P. 1
The Migration Period, southern Denmark and the North Sea

The Migration Period, southern Denmark and the North Sea

5.0

|Views: 2,087|Likes:
The topic of this workbook, written by staff and students of the Maritime Archaeology Programme, is the Gredstedbro ship from the 7th century. The ship was found in 1945 during a normalization project on the stream Kongeåen (”King’s river”) in Southwest Jutland. Originally interpreted as remains of a bridge, a few pieces of the wood were torn off and stored at the museum in Ribe, and the location forgotten. Only 20 years later the timbers were recognized as ship timbers, but the parts that are still out there have yet to be found.

Pending further work on the site, the workbook covers aspects of the landscape, the cultural, social and political environment of the Early Middle Ages, and compares the timbers from Gredstedbro to other contemporary ship finds from Northern Europe. Ship finds from this period are rare, but in construction and dimensions, the Gredstedbro ship seems best to resemble the Sutton Hoo ship.
The topic of this workbook, written by staff and students of the Maritime Archaeology Programme, is the Gredstedbro ship from the 7th century. The ship was found in 1945 during a normalization project on the stream Kongeåen (”King’s river”) in Southwest Jutland. Originally interpreted as remains of a bridge, a few pieces of the wood were torn off and stored at the museum in Ribe, and the location forgotten. Only 20 years later the timbers were recognized as ship timbers, but the parts that are still out there have yet to be found.

Pending further work on the site, the workbook covers aspects of the landscape, the cultural, social and political environment of the Early Middle Ages, and compares the timbers from Gredstedbro to other contemporary ship finds from Northern Europe. Ship finds from this period are rare, but in construction and dimensions, the Gredstedbro ship seems best to resemble the Sutton Hoo ship.

More info:

Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial No-derivs

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/07/2013

pdf

text

original

Objects that are considered common to the Germanic people and that are not
the result of trade are found all over northern Europe (Hedeager 1992, 289-
292, 294).

During the migration period bracteates were a political medium. They are
related to great feasts and to oaths of loyalty. They centre around southern
Scandinavia but are distributed from England to Hungary and Ukraine.
Other objects/symbols that spread among Germanic peoples outside
Scandinavia are bracelets and neck-rings of solid gold, brooches of
Scandinavian type and double-edged display swords. In the Merovingian
period the ring sword and the parade helmet become the symbol of a warrior
aristocracy.

In decorations the development of a symbolic Scandinavian animal art
can be observed from the migration period onwards to the Christianization
of Scandinavia. The styles spread over the continent and southern England
and served as an ethnic and religious symbolic metaphor.

According to Hedeager (1992) these symbols occurred mainly at the
borders between two political systems or in periods of political competition.
Symbols of power were used in burials when a new elite was being
established. Consolidated elites preferred offerings to the gods in the form
of hoards.

The cultural affinities among Germanic peoples can also be recognized in
other aspects of cultural life like the burial or house building traditions. The
ship burials found in England and Holland can for instance be related to the
Scandinavian practice.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->