 5-Feb 6-Feb 7-Feb 8-Feb Standard 4: Lenses Conceptual Physics Chapter ch.28.4-7 ch. 28.8-11 ch.30.1-2 ch.30.3-4 ch. 30.5-8

Standard

Understand how Understand the colors Understand converging Understand how light Understand how to sunlight provides of the sky, sunsets, and diverging lenses, & travels through optical construct images thru colors for mixing, and water surfaces, and images formed by a instruments and the ray diagrams complementary colors atomic spectra lens eye

Write a paragraph what color can be explaining the color of added to your favorite the sky, sunsets, and objectives/ exit ticket color to get white water surfaces. Keep it light? short so you can recite from memory.

Describe how a magnifying glass works.

In complete sentences, describe how the Compare and contrast image appears using nearsighted and focal length and farsighted vision magnification

focal length, focal additive primary colors, point, focal plane, lens, complementary colors, line spectrum, scatter, principal axis, real visual vocab booklet subtractive primary spectroscope, image, virtual image, colors, converging lens, diverging lens RQ: #8-15 Think & Explain: #1-11 RQ: #16-25 Think & Explain: #12-15 RQ: #1-3 Think & Explain: #1-3

ray diagram

aberration, astigmatism, cornea, eyepiece, farsighted, iris, nearsighted, objective lens, pupil, retina RQ: #11-12 Think & Explain: #7-14

problems

RQ: #4-6 Think & Explain: #4-9

Directions: KEEP everything you write on your paper (name + symbol) in your possession. KEEP all of your papers/notebooks, please! Write missing/new agendas below (preferably in order) in your notebook. They will be checked early Feb. Outline chapter sections (preferably in order). They will be checked in early Feb. Complete visual vocab booklet (word on front + definitions & diagrams/examples on back for full credit) KEEP these! Complete Exit tickets (preferably in order--they will be collected in early Feb) Complete problems & keep in your possession (name + symbol on all sheets; scribbled sheets need to be re-written) Turn in assignments from handouts and quiz questions to the sub. Sub: Plesase read assigned chapter/sections to students; write names of on-task students (book on desk/completing tasks/few distractions) Questions? Email me at patrick.a.quinlan@lausd.net thx!:)) 12-Feb 13-Feb 14-Feb 15-Feb Standard 4: Lenses Conceptual Physics Chapter ch. 30.5-8 ch. 31.1-2 Partners: Standard + vocab + Check posters: students explain + diagrams on hanging poster others read exit ticket responses

Standard

Understand how light travels through optical instruments and the eye

Understand diffraction

Check HW, VV, and Ets

objectives/ exit ticket

Compare and contrast nearsighted and farsighted vision

How does diffraction bend light?

visual vocab booklet

aberration, astigmatism, cornea, eyepiece, farsighted, Diffraction, Huyen's principle iris, nearsighted, objective lens, pupil, retina

problems

RQ: #11-12 Think & Explain: RQ: #1-5 Think & Explain: #1#7-14 3

ch. 31.3-6

ch.31.7-8

Special topics: interference, rainbow effects, lasers, and holograms

lasers & hologram

RQ: Think & Explain:

RQ: Think & Explain:

a Standard 5: 5a Electric Current Conceptual Physics 33.4-6 Chapter Standard 5a. Relate the flow of charge in a closed circuit to the difference in electric potential (voltage) between two points

b 5b 34.2-4 ch. 34

c 5c 35.1-.6 35.7

e 5e 32.1-3

Describe how current flows

Understand AC/DC

Understand Series Understand fuses and Parallel

5e-know how to solve problems involving the forces between two electric charges at a distance

objectives/ exit ticket

Describe how a Describe Ohm's Law capacitor works, with a mentioning current, labelled diagram voltage, and resistance

Describe how power is measured and charged to consumers electric power, diode, direct current, alternating current, Watt

visual vocab booklet

electric potential, volt, potential difference, voltage, capacitor ampere, electric current, voltage source, electric resistance, ohm, ohm's Law, Review Questions #11- RQ#1-11; Think & 12, Think &Explain #9 Explain: #1-7, Plug & Chug #1-8

Describe how voltage and resistance differ in series and in parallel circuits in series, in parallel,

What happens when #11a,b: How is Coulomb's you blow a fuse? Fuse law similar to Newton's Lab Law of Gravitation? How are they different? Fuse Lab Write-up electrostatics, electrical forces, charge, conservation of charge, Coulomb, Coulomb's Law

problems

RQ: #18-25, Think & Review Q: #1-8, Results/Conclusions Solve #1-6, Think & Plug & Chug 1-2, at the end of lab. Explain #1-6 Think & Explain #16

Review Questions (RQ): #1-15; Think & Explain #13

d Find

Conceptual Physics Chapter Standard

36.2-5

36.6-7; 37.7, AP phys.141 37.1-8

17.9

physicsclassroom.com (http://bit.ly/WJ2BjK) Atomic Theory

5f-Explain moving electric charges produce magnetic fields; 5jDescribe the nature of both electric and magnetic fields Draw/explain what happens to: (1) iron in a magnetic field; (2) a compass (North-South) in a magnetic field electromagnet, magnetic domain, magnetic field, magnetic pole,

Apply the right hand rule to find the direction of a magnetic field produced by a current carrying wire

5h-Apply Lenzs law that the direction of induced current is always such that it opposes the changing magnetic field that caused it. Demo & lab: Explain how the bulb lights without a battery. Is it a generator or a motor?

objectives/ exit ticket

Compare and contrast the magnetic field and electric fields produced by a straight coil. right hand rule; F=v x sinB

visual vocab booklet

electromagnetic induction, Faraday's law, generator, transformer

plasma

problems

Ch.36: RQ: #1-20, Think & cst.physics: #85,86 Explain: #1-10

http://bit.ly/XSWSlW

STANDARD #1: ATOMIC & ATOMIC NUMBER METALS, NONMOLECULAR AND ATOMIC MASS, METALS, SEMISTRUCTURE ISOTOPES METALS 100 100 200 200 300 300 400 400 500 500 200 400 600 800 1000 200 400 600 800 1000

ALKALI METALS, ALKALINE EARTH, TRANSITION METALS; HALOGENS; ATOMIC SIZE, VALENCE ELECTRONEGATIVI ELECTRONS, TY TRENDS OCTET RULE 100 100 200 200 300 300 400 400 500 500 200 400 600 800 1000 200 400 600 800 1000
Charges: +1 in G_ _ _ _ 1; +2 in G_ _ _ _ 2; +3 in G_ _ _ _ 13; +4/-4 in G_ _ _ _ 14; -3 in G_ _ _ _ 15; -2 in G_ _ _ _ 16; -1 in G_ _ _ _ 17; 0 In G_ _ _ _ 18

ATOMIC SIZE, LOCATION OF MOST OF THE MASS 100 200 300 400 500 200 400 600 800 1000

ELECTRON ORBITALS, ACTINIDES/ THOMSON, LANTHANIDES/ RUTHERFORD, TRANSURANIUM BOHR MODELS 100 200 300 400 500 200 400 600 800 1000

100 200 300 400 500 200 400 600 800 1000

Metals-on left side of the s_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ on the p_ _ _ Atomic number-the number of _ _ _ _ t_ _ _ _ ; and lose e_ p_ _ _ _ _ _ in every e_ _ _ _ _ _ ; _ _ _ _ _ _; Alkali m_ _ _ _; in G_ _ _ _ 1

Density of an atom-the n_ _ _ _ _ _ contains most of the m_ _ _ and very little Actinides-found in the f-orbital of its v_ _ _ _ _ with the e_ _ _ _ _ _ U_ _ _ _ _ _

Bohrs theory-explained why excited hydrogen gas gives off certain c_ _ _ _ _ of light; e_ _ _ _ _ _ _ absorb energy to change from a ground state to an excited state.

Elements (on the P_ _ _ _ _ _ _ T_ _ _ _) either lose valence e_ _ _ _ _ _ _ (one in G_ _ _ _ 1; two in G_ _ _ _ 2; three in G_ _ _ _ 13; 4 in G_ _ _ _ 14; or gain e_ _ _ _ _ _ _ (three in G_ _ _ _ 15; Isotopes-show atomic m_ _ _ in Non-metals-on right side of two in G_ _ _ _ 16; superscript and atomic n_ _ _ _ _ the s_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _; have one in G_ _ _ _ 17; in the subscript on the left side; one less e_ _ _ _ _ _ _ than and zero in G_ _ _ _ Electron-has a m_ _ _ have different numbers of n_ _ _ the ions; the ions have a Alkaline Earth m_ _ _ _ ; in G_ 18 to achieve a noble equal to 1/2000 of a p _ _ ____. smaller r_ _ _ _ (size). ___2 gas configuration _ _ _.

Electron orbital configurations-sorbitals in g _ _ _ _ 1 & 2 hold 2 e_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _; p-orbitals in g_ _ _ _ 13-18 (hold 6 e_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _); d-orbitals in g_ _ _ _ 3-12 (hold 10 e_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _); forbitals at the bottom of the P_ _ _ _ _ _ _ T_ _ _ _) hold 14 e_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _)

Gold-foil experiment-found an atom is mostly empty s_ _ _ _, and the n_ _ _ _ _ _ is positively charged.

Mass number-the same as the atomic m_ _ _ , the number of p_ _ _ _ _ _ and n_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _.

Electron affinity- a trend in the properties of elements in g_ _ _ _ _ (vertical) and p_ _ _ _ _ _ (horizontal)

Group 17- only need one e_ _ _ _ _ _ _ to fill their outer energy level.

Lanthanides--found in the fQuantized-atoms in an energy orbital with the e_ _ _ _ _ _ C_ _ _ level have discrete e_ _ _ _ _ __ levels

Neutral atoms-have the same number of p_ _ _ _ _ _ and e_ _ _ _ _ _ _ , but may have different number of neutrons( called isotopes).

Noble gases- do not form bonds since they Fluorine-has the highest e_ _ _ follow the octet rule _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ , and and have e_ _ _ _ (#) has the greatest tendency to electrons; in g_ _ _ _ gain e_ _ _ _ _ _ _ 18. Groups-have the same number of e_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ , and similar Octet rule-the properties, and are vertical outermost s and _ (run from t_ _ to b_ _ _ _ _ ) orbitals are filled

Neutral charge-atoms that have the same number of p_ _ _ _ _ _ and e_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _. Neutrons- found by subtracting (atomic m_ _ _ - number of p_ _ _ _ _ ); have a mass approximately equal to a p_ _ _ _ _ , or one atomic mass unit.

Protons-determine the properties of e_ _ _ _ _ _

Positive ions-form when atoms lose e_ _ Halogen- n_ _ -_ _ _ _ _ _ in G_ _ _ _ _ _; and the size _ _ _ 17 increases Valence (outer) _ _ _ _ _ _ _: 1 in G_ _ _ _ 1; 2 in G_ _ _ _ 2; 3 in G_ _ _ _ 13; 4 in G_ _ _ _ 14; 5 in G_ _ _ _ 15; 6 Transition metals-found in the in G_ _ _ _ 16; 7 in G_ m_ _ _ _ _ of the P_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 17; 8 In G_ _ _ _ T_ _ _ _); g_ _ _ _ 3-12; 18 Chemical properties-similar for e_ _ _ _ _ _ _ in the same g_ _ _ _ . Compare two e_ _ _ _ _ _ , it is whether they react or not with oxygen in the air.

standard 2 Bonding 100 200 300 400 500 200 400 600 800 1000

atoms form molecules by covalent & metallic bonds (share e-s), and ionic bonds (lose/gain e-s) 100 200 300 400 500 200 400 600 800 1000

Covalent bonds in diatomic, biomolecules, CHONPS 100 200 300 400 500 200 400 600 800 1000

Salt crystals are held together by ionic bonds (attraction between positive and negative ions) 100 200 300 400 500 200 400 600 800 1000

atoms & molecules in liquids move in patterns, gases move randomly Lewis dot structures Reactions 100 100 200 200 300 300 400 400 500 500 200 400 600 800 1000 200 400 600 800 1000

100 200 300 400 500 200 400 600 800 1000

Ionic bonds-(between m_ _ _ _ _ Non-polar covalent and n_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ), and Covalent bond- (between two n_ bondbetween two identical a_ between ions of opposite charge Chemical energyheld in a b_ _ _ -_ _ _ _ _ _ ) _ _ _ that are n_ _ -_ _ _ _ _ _ that attract _ between two or more atoms

Lewis Structures-the element Nitrogen has a lone pair of e_ _ _ _ _ _ _; e_ _ _ _ _ _ _ s are shown as dots

Chemical changes-a s_ _ _ _ forms; a change of c_ _ _ _ ; evolution of a g_ _; there is a change in t_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ; a different s_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ forms

Compounds-composed of two or Polar Covalent bondbetween more e_ _ _ _ _ _ _ , chemically two different a_ _ _ _ that are n_ combined. _ -_ _ _ _ _ _

Ionic compounds-have a higher melting point because there is a higher attractive f_ _ _ _ between the ions; do not conduct electricity as a s_ _ _ _ , only when melted or in a s_ _ _ _ _ _ _ .

combustion reaction-reaction with o_ _ _ _ _ and release of heat

Difference in electronegativity determines bondsnon-polar covalent is at zero-0.1; polar covalent between 0.1 1.5; i_ _ _ _ between 1.5-3.0

Double displacement- two e_ _ _ _ _ _ or g_ _ _ _ _ are exchanged in a chemical reaction

Electron configurationsfor ionic bonds, m_ _ _ _ _ lose e_ _ _ _ _ _ _ , and n _ _ -_ _ _ _ _ _ gain e _ _ _ _ _ _ becoming similar to noble gases

Reactions-combustion, doubledisplacement, synthesis, single displacement

Oxides-have a n_ _ _ _ _ _ _ 2 charge

standard 3 100 200 300 400 500 200 400 600 800 1000

balanced equations 100 200 300 400 500 200 400 600 800 1000

mole is the number of Carbon-12 atoms one mole is 6.02 x in 12 grams of 10^23 atoms or Carbon-12 molecules 100 100 200 200 300 300 400 400 500 500 200 400 600 800 1000 200 400 600 800 1000

molar mass is number of protons and neutrons (on periodic table), the mass in one mole 100 200 300 400 500 200 400 600 800 1000

Law of Conservation of mass same a_ _ _ _ on both sides of a balanced equation; the m_ _ _ of Mole-for every element, there the reactants is equal to the m_ _ are the same number of a_ _ _ _ _ of the products ( _._ _ x 10^_ _)

Avogadros number: _._ _ x 10^_ Molar mass-the mass of one m_ _ _ _

Coefficients-the n_ _ _ _ _ _ in front of the elements or compounds

Molar Mass-calculate for molecules (add m_ _ _ of all e_ _ _ _ _ _ _, multiply by s_ _ _ _ _ _ _ __)

Balancing equations-adjust the c_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ to balance the equation

Compounds elements-balance positive and negative charges by changing the s_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _