Making Sense of the Housing and the Economy

John V. Duca Vice President & Senior Policy Advisor Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas*
* The views expressed are those of the author, and are not necessarily those of 

the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas or of the Federal Reserve System.

Some Links to Relevant Articles
John V. Duca, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas
Reopening America’s Financial Arteries: Addressing the Recent  Financial Crisis (forthcoming, Dallas Fed Economic Letter, by  DiMartino, Duca, & Renier) http://dallasfed.org/research/eclett/ • From Complacency to Crisis: Financial Risk‐Taking in the Early 21st Century (Dec. 2007): •
http://dallasfed.org/research/eclett/2007/el0712.pdf

• • • • •

The Rise and Fall of Subprime Mortgages (Nov. 2007):
http://dallasfed.org/research/eclett/2007/el0711.pdf

Making Sense of the U.S. Housing Slowdown (Nov. 2006):
http://dallasfed.org/research/eclett/2006/el0611.pdf

The Housing Market, After the Boom (July 2007):
http://dallasfed.org/research/swe/2007/swe0703e.pdf

Making Sense of Elevated Housing Prices (fall 2005):
http://www.dallasfed.org/research/swe/2005/swe0505b.pdf

Early Signs of Home Overvaluation Emerging (spring 2004):
http://www.dallasfed.org/research/swe/2004/swe0402.pdf

Housing Permits Point to Some Further Home Construction Declines

Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis, U.S. Census and author’s calculations.

Outline
• The housing slowdown
– First mortgage interest rates  – Then credit standards (subprime crunch) – And now the financial/credit crisis

• Some regional observations • Conclusion

Housing Booms and then Falls
Mortgage rates start rising

Source: National Association of Realtors, U.S. Census and author’s calculations.

Housing Booms and then Falls: First Interest Rates
Mortgage rates start rising Mainly  Mortgage‐ rate effects

Source: National Association of Realtors, U.S. Census and author’s calculations.

Housing Booms and then Falls: Then the Subprime Crunch
Mortgage rates start rising

Subprime  crunch hits

Source: National Association of Realtors, U.S. Census and author’s calculations.

Subprime Mortgages
• Low credit scores, low downpayment, high debt  burdens • Around 13% of outstanding mortgages • But strong growth large effect on housing boom:
– Subprime originations $120 B (‘00) to $620 B (‘06) – 6% of new mortgages in 2000 to 24% in 2006 – 40% new mortgages in 2006 subprime or Alt A • 5% to 6% of homes sold per year, big effect of nonprime  mortgages on market prices of homes used for lending

Subprime & “Alt A” Share of Mortgage  Originations Jump (Goldman Sachs)

2.3

Source: Goldman Sachs, US Economics Analyst, Feb. 23, 2007, Andrew Tilton.

Mortgage Financial Flows 1950s‐70s
Funding  Sources Funding Uses

Savers/Investors

Prime Mortgage  Borrowers

De po s

it s

Banks

s e age im g P r o rt M

Mortgage Financial Flows 1980s‐90s
Funding  Sources Mortgage Originators Funding Uses

Pr Mo ime rtg ag es

Buy

Ss  MB E  GS

Savers/Investors

Prime Mortgage  Borrowers

De po s

it s

Banks

s e age im g P r o rt M

Mortgage Financial Flows 2000‐06
1st Innovation:  Credit‐scoring
t.A / Al e prim gages Sub ort M

Mortgage Originators

Nonprime  Mortgage Borrowers

Pr Mo ime rtg ag es

Su Mo bprim rtg e/ ag Alt es .A

Buy

Ss  MB E  GS

Savers/Investors

Prime Mortgage  Borrowers

De po s

it s

Banks

s e age im g P r o rt M

Mortgage Financial Flows 2000‐06
1st Innovation:  Credit‐scoring 2nd Innovation:  Structured Finance
Ss uy  te MB B a Priv Ss  MB E  GS

Mortgage Originators

t.A / Al e prim gages Sub ort M

Nonprime  Mortgage Borrowers

Pr Mo ime rtg ag es

Su Mo bprim rtg e/ ag Alt es .A

Buy

Savers/Investors

Prime Mortgage  Borrowers

De po s

it s

Banks

s e age im g P r o rt M

Structured Finance: Achilles Heel of funding subprime securities • Investors use new instruments to protect  against default risk, but little history • Make mortgage credit flows vulnerable to  market reassessment of default risk • Over‐optimism; mistakenly saw low  unemployment => low subprime losses 

Low‐Rated Tranches to Protect High Rated  CDOs from Default Losses
Last Loss

Aaa Pools of  Subprime Pools of  Mortgages Subprime Mortgages Loss Position

Aa A Baa Ba B Equity

First Loss

Source: Author modified from Commercial Mortgage Securities Association

Low‐Rated Tranches to Protect High Rated  CDOs from Default Losses

Aaa Pools of  Subprime Pools of  Mortgages Subprime Mortgages

Aa A Baa Ba B Equity Pre‐2006 forecasts subprime defaults
Source: Author modified from Commercial Mortgage Securities Association

Late Mortgages More Prevalent

Source: Mortgage Bankers Association.

Structured Finance: Achilles Heel of funding subprime securities • Investors use new instruments to protect  against default risk, but little history • Make mortgage credit flows vulnerable to  market reassessment of default risk • Over‐optimism; mistakenly saw low  unemployment => low subprime losses • Over‐looked role of temporary surge in home  prices and low interest rates

Late Mortgages More Prevalent

Source: Mortgage Bankers Association.

Late Mortgages More Prevalent

Source: Mortgage Bankers Association.

Low‐Rated Tranches to Protect High Rated  CDOs from Default Losses

Aaa Pools of  Subprime Pools of  Mortgages Subprime Mortgages

Aa A Baa Ba B Equity Pre‐2006 forecasts subprime defaults
Source: Author modified from Commercial Mortgage Securities Association

Unexpected Subprime Losses Pose Risk to High  “Rated” CDO Tranches

Aaa Pools of  Subprime Pools of  Mortgages Subprime Mortgages

Aa A Baa Ba B Equity Much larger actual subprime defaults
Source: Author modified from Commercial Mortgage Securities Association

Unexpected Subprime Losses Pose Risk to High  “Rated” CDO Tranches

Junk? Pools of  Subprime Mortgages

Aaa

Junk? Junk? Junk?

Aa A Baa Ba B Equity

Much larger actual subprime defaults
Source: Author modified from Commercial Mortgage Securities Association

Subprime Mortgage Credit Crunch
t.A / Al e prim gages Sub ort M

Ss uy  te MB B a Priv Ss  MB E  GS

Originators of Securitized Mortgages

Nonprime  Mortgage Borrowers

Pr Mo ime rtg ag es

Su Mo bprim rtg e/ ag Alt es .A

Buy

Savers/Investors

Prime Mortgage  Borrowers

De po s

it s

Banks

s e age im g P r o rt M

Effects from Mortgage & Other Losses on  Financial Activity
• Mortgage losses lower capital cushions • Mortgage losses and opaqueness of new  financial products create uncertainty, hurts  inter‐bank loans, “counter‐party risk” • Banks severely tighten credit standards

Banks Tighten Credit Standards on All  Types of Loans
Net % tightening credit  standards over 3 months on: Prime mortgages Real  Estate Subprime mortgages Commercial real estate Busi‐ ness Business loans (large/med firms) Business loans (small firms) Consumer loans (noncred. card) Willingness to make consumer installment loans (back to 1967) April  2007 15% 56% 30% ‐4%  2% 8% +8% Oct. 2007 41% 56% 50% 19%  10% 26% ‐6% Oct. 2008 70% 100% 87% 84%  75% 64% ‐47% Jan. 2009 47% 56% 79% 64% 69% 58% ‐16%

Cons‐ C&I umer

Housing Booms and then Falls: Now the Financial/Credit Crisis
Mortgage rates start rising

General  Financial/Credit  Crisis hits

Source: National Association of Realtors, U.S. Census and author’s calculations.

The Main Arteries Funding Home Mortgages
Banks

De

s sit po

Ho m e M

or

tg ag es

Savers &  Investors

Nondeposit funded  Mortgage Originators

Home Mortgages
Borrowers

Di re

Buy GSE RMBS

ct  i

nv e

stm

en t

Securities  Markets

Blockages Affecting the Funding of Home Mortgages
Banks

De

s sit po

Ho m e M

or

Loan losses capital constraints

tg ag es

Savers &  Investors

Nondeposit funded  Mortgage Originators

Home Mortgages
Borrowers

Di re

Liquidity of MBSs

ct  i

nv e

stm

en t

Securities  Markets

Fed Actions Lower MBS Liquidity Risk Premiums, Help Reopen Arteries Funding Home Mortgages
Banks

De

s sit po

Ho m e M

or

tg ag es

Savers &  Investors

GSE RMBS
Bu y t re a su rie s en t
Fed &  Treasur y

Nondeposit funded  Mortgage Originators

Home Mortgages
Borrowers

Di re

Buy GSE RMBS

ct  i

nv e

stm

Securities  Markets

Mortgage Rates and Some Mortgage Spreads Have Also Fallen After Fed Measures Were Announced

4.87 4.38

49bp

145bp 2.93

Home Prices: from Rapid Appreciation to Declines

Source: National Association of Realtors, Freddie Mac and S&P/Case‐Shiller.

New Home Inventories At Record Highs, Will Weigh On Home Prices

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Mortgage Foreclosures Jump, Likely to Weigh on Home Prices

Why Our Regional Economy Had  Outperformed the Nation
• Better business climate & low cost of living • Texas consumer spending less dependent on  people spending home price gains • Result: job growth outperforming the U.S. • Although helping national economy, fallback  in energy prices may slow TX

Home Prices Had Risen Faster in Coastal Regions

Source: Freddie Mac and author’s calculations.

Home Prices Had Risen Faster in Coastal Regions

Austin

Source: Freddie Mac and author’s calculations.

Housing affordability recovers some in coastal areas, but largely  due to price declines

U.S. LA New York San Fran. Miami Atlanta Dallas

1999:q4 2006:q4 2008:q4 64% 42% 62% 43% 2% 27% 55% 5% 14% 11% 8% 21% 59% 10% 33% 73% 68% 75% 64% 62% 68%

% Home Price Change 07:3-08:3

-6% -22% -5% -9% -19% -2% +3%

Source: National Association of Home Builders and Wells Fargo, housing opportunity index and Freddie Mac repeat home price index (data from mortgage refinancings included) for metro areas. Percent of homes sold that are affordable to families earning the  median income of that area, putting 10% down, using a 30‐year conventional mortgage, and having mortgage payments no higher  than 28% of income.

Dallas Job Growth Outperforming the U.S. Again, But  Slowing Ahead of Current Financial Crisis
Percent, year/year

Tech Wreck Years

U.S.

Texas
Oil Bust Years

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics and author’s calculations.

Dallas Job Growth Outperforming the U.S. Again, But  Slowing Ahead of Current Financial Crisis
Percent, year/year

Dallas

Tech Wreck Years

U.S.

Texas
Oil Bust Years

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics and author’s calculations.

Summary
• • • • • • Credit boom‐bust behind the housing boom and bust Subprime/Alt A bust hurts housing unevenly across US General financial and credit crisis affecting all interest‐ rate and finance‐sensitive sectors Some success in reopening credit to prime borrowers Housing affordability and pro‐growth policies cushion  housing and economic downturn in Texas 4 down‐legs to housing bust: (1) mortgage rate swing  (since summer ’05), (2) subprime credit crunch (since  early ’07), (3) falling house prices and weak job mkt (since late ‘07), and (4) general financial/credit crisis Much depends on healing the financial system,  stabilizing the economy, and jump‐starting a recovery

Exposure to Nonprime Mortgage Bust Varied Some:  Subprime & Alt A Borrowers Big Share of Home  Builder Revenues in 2006
Subprime Alternative Combined share A share U.S. California Florida Texas 21% 25% 24% 22% 21% 30% 23% 13% 42% 55% 47% 35%

Source: Credit Suisse Report, “Mortgage Liquidity Du Jour: Underestimated No More,” March 13, 2007.

After Directly Raising GDP Growth, Housing  Subtracts

Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis.