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July 2013

July 2013

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Published by FiremensGrapevine
Official monthly publication of the Los Angeles Fire Department, owned and operated by the Los Angeles Firemen's Relief Association including the Widows, Orphans & Disabled Firemen's Fund.
Official monthly publication of the Los Angeles Fire Department, owned and operated by the Los Angeles Firemen's Relief Association including the Widows, Orphans & Disabled Firemen's Fund.

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03/24/2015

Benetting

MountainGate Country Club
September 23, 2013
FIRST IN OR CLOSEST TO THE HOLE
COURTESY OF
GRAND PRIZE
2ND PRIZE
3RD PRIZE
4TH PRIZE
COURTESY OF
Apple iPad
PAYMENT INFORMATION
First Name: Last Name: TOTAL AMOUNT:
Card Holder’s Address: City: State: Zip:
Card Holder’s Phone: Email:
Visa MC AMEX Discover Credit Card No: Exp. Date: *CVV2 No:
Check Enclosed (Payable to Widows, Orphans & Disabled Firemen’s Fund) Signature:
MAIL TO: Widows, Orphans & Disabled Firemen’s Fund
Development & Marketng Department. ATTN: M. Casillas PO Box 41903 - Los Angeles CA 90041
( 323) 259- 5215
Winner Need Not be Present to Win.
participants will receive Ticket stubs by mail prior to event.
(*Required)
Entries must be received by Wednesday, September 16, 2013.
$10 per ball
$20 for 3 balls
$50 for 7 balls
$100 for 20 balls
Home
Cell
Work
Home
Work
Benetting
MountainGate Country Club
September 23, 2013
FIRST IN OR CLOSEST TO THE HOLE
COURTESY OF
GRAND PRIZE
2ND PRIZE
3RD PRIZE
4TH PRIZE
COURTESY OF
Apple iPad
PAYMENT INFORMATION
First Name: Last Name: TOTAL AMOUNT:
Card Holder’s Address: City: State: Zip:
Card Holder’s Phone: Email:
Visa MC AMEX Discover Credit Card No: Exp. Date: *CVV2 No:
Check Enclosed (Payable to Widows, Orphans & Disabled Firemen’s Fund) Signature:
MAIL TO: Widows, Orphans & Disabled Firemen’s Fund
Development & Marketng Department. ATTN: M. Casillas PO Box 41903 - Los Angeles CA 90041
( 323) 259- 5215
Winner Need Not be Present to Win.
participants will receive Ticket stubs by mail prior to event.
(*Required)
Entries must be received by Wednesday, September 16, 2013.
$10 per ball
$20 for 3 balls
$50 for 7 balls
$100 for 20 balls
Home
Cell
Work
Home
Work
2 • July 2013
Los Angeles Firemen’s Relief Association Medical Plan may
cover this examination. Contact your plan provider to verify.
Paid Advertisement:
July 2013 • 3
30
On the cover:
Structure Fire - South LA
Photo by:
Rick McClure, EPN
Lane Kemper SoftbaLL CLaSSiC
On a Wednesday in May, 28 frehouse teams gathered in Lane
Kemper’s memory to play softball, eat, drink and laugh for a few
hours in the spirit of camaraderie and friendly competition • . . . 08
Lafra SoCaL reunion
This year the reunion fnally came home with fve days of fun
and friendship in nearby Temecula at the Pechanga Resort
and Casino property • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 06
fire Station 29 CeLebrateS 100 YearS of ServiCe
100 years to the very day, 29’s marked its anniversary of
service to Korea Town and Hancock Park with a pancake
breakfast for alumni and friends • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
President’s Message • ................................................................................05
Battalion News • ..........................................................................................13
Retired Guys • .............................................................................................23
LAFD Handball
CARLOS AND STEINER WIN “A” DIVISION • ........................................................25
Firefghter Team Races in Mexico • .............................................................26
11
th
Annual “Z Awards for ExZellence” • .......................................................29
Department in Action • ................................................................................30
Fire Service Day 2013 • ...............................................................................33
Retirement Dinners
ROGER CAMUNAS • ......................................................................................35
DEBBIE BROWN & GLENN OLSON • .................................................................37
Retirement Dinner Announcements • ..........................................................38
Station Fridge • ...........................................................................................42
From the Files of the Arson Squad
FIRE-OUT YIELDS 8-YEAR PRISON TERM • ..........................................................43
Mailbox • .....................................................................................................44
Memorials • .................................................................................................47
Dollars & Sense • ........................................................................................49
LAFD History
PIONEERING UNDERWATER FIREFIGHTERS • ......................................................50
Minutes of the Board of Trustees • ..............................................................54
Classifeds • ................................................................................................57
Tailboard • ...................................................................................................61
Vol. lXXXIX JUlY 2013 No. 12
• FEAtuRES • • CONtENtS •
COPYRIGHT © 2013
Los Angeles Firemen’s Relief Association.
No material may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher.
Notice: Production of The Firemen’s Grapevine magazine is very expensive, and while your dues
serve to underwrite a portion of the magazine’s costs, the bulk of funding comes from advertisers.
Many businesses advertise in the Grapevine. This does not mean that LAFRA endorses these
advertisers. Use of a Grapevine advertiser is at the risk of the member. If you are interested in any
of the advertisements, we urge you to use any and all means at your disposal to investigate them.
Follow us on Facebook
www.facebook.com/fremensgrapevine
4 • July 2013
Paid Advertisements:
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310-267-5959/ e-mail: cpc@mednet.ucla.edu
www.cpc.mednet.ucla.edu
FIREMEN’S GRAPEVINE
owned and published by the
Los Angeles Firemen’s Relief Association
815 Colorado Blvd, 4th Floor, los angeles Ca 90041
EdItoRIAL StAFF
dave Wagner • Editor..........................................................editor@lafra.org
Juan-Carlos Sánchez • Project Coordinator................jcsanchez@lafra.org
Eric Santiago • Creative Editor.....................................esantiago@lafra.org
david Vienna • Web/Social Media Editor...........................dvienna@lafra.org
display Advertising....................................(323) 259-5200 ext. 231, 232, 260
PSo’s
Matt Spence, Brian HuMpHrey, erik Scott
CoNtRIbutING WRItERS
Mike MaStro, Frank Borden, Marc eckStein M.d.,
JoHn MittendorF, MicHael SteFano, Monte egHerMan, Jody HouSer
PHotoGRAPHERS
david Blaire, doc deMulle’, keitH culloM, roB curtiS, Harry garvin,
Juan guerra, Brian HaiMer, gavin kauFMan, ryan ling, rick Mcclure,
Mike MeadowS, lloyd payne, JeFF ZiMMerMan, yvonne griFFin, laura licHter.
LoS ANGELES FIREMEN’S RELIEF ASSoCIAtIoN
John JaCoBsen .........................................................preSident
Juan alBarran .................................................vice-preSident
andrew KulJis ........................................................Secretary
boARd oF tRuStEES
Barry HedBerg
cHriS Hart
cHriS Stine
craig wHite
david lowe
david ortiZ
david peterS
doak SMitH
Frank HernandeZ
gene BednarcHik
JaMeS e. coBurn
JeFF cawdrey
Mark akaHoSHi
Mike overHolSer
rick godineZ
roBert SteinBacHer
Steve Berkery
Steve ruda
Steve tuFtS
Steven doManSki
tiM larSon
CHAPLAINS
greg w. giBson...............Sr. cHaplain
danny leon...........................cHaplain
george a. negrete...............cHaplain
aquil F. Basheer...................cHaplain
hershy Z. ten........................cHaplain
riCK a. godineZ.....................cHaplain
MarK r. woolF......................cHaplain
Jesus Pasos..........................cHaplain
tELEPHoNES
Fire-relieF ................................................................(323) 259-5200
relieF assoCiation toll Free nuMBer ...........................(800) 244-3439
relieF MediCal Plan ..........................(866) 99laFra - (866) 995-2372
Fax nuMBer ................................................................(323) 259-5290
david ned sMith • exeCutive direCtor............................(323) 259-5201
Marlene Casillas • develoPMent & MarKeting direCtor(323) 259-5217
BeCKy valverde • huMan resourCes adMinistrator.......(323) 259-5247
todd layFer • Controller/treasurer.........................(323) 259-5243
BoB dillon • oPerations Manager................................(323) 259-5233
ana salaZar • MeMBer serviCes Coordinator...............(323) 259-5223
LAFRA MANAGEMENt
HealthSCoPE benefts
wayne sherMan • MediCal ClaiMs Manager...................(323) 259-5211
tHE FIREMEN’S GRAPEVINE (USPS 191-060) is published monthly by the Los Angeles Firemen’s
Relief Association, 815 Colorado blvd. 4th Floor, Los Angeles, Cal i for nia 90041. Annual $24 Subscription
included with Association mem ber ship; Non-members: $36. Single issues $3 postpaid. Back issues $6
postpaid. Pe ri od i cals post age paid at Los Angeles, CA and at additional mailing offce. POST MAS TER: Send
ad dress changes to: tHE FIREMEN’S GRAPE VINE Magazine, P.O. BOX 41903, Los An ge les, CA 90041.
Printed by Collective Color, Los Angeles CA. For Clas si fed and Display Ad ver tis ing rates please call (323)
259-5200, ext. 231, 232 or 260. All editorial matter must be received by the Editor eight weeks prior to the
month of pub li ca tion. The opin ions ex pressed here in are those of the writ ers and do not nec es sar i ly refect
the offcial views of the Los An ge les City Fire De part ment or the Los An ge les Firemen’s Relief Association.
July 2013 • 5
cards once you have received the new ones. For those of you with two or
more in your family, you will receive two identical cards, both with the
member’s name on it. If you would like to order additional cards or have
any questions, simply call the number on the paper that comes with the
card: (866) 99-LAFRA or go to www.healthscopebenefts.com.
I want to acknowledge all of you out there in the frehouses
that have taken the time out of your busy day to honor our members who
have passed. Not once has there been a moment of hesitation about stop-
ping whatever you were in the middle of to raise a fag and pay honor
to a deceased member. The fag that you are fying will remain a dear
memory to that member’s family forever. Some of you have taken the
time to include something additional (a picture or a note) to the family
when it is presented at their service. This is truly a class act by some, and
the families simply will not forget this act of respect for their lost loved
one.
Respectfully,
John E. Jacobsen
President@lafra.org
(323) 259-5200
By John Jacobsen
I
’m happy to relay to all of you who weren’t fortunate enough to at-
tend the LAFRA Reunion in Temecula this year, everyone reported
they had a wonderful time. This was our attempt to replicate the tra-
dition of active and retired firefighters and their families sharing some
quality time together in a beautiful setting. The LAFRA reunion was held
at the Pechanga RV resort which allowed for a whole host of activities
within a close geographical area. Although attendance was not as great
as we had hoped for, those who made it seemed to enjoy it. There were
quite a few ideas thrown around for new possibilities for the coming
years and I’m sure we will be talking them through.
We just fnished wrapping up from another successful Hope
for Firefghters. This year was the 16th time that this event has gone off
without a hitch. The outstanding efforts of our frefghters and our Busi-
ness Community friends resulted in one of our largest fundraising efforts
yet. Although this event is only a few hours on one day, the amount of
time and effort expended for our Widows, Orphans and Disabled Fire-
men’s Fund is truly admirable. The food was great, the weather was nice,
the lines were long and judging by the smiles on the faces, a great time
was had by all.
Several unfortunate incidents in the recent weeks have put
another spotlight on some of our membership’s lack of planning. How
many of you have taken the time to have a Living Trust prepared? Time
and time again we see the burden brought upon a family when a tragedy
strikes. If any of you can share the experience of going through probate
with someone who hasn’t, please do. None of us are going to be around
forever and taking some steps now will make all the difference in the
world for your family when the unthinkable happens. All Relief Mem-
bers are entitled to a onetime $600 Estate Planning beneft. If you haven’t
used it yet, what is stopping you? For most people, all it takes is a few
dedicated days and writing a check. How about
all of your benefciary documents? Have you up-
dated them in the last several years? Have you
gotten married, had some kids, gotten divorced?
I have to believe the majority of us will procrasti-
nate whenever possible, but a little paperwork up
front will be of substantial help later. Notifying
the groups that you are depending on for benefts
with any changes to your personal information
as soon as possible cannot be repeated enough.
Think about all the particular benefts and/or or-
ganizations with whom you have something on
fle - Relief Association, Union, Pensions, De-
ferred Compensation, Life Insurance, etc.)
For those on the LAFRA PPO Medical
Plan, you will be receiving a new Medical ID card
right around July 1st. The most signifcant change
is that you will notice that it references Express
Scripts instead of Medco as your prescription
manager. Please be sure to dispose of your old
6 • July 2013
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veliqua tentum.
T
he idea of a reunion of LAFD mem-
bers is nothing new. As long as fire-
fighters have been working together
– they’ve been socializing together. Wheth-
er the crew meets for an informal backyard
BBQ or a legendary event like the Grass
Valley Reunion, there will always be plenty
of beer, BBQ smoke and “bull” stories.
But this year the reunion fnally
came home. There were fve days of fun
and friendship right here in sunny South-
ern California. So close to home that mem-
bers could just come out for a day or two
as their busy schedules permitted. LAFRA
members flled more than 30 RV spots at
the Pechanga Resort and Casino property,
while many others booked rooms at the
hotel. In addition, other attendees utilized
many of the other hotels and resorts in the
Temecula Valley or just stayed with friends
in the area.
Crucial to making the SoCal
Reunion a reality was the support of the
LAFRA Board and the hard work of V.P.
Juan Albarran and Trustee Steve Doman-
ski. They were ably assisted in pulling off
the event by a solid group of colleagues in-
cluding Ana Salazar, Loan Tran, Maria Ro-
driguez, Angelica Patino, Monica Garcia,
Miguel Castaneda, John Jacobsen, Barry
Hedberg, Tim Larson, Andy Kuljis, and Jim
Dolan.
The reunion offcially opened on
Wednesday with check-in and a re-acquain-
tance get-together. On Thursday morning,
golfers took to the links at “Journey at
Pechanga,” listed by the SCPGA as one of
the top 100 resort courses. Later in the day
a high-spirited match of horseshoes was
played out in the campground, with Gary
Maga and his better-half Diane taking away
the gold. Organizational reps from LAFRA,
LAFCU, LAFPP, UNUM, and ExpressS-
cripts were also available throughout the
day to answer specifc questions from any
attendees.
In the evening, the clubhouse
was the spot to unwind with a social hour
followed by a scrumptious potluck dinner.
Everyone pulled out all the stops to impress
and there ended up being a great sampling
of appetizers and entrees. There was even
birthday cake and ice cream for dessert,
with Tim Larson and Andy Kuljis not dar-
ing to break LAFD tradition. Happy birth-
day guys!
With the irresistible charm of
the friendly tasting rooms and hundreds of
award-winning wines offered by the local
wineries, it’s no wonder the Temecula Val-
ley Wine Country tour was the biggest hit
of the gathering. The bus was flled to ca-
pacity as it headed out into the rolling hills
and vineyards on Friday morning. Sched-
uled were stops at three different wineries
and a gourmet lunch. Everyone had a great
time, especially the boisterous rear end of
the trolley led by the “Italian” connection
of Balzano and Roverino.
On Friday evening, the gang
headed for “The Comedy Club at Pechan-
ga.” It was a night of side-splitting laughs
with an excellent cast of comedians and en-
tertainers on hand. Great fun!!
The summer heat often arrives
early in the Temecula Valley and it was
very warm on Saturday morning as a few
of the group headed out for an outing to the
Temecula Valley Balloon and Wine Festi-
val. Here you could book a hot air balloon
fight, enjoy beer and wine pairings, and
be entertained by an assortment of music
acts ranging from country to classic and
alternative rock, all the way to the Young
Dubliners.
At 1800 hours on Saturday,
nearly 100 reunion attendees headed for
“The Buffett.” The casino describes it as
“an all new dining adventure that awaits
the hungry.” None of the attendees could
describe it at all – because all of their
mouths were full! And who could blame
them with all of the choices available
- seafood, Asian selections, grilled and
BBQ items, roasted and rotisserie foods,
American comfort items, Mexican and
Latin specialties, Italian and Mediter-
ranean foods, an expanded salad bar and
new multiple action stations, where cus-
tom ordered pastas, sushi, seafood, BBQ
and grilled meats, pizza and fatbreads,
carving stations and desserts are served.
Check out time came and went
on Sunday, with many attendees sleeping
off the huge meal from the night before.
I’m sure they were also dreaming about
the great time they had at the frst ever
(but defnitely not the last) LAFRA So-
Cal Reunion. While the Temecula Valley
may be widely recognized as the ‘jewel’
of Riverside County, the 2013 LAFRA
Reunion certainly borrowed some of the
dazzle.
The LAFRA SoCal Reunion
was a combined effort of many behind-
the-scenes volunteers. If you have any
ideas for next year’s event, contact your
LAFRA Trustees and let them know what
you’re thinking. If you didn’t attend this
year’s reunion, start making plans to at-
tend next spring - and maybe even lend a
helping hand!
July 2013 • 7
8 • July 2013
“A
lways Remem-
ber the 12th of
September.” The
2013 Lane Kemper Softball
Classic T-shirt logo simply
asks that we remember Lane
Kemper and the camarade-
rie he always tried to promote
with his off-duty activities and
fundraisers. Lane always tried
to rise above the petty differ-
ences and procedural directives
that sometimes overshadow
the fact that, as frefghters,
we’re all in this craziness
together.
The stresses that directly infuence
our well being every time we jump to answer
an alarm are real but diffcult to quantify. There
needs to be some means of release. The un-
certainty in the political arena and the often
disruptive management decisions of our own
department scramble continuity and chip away
at our morale. Recent history of near misses and
tragedy in our department and others across the
U.S. only prove that, now more than ever, we
need to focus on cohesion and strengthen our
morale.
So on May 16, 2013, we gathered in
Lane Kemper’s memory to play softball, eat,
drink and laugh for a few hours in the spirit
of camaraderie and friendly frehouse compe-
tition. We organize, pay for, schedule, equip,
feed, compete, police ourselves and clean up
without any visible means of support from the
mothership of the Ivory Tower. Funny how
well it goes. As always, all monies raised are
donated to the LAFRA Widows, Orphans and
Disabled Firemen’s Fund.
This year’s feld of competitors was a
bit smaller. With more fragmented fre stations
it becomes more diffcult to assemble teams.
There were 28 teams that played on eight felds
at two parks. As usual, the competition was
intense with some very closely matched teams
and some not so closely matched teams. There
was a great group of umpires this year that did
a necessary but not always appreciated job of
calling the games. Remember, these guys are
unpaid volunteers and do their best to keep
things fair and equitable. Also, remember there
is a no guff rule designed to protect the umpires
and minimize confict and delays of game.
July 2013 • 9
With an odd (not divisible by eight)
number of teams scheduling became a little
confusing but we worked through it and got ‘r
done. At Balboa Park 12 teams played down to
two. At Hjelte Park 16 teams played down to
four. The elimination continued at Hjelte Park
down to the fnalists. Missing from the group
of fnalists were the 3-peaters from 15’s. Ap-
parently, their perennial threat was eliminated
early. A very talented, and YOUNG group of
players from Battalion 13 endured to the fnale.
46’s, 33’s and 64’s were the top three teams
with 46’s topping 33’s for the victory, trophy
and bragging rights for a whole year!
The food was exceptional this year
and was the handiwork of Mark Curry and
his cast of characters: Greg Pascola and Eric
Stevens, with their strike team of BBQ’s and
convergent volunteer helpers. There was plenty
to eat for all. In fact, some lucky maggot-mess-
ers got some nice leftovers to take back to the
station. (Note: There was a little “squeaking”
about how high the food budget was. Rumor:
Some of that budget might get “sequestered”
next year.)
The raffe and auction was loaded
with great stuff again and credit here goes to
the wonderful Valerie Lawrence and her cast
of helpers, volunteers and Relief Association
ladies. Question: How is it that there always
seems to be a few names that get drawn mul-
A Huge “Thank You” to our
generous sponsors and donors
Anaheim Marriott
Aquarium of the Pacifc
AVI Resort and Casino
Bear Pit
Best Buys
Bill Bringas
Brent’s Deli
Calloway Vineyards & Winery
Cambria Winery
Chris Stine
City Employees Club of Los Angeles
Costco
Dicks Sporting Goods
Don Francisco’s Coffee
Dream Dinners
Edendale
Frito Lay
Go Cart World
Howl at the Moon
Ice Station Valencia
In n Out Burger
Jeopardy
10 • July 2013
tiple times? Some people just have all the luck.
Thanks to Steve Ruda for keeping things mov-
ing and entertaining as he exposed the winners.
Again, all proceeds go to the Widows, Orphans
and Disabled Firemen’s Fund.
Special thanks again to Bill Bringas
for keeping the tradition alive. Special thanks
also to Steve and Mona Romas for offering
their home for storage of the equipment and
staging the pre-tournament logistics. For this
tradition to continue there will always be a
need for people to handle these logistical du-
ties. Individuals interested in keeping this tra-
dition alive will have to step forward and learn
the ropes in the next few years if we want the
Lane Kemper Softball Classic to live on. Do
A Huge “Thank You” to our
generous sponsors and donors
Kevin Wright - Morgan Stanley
Knott’s Berry Farm
Laemmle Theatre
LAFRA
Laugh Factory -Hollywood
Laugh Factory -Long Beach
Laughlin Tropicana
Maria’s Italian Kitchen
Medieval Times Dinner/ Tournament
Mike Scioscia
Mountasia
OPI
Pinks Famous Hot Dogs
San Diego Zoo Global
San Manual Band of Mission Indians
Shakeys Pizza Parlor
Skateland
Smart & Final
Speed Zone
Steve Ikeda
Stonefre Grill
The Smoke House
Tommy’s Hamburgers
Trader Joes
UCLA Intercollegiate Athletics
UFLAC United Firefghters Los Angeles City
US Bank - Downtown LA
Valerie Lawrence
Warehouse Restaurant
Warner Brothers Consumer Products
Woodland Hills Marriott
you have what it takes? Bill and Steve need
you.
P.S. If you notice these sorts of
things, you may have seen an older gentleman
wandering around all afternoon at Hjelte Park
purposefully gathering cans and bottles from
the ground and trash cans. He’s not a vagrant
living off the discards of a well-to-do public.
His name is Hoy and he is a relevant, respon-
sible, retired professional who has been col-
lecting and cashing in at our softball event for
a number of years now and donating what he
collects, rounding up the amount with a some
of his own money, to the Widows and Orphans
Fund. What a wonderful example of the chain
of love.
July 2013 • 11
O
n the morning of April 16th, 1913, Fire
Station 29 opened its doors for busi-
ness for the very first time. Fire Sta-
tion 29 was located in what was considered the
“rural area” on the outskirts of Los Angeles on
Western Avenue between 1st and 2nd. Fire Sta-
tion 29 housed Engine Company 29 and Truck
Company 4.
100 years later to the very day, New
Fire Station 29 marked the 100th anniversary
of service to the communities of Korea Town,
Hancock Park, and the Greater Wilshire area
by hosting a pancake breakfast for alumni and
friends of 29’s. Following the breakfast, a fag
raising ceremony utilizing the original fagpole
from Old 29’s honored 100 years of dedicated
service.
The pancake breakfast was attended
by dignitaries of the City Council, the LAFD,
and of the community. Councilman Tom La-
Bonge was in attendance as were all mem-
bers of the Fire Commission, Fire Chief Brian
Cummings, Division and Battalion Chiefs, and
many of the local consulates that are located
in Fire Station 29’s district. No celebration of
29’s would be complete without a visit by re-
tired Captain I Bill Finn who provided a de-
tailed history of Old and New 29’s. Many re-
tired members and alumni of Fire Station 29
stopped by to say “hello” and tell stories of
the “old house.” Alumni included the likes of
former Chief Engineer Bill Bammatre and his
wife Liz, retired Battalion Chief “Iron Mike”
Ambarian, retired Captain Rick McLaren, re-
tired Captain II Addison Birdine, and many
others too numerous to mention.
The celebration culminated with the
dedication of a fagpole monument created
for the occasion by the members currently as-
signed to Fire Station 29. Shortly after its clo-
sure in 1991, Old 29’s was sold by the City for
private use. Earlier this year the current owner
was contacted and he agreed to generously
donate the iconic fagpole and bracing system
that was mounted to the roof of Old 29’s. The
century old wooden fagpole hadn’t fown our
country’s colors since the closing of Old 29’s in
January of 1991 and it was in desperate need of
repair. The fagpole was acquired and painstak-
ingly restored to its original glory. The bracing
system was sandblasted and given a new coat
of paint and the “truck” on top of the pole was
stripped of many layers of paint revealing that
it was actually made from brass.
Not being satisfed with simply plac-
ing the fagpole in the ground, the members
of New 29’s took used brick and utilized the
original cornerstone from Old 29’s to form a
base for the monument. The base is meant to
replicate the many pre-33 center-hall apartment
houses found in Battalion 11; right down to the
king’s row, inset window (the cornerstone),
and even replica tie-plates. To further honor
the monument, some talented members created
a fountain from an old hydrant that had been
used for training purposes. The monument and
fountain are located just outside the kitchen of
New 29’s. If you are moved-up or working at
New 29’s, be sure and check it out!
An American Flag was gifted to New
29’s by the “Daughters of the American Rev-
olution” to be fown from the newly restored
fagpole. Like the fag that few on the opening
day of Old 29’s, this fag has 48 stars instead of
50 (there were only 48 states in 1913). Below
the 48-star American Flag is a smaller fag that
was created to honor the dates of the 100-year
anniversary of service.
Upon seeing the new location for the
restored fagpole, Councilman LaBonge imme-
diately dedicated the monument and declared
its installation “sound and proper.”
An event like this requires teamwork
and there is not enough space to thank all in-
volved. A special thanks goes out to Marc &
Lynn Cohen, Mike Genewick, and all of the
members of “Friends of 29’s” for their gener-
ous support. “Thank you” as well to the “Inter-
national House of Pancakes” and “The Coffee
Bean” for their generous donations towards the
breakfast, and of course the “Daughters of the
American Revolution” for the donation of the
48-star American Flag.
The offcers of FS29 would also like
to add just how proud they are of the hard work
and dedication displayed by the members as-
signed to the “A”, “B”, and “C” Platoons of
Fire Station 29. It was a monumental effort to
pull off this event and to complete the memo-
rial fagpole in the amount of time that you did.
Your efforts have honored the brave men and
women of the LAFD who have served this Fire
Station and this Community: 24 hours a day,
365 days a year, for the last 100 years.
12 • July 2013
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SEPTEMBER 11, 2013
wednesday
July 2013 • 13
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SEPTEMBER 11, 2013
wednesday
Greetings and Happy Independence
Day from the sinners and the saints of the
Second Battalion.
Only a little movement in our
beloved battalion this month as FF/PM Robert
Barna jumps out of the pool at One’s to bask
in the sun at 15’s, and to ease the pain of our
loss, Capt. Gary Matsabara leaves 52’s to
enjoy the serenity of El Sereno.
Remember, we start off liking you,
you’ve got to do something to change that.
I think Mark Twain said, “It’s better
to be silent and thought a fool than to open
your mouth and remove all doubt.” On an un-
related subject, there was once an extrication
drill with participants ranging from the new
Fire Department to seasoned Heavy Rescue
veterans. New Fire Department stabilizes the
vehicle by inverting the step cribbing con-
verting it from step cribbing to an infnitely
adjustable ramp. This new age thinking raises
the ire of the seasoned Heavy Rescue veteran
who is very vocal about the lack of integrity
and footprint with the out of the box thinking.
Now while I’m no structural engi-
neer, I did put one through USC (he takes after
his mother). Here’s his professional opinion
on the subject using the laws of physics
Send your version of the truth to:
battalion7news@yahoo.com
Sheet2
Page 2
Stepped Cribbing – Inverted
Check Friction between Car and Cribbing
See Figure 1 & 2
m = mass of car
g = acceleration of gravity
0.301 radians
0.4 (approx.)
0.296
0.955
0.296mg
0.382mg
0.382mg > 0.296mg
therefore, car will not slide along surface of cribbing
Check Friction between Cribbing and Concrete
0.6 (approx.)
0.6mg
0.283mg
0.6mg > 0.283mg
therefore, cribbing will not slide relative to concrete
µ
s
= coefficient of static friction
φ = angle per attached Figure 1 & 2
mg*sin(φ) = force trying to make the car slide relative to the cribbing
mg*cos(φ) = force normal to the surface of the cribbing
µ
s
*mg*cos(φ) = force resisting sliding (normal force x coefficient of static friciton)
if: µ
s
*mg*cos(φ) > mg*sin(φ), car will not slide along the surface of the cribbing
φ = tan-1(9/29) =
µ
s
(steel to wood) =
sin(φ) =
cos(φ) =
mg*sin(φ) =
µ
s
*mg*cos(φ) =
mg*sin(φ)*cos(φ) = force trying to make the cribbing slide relative to the concrete
µ
s
*mg = force resisting sliding of cribbing relative to concrete
if: µ
s
*mg > mg*sin(φ)*cos(φ), cribbing will not slide relative to concrete
µ
s
(wood to concrete) =
µ
s
*mg =
mg*sin(φ)*cos(φ) =
φ
m
g
*
c
o
s
(
φ
)
m
g
*
s
in

)
mg
φ
φ
9
"
7"
36"
2
9
"
3
0
.
3
6
"
Figure 1
Figure 2
m
g
*
s
in

)*
c
o
s

)
Yes, the Professional Engineer’s
stamp is the real deal.
14 • July 2013
Well friends once again, the stories
keep coming. We would like to extend a
warm welcome to the battalion to a newly
transferred captain to 71’s. As all good
captains do, he was out and about getting to
know the public in his district, and what better
way to do so than the annual “Fill the Boot”
campaign. He must have been missing the
smell of the salt air or the smell of jet fuel,
either way, all the dollar bills he collected in
20 minutes from the citizens of Bel-Air turned
out to be too much for him to bear. He had to
tap out and call for relief because . . . wait for
it . . . because??? “My feet hurt.” No worries,
the Task Force in the battalion stepped up and
again did more than their share and why not?
Especially for such an incredible cause and in
a area that could afford to donate. Turns out
that this is the same captain that recently got a
SOD day at the same local Task Force house
and decided to use a department issued chest
hair EMS razor to shave (free razor, right?) He
probably would have had less cuts if he had
shaved his face with an angry beaver. Just a
few things Cap to limit the attention brought
upon yourself. If you’re going to call line-up,
at least give the half a roll of toilet paper on
your face time to stop the bleeding, and if you
bring food into the station write your name
on it or at least write “save.” Welcome to the
Battalion Dave. I was getting low on stories.
Now that you are here I’ll be good for the next
few years.
A recently promoted “Captain II” has
got himself some good ol’ fashion gold fever.
Symptoms include: Unilateral SOP changes for
all three shifts, free blood pressure checks for
the public (disappearing sign and all), station
reorganization, and a dorm remodel all just a
few weeks before annual inspection. Hope-
fully a cure is found quickly so the fellas can
get back to working on looking busy. Welcome
aboard too.
Have you had Dave Howards “faming hot”
chips? I’m just gonna leave it at that.
Just remember - It’s not personal,
It’s just business.
ninewriter@yahoo.com
We all can appreciate a clever per-
sonalized license plate. More times than not
we pick ‘em and our buddies interpret them a
different way as they deem ft. And since milk,
leftover, raisin, ice cream, or maggot won’t ft
on a plate . . . (pun intended), a generic FOOD
SLR (slayer) seemed more appropriate.
battalion 10 frefghters put out a fre on the second foor of a two-story apartment building
at 15740 Sherman Way that caused $105,000 on Mother’s day morning.
Photo by Juan Guerra, juanguerra.smugmug.com
Famous dave Howard
July 2013 • 15
91’s and 98’s made short work of a fre in a load of
scrapped vehicles in a Lopez Canyon storage facility.

Photos by david “doc” deMulle’, the Foothills Paper
on May 6, 2013, crews from FS 24 and FS 74 tried to shut
off a main following a t/A above Sunland blvd.

Photos by david “doc” deMulle’, the Foothills Paper
16 • July 2013
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July 2013 • 17
Greetings from the Battalion that
never sleeps!
Congratulations to all the members
that participated in the Annual Lane Kemper
Classic, previously known as “Bats and Beer.”
Great weather and camaraderie made it a
perfect day to pay tribute to the founder and
namesake of this great event, Captain Lane
Kemper. Anybody who had the opportunity to
meet him was a fortunate individual. More-
over, congratulations to the Top 3 teams, all
Battalion 13 participants, and also to the win-
ner – FS 46! Way to go guys, and again Thank
You Lane!
Also, I’d like to say Thank You to
Chief Bobadilla who recently ended his ride
here in Battalion 13. He kept up with tradition
by getting a full Batt. 13 assignment to a com-
mercial fre on his last day. The previous fve
“B” shift chiefs have left fulflling their “Last
Shift Fire” terms and Chief Bobadilla kept the
streak alive.
At the beginning of the month, RA
864 was returning to quarters when they hap-
pened upon a two-story multi-family dwelling
with fre showing from two windows on the
1st foor. They notifed Metro of the incident
and asked for resources as they pulled out of
the way for incoming companies to spot. As
they suited up and made their way toward the
dwelling, LAPD members on-scene armed
with 20-30 dry chems told them that there
was somebody trapped just inside the front
door. While one member did a quick re-con,
the other was fully suited up and attempted
to enter the inferno. Coming across another
security gate inside the structure, he went to
work opening that. After breaching the 2nd
door, both members made a quick search
through the intense heat and found nobody.
They quickly attempted to search the fre area
to make sure that nobody else was trapped. LF
64 showed up at the same time that they no-
ticed a man stuck on the upper foor. RA 864
members raced to get the appropriate ladder
to throw to the upper foor, but were beaten
to it. Fortunately with some quick thinking
and ingenuity, LAPD had thrown a rickety A-
frame ladder and “stabilized” it on the top of a
cinder block wall to allow the stuck civilian a
means of egress. As the rest of the assignment
showed up, and completely clogged 108th St.,
the fre was quenched, ventilation holes were
cut, and the rest of the building was searched
and cleared. Two civilians were transported to
the hospital with some minor smoke inhala-
tion and fortunately nobody was hurt too bad
thanks to the quick thinking and willingness
of our members to do what they were trained
to do and lay it just on the other side of the
line. Thank you guys and nice work by all
involved!
Recently RA 64 responded with a
bunch of other companies to an eight car T/A
with fortunately just a few patients. Once they
made it on-scene, they were directed to tend
to a fatality and start the e-PCR and complete
all the proper “paperwork.” Half-way through
the documentation, they were then diverted
to tend to a critical patient. Just like the entry
level interview question with “conficting
orders,” they let the captain know what they
were assigned to do, and the captain told them
that he would get somebody else to fnish their
original paperwork and that they were needed
more at the other patient. Switching gears,
they went to their new patient and started
patient care. As other paramedic resources
arrived on-scene it was a no-brainer that their
original documentation would defnitely get
taken care of! They transported their critical
patient to the hospital and were cleaning up
when they received an MDC message from
EMS 9, who by the way had also made it all
the way on-scene and is also a paramedic, that
after they were picked up they had to respond
back to the scene and fnish the paperwork
on their deceased patient . . . as if they’re
not busy enough. Wow, talk about passing
the buck! I realize that sometimes things get
lost in the shuffe during a busy incident, but
with these new computers, I believe we have
the ability to see if a medical report has been
done for all involved patients. Anyway, they
cleaned up and made it back to scene to fnish
the report. Only LAPD was there now as all
the LAFD companies had long since picked up
and gotten back in their warm beds. Seems to
me that EMS 9, who again is a paramedic and
also the highest medical authority on-scene
could’ve fnished the job or at least designated
someone else to the task . . . I guess not. Not
sure who I’d put as more useful: EMS 9 or
MD 1 . . . seems as in this day and age you
should do everything possible to justify your
existence . . . or hurry back to Battalion 9 to
get back in bed. Sorry for the inconvenience
of a run . . . just sayin’.
It seems that at least a few people
read this article in the Grapevine because this
next captain either got lucky or we actually
had a breakthrough.
Recently E 57 respond-
ed with RA 57 and RA
257 to a T/A with two
critical patients. The
1st RA needed both
paramedics in back,
along with another
set of hands and also
a driver, so both FF’s
off E 57 jumped in the
appropriate spots and
the RA was off to the
hospital. Now here’s
the dilemma . . . the 2nd RA only needs a
driver. If you remember a few articles back,
this almost exact same scenario occurred. An
RA needed only a driver and the captain was
apparently not certifed on the “driving” part
of the PRB for a LAFD Rescue Ambulance,
so he called Metro for someone that defnitely
had some experience behind the wheel and
received RA 864 to transport. Now back to
the present story. It seems as if this captain
was not only certifed in his PRB to drive a
RA, but also, had the forethought of keeping
a much needed RA in service in this busy Bat-
talion and not just sitting in the front seat of
his Fire Engine for the ride to the hospital. Just
what I heard.
Apparently one of the members
at FS 64 has a slightly “sensitive” stomach,
to put it nicely. Where most of us just don’t
enjoy the “odor” or “view,” this member has
been seen/heard actually dry-heaving or on
the verge (or actually fully involved on a few
instances). For him, it’s like the pie eating
contest in “Stand By Me.” So you can imagine
his dilemma when one day, while chang-
ing the toilet paper rolls at the station during
housework, the actual holder plummets into
the deep waters of the clean toilet. While most
people would fsh it out right away or at least
grab some gloves and snag it before it gets
too marinated in toilet water, this member
was pacing back and forth in a “oh no what
do I do now” panic! From what I hear, an
announcement may have been made on the
PA for everyone to come watch the event. As
each member made their way up, the ten-
sion mounted. With some cheering from the
assembled crowd, our hero “suited up” with
multiple sets of gloves and started bobbing for
the toilet roll holder. With each attempt, the
holder would deep-six past his gloved hand
and a serious “wwrreettcchh” would erupt!
Evidently all in attendance had an enjoyable
time watching/listening to FF Newon’s in-
ability to handle the “yucky.” The holder was
fnally netted and de-conned and from there on
out, FF Newon only enters the stalls with full
rolls already installed. Just what I heard.
Now I know the shops are busy, but
recently somebody spotted two Truck 64’s in
the Aerial Shops. I wasn’t aware that 64’s even
18 • July 2013
had two Truck 64’s?!? Seems as while the
front-line is down, needing only a broken
spark arrestor changed (fve minute job with
three months of “neccessary” back log ), the
Reserve Truck 64 had to go down for broken
axle seal, bald duals, worn front tires, and b/o
rotors. Half-day job and sent right back out the
door. Not really sure where any of the things
we do make sense, but I guess that’s not really
my job. Can’t make this stuff up!
As I mentioned last article, we all
have a lot of future FF’s coming through
the stations trying to get information to be
ready for their upcoming interviews. In a few
months some of these people will go through
our tower and become members of our LAFD.
Take some pride and show these future
members what a FF for the LAFD is all about.
Remember, we are all inheritors. We aren’t the
ones who made this department GREAT. It
was all the previous FF’s that walked through
these great stations that did. They are the
legends and now it’s our job to maintain it by
continuing to uphold the VALUES, TRADI-
TIONS, and SERVICE for the community we
serve and to each other. You owe it to the FF
next to you and the ones that will be roaming
these halls in 1, 5, 10 years. Take charge and
take pride in ownership, because amongst us
now are the next “Legends” that these young
members will look up to.
Well, that’s all I’ve got for this
month. Stay safe and remember that 2+2
makes sense, play nice, know your audience,
get a cool nickname, fgure out which formula
to use before the media gets a hold of it, “you
get out what you put in”, FI-1, read the label,
if you’re tired-sleep in, when in need of a
driver, call an already overworked 800 to do
your job, and watch out for irony! Keep send-
ing your stories to wattsfre@gmail.com
Early morning fre at Manchester
and broadway
HazMat tF 21’s newest member
Modeling the “strikeout” shirt
at the Kemper Classic.
July 2013 • 19
89’s practices high angle rescue. Photos by Juan Guerra, juanguerra.smugmug.com
on April 15, 2013, Engine 89 handled
an auto fre on Radford Ave
Photos by Rick McClure, EPN
20 • July 2013
two men were injured when their car struck a tree
and house in Northridge on May 18, 2013.
Photos by Juan Guerra, juanguerra.smugmug.com
battalion 15 frefghters shut off the main after a hydrant
was knocked off in a three-vehicle t/A at Corbin and
Plummer on April 17, 2013.
Photos by Rick McClure, EPN
Fire in a single family structure at 9415 Geyser Ave
on May 10, 2013.
Photos by Juan Guerra, juanguerra.smugmug.com
July 2013 • 21
Hello from the 18th hole everyone.
I’ve been away for a while and we have some
catching up to do, so let’s get started.
This one coming from 34’s. Well,
34’s had a fre on the border of 94’s, with 26’s.
Just after 26’s went to the up top to strip a sec-
tion of the roof during overhaul, and of course
they were all using their axes, a member from
26’s went back to swing with his axe and lost
it. The axe went fying from the roof and half-
way down you fnally heard a faint warning,
“Look Out.” It was barely shouted (his inside
voice) before it came crashing down pick
end into a member from 34’s doing overhaul
below.
Fortunately Josh Tsai had on his
proper PPE’s - and in addition he is a Cross
Fit King - or else he may have lost his ability
to use his arm. He escaped with just a tetanus
shot and a few stitches. I’m told that there was
no remorse, no apology and no cream, I guess
it was 34’s fault for getting in the way of the
axe. Maybe he could say “hinder” a lot louder
next time?
On a lighter note, the member’s of
34-A wish Engineer Jared Hart all the best
as he moves uptown to 56’s. We will miss all
those great fshing trips he planned and BBQ’s
at his house.
Now here’s a story from 43’s. It’s a
real horror story that I’ll call “The Butcher of
Palms.” If you come by 43’s you may notice
some of the trees in front and on the side
appear to have been butchered by some of
the station members on the A shift. It seems
that they believe they are expert gardeners
and ornamental tree trimmers – Yikes! There
must be at least four trees that are in a state of
shock from the butchering they received from
Engineer Kumar and FF Martinez. Some of
the neighbors have come by to offer help to
try to bring the trees back from the light but it
may be too late.
Don’t you hate when the chief drops
by without a honk of the air horn or announce-
ment on the microphone? Don’t have to worry
‘bout that anymore.
Now some goodies outta 61’s. We
just had the Lane Kemper Classic softball
tournament and 61’s had a good showing.
Lots of fun with 58’s and 61’s each felding
teams. 61’s played a total of three teams, los-
ing an elimination game against 3’s although
a valiant comeback was in the works until a
controversial call was made ending the game.
29’s really showed a high level of sportsman-
ship with their leader and other members
snubbing the traditional end of game high fve
with the winning team. I was told that after
the game 29’s challenged the winning team to
a round of “Hose Lays.” WHAT THE HECK
- HOSE LAYS?!? We’re talking softball here
guys. Hose lays? Is that the best 29’s can come
up with? Just say we lost, good game, and go
have a cold beverage. What a great example
for the younger members. At the end of the
day everyone had as great time and most
importantly, a good cause was benefted. Hose
Lays?????????? I’m sure those blue cups were
full of non-alcoholic beverages.



Now if you been lucky enough to
work a day at 61’s, you can’t help but notice
the great looking work-out area they have
now, thanks to the nice folks in the neighbor-
hood. So they want to keep it neat and clean
right? Well, every station has a mop for just
about every area of the station and they mark
it with a color or they just write a name on the
mop. As you can see the “GMY” won’t get
cleaned at this rate. You think a little three let-
ter word would cause so much trouble. No one
has claimed the misspelled mop. Rumor has it,
it may have been an A/O or FF Topete.
Well that’s all for now. Please keep
the stories coming. Be safe out there.
batt18news@yahoo.com
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A breath of fresh air at the barton
Avenue fre on May 31, 2013.
Photo by Yvonne Griffn, EPN
Send your stories and photos directly to you battalion News writer
or to the editor at editor@lafra.org
22 • July 2013
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July 2013 • 23
D
o
you
know what a
frappe is? Accor-
din’ to Webster it’s a
“A liqueur served over
shaved ice,” or “A thick
milk shake.” In 1969, Engi-
neer James “Doc” Dougherty
arrived at FS 64”C” from FS
38. Shortly thereafter he formed
or was instrumental in formin’ the
“Frappe Club.” When I got to 64-C, in
early 1974, I heard such names as Kenny
Brass, Denny Willahan, Leroy Fry, Gor-
don Hopkins, Bill Collins, Jerry Allingham,
Gary Perdue, Mike Reagan, Johnny Samp-
son, Don Forrest, Jack Gamrat, Keith Wilson,
Ralph Whitney, Leroy Fry and Bill Collins. I
met some of these individuals while on the job,
such as Don Grant who was one of my Drill
Tower instructors, but others I did not.
This group, includin’ wives, always
enjoyed a good time. Whether it was at the
“River” or in someone’s backyard, there was
lots of camaraderie and fun times. I’m not sure
how many went, but the Frappe Club even
went to Missoula, Montana to enjoy the great
outdoors and share the good times with their
families.
Dare I say this, but there was even
bucketin’ that took place at 64’s. I know, I was
shocked out of my socks, but whether it was
celebratin’ someone’s birthday, a promotion or
just decidin’ the time was right, gettin’ buck-
eted was all part of the day’s routine.
So, with the help of his wife Char-
lotte, Doc videoed each page and gave brief
explanations of the various get-togethers and
events of the Frappe Club.
Kenny Brass was kind enough to send me a
copy of that CD. Listenin’ to Doc and Charlotte
speak of those times was a bit eerie, but it was
extremely entertainin’ to watch what took place
in a time long gone and forgotten.
I couldn’t get any traditional pic-
tures, so I took them off the CD. Sorry for the
less than vivid images, but I hope some of these
bring back good memories from the day.
COWBOY HUMOR
A Pastor goes to the dentist for a set
of false teeth. The frst Sunday after he gets his
new teeth, he talks for only eight minutes. The
second Sunday, he talked for
only ten minutes. The third
Sunday he talks for 2 hours
and 48 minutes. The congre-
gation had to mob him to get
him down from the pulpit
and asked him what hap-
pened.
The pastor explained the
frst Sunday his gums hurt so bad he couldn’t
talk for more than 8 minutes. The second Sun-
day his gums hurt too much to talk for more
than 10 minutes. But, the third Sunday, he put
his wife’s teeth in by mistake and he couldn’t
shut up.
KEEP SMILIN’!
AC
choppedup@att.net
Doc always enjoyed talkin’ about
how certain individuals were made into “Pull
Toys.” I think I may have seen this happen
a time or two at 64’s, but hopefully the
statute of limitations has passed!
However, I understand the pro-
cedure included tyin’ some-
one to a creeper and pullin’
them around for awhile.
Then someone would
grab a hose line
and cool them
off before
s o me o n e
else with
a dry
chemi-
cal ex-
tinguish-
er turned
them into
what looked
like a lump of
four. Then they
were left out to
dry. Great fun!
It was defnitely a
different time and a different mindset. These
individuals worked hard, played hard and un-
derstood the importance of camaraderie. Un-
fortunately, as time passed and the Frappe Club
dissolved, with individuals promotin’ or trans-
ferrin’, so did the horseplay and the individuals
that understood what it was all about.
Doc also made up a scrap book of
pictures and events of the group’s outings. Nat-
urally, over the years, the scrap book began to
show it’s age and deterioration. With some gen-
tle persuasion it was suggested that he make a
video of the book, to preserve it for posterity.
I’m glad he did.
Paid Advertisements:
24 • July 2013
Paid Advertisements:
$38.75 per Shield
Plus UPS

Mike Rhodes
Cell (805) 501-6044
Email: mrhodes@prucalhomes.com
BRE License # 01177388
“20 Years Serving Tousand Oaks, Newbury Park,
Simi Valley, Moorpark & Camarillo”
LAFD Retired
An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Afliates Inc. Te Prudential logo and the
Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. Used under license with no other
afliation of Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity.
July 2013 • 25
O
n Tuesday, May 28, 2013, Fire Station 94 hosted the finals of the
LAFD Spring Doubles Handball Tournament. The captains and
crew of Fire Station 94 were excellent hosts and made everyone
feel welcome. They set up a video feed to the kitchen, which accom-
modated the overflow and allowed guests to watch the action while they
were eating lunch.
Returning the fnals to a Fire Station provided spectators with
the opportunity to concentrate on the game being played, and enthusias-
tically give their support to the players. A Taco Cart was hired, and lunch
was served from 1100-1400 hours for the players, guests and crew of
Fire Station 94.
Ryan Carlos and Joe Steiner from Fire Station 92 won their
frst LAFD “A” Division title after playing one of the toughest draws in
recent memory. They defeated teams consisting of John Libby & Ladd
Stilson, and Rex Villaubi & Joe Castro before defeating Eddie & Juan
Marez in a tiebreaker fnal. This is a team to watch in the future - Ryan
Carlos is an exceptional young player who covers the court with speed
and agility and Joe “Dirty Right” Steiner has outstanding instincts and
refexes which allow him to dominate the frontcourt.
The “Bruise Brothers” - Kevin Schilling (73-B) and Chris Ta-
vera (64-B) - are the newest “A” Team on the LAFD. They defeated
Sergio Guzman (73-B) and David “DD” Diaz (13-A) in a tiebreaker “B”
Final. Schilling and Tavera dominated the frst game with pure power,
ending nearly every rally with a kill shot. Guzman and Diaz rallied to
win the second game with a strategy of moving the big guys around and
using their superior speed to score points. The big fellas went back to
murdering the ball in the tiebreaker, winning 11-4.
The “C” Division started with a full bracket of 16 teams. Mar-
cus Meza and Rob Robbins from Fire Station 66 defeated Al Balestra
and Carlos Vera from Fire Station 11 in a battle dominated by hustle and
determination by both teams.
The fnal in the Masters Division was one of the most com-
petitive matches all day. Eddie Marez (2-C) and Don Paone (Retired)
defeated Joe Castro (Batt. 5-C) and Rex Villaubi (63-C) in a display of
skill, strategy and shot making that was very impressive. This match
ended in an 11-10 tiebreaker that took 4 side-outs to complete.
Although the crowd had thinned, the “C” Masters proved to be
a very competitive and entertaining match. Tony Arnado (50-B) and Tim
Aguayo (1-A) defeated Fernie Jimenez (2-C) and Sammy Quan (2-B) in
another tiebreaker. It appeared that Jimenez and Quan had the game won
with a 10-5 lead. But Arnado and Aguayo got the side out and fnished
the game scoring 6 points in a row to win 11-10.
First time winners Adin Waldrep and Galvin Yanagisawa both
from FS 11-B defeated veterans Tom Nyberg (26-C) and Sean Ken-
nedy (11-B) in the fnal of the “D” Division. This bracket started with
21 teams and reinforced the fact that LAFD handball is growing. These
players were very competitive, and displayed a strong understanding of
the fundamentals of handball. All winners received embroidered back-
packs.
26 • July 2013
F
ireForce Racing, a group of active and
retired firefighters, successfully com-
pleted a four day (4/28 – 5/01), 1,242
mile off-road race in Baja Calif, Mexico. The
NORRA (National Off Road Racing Associa-
tion) was the original sanctioning body for the
legendary Baja 1000 beginning in 1967 – 1970
led by Ed Perlman. His son, Mike Perlman,
brought NORRA back in 2010 as a four day,
rally style event designated primarily for vin-
tage race vehicles. He attracted some of the
legends of the sport including Walker Evans,
Malcom Smith, and Parnelli Jones and many of
the original race vehicles, restored to their for-
mer glory. Although the race is centered around
the vintage vehicles, it has been opened up to
any year of motorcycle or vehicle, divided into
a Vintage Divison and Evolution Division for
the newer vehicles. Each division was further
divided into various classes depending on age,
suspension and engine size.
This year we entered a 1968 Ford
F-100 pickup truck. This truck was raced in
the 80’s as a Class 8, which required it to re-
tain the stock frame and cab. It has a full roll
cage made of 2” DOM mild steel, front to rear
which adds rigidity to the frame, safety for the
occupants, and attachment points for the sus-
pension. Rear suspension is a three link set up
for approximately 24” of wheel travel and a 9”
Ford rear end with a spool and 4:11 gears. Us-
ing 33”x12.50 x 15” BFG All Terrain tires we
had a top speed close to 100 mph. The front
suspension is the classic Ford Twin I beam,
although strengthened and adjusted for maxi-
mum wheel travel. All four wheels were con-
trolled by remote reservoir coil over shocks
and 2” bump stops. Power to the wheels is sup-
plied by a Ford 351 c.i. Cleveland, developing
approximately 425 h. p.
Our team this year consisted of Bruce
Galien (Driver of Record), Bob Motheral (Big
Ol’ Bad Ass Bob, Baja Veteran) and Mike Ryan
(Stunt driver, Pikes Peak record holder) as
owners/drivers. Mike Reitmayer, Doak Smith
and my wife Debbie made up our capable chase
crew. This year our team name was “Perros Lo-
cos” borrowed from FS 98, and representing
the Los Angeles Fire Dept. in our Truck #98.
This rally style race is a little differ-
ent than the traditional Baja 1000 in that it is
held over four days with three overnight stops.
Each day we had dirt “special stage” sections
ran at top speed, then highway ‘transition” sec-
tions at controlled speeds to the next stage. The
total mileage was 1,242 miles with approxi-
mately two-thirds at race speed over dirt roads
and trails, and one third on highway “transi-
tion” sections. The course is not marked but
instead we used GPS and a route book, which
described the landmarks and mileages to vari-
ous turns and roads.
DAY 1 – Mexicali - just over the US
border into Mexico – Technical inspection,
drivers meeting, last minute preparations for
race day.
DAY 2 – Race day- Left the start
line at 10:07, seventh off the line in our class
of “Vintage Open Truck.” First stage went well
with Bob averaging 71mph! Second stage with
Mike driving, again no issues picking off a few
competitors.. Third stage was my turn, on a
short section just to get used to the truck. My
claim to fame was I beat Walker Evans’ time,
who was the eventual overall winner. OK,
maybe he had a fat tire? It was approximately
400 miles to the Bay of Los Angeles. 9th place
overall in the Vintage Division, third in class.
DAY 3 – Bay of Los Angeles –
worked on brakes which had been fading and
a leaking power steering hose. Found the local
“soldadura” and did the baja fx on the power
steering hose. Mike driving, Bob co-driver
for the 125 mile off road section. 80 mph, bad
brakes, a big dip in the road and Mike rolls the
truck on its side only to be stopped by a “to-
rote” tree. The sap in these trees is blood red
and the truck looked like it hit a cow that bled
all over it! Got some help rolling it back over
and on their way thanks to the #54 and the Sub-
urban guys in #71. Somewhere during that time
the rear sway bar broke causing the truck to not
corner as it should.
When they got to the pit we replaced
the power steering hose with one I had found in
a local auto parts store. Now the power steer-
ing pump was pouring out fuid. One more trip
to the auto parts, two junk yards and fnally to
“Jose’s” house where he took a pump off the
family pickup to get us going. Lost the brake
pads from the left rear caliper, pinched off the
brake line, and ran on three wheel brakes. By
now the rear end is making an awful whining/
grinding noise.
Bob is driving and I am co-driver as
we do the next section of 175 miles to Loreto.
Nursing it along as the rear end is now howling.
We were running short on time from downtime
from earlier repairs. Going through the town
of La Purisima the throttle suddenly sticks
wide open as we nearly hit a car, a fence and
a goat. Get it shut down and stopped. Pulled
the carb off and found a copper vent tube came
loose, fell down the throat, and was holding the
throttle wide open. How many times does that
happen? It’s now dark. Bob is trying to make
up time. We lose the other rear brake and are
now working with the front brakes only. Bob’s
leg is so cramped that he is using his hand to
help move his leg from the gas pedal to the
brake pedal. We get a fat. We arrive in Loreto
at 10:30 pm.
DAY 4 – Loreto, BCS, Mexico –
Mike buys and scrounges enough parts to re-
build the rear brakes. Doak and Mike Reitmay-
er are all over the truck getting it ready to go.
Mike driving, Bruce co-driver – frst
20 miles is a paved speed section. Got schooled
on driving an off-road truck up a twisty moun-
tain road by Mike. Right up until the time he
was passed by a VW powered single seat car
July 2013 • 27
called the Bel Ray Bullet. Changed places with
Mike for a 125 mile section into La Paz. Bur-
ied the front end of the truck in an unseen hole
flled with silt. The lights went out for a second
as we were in a dust cloud and couldn’t see
out. Knocked the front end out of alignment.
No other issues except the rear end sounding
like someone threw some bolts into a garbage
disposal.
DAY 5 – La Paz – All hands worked
on the truck getting ready for the last day - 125
miles into San Jose del Cabo. Bruce driving,
Bob co-driver. Showed up at the start line –
nobody there, where is everybody? Oops, sup-
posed to start at a hotel in La Paz, not 16 miles
out of town where we were. Haul ass back to
the hotel, get there with fve minutes to spare,
start over. This added an extra 32 miles on a
rear end that was rapidly coming apart. Hope it
makes it!
Ran out of La Paz, to the Pacifc
Ocean into Todo Santos, one fat along the way.
Meet our pit crew, get two new spares, pow-
er steering fuid, and a small fre as the fuid
fashed on the hot engine. Then it’s over the
mountains back to the Sea of Cortez side just
north of San Jose del Cabo. Lost the rear brakes
again - To close to the fnish to try to fx it. Last
30 miles on front brakes only. Took a Sunday
stroll and savored our last few miles to the fn-
ish line.
This year there were a total of 148
entries. In the Vintage Divison there were 60
entries. In our class of Vintage Open Truck
we competed against 12 other trucks, includ-
ing Walker Evans, the eventual overall Vintage
winner. We came out 25th in our division and
6th in our class with an average speed of 49.5
mph. It was one hell of an adventure and we
hope to do it again next year.
You can check it all out at http://
norra.com/results.php
P
a
i
d

A
d
v
e
r
t
i
s
e
m
e
n
t
:
28 • July 2013
visit:
www.LAFRA.org
mail:
P.O. Box 41903
Los Angeles CA
90041
phone:
(800) 244-3439
Paid Advertisement:
July 2013 • 29
T
he 11th Annual “Z Awards for ExZel-
lence” luncheon was held on May 16th
at the Warner Center Marriott in Wood-
land Hills to honor public safety personnel who
go above and beyond the call of duty in order to
serve the citizens of the Third Council District
and the greater Los Angeles community. Fox
11 News Anchor Christine Devine presented
the awards to the recipients and the Honorable
Richard Katz served as the Master of Ceremo-
nies. Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa
also offered inspirational remarks.
Founded by Councilman Dennis P.
Zine, the “Z Awards for ExZellence” is in its
eleventh and fnal year and recognizes individ-
uals for their ongoing dedication, commitment,
and “exzellence” in their professional lives and
outstanding contributions in the areas of law
enforcement, public safety, and emergency ser-
vices. At this year’s Z Awards ceremony, Coun-
cil District Three honored personnel from the
Los Angeles Police Department, the Los Ange-
les Fire Department, the Los Angeles County
Sheriff’s Department, and the California High-
way Patrol.
The Los Angeles Fire Department’s
own Captain David Rejino and Firefghter III
Todd Harris from Battalion 17 were among the
honorees.
Captain David Rejino has been a
member of the Los Angeles Fire Department
for 25 years and has been assigned to Fire Sta-
tion 72 in the Canoga Park area since 2008.
During his career, he has held the ranks of Fire-
fghter III, Apparatus Operator, and since 2007,
Fire Captain. Captain Rejino and his crew
provide quality fre prevention education, fre
safety awareness, and disaster preparedness
instruction to the surrounding community. One
initiative is the Halloween Safety and Aware-
ness Program which teaches children and
their families about wearing proper costumes
and understanding the guidelines for risk-free
“Trick-or-Treating.” In addition, Rejino and his
team spearhead a project that educates children,
their parents, and teachers on the importance of
wearing bike helmets, preventing serious pedi-
atric head injuries. Captain Rejino also trains
volunteer frefghters for the City of La Habra
Heights, where he also holds the rank of cap-
tain. Through his passion for this work, many
of the young men and women that he mentors
in this volunteer position achieve their career
goal of becoming professional frefghters. In
fact, one of the current members of his crew
at Fire Station 72 is one of those frefghters he
trained from La Habra Heights.
Firefghter III Brian Todd Harris has
been a member of the Los Angeles Fire De-
partment for 13 years, 12 of which have been
spent working in the West Valley at Fire Sta-
tion 73 in Reseda, Fire Station 106 in West
Hills, and currently at Fire Station 105 in
Woodland Hills. For the past ten years, Fire-
fghter Harris has been a part of the handpicked
40-member Brush Task Force, educating and
verifying compliance of residential properties
to clearance requirements throughout the City
of Los Angeles. Some of his distinctions and
specializations include: certifed member of the
LAFD Tractor Unit, certifed Swift Water res-
cue technician, and licensed commercial pilot
for both fxed-wing and rotor aircraft. He also
volunteers as an instructor for the LAFD Cadet
program in West Hills where he helps prepare
young men and women who would like to pur-
sue a career in the fre service. Prior to his time
with the LAFD, Todd served as an LA County
Deputy Sheriff working in the Custody Divi-
sion, Patrol Division, Gang Suppression Team,
and Warrant Unit. Firefghter Harris continues
in his law enforcement career working on his
days off as a Reserve Deputy.
The other honorees recognized at
the event include: Deputy Darren Martin, Los
Angeles County Sheriff’s Department; Offcer
Adam Smith, California Highway Patrol; Of-
fcer Brian McClary, LAPD Valley Traffc Di-
vision; Sergeant Douglas Winger, LAPD West
Valley Area; and Sergeant Cathy Riggs, LAPD
Topanga Area.
Honoring public safety personnel who keep our communities safe
30 • July 2013
Photos by Rick McClure, EPN
StRuCtuRE FiRE
South LoS AngeLeS
on May 13, 2013, companies
from battalion 13 handled a well
involved garage on fre at 9011
South San Pedro Street.
July 2013 • 31
PHYSiCAL RESCuE
northridge
Photos by Juan Guerra, juanguerra.smugmug.com
Six people were injured in a
three-vehicle traffc accident on
Roscoe blvd on May 8, 2013.
32 • July 2013
July 2013 • 33
O
n Saturday, May 11, 2013 all of the neighborhood fire stations
in the City threw open their doors and invited the community in
for a visit. To increase community awareness of the services we
provide, the second Saturday of each May is designated as Fire Service
Recognition Day. This year’s theme was “Providing Exceptional Cus-
tomer Service - Anytime, Anyplace.”
Along with personal tours of the fre stations, special “Hands-
Only CPR” demonstrations were available at select sites. Community
pancake breakfasts were also hosted at Fire Stations 27, 63 and 86.
Photos by AdAm VAnGerPen - the LA FireFiGhter,
JeFF ZimmermAn - ePn And yVonne GriFFin - ePn
34 • July 2013
July 2013 • 35
“W
hat a glorious evening!” as re-
tired Engineer Roger Camunas
put it. It was indeed an evening
to remember with family, friends and of course
his esteemed fre family who all gathered in
Quiet Cannon’s Cannoneer Room in the city of
Montebello to celebrate, roast, and wish Roger
well. It was a great turnout with fremen and
many of their wives attending from stations
Roger worked at throughout his 32 year career.
Battalion Commander Steve Ruda was Master
of Ceremonies and did a fabulous job speaking
of the brotherhood that is shared in the depart-
ment and enlightened guests as to what the fre-
fghting job entails. His leadership skills were
evident as he conducted the evening’s agenda.
The evening began with a social hour
including hors d’oevres while a montage of
photos created by Roger’s daughter, Cathleen,
was shown. The show included photos from
Roger’s academy days, graduation and various
fre station events like Easter, Thanksgiving
and Christmas gatherings. Prayer was lead by
Chief Ruda and dinner was served. The mon-
tage of photos continued through dinner and it
was enjoyed by all, especially those frefghters
and wives present who were in the photos tak-
en as far back as 30 years ago. Fond memories
were reignited by these nostalgic pictures. Rog-
er’s parents, his sister and several cousins were
in attendance, along with long time friends and
his godsons. Table centerpieces were a fre hat,
ladder and pike pole with an ax indicating each
of the 14 assignments Roger held throughout
his career.
Speakers began with Kurt Tietze, fel-
low engineer and longtime close friend of Rog-
er’s who had everyone laughing as he shared
Roger’s bio with a roasting favor. The ribbing
had only just begun. Capt. Paul Croghan pre-
sented Roger with his Personal Record Book
by way of Afghanistan . . . don’t ask, you had
to be there. Steve Tufts, representing the Relief
Association, presented Roger his retirement
badge. Isaac Burks, retired F/F represented the
City of Los Angeles with a City Proclamation
for Roger and Ray Delgado presented the Ax
from UFLAC. Roger’s captain, Myron Moss,
presented his pin. Captain Moss sat with his
fne crew at table with the centerpiece labeled
Fire Station 50, Roger’s last assignment. Ar-
mando Jurado and Rick Reyes represented
50-A crew and presented Roger with a beauti-
fully handcrafted wooden badge adorned with
a cutaway of a 2½ inch four-way valve. A lot
of work went into this huge plaque and Roger
was humbled. His shift also presented a second
plaque indicating all of Fire Station 50’s shifts
A, B, & C’s names bidding him farewell.
In between presentations, Roger
came up to speak. He announced that his wife,
Josie, also shared in his 32 year career holding
down the fort at home when his job kept him
away from family functions, his daughter’s frst
steps etc. He presented her with a gold retire-
ment badge and said she is the chief at home.
Nice going Roger!
The evening was capped off with
a video put together by longtime high school
friend, David Gonzalez. David works at ABC
and is a 4-time Emmy winner who began work-
ing on this video in November. It was a 20
minute compilation of Roger leaving home for
work on his last day, interviews with fremen
about what it was like working with the retiree
and homage to Roger. The video was narrated
by LAPD Retiree, Rick Alatorre, also a long
time friend and fellow Salesian High School
alum. Some special surprises for Roger includ-
ed an interview with his wife, and his daughter
letting dad know he is her hero. His godsons
also played roles in video. Included was cov-
erage of the 1988 First Interstate building fre
that Roger fought from the inside. The creative
video was enjoyed by all.
At the end, Roger came up to express
his gratitude to Chief Ruda for his presence that
night, and to all who took part in the humorous
yet heartfelt presentations. He thanked all fre
personnel in attendance and shared that every-
one present this special night played a part in
his successful career. He was a grateful man.
Indeed a night to remember.
Farewell Engineer Camunas! Enjoy
retirement!
36 • July 2013
Mark you calendars
for the August outing
August 2nd - 9th
Come join the us at beautiful Lake McClure
in Snelling, California
For some great family fun!
For Information Contact
Gary Maga (FS 69C)
(661) 755-6072
Dale Shrode (FS 60C)
(661) 713-7664
July 2013 • 37
O
n March 4, 2013, co-workers, family and friends gathered on the
Drill Deck at FHMTC to honor Debbie Brown and Glen Olson
as they set to leave the Department after many years of service.
Debbie Brown had over 30 years on the job, with Glen Olson reaching
more than 32 years.
Part of the fun for us was putting this together. All of us in
Medical Liaison learned much about these two.
Debbie came on the job at age 26, attending LAFD’s para-
medic training. She has worked in the feld at some of our more interest-
ing stations - from 34’s to 15’s for 2 years. Being at 15’s she worked the
Olympics, which was ‘pretty cool’. Then 26’s to 3’s to 9’s from ’85 to
’87. Then three years at old 27’s. She worked a year at 10’s before mov-
ing on to a training position as our frst female EMS captain. We who
know her energy are confdent she made that new position sparkle. She
worked at Quality Assurance for two years, and then on to MLU for four
years before developing the Wellness Program as the frst female Captain
II. She dislikes this moniker, but her legacy shows her qualifcations.
Her energy and her background in kinesiology built that program into
something worthwhile for all members.
Then in October of 2004 she became the Commander of the
Medical Liaison Unit. Here she worked for all of us. Many phone calls
come in asking for Captain Brown. All of us out there knew who would
get our problem fxed.
She helped design the PAP program. The Prior Authoriza-
tion Program helps us receive more timely treatment without having to
go through the UR program. Shoulder treatment would take up to six
months before an MRI. Now MRI’s, physical therapy, specialist are re-
quested and approved upon First Care.
Glen came on the job at age 27, after years as a butcher. He
also began as one of our well-needed paramedics. He traveled through
many of our downtown and mid-city stations. From 10’s, 26’s and 45’s
into Hollywood at 35’s for four years. Then for a little Harbor time at
38’s. From there he went to Disaster Preparedness and Quality Improve-
ment; using his paramedic talents helping to fne tune the care we give
to all our patients. He then became the frst paramedic to become an
Inspector in our busy Brush Unit. After eight years working in the brush
and as acting captain for his last year there, Glen promoted to captain and
came to our Medical Liaison Unit. For his last six years on the job, Glen
worked with Debbie to help all of us get through our injuries and sick-
nesses. Glen was also the timekeeper for all of you who were transferred
to Accounting during your recovery. At one point the paychecks for more
than 100 members was in his capable hands.
Glen is now taking care of his youngest son, Jonathan, who is
11, and his father, who is 92. Glen can be seen around the West Valley at
different eateries. But his next project is his second science fction book
that he’s been working on.
We had quite a crowd here at FHMTC. Chief Ruda did a great
job as MC. Chief Palacios presented Glen and Debbie the City Letter of
Appreciation. Chief Yamahata presented their city service pins. Chief
Nida presented the Retirement Badges; Captain Tobey, representing
UFLAC, presented Ax and Shield Plaques. Debbie’s daughter, Allie, and
son, Scott, talked about their mother and what a great change it will be to
have her home 24/7. Glen’s father talked of his appreciation for the life
his son had with the Fire Department. Dr Scott gave a farewell address
talking about how long she would be on the phone working to clear up
a member’s issue. Captain Kepner talked of Debbie as a friend, workout
partner and mentor. “Because Debbie was such an incredible leader…
she will be greatly missed, with her abundant knowledge and compas-
sion” having been passed on to the Unit for all to beneft. “We will never
be able to replace Debbie and are so thankful for her.” Her legacy has set
the standard for how this unit must be run.
by tom yost, CAPtAin, mLU
38 • July 2013
BoBBY “MooSE” MIHlHAUSER, Captain II
Fire Station 73-A
FRIdAY, JUlY 19, 2013
Marriott Warner Center
21850 Oxnard Street, Woodland Hills CA
Social: 6:00 PM Dinner: 7:00 PM
Chicken or Tri-Tip - $50 includes dinner & gift
Call Fire Station 73 - (818) 756-8673. RSVP by July 17, 2013
RoBERT “BoB” FRANCo, Assistant Chief, South Division-C
FRIdAY, JUlY 26, 2013
Ports o’Call Restaurant
1199 Nagoya way (Berth 76), San Pedro CA 90731
Social Hour: 5:30 PM Dinner: 6:00 PM
Buffet Style dinner - $50 includes tax & tip
Followed by live music - Casual Attire
Call EIT South Division - (213) 485-6285 or
Rachel-FPB Harbor (310) 732-4593. RSVP by July 16, 2013
RICH HANSoN / FREd RAMSEY / JERRY BRoWN
Captain / Apparatus Operator / Firefghter, FS 80-C
FRIdAY, JUlY 12, 2013
Fire Station 80
7250 World Way West, Los Angeles CA
Social Hour: 11:00 AM Lunch: 12:30 PM
Buffet lunch - $10

Call Fire Station 80 - (213) 978-2180 or Lorenzo Brazley - (909) 731-9274.
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THoMAS SoMERS, Captain, MFC-C
TUESdAY, AUGUST 13, 2013
Knollwood Country Club
12024 Balboa Blvd, Granada Hills CA 91344
Social Hour: 6:00 PM Dinner: 7:00 PM
Buffet - $50 includes tax, tip & gift
Call Natalie Goshi - (213) 576-8900
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Wanted
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July 2013 • 39
JAY “JAYBIRd” FREEMAN, Engineer, FS 15-A
SATURdAY, AUGUST 24, 2013
Jay’s large backyard
1970 Fullbroke Drive, Thousand Oaks CA
Social Hour: 3:00 PM Dinner: 4:00 PM
BBQ - No cost. Just show up!
Very Casual Summer Attire
Call Fire Station 15 - (213) 745-8841.
BRAdlEY GRoSSMAN, Apparatus Operator, Fire Station 48-C
WEdNESdAY, AUGUST 21, 2013
Ports o’Call Restaurant
1199 Nagoya Way, Berth 76, San Pedro CA
Social: 6:00 PM Dinner: 7:00 PM
Buffet - $55 includes tax, tip & gift
Call Fire Station 48 - Bus: (310) 548-7548 or Grapevine: (310) 832-4768
RSVP by August 19, 2013
MIKE o’GoRMAN, Captain I, FS 48-B
SATURdAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2013
Elk’s lodge #966 - San Pedro
1748 Cumbre Drive, San Pedro CA 90732
Social Hour: 1:00 PM Lunch: 2:30 PM
Buffet - $40 includes tax, tip & gift
Call FS 48 Grapevine - (310) 832-4768
or Rachel-FPB Harbor - (310) 732-4593. RSVP by September 6, 2013
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40 • July 2013
H
ow’s the condition of the tools in your
workroom? Your treadmill? Your ice
machine?
We all know that tools get break, get
lost and misplaced, or have to be replaced. But
you have to have something to work on the
equipment and apparatus.
Your treadmill has thousands of
miles on it and is beyond the state of repair. It
must be replaced so you can stay in shape for
the demanding job at hand.
Your ice machine just doesn’t keep
up, especially during the hot summer months
when you really need it the most. It’s gotta go!
Your station demands an ice machine that will
produce enough ice to keep your water cold on
those hot days. And don’t forget how much that
ice gets used every day at the fre house.
So, how do you get what your station
needs? If your account at the Credit Union is
tapped out and your house dues person says the
station can’t afford another loan - now what?
In these fnancially troubling times,
many members have found success thinking
“out of the box” to make their fre station a bet-
ter place to work and live. This article is meant
show you that there is funding available right
under your very nose. Many members who are
aware of these options have had success getting
supplemental funds to fnance the costs of run-
ning a fre station.
Some of the fnancial resources fre-
fghters have available to them come directly
from their local councilman’s offce. Didn’t
know that? Most frefghters do not know of
this potential funding stream so let me explain
the subtle nuances of this program.
Each councilman’s offce has what is
called “discretionary funding,” but in the pres-
ent budgetary world, the sources of funding are
far less than in the past. Some discretionary
money has to go to 501(c)3 recognized chari-
ties. 501(c)(3) charities are exempt from taxes
and are tax-deductible for those who donate to
the charity. These include religious organiza-
tions, scientifc research, public safety testing,
literary charities, educational charities, nation-
al or international sports competitions for ama-
teurs, arts promotions, and organizations work-
ing to prevent cruelty to animals and children.
So, after the councilman’s offce
gives to their selected 501(c)3 charities, there
is money left over for other discretionary dona-
tions like the local fre station in their district
which is in dire need of many things.
My main advice for any members
who wish to explore this funding stream is to
remember that donations revolve around re-
lationship building. Each offce has a Public
Safety Deputy (PSD). Often, as in the case in
Council District 12, that PSD is a retired LAPD
offcer with more knowledge and perhaps a bias
toward the police. Any request for funding will
go through that person. It is imperative to have
a personal relationship with the PSD so take
the initiative and reach out. It might be good to
have the PSD over for lunch, and allow him/her
to see the condition of the station. If the PSD
is a retired police offcer, they are in their own
element walking into the police station, chat-
ting with the offcers, and fnding a way to help
with say, some night vision goggles for the vice
squad. They may not immediately understand
an extra chainsaw issue at a fre station. These
issues need to be explained in detail with an
emphasis on public and frefghter safety.
There is no citywide formal process
to obtain these funds. If a fre station needs an
icemaker, tools, treadmill etc., a captain at the
fre station could ask the PSD about procuring
the necessary funds. But in all likelihood, they
will require an email to the council member
from one of the captains with the request. The
request should obviously explain the need, and
try to tie it into the public good.
Another source is the Neighborhood
Council. Again, relationships are key. Fire sta-
July 2013 • 41
mundane tasks like data entry. There is one
overall station commander for the station,
who meets regularly with these groups, plus a
community relation’s team led by a sergeant.
Contrast that with three equal LAFD battal-
ion chief’s with a small offce at a station, no
community relations staff and no volunteers.
Some of these differences are cultural; some
are because of the nature of the work.
An example of LAPD fundraising
in Devonshire Division is a group called Sup-
porters Of Law enforcement In Devonshire
(SOLID). They are a 501(c)3 and do two ma-
jor fund raisers a year: a pancake breakfast
at the station and a pasta dinner at a church.
As the end of the year approaches, SOLID
asks the Neighborhood Councils in the Dev-
onshire Division to fund specifc projects.
LAPD has been at this fundraising game for a
long while and it shows.
Could members of LAFD employ
some of these tactics? It would require extra
work and tenacity on the part of the members
to persevere. As more time passes, the con-
straints of fnding new sources of revenues
will become more diffcult. The historical
sources of revenues such as fundraising or
donations are in competition with an increas-
ingly large group of organizations also fght-
ing for the donations. There are lots of good
organizations trying to get the attention of
donors and benefactors so they can get their
share of the pie.
So, will it be your fre station that
decides to give any one of these options a
try? Maybe the members of your station don’t
want to be bothered by attending any meet-
ings that they are not obligated or ordered to
attend. Maybe they don’t want to put forth the
effort to reach out to their local City govern-
ment offcials. Maybe they’re happy with the
status quo at the fre station and just want to
be left alone. But just maybe someone will
take the reins and explore the different op-
tions to fund your station. If you do, I think
you’ll fnd that success really wasn’t that hard
after all. Good Luck!
Acknowledgments to Pat Pope,
Porter Ranch Neighborhood Council, and
Isaac Burks (LAFD Retired), Council Dis-
trict 4 for their help with this article.
tion members should try to regularly attend
the Neighborhood Council meetings to build
the relationship and remind them that YOU
ARE THEIR FIRE STATION. The captain
may want to ask for a few minutes at a meet-
ing to discuss local issues. Station boundaries
and Neighborhood Council boundaries don’t
necessarily align, so a station could be in
two Neighborhood Councils, or two stations
could be in the same council.
Neighborhood Council funding
has dropped every year, just like everywhere
else. Still, the February/March timeframe is
when Neighborhood Councils start looking
at end-of-year projects and funding. Some
Neighborhood Councils expend their budget
early and have no money left, while others
may still have money left and are looking for
a project to fund. With Neighborhood Coun-
cils, buying something is much easier with a
credit card than a check. Typically, the fre
station will work with a Neighborhood Coun-
cil Board Member who can advocate for the
purchase at a board meeting. It’s best to be as
specifc as possible, like: Stihl MS 211 C-BE
chain saw available from “John’s Lawnmow-
er and Saw” for $357.94, for clearing downed
trees and branches during windstorms. Al-
though a new microwave or gym equipment
is very possible, starting with something that
will serve a visible public good is an easier
sell. Unless the captains have complete conf-
dence that their board member can answer all
questions from the board or the audience, the
frefghters should be present when their item
comes up at meetings. A busy engine com-
pany can usually work with the president so
their item comes up frst on the agenda when
they can be there to answer questions.
Another source is the LAFD Foun-
dation (http://supportlafd.org/). They are a
501(c)3 organization and requests could be
funneled through them to your Neighborhood
Council. Check with them about their rules
and remember that they were established to
help you with these needs. They have been
successful with Neighborhood Councils for
funding in the past and they may be able to
help your station when you need them the
most. Neighborhood Councils love to fund
things in their neighborhoods, which explains
why it’s one of their primary jobs and where
they see the best results.
Let’s face it, LAPD is just plain
better organized to get funding from the
council member’s offce, Neighborhood
Councils and the public. Even though LAPD
station boundaries are generally smaller than
battalion boundaries, there is a central point
for relationship building with the citizens.
Often there is an organized group of support-
ers or boosters for a specifc police station
that do fund raisers for offcer’s needs that
the city doesn’t cover. There are volunteers
in each police station that handle routine or
Paid Advertisement:
42 • July 2013
July 2013 • 43
O
n July 3rd, 2012 at approximately at
approximately 0347 hours, Engine 14
responded to a structure fire at 500
E 32nd St. Upon their arrival, they observed
a large 2-story, wood framed, single family
dwelling with fire on the front porch. Once the
fire was extinguished, the captain conducted his
origin and cause investigation and determined
the fire originated on the couch and extended
up the exterior wood siding. The homeowner
informed the captain that they are having prob-
lems with a neighbor and have video of his ve-
hicle driving by the location just prior to the
fire. An A-Unit was requested, collected evi-
dence, identified a suspect and presented the
case to the DA which also included several pri-
or vandalism incidents. Unfortunately, because
no one actually observed the suspect ignite the
couch, the DA decided not to file the case.
In the meantime the suspect contin-
ued to harass the family, throw billiard balls
through the windows of the home and violate
his Restraining Order.
On February 24th, 2013 at approxi-
mately 0218 hours, Engine 14 was dispatched
non-emergency to a “fre-out” incident at 500
E 32nd St. Some of the members immediately
recognized the address from the previous fre
they responded to in back in July.
On this incident when they arrived at
the scene all they observed was minor sooting
to the concrete walkway and large glass frag-
ments from a destructive device, AKA Molotov
Cocktail. The homeowner immediately sus-
pected the same individual as the prior incident
and even had video of the Molotov hitting the
porch. Again, the suspect was out of camera
range and was not captured on the video. An A-
Unit responded, collected the evidence which
included summiting the glass for DNA and la-
tent prints and identifed additional witnesses.
A few days later the suspect assaulted the ho-
meowner and was arrested. While in custody,
investigators questioned him about the fre to
which he ultimately confessed.
The case was presented to Los An-
geles County Deputy District Attorney Sean
Carney who is assigned to the Arson Section of
Target Crimes. DDA Carney fled a fve count
felony complaint which included: Use of a De-
structive Device, Attempt to Burn, Stalking,
Assault with a Deadly Weapon and Disobey a
Court Order. Bail was set at $720,000.00.
On April 23rd, 2013, the suspect
pled guilty to one count of Use of Destructive
Device and was sentenced to seven years state
prison.
The dispute between the homeowner
and the suspect had been going on since 2009.
The homeowner and his family were very
grateful with the successful resolution as a re-
sult of the hard work by Engine 14, LAFD Ar-
son Section and DDA Carney.
A few things to remember . . . Even
a boring, routine, non emergency “fre-out” is
still a fre that needs to be investigated by the
incident commander. If during your investiga-
tion you observe physical evidence, have an
eyewitness or a possible suspect, contact an A-
Unit. Obtain good witness, victim and if pos-
sible suspect information. In addition to frst
and last name, attempt to get their date of birth,
phone number and driver’s license number. We
can not follow-up on these incidents without
the proper information. Always look for cam-
eras. We are fnding more and more cameras on
single family residences. If you observe cam-
eras near the incident, note this in you NFIRS
report.
We are here to assist you 24/7. Feel
free to contact us if you have any questions,
comments or concerns.
44 • July 2013
Gentlemen:
Please accept the enclosed donation in
memory of my husband John Schindler.
The article in the Grapevine about the work
party at Capt Vehling’s brought back many
memories of similar times. Though the helmets
are different and the turnouts have changed
since John retired, he’d be as happy as I am
to know that the “brotherhood” (including our
gals too) remains as strong as ever.
God bless all our LAFD family.
Jere Schindler
Klamath Falls, OR
Dear Mr. Kuljis,
The family of Lyndall Bowers wishes
to thank you, and the Firemen’s Relief
Association, for the beautiful fag display.
Dad had many, many stories of his friends and
experiences at Fire Station 12 that will stay
with us forever.
Please pass on our gratitude to the frefghters
of Station 12 for fying this fag in his memory
and presenting to the Association. You are
forever in our memories.
The family of Lyndall Bowers
Alice Bowers, David Bowers & Larry Bowers
Lemars, IA
To the members of Fire Station 107:
Thank you for your help on March 9, 2013
after my fall. I broke my hip and you took me
to West Hills hospital. I have fnally recovered
and I really walked just last Sunday.
Thanks again,
Bob Hromadka
Chatsworth, CA
Send your letters & comments to the editor at: editor@lafra.org
L.A. Firemen’s Relief Assoc.
Please accept this check in honor of Scott
Brady whom I worked with at old 28’s. It was
such a wonderful memory I have of him as a
frefghter. May he rest in forever peace.
Sincerely,
Vaughn Swanson
Mosier, OR
LAFRA –
Please accept this donation in memory of
Mike Ambarian. I will always remember the
crew at old 26’s in the sixties with respect and
admiration.
Bill and Judi Robinson
Newbury Park, CA
John,
Please accept this donation to the Widows,
Orphans and Disabled Firemen’s Fund in
memory of “Iron Mike” Ambarian. He was a
great offcer and friend.
Gary and Linda Hight
Reno, NV
Los Angeles Firemen’s Relief
I wish to make a contribution to the Widows
and Orphans fund in memorial of Mike
Ambarian. Mike and I were longtime friends
having worked together in many assignments.
What a great man, great leader of people, and
to me will be sorely missed.
Sincerely,
John Adams
Camarillo, CA
LAFRA,
This is a donation in memory of my husband
Mike Brumbaugh. Thank you LAFRA for all
that you have done and are still doing.
Christine Brumbaugh
Riverside, CA
Andy Kuljis,
Please accept this donation to the Widows
and Orphans Fund in memory of Leo Dempsey.
Our lives crossed many times during our time
on the job as well as in retirement. He was a
great guy who always did more than his share.
Sincerely,
Harry and Doris Morck
Helendale, CA
Hi Andy.
Please accept this donation in memory of
John Lewandowski – long time gone but not
forgotten.
Guy Miller
Anderson, CA
Andy Kuljis,
Please accept this donation to the Widows
and Orphans Fund in memory of Clarence
Bonesteel. In the early days on the job he came
to my house and did a great job on my den
foor.
Sincerely,
Harry and Doris Morck
Helendale, CA
July 2013 • 45
L. A. Firemen’s Relief Assn.
This is a check in memory of Carol
Villavicencio. She is the wife of Ed
Villavicencio, retired Captain II from the fre
department.
Our families have been friends for many
years. She was a great lady and lots of fun.
She will be missed. Our condolences to the
families.
God bless them all,
The Dick Dunavant Family
Ventura, CA
LAFRA –
Please accept this donation in memory
of Charles W. Johnson – a true friend and a
member of a great crew at “old “Fire Station
11.
Sincerely,
Ed and Anna Adam
Avila Beach, CA
LAFRA –
Please accept this donation to the WODFF
in memory of my good friend Leo Dempsey.
Leo was a wonderful friend and a dedicated
retired man of the LAFD museums, putting
many hours of labor restoring rigs on display in
Hollywood and San Pedro.
He and his wife Donna were always active
with their photo studio years ago taking family
photos, mine included. We shall miss he and
Donna dearly.
Sincerely,
Hank Huizinga, LAFD retired
Reedley, CA
visit:
www.LAFRA.org
mail:
P.O. Box 41903
Los Angeles CA 90041
phone:
(800) 244-3439
Paid Advertisement:
Dear Andrew,
I wish to extend my sincerest gratitude and
thanks for the wonderful tribute you and the
Firemen’s Relief Association paid to my dad
for his years of service with the Los Angeles
Fire Department.
The fag and beautiful encasement with
my dad’s name and years of service will be
displayed with honor in my home.
The men and women of the Los Angeles
Fire Department have always shown support,
concern, dedication and excellence in service
throughout the community. It is comforting to
know such a close knit group as this one looks
after their own and others. I commend each and
every person for their outstanding dedication.
My sincerest thanks and admiration,
Mark Bertolo
Long Beach, CA
46 • July 2013
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July 2013 • 47
MEMBERS
GerALd A. LehmAnn, Captain i. Appointed november 01, 1956.
retired on A service pension July 29, 1989 from fs 73-A.
Passed away aPril 27, 2013.
FrAnk L. bUChAnAn, FireFighter. Appointed november 18, 1942.
retired on A service pension februAry 21, 1971 from fs 52.
Passed away May 05, 2013.

derek W. PArker, apparatus OperatOr. Appointed August 11, 1980.
retired on A service pension mArch 12, 2001 from fs 89.
Passed away May 06, 2013.

WArren G. Pietro, Captain. Appointed november 02, 1948.
retired on A disAbility pension mArch 01, 1966 from lAfd heAdquArters.
Passed away May 03, 2013.
miChAeL J. AmbAriAn, BattaliOn ChieF. Appointed februAry 09, 1963.
retired on A service pension June 06, 1993 from fire prevention bureAu.
Passed away May 08, 2013.
CALVin s. rAsmUssen, Fire inspeCtOr ii. Appointed november 02, 1948.
retired on A service pension november 01, 1968 from vAlley fire prevention.
Passed away May 10, 2013.
FAMILY
kAryL J. rotte, spouse of JAmes r. rotte, Passed away aPril 21, 2013.
mAxine VArner, surviving spouse of mArcell f. vArner, Passed away May 23, 2013.
mUriettA LUttio, surviving spouse of merrill J. luttio, Passed away May 24, 2013.
JenniFer JimeneZ, spouse of lAnce g. Jimenez, Passed away May 26, 2013.
A portion of fre-related
jewelry profts donated to
the Widows, Or phans and
Disabled Firemen’s Fund.
Paid Advertisement:
48 • July 2013
July 2013 • 49
by Mike Mastro, President/CEO
Los Angeles Firemen’s Credit Union
O
ne of the important components to con-
sider for providing financial stability
for you and your family is making sure
you have a sound investment strategy. There’s
no master blueprint to determine: where you
should invest, which investments offer the best
return, or how much money you should start in-
vesting with. Responses to these questions are
as different as your fingerprint. Your best op-
tion should be based on your lifestyle, interests,
resources, and tolerance for risk.
In today’s economic environment,
many people believe that an income property
serves as a good investment. For this month’s
article, I’ll discuss the benefts of investing in
an income property.
Is an investment property right for me?
Investing in an income property is
similar to owning your own business – it’s not
for everyone. Getting started with an income
property does not require experience (although
it would be an added beneft), but it does re-
quire due diligence. Unless you are purchasing
the property for cash, you may need fnancing.
If so, a borrower should be in a good cash posi-
tion (a cash reserve of at least six months) and
have a down payment of 30%-35% of the pur-
chase price. Similar to a business, you can be
the sole investor or pool the funds by seeking
additional investors. Consider choosing family
or friends as additional investors, but do ensure
that your partners have knowledge, experience,
and integrity.
Tax shelters
The benefts of investing in an in-
come property can be fnancially rewarding.
Like a business, there are specifc tax deduc-
tions that can beneft income property owners.
For details of the tax benefts, please consult a
tax advisor.
Types of income properties
As previously mentioned, the type of
income property to invest in should be based
on your risk tolerance and the property’s abil-
ity to make a proft. It’s a business decision, so
emotions or personal preferences should not be
a factor in your decision. Therefore, it’s impor-
tant to remember that your opinions of the ar-
chitecture or the internal design are irrelevant.
The major component of your deci-
sion should be based on whether or not there
is a positive cash fow – rental income must
exceed your mortgage and other operational
expenses.
Types of income properties to consider:
• Residential: A residential dwelling with
fve or more units (apartments, trailer
parks, etc.).
• Residential mixed use: A building with
both residential and retail components.
• Retail: A structure rented or leased by
a retail business (shopping centers, strip
malls, commercial business districts, etc.).
• Offce: A property used for a non-retail
business (administrative, headquarters,
etc.).
• Commercial specialties: A property used
for a specialized purpose (self-storages,
parking lots, etc.).
• Industrial warehouse or specialties: A fa-
cility used for manufacturing, distribution,
or food processing.
Location
For a single family residence, loca-
tion is important. For a commercial property,
its appeal should not be solely measured from
residential standards. Although location is im-
portant because the accessibility and accom-
modations of the property may enhance its ap-
peal to a prospective tenant, it should not be the
deciding factor in your selection. It is important
to acquire property in an area you feel comfort-
able servicing.
The three T’s
Another important aspect to consider
is how you plan to manage the property. Should
you seek the assistance of a property manage-
ment company or manage it yourself? If you
manage the property yourself, it will require
much of your time. You will be handling the
three Ts – toilets, tenants, and trash. Are you
prepared to screen potential tenants, collect
the rent, evict tenants, or facilitate the build-
ing maintenance? It may not be a responsibility
that can be juggled with another career.
If managing the property is not fea-
sible, consider hiring a property management
company. With proper budgeting, the benefts
of hiring a professional property management
company will easily outweigh the cost.
Knowledge from the feld
When you’re ready to take the frst
step, seek assistance from experienced pro-
fessionals. They’re your best bet to point you
in the right direction. While prospecting for
properties, a real estate professional specializ-
ing in commercial properties may offer more
information and understanding of the market.
Seek an experienced commercial loan offcer to
assist with the loan process. A good loan offcer
will help you consider your fnancing options.
Also consider tax advisors and attorneys that
specialize in commercial real estate for your
investment property.
Although there are inherent risks in
any type of investing, understanding the op-
tions available to you can help determine your
course of action. At FIREHOUSE Business
Services, we stand ready to provide profes-
sional and trusted guidance, in addition to a
wide range of business fnancing opportuni-
ties. Contact FIREHOUSE Business Services
at (800) 231-1626, Option 6, to discuss your
goals today.
The more business we do together
as a Fire Family,
the greater the fnancial reward will be
for all LAFCU members.
Have a safe month!
Mike Mastro
50 • July 2013
laFd History
Pioneering Underwater FireFigHters
Submitted by Frank Borden • Director of Operations, LAFDHS
LFDHistorical Society
T
he Los Angeles Fire Department is
charged with the responsibility of the
protection for the leading port on the
west coast, Los Angeles Harbor. Today the
LAFD’s unique Underwater Firefighting
Team consists of 18 front-line divers and 6
reserve divers.
In the years following WW II sev-
eral major fres occurred in Los Angeles Har-
bor focusing attention on the fact that a well
involved wooden wharf fre was very diff-
cult to extinguish: April 1947 - the freighter
“Markay” explodes and splits in half, spread-
ing gasoline across the water and igniting the
substructure of several docks. March 1960 -
berth 200-A is accidentally set ablaze. Losses
from these two fres alone were in the millions
of dollars.
The genesis of underwater
frefghters goes back to St. Patrick’s
Day, March 17, 1960. On that day a
spark from a welder’s torch set ablaze
a lumber barge tied up at Berth 200-A.
The fre spread to the adjacent wharf,
burning more than 1100 feet of dock
before being controlled. Also threat-
ened were a huge gantry crane and an
adjacent warehouse. This disastrous
fre, known as the “Matson Dock
Fire,” resulted in over 3 million dol-
lars in damage.
At the time of the Matson
dock fre, Los Angeles Harbor had
more than 28 miles of wooden wharf. The con-
struction of a wooden wharf presents a night-
mare from a frefghting standpoint. Built up
against a concrete or rock bulkhead on the
land side, a wharf is made up of wood pilings
closely set. They support a maze of heavy
timbers and stringers all capped with 4” wood
planking and paved over with concrete or as-
phalt. All this timber is creosote or oil impreg-
nated to retard deterioration from the marine
environment. This open construction invites
rapid spread of fre beneath the decking where
it can travel out of reach of hose streams from
above, and depending on the tides, from fre-
boats on the water side.
Conventional methods for attacking
underwharf fres involved getting well ahead
of the fre and cutting several holes through
the decking starting from the bulkhead and
working across the dock. Cutting these holes
with jack hammers and chain saws was a long
and laborious job considering the acrid smoke
and tremendous heat billowing up from be-
low. Cellar nozzles could then be lowered
through the holes and a water curtain would
be formed across the underside of the dock,
hopefully stopping the fre from spreading.
Often the fre would advance so fast fremen
working from above had to abandon their po-
sitions and move further down the dock trying
to stay ahead of the inferno below. Even under
ideal conditions this method only stopped the
fre from spreading. Extinguishment was very
diffcult because water applied from above
could not reach the seat of the fre.
Fireboats attacking a burning wharf
from the water side often did not fare much
better. Depending on the height of the
tides, the streams of water from a fre-
boat would often have diffculty reach-
ing the seat of the fre because of the
maze of lumber beneath the wharf.
After the infamous Markay fre in
1947 and the Matson dock fre in
1960 it was obvious a more effective
method was needed to attack under-
wharf fres. Two circumstances set
the stage for underwharf frefghting.
First was the popularity of scuba div-
ing by 1960. Barely ten years from its
introduction, scuba diving had passed
the pioneering era and was now a very
popular sport. Second, the LAFD had a ready-
made team of divers in its ranks. Members of
the LAFD Neptune’s Club were young, en-
ergetic and ready to apply their scuba diving
skills to frefghting.
Assistant Chief W.W. Johnston was
in charge of overhauling the Matson Dock
fre. An avid diver with over 15 years experi-
ence, he reasoned that it might be possible for
scuba divers to attack a wharf fre from be-
low. Scuba divers had a ready supply of fresh
air on their backs and swimming in the wa-
ter they were protected from the heat above.
Members of the Neptune Club were utilized
to recover equipment dropped in the water
during the Matson Dock fre. While the divers
were under the wharf, Chief Johnston decided
to see if it would be possible for them to swim
through the pilings with charged hose lines
Fireboat 2 at berth 174 with
divers going over the side.
Fireboat 4 at a wharf fre drill with divers
and their hose lines and foats.
divers with water curtains on
before going under the wharf.
July 2013 • 51
and extinguish some hot spots still smoldering
beneath the dock. To the divers’ surprise, the
charged hose lines easily snaked around the pil-
ings without hanging up and when turned on,
the nozzle reaction could easily be overcome
by tying a strap from the nozzle around a pil-
ing.
Chief Johnston and several other
offcers were pleased with the way the divers
were able to handle themselves and their equip-
ment beneath the wharf. They envisioned a rad-
ical new plan of attack for future wharf fres,
using trained fremen attired in scuba gear to
make direct attacks to the underside of a burn-
ing wharf. A committee was formed. Neptune
members volunteered to test and suggest ways
to foat frehose and attach nozzles to foating
platforms so they can be operated in the water
and directed where needed. As the new pro-
gram developed, nearly 150 Los Angeles City
fremen were given the L.A. County Life Guard
Basic Scuba Training course. A scuba training
manual was written describing the various new
drills, diving evolutions and procedures.
Drills were scheduled to refne the
divers’ new skills. Simulated wharf fres us-
ing smoke bombs were commonplace in the
harbor. However, these drills did not tell them
what they really needed to know. How much
fre and heat can an underwater frefghter
endure? What about protection from falling
objects? Will the newly designed equipment
work under fre conditions? Can a diver stop a
wharf fre from spreading by setting up a water
curtain from below rather than rely on the old
method of cutting holes from above and lower-
ing nozzles down through the deck?
The answer of course was to experi-
ence a real fre. The opportunity presented itself
when it was learned that the old wooden wharf
at Berths 128 – 130 was to be razed. Permission
was granted by the Harbor Department to burn
up to 300 feet of wharf. Some of the objectives
of the burn were to:
1. Prove that trained fremen with scuba
gear could make a direct attack to the un-
derportion of a burning wharf
2. Determine if the newly developed
equipment worked as well in heat and
smoke as it did in the simulated drills.
3. Determine the effectiveness of set-
ting up a water curtain from below to stop
the spread of fre
4. Test basic attack plans to coordinate
both divers and freboats
5. Gather fre behavior data such as
temperatures at the water surface, smoke
densities at various levels and draft condi-
tions under a burning wharf
6. Develop a better system of commu-
nication between divers, freboats and fre
offcers

The wharf was set ablaze using JP
jet fuel. Three test fres proved that underwater
frefghters can make a direct attack and extin-
guish any wharf fre. Some modifcations were
necessary to the newly designed equipment.
Drills were scheduled to work out the bugs and
further refne the divers’ newly acquired skills.
Outside agencies who witnessed the drills were
the US Coast Guard, Fish and Game, US Navy,
LA Harbor Department and several other mu-
nicipal fre departments.
On September 25, 1963 the Un-
derwater Firefghters had a chance to prove
themselves. The day was hot and dry when fre
broke out on an abandoned cattle loading dock
next to the Catalina Terminal. Due to its depth
and heavy timber construction, it was one of
the most hazardous occupancies in the Harbor.
The alarm sounded in the boathouses and im-
mediately freboats and divers got underway.
The billowing clouds of smoke on the horizon
intensifed as the divers suited up in their scuba
gear. Upon arrival a few last words were ex-
changed as the Underwater Firefghters gave
the thumbs-up and went overboard to deploy
the water curtain. The divers quickly swam the
hoselines and foating nozzles deep beneath the
burning dock skillfully snaking them between
the maze of pilings. After securing the foats
to the pilings they signaled for the lines to be
charged. In seconds a solid curtain of water was
spread across the underside of the dock to keep
the fre from spreading further. Swimming back
to their freboats the divers next advanced fre-
fghting lines. They swam cautiously between
the burning pilings, often ducking beneath the
surface to escape the heat and falling debris.
Their aggressive attack resulted in an immedi-
ate knockdown of the fre.
Again on December 28, 1967, the
Underwater Firefghters were put to the test.
Berth 174 was set ablaze by a welder’s torch
near a can of gas. The fre quickly spread to
several hundred feet of wharf. The Texaco Ma-
rine Oil Terminal was immediately to the south
and was a major concern along with the Texaco
Louisiana, a tanker ship with 30,000 barrels of
crude oil on board. Land companies along with
freboats and divers immediately responded to
the blaze and made a coordinated attack. The
Underwater Firefghters quickly set up two
water curtains, one at
each side of the blaze and
also advanced frefght-
ing lines to the underside
of the wharf. Fireboats
2 and 4 pumped a com-
bined 25,000 gpm for the
better part of six hours.
While the divers made
nearly 90 sorties beneath
the burning wharf, only
one diver was injured.
Fireman Charles Hilger
suffered a torn ligament
and required surgery to
repair the damage. Pre-
caution had to be taken because of the close
proximity of the divers and freboats and the
limited visibility due to the tremendous amount
of smoke. With the fnal knockdown of the fre
the Underwater Firefghters once again proved
their value on the waterfront.
In addition to their frefghting duties
and station responsibilities, the divers are of-
ten called upon for various waterfront related
incidents. With the increase of shipping and
commerce passing through LA Harbor, it’s not
uncommon to have a dockworker or a vehicle
accidentally end up in the bay. The divers can
be called upon to use their underwater rescue,
or search and recovery skills as necessary. They
also respond to sinking boats to plug leaks in
hulls or dive down and stop leaking fuel and oil
tanks until the boats can be raised. Divers also
play an important part in maintaining the fve
freboats in the Harbor. Regular hull cleanings,
along with zinc plate inspections and replace-
ment are all part of a diver’s responsibilities.
The divers also play an important role in fre
prevention. They’re involved with interagency
preparations for large scale emergencies, i.e.,
Coast Guard, Port Police, Harbor Department
and the Long Beach Fire Department.
Since 1960, the LAFD’s Underwater
Firefghters have proven themselves again and
again to be a valuable tool in the protection of
the Los Angeles Harbor. Today’s divers carry
on the traditions pioneered by those who came
before them.
Thanks to Bill Dahlquist for back-
ground information and photos.
Frank’s note:
Mark Howell was an engineer on Fireboat 4
for more than 20 years and now volunteers at the Harbor
Museum and on the restoration of the Ralph J. Scott Fire-
boat. His hobby is hard hat diving, and with his divers club,
puts on many demonstrations and lectures. Come and meet
Mark and learn more about the dive program and see the
diver displays in the Harbor Museum.
Bill Dahlquist was the Pilot on the Ralph J.
Scott for 17 years and was one of the frst members of the
LAFD dive team. He volunteers at the Hollywood Fire Muse-
um and is our supervisor on the freboat restoration project.
See Bill for some great stories about the pioneer divers and
about the harbor.
A recent drill with boat 2 and a
diver simulating a water rescue.
52 • July 2013
torical Society so it could be displayed. In May
this came true when she contacted us and we
received her generous donation which is now
displayed in the Harbor Fire Museum. We are
so grateful to Betty Paetz for this wonderful do-
nation and photos of Les and his pilot friends.
A great piece of LAFD History that we now
have for many to enjoy.
July 2013
Calendar for
July & August 2013
MEMORIAL DAY MAY 27, 2013
The Green Hills Memorial Park held
their annual Memorial Day event in Rancho
Palos Verdes. Each year they invite our Histori-
cal Society to participate in the parade of color
guards. Bill Dahlquist and Don Dodd marched
behind the LAFD color guard dressed in the
LAFD vintage uniforms carrying a parade axe
and speaking trumpet. It was an outstanding
event. The sky diver in the photo is retired US
Army Sgt. Dana Bowman. While a member of
the Golden Knights parachute team he collided
with his team member on a jump and lost both
his legs. His friend and team member died in
the accident. Dana now spends much of his
time working with other amputees and physi-
cally challenged people and gives inspirational
LAFD HELICOPTER 5 MODEL
Les Paetz was one of our early heli-
copter pilots when the program started on the
LAFD. He few for 20 years before retiring.
During his career he built a large scale fying
model of LAFD Helicopter 5, the Department’s
frst Jet Ranger from the Bell Helicopter Com-
pany. Les had a special place for this frst new
helicopter since he and another pilot few it to
LA from the Bell factory in Texas. He built the
model and few it several times as witnessed
by Stan Matesich, retired LAFD Engineer and
long time family friend. Les has passed away
leaving the model copter with his wife Betty
Fay who lives in San Pedro. For some time she
has thought about giving it to the LAFD His-
LEFt: Sgt. dana bowman parachutes into the event at
Green Hills just before his keynote speech. An awesome
sight appreciated by all. RIGHt: LAFdHS members bill
dahlquist on the left and don dodd on the right ready for
the Memorial day color guard parade.
speeches as he did at
the event after he para-
chuted down. It was a
great program attended
by several thousand
people to pay tribute to
our fallen military men
and women. Medal of
Honor recipient Lt. Mi-
chael Thorton, a retired
Navy Seal, gave a spe-
cial tribute to the Seals
who have paid the ulti-
mate sacrifce for our country.
It was a great event and
experience to be there and hope
we can return with many of you
next year.
AboVE: Mrs. betty Paetz at home describing
how her husband Les built and few his model
of LAFd Copter 5. LEFt: the model of Copter
5 is on display at the Harbor Fire Museum.
August 2013
July 2013 • 53
The Hollywood Museum is located in “Old Fire
Station 27” at 1355 No. Cahuenga, Hollywood,
CA 90028. The Harbor Museum is located in San
Pedro City Hall at 638 S. Beacon St., San Pedro
CA 90731.
Anyone interested in joining our great cause by
becoming a member, or volunteering to work, or
make a donation of money or an LAFD item may
contact us by mail:
LAFDHS Museum & Memorial
1355 No. Cahuenga Blvd.
Hollywood, CA 90028
Phone: 323 464 2727. But remember we are cur-
rently staffed part time, so leave a message and
we will return your call. The fax number is 323-
464-7401. Our E-mail is: LAFDHS27@aol.com.
Web site at www.lafdmuseum.org. If you want
to look at some great LAFD history check www.
lafre.com. and check the LAFD web site for in-
formation and events at www.LAFD.org. We look
forward to hearing from you and seeing you at the
Museum.
The Los Angeles Fire Department Historical Soci-
ety is a non-proft 501 (C) (3) organization.
“PRESERVE, EDUCATE, MEMORIALIZE”
It’s a motto reghters live and breathe. The moment someone is
hurt, sick or passes away, everyone wants to know “How can I help?”
By making a planned gift.
“I’ve been so impressed with the Widows, Orphans & Disabled
Firemen’s Fund, I made a charitable gift through my Estate Plan. Giving
through a trust is aordable and I know my contribution will make a
positive impact.”

The Widows, Orphans & Disabled Firemen’s Fund has helped LAFD
families for more than a century. Now you can help make sure it is here
to protect your family and friends for another 100-years, by donating
through your will or trust.
Family first
For information call
(323) 259-5217 or email MCasillas@LAFRA.org
- Marlene Casillas, Development & Marketing Director
PLANNED EVENTS FOR 2013
September
-Annual 9-11 Memorial at LAFD Memorial
(Museum 27), Wed. 9/11
October
-LAFD Memorial at LAFD Fallen Fire-
fghters Memorial, Sat. 10/12
-Fireboat 2 “Ralph J. Scott” 88th Birthday at
San Pedro- Date TBD
-Harbor Museum Group Tour, Fri. 10/11
November
-Marine Corps Birthday at Museum 27,
Sun. 11/10
-Hollywood Christmas Parade- Sun. 11/24
December
-HS Annual Holiday Party at Museum 27,
Sat. 12/14
54 • July 2013
LOS ANGELES FIREMEN’S RELIEF ASSOCIATION MINUTES OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES
May 01, 2013
CALL TO ORDER
Vice President Juan Albarran called the meeting of
the Board of Trustees of the Los Angeles Firemen’s
Relief Association to order at 10:22 a.m.
ROLL CALL
MEMBERS PRESENT:
Juan Albarran, Vice President
Andrew Kuljis, Secretary
Trustee James Coburn
Trustee Francisco Hernandez
Trustee Rick Godinez
Trustee Gene Bednarchik
Trustee Chris Hart
Trustee Steven Domanski
Trustee Jeff Cawdrey
Trustee Craig White
Trustee Steve Ruda
Trustee Barry Hedberg – Pension
Trustee Tim Larson – Pension
Trustee David Lowe – Pension
David Ned Smith - Executive Director
Controller – Todd Layfer
MEMBERS ABSENT:
Trustee Michael Overholser (Excused)
Trustee Robert Steinbacher (Excused)
Trustee Mark Akahoshi (Excused)
Trustee Doak Smith (Excused)
Trustee Steve Tufts (Excused)
Trustee Chris Stine (Excused)
Trustee David Peters (Excused)
Trustee David Ortiz (Excused)
John Jacobsen, President (Excused)
GUESTS:
Robert Olsen, L.A. Retired Fire & Police
Lee Kebler, L.A. Retried Fire & Police
INVOCATION & Flag Salute
Rick Godinez led the invocation. Steve Ruda led the
fag salute.
RATIFICATION OF MINUTES
Juan Albarran entertained a motion to ratify and
dispense with the reading of the minutes of the Board
of Trustees meeting held April 3, 2013. Craig White
so moved. David Lowe seconded. There was no
further discussion or objections.
Motion carried to ratify and dispense with the
reading of the minutes of the Board of Trustees held
April 3, 2013.
VICE PRESIDENT REPORT
1) Juan Albarran informed that Jacobsen and
Steinbacher were in New York visiting with the
fnancial advisors.
2) Juan Albarran reported that Jim Dolan has
handed him the results of the elections for the L.A.
Firefghters Association; President David Frelinger,
Vice President George James, Treasurer Jim Dolan,
Secretary Ray Keene. He also mentioned that the
CSFA directors will be Robbie Cordobes, Russell
Rawls and Dennis Frazier.
3) Juan Albarran mentioned the resignation of Kurt
Stabel and indicated that if anyone has any questions,
to please direct them to Kurt. He mentioned that they
are looking for candidates to fll that position.
4) Juan Albarran mentioned the LAFRA Reunion and
indicated that they have a few events planned. He
indicated that they have flled 30 of the 35 RV spots.
He also indicated that there are members who live in
the area that will also participate. He mentioned that
they will have members of other agencies present to
help with any member questions.
AUDIT COMMITTEE REPORT
Todd Layfer informed that Tonetta Connor, Managing
Partner of Harrington Group, will provide an update
to their audit report.
Tonetta indicated that she had met with the Audit
Committee last month to go over their fndings from
the audit. She stated that the Relief Association
received an unqualifed opinion which means that
they looked at the systems, procedures, documents
and underlying controls and if they are supported.
She indicated that they found everything to be
adequately supported. She reported that last year, the
Association net assets increase $14.2 million with
income exceeding expenses including net gain on the
investment portfolio of about $9 million. She stated
that they found no issues with the internal controls.
She commented that the Association has very strong
fnancials.
Juan Albarran entertained a motion to accept the audit
report presented by the Harrington Group. Craig
White so moved. Barry Hedberg seconded. There was
no discussion or objections.
Motion carried to accept the audit report provided
by the Harrington Group.
INVESTMENT REPORT
Garth Flint presented the investment performance
for the LAFRA portfolio ending March 31, 2013.
He reviewed the market performance compared to
the current environment and future expectations. He
referred to the returns as of March 31st and indicated
that one-year fgure indicates that the portfolio had
underperformed the policy index. He stated that the
policy index is 75% of the S & P 500 and 25% of
the Aggregate Bond Index and indicated that they
are looking at changing the policy index for their
clients because it is not refective of how they are
invested currently. He did mention that the policy
outperformed the Allocation Index for the one-
year, but also mentioned that the composite of all
investments outperformed both indexes in the 5, 7
and 10 year periods.
He referred to Domestic Equities, and indicated
that they are defensive with St. James, Symons and
Stralem in order to preserve capital in down markets.
He indicated that St. James had a diffcult year
relative to the index and ranked in the 95th percentile.
He stated that St. James did very well on their 5,
7 and 10 year returns which was before LAFRA
contracted with them. He mentioned that Cohen &
Steers has been on the watch list and stated that they
are a little more aggressive. He stated that they are
concerned because they are not outperforming on
their 5 and 7 year returns and may consider replacing
them. He referred to Stralem and stated that they are
very defensive. He indicated that they are looking
at becoming more aggressive and fnding a manager
to pair up with Stralem that is a Large Cap Growth
manager that invests in classic world stocks. He
referred to the London Company and stated that their
composite has done very well and outperformed the
benchmark in both the short and long range.
He referred to PIMCO Total Return bond fund
and stated that they have really outperformed the
benchmark. He stated that they have had great
performance out of the BRAVO Fund and indicated
that they are up 25% for the year. He stated that
they had just added Southwest Value Partners and
indicated that they do not yet have numbers for them.
He also stated that he will meet with the Investment
Committee to discuss changing asset allocations.
Juan Albarran asked why there was a negative on the
YTD Net Contributions. Todd Layfer stated that he
will look into that and indicated that it should not be
a negative.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S REPORT
1) David Smith provided an update for the Hope for
Firefghters event and mentioned that Ralphs has
stepped up to be the offcial soft drink and water
provider. He stated that they have 9 food booth
sponsors so far and 9 muster teams signed up for
the event. He indicated that the L.A. County Health
inspectors are pushing to place screens on the booths
because of their regulations. He also mentioned that
from 11:00am – 12:00pm there will be a homeland
security training session in downtown L.A. three
blocks away but it should not affect the HFF event.
2) David Smith referred to the Purchase and Sales
Agreement for the building and indicated that they
are in agreement with the language except for one
issue. He stated that it has to do with the lease-back
option. He stated that they have countered to have the
seller pay the month-to-month carry over lease with
the Credit Union if we had to stay beyond our lease.
3) David Smith mentioned that Jacobsen had
approved the fnal home page for the new LAFRA.
org site and indicated that it should be up and running
in six weeks.
4) Todd Layfer mentioned that he attended an
eight day Nonproft Management class that dealt
with several topics such as board development and
governance, fnancial management, fundraising and
July 2013 • 55
social enterprise. He stated that his take on this class
was that the things LAFRA deals with on a daily
basis are being practiced appropriately.
MEDICAL COMMITTEE REPORT
Barry Hedberg presented the following motion.
The committee recommends and I so move to accept
the applications to the Medical Plan. There was no
discussion and no objections.
Motion carried to accept all applications to the
Medical Plan.
He mentioned open enrollment and indicated that we
have added 27 new members with 61 dependents. He
stated that they are waiting on UFLAC to provide the
number of those who dropped off the plan.
ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE REPORT
Chris Hart presented the following motions.
The committee recommends and I so move to pay
the usual and customary bills in the amount of
$781,532.67. There was no discussion or objections.
Motion carried to pay the usual and customary bills
in the amount of $781,532.67.
The committee recommends and I so move to pay the
professional fees in the amount of $119,708.16. There
was no discussion or objections.
Motion carried to pay the professional fees in the
amount of $119,708.16.
Chris Hart mentioned that the Six Flags Magic
Mountain Firefghter night will happen again this
year on August 23rd. He stated that LAFRA is no
longer required to have a minimum guarantee of
ticket sales. He indicated that LAFRA will only
provide advertisement on the website and Grapevine.
Tickets will only be sold through the Magic Mountain
web site.
The committee recommends and I so move to
approve an additional $4,500 beyond the contracted
amount with CodeSpoke to fnalize the website.
There was no discussion or objections.
Motion carried to approve an additional $4,500
beyond the contracted amount with CodeSpoke to
fnalize the website.
The committee recommends and I so move to
purchase 100 additional fag boxes from the vendor
previously used. There was no discussion or
objections.
Motion carried to purchase 100 additional fag
boxes from the vendor previously used.
RELIEF COMMITTEE REPORT
James Coburn presented the following motion.
The committee recommends and I so move to pay:
The Sick & Injury benefts in the amount of
$7,614.80
The Estate Planning beneft in the amount of
$5,457.95,
The Relief Death Benefts in the amount of $18,000.
There was no discussion or objections.
Motion carried to pay the above Relief benefts.
James Coburn read the names of members who
recently passed and asked for a moment of silence
from the Board.
MEMORIALS
Robert E. Lowe
Ronald P. Marano
Jerry R. Brady
Frank C. Geyer
ASSISTANCE COMMITTEE
James Coburn presented the following motions.
The committee recommends and I so move to accept
the donations in the amount of $3,198.77 to the
Widows, Orphans & Disabled Firemen’s Fund. There
was no discussion or objections.
Motion carried to accept the donations in the
amount of $3,198.77 to the Widows, Orphans &
Disabled Firemen’s Fund.
The committee recommends and I so move to
approve the fnancial assistance applications for
surviving spouses, active and retired members. There
was no discussion or objections.
Motion carried to approve the fnancial assistance
applications for surviving spouses, active and retired
members.
EMERGENCY ADVANCEMENTS
James Coburn presented the following motion.
The committee recommends and I so move to
approve the emergency advancement applications for
active and retired members. There was no discussion
or objections.
Motion carried to approve the emergency
advancement applications for active and retired
members.
SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE REPORT
Rick Godinez mentioned that they will have their
Scholarship exams this coming weekend. He
indicated that they have added the Leadership
category for this year’s program. He stated that they
have 36 candidates and mentioned that two of them
were memorial scholarships. He also stated that
they want the ability for the candidates to complete
the applications online next year. Juan Albarran
indicated that he thought that there were going to be
three candidates for the memorial scholarship. Rick
indicated that he has not yet heard of the third person.
After the meeting it was confrmed there were three
memorial scholarship candidates.
The committee recommends and I so move to award
two memorial scholarships and making an exception
to one candidate that may not be able to participate on
exam day due to taking a placement test. There was
no discussion or objections.
Motion carried to award two memorial scholarships
and make an exception to one that may not be able
to participate on exam day.
GRAPEVINE/WESBITE REPORT
Chris Hart asked the Trustees to spread the word in
their battalions to submit stories to be published in
the Battalion News section of the Grapevine. He also
indicated that they are currently focusing on social
media and mentioned that they have about 1,800
members through Facebook and several more through
other social media sites. He also indicated that they
will soon be looking into upgrading new hardware
and software for the Grapevine staff so that they
could work at industry standard.
SECRETARY’S REPORT
Andy Kuljis indicated that they had asked permission
from the Fire Department to flm a fag raising
ceremony at Fire Station 84. He indicated that if they
approve, they will provide DVD’s for worksites and
will place on the website.
BY-LAW COMMITTEE REPORT
David Lowe indicated that he will have some by-law
changes to present at the next Board meeting.
SETTING OF DATES
1) LAFRA Reunion – May 29th through June 2nd
2) L.A. Retired Fire & Police Annual BBQ June 5th
3) Hope for Firefghters – June 6th
RETIREMENT DINNERS
1) Kenny Myers & Ernie Navarro – May 11th
Newport Beach Vineyards
2) Richard Martinez – May 31st The Castaway
Restaurant
3) James Stiglich – June 12th The Odyssey
4) James F. Cairns – June 15th Mountain Gate
Country Club
5) William E. Thost Jr. – June 28th Quiet Cannon
6) Bobby Mihlhauser – July 19th Marriott Warner
Center
ADJOURNMENT
Juan Albarran entertained a motion to adjourn. Craig
White so moved. Tim Larson seconded. There was no
discussion and no objections.
Motion carried to adjourn. The Board of Trustees
meeting adjourned at 12:00 pm.
Juan Albarran, Vice President
56 • July 2013
donations to Widows, orphans & disabled Firemen’s Fund
May 2013
GERALDINE A. SCHINDLER in memory of
my husband JoHn scHindler
JASON ORTIz from the dads and Kids
HorsesHoe toUrnaMent
GENE H. ALLEN in gratitude to andy KUlJis &
tHe worK oF tHe relieF association
HELEN L. SCHULz
HENRY O HUIzINGA JR. in memory of
leo deMPsey
JOHN J. ADAMS in memory of my husband
MiKe BrUMBaUgH
ANONYMOUS DONATION in memory of
MiKe aMBarian
NICHOLAS TUzzOLINO in memory of
leo deMPsey
RICHARD E. HALSTEAD in memory of
F. scott Brady
W. JOHN HOLST in memory of neil BUllocK
DICK DUNAVANT in memory of
carol J. VillaVicencio
GARY D. HIGHT in memory of “iron”
MiKe aMBarian
CHANG YONG C/O trUst
JAMES E. GILLUM from the siMi Valley
BreaKFast gang
STEVEN SMITH C/O at&t United way
EDWARD H. MC ADAM in memory of
cHarles w. JoHnson
MRS. TED L. WOLFE
HARRY M. MORCK in memory of
leo deMPsey
HARRY M. MORCK in memory of
clarence Bonesteel
WILLIAM C. ROBINSON in memory of
MiKe aMBarian
WALTER KORNBLAU
CRAIG & SUSAN HURST in memory of BoB
& noreen Henderson. We owe them so much.
RUDY RENKA/RUDY’S GARAGE in
memory of dana r. laine
JOHN M. SCHERREI in memory of
leo deMPsey
FRED G. HAARMAN
HUGH G. MARTIN III
FRED G. HAARMAN
leo deMPsey C/O MICHAEL DEMPSEY
WILBERT Q. LEW
BONNIE J. ROWE
JAME F. CAIRNS
KIM COX in memory of MicHael aMBarian
ANITA KALOYERAKIS in memory of my
cousin JoHn woltMann
JERRY SCHNITKER in memory of my great
friend MiKe aMBarian
GLENN WILKINSON in memory of
MiKe aMBarian
Special Board Meeting - March 12, 2013
CALL TO ORDER
President John Jacobsen called the Special Meeting of
the Board of Trustees of the Los Angeles Firemen’s
Relief Association to order at 8 a.m. The meeting had
been noticed to the Board on March 6, 2013.

ROLL CALL
MEMBERS PRESENT:
John Jacobsen, President
Juan Albarran, Vice President
Andrew Kuljis, Secretary
Jim Dolan, Assistant Secretary
Trustee James Coburn
Trustee Jeff Cawdrey
Trustee Chris Hart
Trustee Craig White
Trustee Doak Smith
Trustee Gene Bednarchik
Trustee Robert Steinbacher
Trustee Michael Overholser
Trustee David Peters
Trustee Steve Tufts
Trustee Chris Stine
Trustee Francisco Hernandez
Trustee Steven Domanski
Trustee Rick Godinez
Trustee Kurt Stabel
Trustee Mark Akahoshi
Trustee David Ortiz
Trustee Barry Hedberg
Trustee David Lowe
Trustee Tim Larson
David Ned Smith - Executive Director
Todd Layfer - Controller
GUESTS:
Marlene Casillas, Marketing Director
Paul Butler, NewLeaf California LLC
Building Purchase
John Jacobsen informed the Board that they were
holding a Special Board Meeting to discuss and de-
cide if they will approve entering into a purchase and
sales agreement or continue to lease with LAFCU.
David Smith reviewed the option of continuing to
lease with the LAFCU for an additional fve years
after the two years of the current lease. He informed
the Board of the credit union’s lease price offering for
the additional fve years.
David Smith referred to the specifc property of
interest and showed a summary of the year-by-year
cost compared with the Credit Union lease offering.
He discussed operating costs, property tax and the
opportunity cost for this investment. He briefy dis-
cussed the option of obtaining a loan for the property
versus purchasing with cash. He indicated that if they
decide to purchase the building, they need to sign the
Purchase and Sales agreement which would start their
30-day due diligence period.
Barry Hedberg motioned to approve entering into a
purchase and sales agreement for the stated property.
Chris Hart seconded. Kurt Stabel indicated that they
need to spend an appropriate amount to perform
due diligence including evaluating the seismic and
environmental situation of the property. There was no
further discussion or objections.
Motion carried to enter into purchase and sales
agreement for stated property.
Jacobsen reminded the Trustees of the confdentiality
issue with the building and asked that they not speak
publicly of the potential purchase due to the nondis-
closure agreement that we have engaged into.
ADJOURNMENT
John Jacobsen entertained a motion to adjourn. David
Lowe so moved. Barry Hedberg seconded. There was
no discussion or objections.
The Special Board of Trustees meeting adjourned at
8:58am.
July 2013 • 57
MERCHANdISE
FoR SAlE
2000 HARlEY-dAVIdSoN RoAd
KING. Beautiful Bike! 95-inch mo-
tor, includes seat back and chrome
rack (10K in chrome), 16,000
miles. Asking $9,500. Also for sale,
2004 Honda XR650R, good condi-
tion. HR hop up kit, runs excellent.
Asking $2,500. (909) 838-5929.
LACO Captain, John Mark FS
135-C.
2007 HARlEY-dAVIdSoN Heri-
tage Softail Classic **Firefghter
Edition** Great condition with extra
chrome and after market pipes.
9300 Miles. Always garaged.
Asking $11,500. Call Adam (805)
660-9374.
2008 PRoVIdENCE dIESEl
Cummings 8.3 L, 40X 360HP
5 speed Allison Transmission,
35000 miles with 3 slide outs, 5
TVs. Many upgrades, Vacuum,
exterior entertainment Center w/
TV and BBQ, Cameras, Spot light
w/remote Control, VSD Compass
& Temp monitor System, Custom
Cover, Tow Bar. $145K Mike White
FS 108-B, 661-904-2234 cell.
FoR SAlE: Have a 1890’s barber
chair (antique) purchased in 74
(on the job), from freman who
sold them, $2000, FOB , Arizona.
Appraised 4 yrs ago, $2600 dol-
lars ..Photos avail, Don Gross,
Surprise AZ. dgross18@cox.net
REAl ESTATE
FoR RENT
ATTENTIoN - RooM FoR
RENT!!! 2000 sq.ft Single family
dwelling. Prefer single person.
Newhall / Santa Clarita area 2mins
from costco,10 mins from the
SFV. Large backyard w/pool and
jacuzzi. Washer / Dryer. $850 utili-
ties included. Interested contact
Ernie (818) 326-4054. LAFD mem-
ber. Min 6-month lease. Credit
check upon rental.
FoR RENT. NEW lAKE PoWEll
VIEW HoME.Two separate living
areas, each with own kitchen.
2 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath upstairs, 1
bedroom 1 1/2 bath downstairs.
Take one or both foors. 1500 sq.
ft. view deck. Two Seados and ski
boat available. Call 310.283.8975
HoRSE PRoPERTY, lAKE
VIEW TERRACE - Near FS24. 3
bedroom, 2 bath, newly remodeled
kitchen with granite countertops
and stainless steel appliances.
Formal living room, plus family
room. 3 pipe corrals, arena, 2
barns, trail access. Motor home
and horse trailer parking. Gar-
dener included. Available October.
$2800/month. Eng. Ames (818)
257-4549.
loVElY 110 YR. old HISToRIC
HoUSE to share in San Pedro’s
historic waterfront dist. Private
bedroom with private full bath-
room, kitchen, laundry, air condi-
tioning, spacious back yard, sorry,
no private parking, $700 month.
“Cindy” 310 831-0926.
THIS CHARMING SPACIoUS 2
BEdRooM HoME is centrally
located in the heart of Encino.
Features hardwood fooring
throughout with a large master
suite, bath, cathedral ceilings and
walk-in closets. The upstairs can
be separate with its own entrance.
Downstairs is a bedroom, full bath
and powder room. Big backyard,
garage and additional parking
for RV. $2500 for the above, or
rent just the master suite, $1000,
downstairs for $1500 a month. Call
Tracy (818) 704-9592.
REAl ESTATE
FoR SAlE
BEAUTIFUl BoISE IdAHo
HoUSE. 4000 Sq Ft., 4 bedroom,
3 bath, prime view with Foothills
Nature Reserve (BLM) trails over
back fence, 15 minutes from air-
port, 40 minutes from ski slopes,
overlook downtown. $569, 900
online. MLS# 98505356. Contact
agent at (208) 870-8292.
BEAUTIFUl, SINGlE lEVEl
HoME available in Mill City,
Oregon. Single owner, retired L.A.
Fireman, now deceased. Quiet
neighborhood on dead end street.
Built among trees, gorgeous
meadow behind, unequaled view
of the Cascades. 3 Bdrm, 2 1/2
baths. Natural landscape with
150 yr. old Maple in the side yard.
Plenty of room for RV, boat, trailer
etc. Contact Judy Quillin, 503
559-8643;
email: JudyQ@equitygroup.com
MLS#640292
CUSToM loG HoME- Kings
Canyon Sequoia Area. 4200 sq
ft, 2 story, 3 bedroom/2.5 baths.
Master bed has walk in closet w/
French doors and deck. Large
game room w/bar and wood burn-
ing stove. Huge gourmet kitchen
w/six burner professional Garland
range, Sub-Zero freezer and re-
frigerator. Hard rock maple coun-
ters and maple cabinets. Large loft
with library and offce overlooking
great room with vaulted ceilings
and riverrock freplace. Pella win-
dows and doors. Hardwood foors
throughout, tile in kitchen, laundry
and baths. Central vac. Deck on
three sides. 15 acres fenced.
Tennis court, pool, 2 car garages,
40X60 metal bldg. Septic and 40
gpm well. $650,000. Contact Ray
Oster (559) 338-2220 or email
rsoster1@dishmail.net for more
info and photos.
FoR SAlE. 2 bedroom, 2 bath
condo fully furnished in Barra de
Navidad, Jalisco, Mexico. Short
walk to small fshing village,
beach, restaurants, etc. LAFD
retired. (909) 392-8941.
loVElY 2800 SQ FT 3 bedroom,
2 bath home on Marrowstone
Island near Port Townsend,
Washington. Sits on 4 plus partical
wooded acres with Puget Sound.
230 foot waterfront view. Has barn
for RV storage. City water, oil heat
in foor. Past home of LAFD get
together. Call Vonnie Rogers (360)
385-7544.
oREGoN RIVER PRoPERTY
Chiloquin, Rustic homestead on
73 wooded acres, bordered by
turquoise, clear Spring Creek
river. Artesian well produces 200
gpm. Block built 1926 sq.ft. home,
2BD 2BA, large garage, shops,
barn on private, level land. Boat
house w/boat. Near Williamson
and Sprague Rivers; world famous
trout streams. $625,000 www.
survivalacreageoregon.com
RIVER PARCElS. Three 20 acre
Klammath River frontage parcels
in beautiful Northern California- 30
miles from Oregon. Electricity and
telephone available. Rarely used
County-maintained road runs
through. Very private. 6 miles from
Happy Camp. Each parcel has
more than 700 front feet of river.
$195,000 - $295,000. Contact Troy
Bonar, LAFD retired. PO Box 466,
Happy Camp, CA 96039 or call
(530) 493-2453 or fax (530) 493-
2589 or email: troy@sisqtel.net
SKI THE SUMMIT! BIG BEAR,
4+2, 5 minutes from snow sum-
mit, downtown and the lake. Locat-
ed in the desirable Fox Farm area.
2 story-upstairs 2+1, downstairs
2+1 turn key condition, ready to
enjoy. Fully furnished. Investment
Vacation or Retirement. $359,000
Call Therese (818) 216-4628 or
theresewyman@msn.com
THE lAST BEST PlACE. Own
a piece of Montana. Panoramic
views of Flathead Lake. 3 acres
with a great building site. Adjacent
to forested public land. Access to
fshing , summer water sports and
winter skiing. Owned by retired
LAFD. Listed with Riverbend Re-
alty. Keith at 406-837-1501.
www.riverbendbigfork.com
TRUST SAlE, VAlYERMo, CA –
2/3 completed home located on 20
acres. The house is 2 bedroom, 3
bath, approximately 2000 Sq. Ft.
It is completely framed (metal stud
construction) and enclosed. Rough
electrical and rough plumbing
completed. Solar power and well
with 10,000 storage tank in place.
Large 24’ X 30’ storage building
adjacent to the house. In addi-
tion there are approximately 150
acres connected to this property.
$240,000 takes all. For information
contact; Jim Duzick @ Prudential
Troth Realitors. (661) 547-9750 or
Bill Stires (661) 252-2299 or Tom
Stires (818) 240-7153

SERVICES
BoAT & PWC SToRAGE
Firemen’s discount. 10% off frst
month’s rent & no deposit re-
quired. Winter rates available. Lo-
cated on the Colorado River, close
to launch ramps. All Seasons
Storage 800 North K St., Needles,
CA 92363. (760) 326-2001.
BoB SoUTHWood o.C CoN-
CRETE Specializing in all concrete
needs: Slabwork foundations,
Patios, Driveways, Private Road-
ways, Retaining Walls and Built in
BBQs.Proudly serving Police and
FIre with service and quality for
over 40 Years. We will work with
you! CALL FOR AN ESTIMATE !
CALL BOB @ (949) 697-4864
BUIldING PlANS. Residential:
patios, decks, additions/remodel-
ing, repairs, new construction,
design. Commercial: tennant im-
provement, ADA compliances and
more. George Lavallee (805) 532-
1905 offce. cre8iveanswers@
hotmail.com
CHooSE YoUR dREAM
CRUISE - Princess Cruises, Royal
Caribean, Holland American,
Carnival and more... 3 to 21 day
getaways to Alaska, Hawaii, The
Bahamas and many other exciting
destinations. Call Patricia at (661)
265-9440 or toll free at (877) 7HI-
SEAS, or email pliefeld@qnet.
com wife of LAFD Mechanic,
sister of LAFD Captain.
CRAIG SANFoRd HEATING &
AIR - Free estimates, residen-
tial, commercial. Great rates for
CLASSiFiEdS
58 • July 2013
LAFD and LAPD. Toll free (877)
891-1414, (661) 298-3070, FAX
(661) 298-3069. State License No.
527114
CRANE SERVICE All kinds of
lifts - A/C Units, Spas, Construc-
tion, Beams, Poles, Appliances,
Man Baskets available. Insured
and bonded. Leonard Campbell –
Owner/Operator (818) 340-8907
dJ FoR All oCCASIoNS - You
name it, I play it!! Call Frank (818)
554-7273. Serving San Fernando
Valley over 20 years! “Firefght-
ers are my family.”
doES ANYTHING BoTHER
YoU? Anything at all? Mental,
emotional or physical? Dr. Bob
Price, psychotherapist. LAFD
retired, has developed a model
that puts the fre out fast. It allows
you to overcome almost anything
that bothers you rather quickly.
My book, “Speed Healing,” & DVD
is available at www.priceparts-
model.com. Telephone sessions
granted quickly. Call for telephone
appointment. (619) 461-9527
dRYWAll SERVICE, new
construction, remodel, repair,
acoustic ceilings removed. All
types of textures. Licensed, bond-
ed and insured. Gregg Avery, F.S.
66 “A” residence (805) 494-9037.
FIREFIGHTERS TAXES - Are
you getting the most from your tax
returns? I am a wife of a frefghter
and specialize in their returns, with
60% of my clients being frefghter
families. Taxes done at you con-
venience; my offce or by phone.
Available year-round. TaxPro,
Barbara Ravitz, 661-257-7606.
FIREFIGHTER dISCoUNTS. At
Farmers Insurance Group, I can
assist you in deciding what options
best meet your insurance needs.
Free competitive quotes available
for homeowners, auto, life, RV’s,
boats motorcycles and more. As a
former LAFD and LAPD Commis-
sioner, and coming from a family
of frefghters (3 brothers and 1
nephew), I understand your need
for an agent that can make your
life a little easier. For a free quote,
please call the Corina Alarcon
Insurance Agency at (818) 263-
1723.
GARAGE dooR INSTAllATIoN
& SERVICE. Garage doors and
openers. Need to replace your
broken springs? or does your
door need repair, even replaced?
We do it all from new product to
repairing old. Call (661) 860-4563
Grassroots Garage Doors, Inc.
Lic# 950020. Son of 35 year vet-
eran freman.
PAINTING IN MAMMoTH
lAKES. Need your Condo or
Home painted in Mammoth? I
have been painting in Mammoth
for 30 years. Neat, clean, and
reasonable. Fireman references.
Please call Mark Eddy Painting.
(760) 935-4963 or email:
bobbzz@hughes.net
Lic# 468886.
REAl ESTATE FINANCING.
Interest rates are at All-Time-Lows.
Refnance & Purchase Loans,
Investment/Second Home Loans/
Equity Lines/2nd Trust Deeds, No
Points/No Fees Loans, VA, FHA,
Conventional Loans, Lending
in many other states. Mortgage
lending with exceptional customer
service, integrity, strength and ex-
perience. For your Free Mortgage
Analysis, call (714) 469-8900. Jay
Trementozzi, Mortgage Banker.
DRE# 01113819, NMLS# 241591.
REAl ESTATE SERVICES - Start
a new life in the gorgeous commu-
nities of Temecula and Murrieta.
Top rated schools, world renowned
wineries, numerous golf courses,
lakes, shopping and a great family
atmosphere. Located 78 miles
from HQ between Los Angeles
and San Diego. Call Mike Utley at
(951) 775-8491 (LAFD Retired).
REAl ESTATE SERVICES -
Thousand Oaks, Newbury Park,
Simi Valley, Moorpark, Camarillo,
and Ventura. Representing Sellers
and Buyers for over 20 years.
Please call or email with your real
estate questions and also request
your real estate activity reports
your neighborhood or areas of
interest. Mike Rhodes – Prudential
California Realty. LAFD Retired.
Realtor - BRE License 0177388.
Cell: (805) 501-6044
Email:
mrhodes@prucalhomes.com
REBECCA MARTIN lANd-
SCAPE. Architectural landscape
design and installation. A full ser-
vice design/build landscape frm
that creates unique custom exte-
rior environments that will increase
the value of your home and bring
you years of outdoor enjoyment.
Rebecca Martin, LAFD wife. (818)
216-3637. Lic# 936577. rebecca-
martinlandscape@gmail.com
TAX AlERT FoR FIREFIGHTERS
Don’t lose thousands of dollars
during your professional career to
the IRS! Let HEWITT FINANCIAL
GROUP, the specialists in fre-
fghter tax services, prepare your
tax return and review your prior
years’ tax returns. We specialize
in tax planning and preparation for
frefghters. We also offer FREE
REVIEW of your last four years of
tax returns. Call us today at (800)
573-4829 or visit our website at
www.alhewitt.com
WINdoWS & PATIo dooRS
- vinyl replacement windows &
Patio doors. I also carry aluminum,
wood and entry door systems.
Rick Brandelli, Capt. LACoFD,
FS 8-C (800) 667-6676. www.
GeeWindows.com
VACATIoN
RENTAlS
BIG BEAR CABIN - All season,
restful views from decks. Two
story, sleeps 6, half mile to lake,
two plus miles to slopes. Fire-
place/Wood, cable TV/DVD/VCR.
Full kitchen, completely furnished
except linens. Pets ok. $95/$105
(two day minimum). $550/$600
a week, Beep or Donna Schaffer
1+(760) 723-1475.
www.schaffercabin.com
BIG BEAR CABIN. 2 bedroom, 2
bath, 2 story. Sleeps 8. Near ski
slopes & lake. Fireplace/wood,
cable TV, DVD,VCR, full kitchen.
Completely furnished. $85/$95 per
night. Minimum 2 nights. Holidays
extra. Weekly available. All Sea-
son. Sheri (909) 851-1094 cell or
(760) 948-2844 home.
BIG BEAR lAKE’S FINEST-
Deluxe lakeside townhouse, 2
bedrooms, 3 baths, 2 cable TVs,
HBO, DVD, WiFi, 2 wood burning
freplaces, laundry room, tennis
court, indoor pool, sauna, spa,
boat dock. Fully equipped, includ-
ing all linens. Sleeps 6. 310-541-
8311 or email cindy14@cox.net
BIG BEAR VINTAGE CABIN. 2
minute walk to village. 5 minute
drive to both slopes. Lake view.
2 bed, 1 bath, sleeps 6. Contact:
bigbearescapes.com/pikes-
place
Owned by LAFD member.
CATAlINA BEACH CoTTAGE
- 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, one block
to beach, view, fully equipped
housekeeping unit. Marci (818)
347-6783 or Clarence (310) 510-
2721.
dElUXE lAKESIdE ToWN
HoME. 2 bedrooms, 3 baths, 2
freplaces, washer, dryer, gas
barbeque. Indoor pool, sauna,
Jacuzzi, locker room with shower.
Tennis court, boat dock, cable TV,
HBO. Fully furnished including
linens. 3 miles from Snow Summit.
Sleeps 6 max. (310) 541-8311
FoR SAlE 5 SHARES 18’x70’
2008 houseboat on Lake Powell.
1 master suite & 3 staterooms 2
full bathrooms and 1 1/2 bath. 2
large residential refrigerators in
the kitchen/salon and 1 refrigera-
tor & freezer on the topdeck. Top
deck has 36’ of hard cover and
full bar, BBQ and lounge seating.
2 LCD televisions with Direct TV
and VCR’s. Pictures on request.
Weeks available are week 1 (Fri
after Memorial Day), Week 12
(Aug 17-24), Weeks 14-16 (late
Aug into Sept). These dates vary
from year to year. We are an LLC
corporation incorporated in AZ.
$25,000 annual dues are also ap-
plicable. Call (661) 547-4205.
lAKE HAVASU lANdING-Wa-
terfront, steps to the water. Boat
mooring out front, off-road desert
behind house. 3 bed/3 bath, fully
furnished w/linens. Direct TV/DVR,
BBQ, Casino, Grocery/Meat Mar-
ket, Launch Ramp, Marina with
Boat House, Gated Community.
No pets/smoking. $350 Dan Cook
310 418 1577.
JUNE lAKE CABIN - Scenic
2br/2ba cozy, cabin with views.
5 minutes from Fishing and Ski-
ing. Fully furnished. Wood Deck,
Sleeps 8, wood burning stove,
full kitchen, cable Tv/Dvd, stereo,
phone. Detached garage/room
for boat. Call for summer/winter
rates. Cleaning fee applies. Jeff
Easton 105-A, (805)-217-5602 -
junebound@gmail.com
KAPAlUA, MAUI. Luxurious
ocean view Kapalua Ridge 1 and
2 bedroom villas from $145/$250,
7th night FREE. Fully equipped
with washer/dryer, Hi speed inter-
net, Wi-Fi, cable TV, free resort
shuttle, minutes from ocean. Fea-
tures 3 white sand beaches includ-
ing “BEST BEACH” in the world,
Kapalua Bay Beach, 100 miles of
hiking trails, 2 golf courses with
great discounts, 10 tennis courts,
zip lines, 2 spas, golf academy,
horseback riding, snorkeling,
swimming, surfng, kayaking,
shops, restaurants. Contact Terry
or Diane @ 800-326-MAUI (6284).
www.kapaluavacations.com/
the_ridge.asp or email info@
kapaluavacations.com
lAKE ARRoWHEAd Blue Jay
cabin charming two-story with
creek, large deck, two baths,
complete kitchen, TV,VCR/DVD,
freplace, washer and dryer, walk
to Blue Jay Village. Sleeps 6. $90/
night. NO PETS! Bruce or Sue
Froude, (805) 498-8542.
lAKE HAVASU – BEACH
FRoNT. Located at HAVASU
LANDING RESORT a gated com-
munity on the California side of
Lake Havasu. Swim, Ski or fsh
from the front yard. Buoys in front
of home for overnight boat(s) tie-
ups. No need to launch boat each
day. Walking distance to a CASI-
NO, restaurants and grocery store.
Adjacent to miles of off-road desert
trails, great for ATV’s, 4 wheel-
ers and Motorcycles. Beautiful
landscaping with a lawn from the
home to the lake. Covered patio
July 2013 • 59
with furniture and a gas BBQ. Four
bedrooms with beds for 10.Two full
bathrooms. Check Craigslist for
pic. $350. Per night 10% discount
for a week. For Reservations call
Bud @ 818 352-4422
lAKE HAVASU BEAUTY FoR
RENT - 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1600 sq.ft.
Fully furnished with all ameni-
ties- Laundry & BBQ. 13,000 sq.ft.
lot. 3 car boat-deep garage. 3
miles from launch ramp. Close to
downtown shops & restaurants.
View of the lake. Quiet street in
good neighborhood. No pets. No
smoking. Snowbird rates. Call
Mike (661) 510-6246
lAKE HAVASU CITY. New Cus-
tom 3 bedroom/2 bath home on
lake side of Hwy 95 north side of
town. Quiet street. All the amenti-
ties. 60” TV in living room. TV’s
in all bedrooms. Wireless internet
with on site computer. BBQ on
large patio. Swimming pool. Near
marinas and restaurants. $150
per night. $85 cleaning fee. No
smoking or pets please. Scott at
805-208-1598 or h2oratscott@
aol.com.
lAKE HAVASU HoME for rent.
Built in 2004. 1800 square feet,
3 bedrooms, 2 baths. Newly/
fully furnished w/all amenities of
home. Large garage 20x32 with
tall doors. Large area for guest
parking. Located less than a mile
from lake on a quiet cul-de-sac!
RV hookups. Ask for FF discount.
Call Ryan Penrod (310) 804-1801
or Nicole (909) 263-8177.
lAKE HAVASU HoME - Beautiful
3 bed, 2 bath home that sleeps
8. Lake view, RV access, boat
parking, everything is new. Quiet
street in great neighborhood, just
minutes from London Bridge. Call
John for pricing at (323) 449-4473.
Snow-bird rates and fremen dis-
count available.
lAKE HAVASU Landing Cali-
fornia. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, wif,
DirecTV, BBQ, full laundry, slip-in
marina included, just steps away.
180 degree view of lake and your
boat in slip. Huge covered patio.
No pets. No smoking. Larry Mc
Andress ret 112A (714) 963-9344
or (714) 393-1464.
lAKE HAVASU VACATIoN
HoMES for rent. Each fully fur-
nished with all amenities of home.
Every home has a lake view, pool,
RV access, boat parking, ample
guest parking and sleep up to 8
people. Check out our website @
werenthavasu.com or call (928)
855-5848 or (661) 212-3191.
lAKE NACIMIENTo. Oak Shores
gated community. 3 bedroom, 2
1/2 bath, large loft. 3 minute drive
to main marina in Oak Shores.
Large driveway. Fully equipped
kitchen, BBQ, washer/dryer, TV/
DVD. No cable. No pets/smok-
ing. $165.00/night. Call Ben (805)
444-2264.
lAKE TAHoE GETAWAY 3
bedroom, 2 bath home with all of
the amenities complete kitchen,
washer/ dryer, TV/ VCR. Quiet
neighborhood near the lake, casi-
nos and ski slopes. Call for rates.
Call Cal or Linda @ (805) 584-
2718. www.sltgetaway.com
lAKE PoWEll HoUSEBoAT.
68’ Sumerset. 2 staterooms, 2
cuddy cabins, 2 baths. Will sleep
10 to 12. 2 ref. fully equipped
kitchen, BBQ, TV, DVD, Twin A/C.
Party top, fybridge, V8 drives, 12
KW ge., 100 gal. aux. fuel tank
with pump. Dan Coyle (805) 494-
8854.
lA QUINTA - Gated community,
fully furnished deluxe home, three
bedrooms, three baths on the
10th fairway of the Dunes Golf
Course in La Quinta Country Club.
Two car garage, large patio with
barbecue. No pets, no smoking.
$200/night - 2 week minimum, plus
refundable security deposit. Call
(323) 254-3874
MAMMoTH CoNdo 2 bedroom, 2
bath, Sleeps 5. Beautifully remod-
eled. No pets, no smoking. 150.00
weekdays, 175.00 weekends.
Contact Scott at 310-562-1366 or
at sdefoe313@msn.com
MAMMoTH CoNdo-CHAMoNIX.
2 bedroom & large loft, 3 full
baths, sleeps 8. 5 minute walk to
Canyon Lodge. Fully furnished,
TVs, VCR/DVD, pool, spa, rec
room, sauna, linens included.
Winter $175, $195-weekdays/holi-
days; summer $125, plus cleaning.
No smoking; no pets. Craig Yoder
(909) 948-3659.
MAMMoTH CoNdo Cozy 2
bedrooms, 2 bath. Fully furnished,
WIFI, 3 TV’s, pool, spa, walk to
shuttle, Old Mammoth area. Win-
ter $115, Summer $90, plus maid
$126. Includes linens. No pets, no
smoking. Call (310) 540-4648.
MAMMoTH CoNdo NEXT To
THE GoNdolA VIllAGE – Fully
furnished, three bedroom, two
bath with towels and linens, fully
stocked kitchen, internet and cable
TV, pool and Jacuzzi. Walk to the
gondola, shops, restaurants and
ski in on the new comeback trail.
Parking at the front door. Winter:
$225/night. Summer $150/night.
Holidays $275/night. Cleaning is
included. Call Mike Whitehouse,
Retired, 805-987-6122, email:
btkwhitey@yahoo.com or Bruce
Galien, Retired, 661-645-7448,
email: luvbaja2@aol.com
MAMMoTH CoNdo Fully fur-
nished, 2 bedroom, 2 bath, sleeps 6.
Close to Canyon Lodge, pool, spa,
recreation room, laundry facilities,
condo has been beautifully remod-
eled, photos available, $225 a night
winter - $125 a night summer +
$150 cleaning fee. 3 night minimum.
Call for holiday pricing. Joe Angiuli,
North Division (626) 497-5083.
www.discoveryfour.com
MAMMoTH CoNdo - Fully
furnished, 1 bdrm, loft, 1 1/2 baths,
sleeps 4. On shuttle route. All
amenities: Sauna, Pool, laundry
on premises. Fall/Winter prices.
$100/night. Spring/Summer $85/
night. One time $135 cleaning
fee. No smoking, no pets, contact:
Julian Edwards (909) 573-3815
MAMMoTH - 1 bedroom Sum-
mit condo, sleeps 6. Convenient
underground garage parking,
jacuzzis, gym (pool, tennis in
summertime), shuttle right outside!
Across from chair 15. Winter $110
per night, Summer $80 per night
plus $65 cleaning fee per stay. All
linens included. Drew or Nancy
Oliphant (661) 513-2000.
MAMMoTH CoNdo - MAM-
MoTH ESTATES, 4BR/3BA, fully
furnished, linens, full kitchen, TV/
DVD, stereo, freplace, pool ,
jacuzzi, sauna. 2 blocks from gon-
dola village. 1 block to ski shuttle.
Winter $330/night, Summer $215/
night, plus cleaning. Includes
city bed tax. No pets, no smok-
ing, sleeps 8. Dory Jones (310)
918-0631 or Kelly Corcoran (310)
619-5355.
MAMMoTH CoNdo - 2 bdrm, 2
bath, 2 TV’s, phone, garage, pool,
jacuzzi, fully furnished - exept
linens. Near shuttle/chair 15.
Winter $125/night. Weekends and
Holidays $110 midweek. Summer
$95/night. $495/week. No smok-
ing. No pets. Jim Johnson (818)
992-7564, FS 80C.
MAMMoTH CoNdo - Sierra
Manors Sleeps 7. 3 bedroom 2 1/2
bath. Fully furnished except linens.
2 TVs/VCR/DVD, stereo/CD.
Dishwasher, microwave, sauna,
jacuzzi, pool. No smoking/No
Pets. Shuttle at door. Winter $155/
night, Summer $100/night, Plus
$80 cleaning fee and City Bed
Tax. Brian & Karen Salvage LAFD
Retired (805) 499-7752.
MAMMoTH lAKES - One bed-
room, extremely charming wild-
fower condo. Full amenities, close
to shuttle. Antiques, art, satellite
TV, freplace. Sleeps 4. Winter
$110, Summer $85 plus cleaning
fees. Call (818) 371-6722
Email: shakesong@aol.com
MAMMoTH SKI & RACQUET:
Studio/loft, 2 bath, king bed,
sleeps 4. Full kitchen, TV, VCR,
DVD. Garage parking. Walk to
Canyon Lodge. Ski back wall. 2
night minimum. Winter $100/nite,
$126 Fri, Sat & Holidays. Summer
$50/nite. Plus $95 cleaning &
linens. Jeff & Lisa Moir. LAFD Air
Ops (661) 254-5788.
MAMMoTH CoNdo Wildfower,
1 bedroom sleeps 4, king bed and
queen sofa bed. Fully furnished,
freplace, dishwasher, stereo, TV/
DVD, phone, spa, sauna, pool and
tennis court. Linens and clean-
ing fee. On shuttle route. Winter
rate $100/night, summer rate $70/
night. Mike Greenup (805) 583-
8239 or cell (805) 338-9955.
MAMMoTH SKI & RACQUET:
Walk to Canyon Lodge. Studio loft
sleeps 4. Queen beds, full kitchen,
2 baths, garage parking, TV, VCR,
DVD. Winter Sun-Thurs $100.nite;
Fri & Sat $115/nite plus cleaning
fee $100. Non smoking complex.
Joel Parker, LAFD retired. email:
cat25sailor@juno.com or (213)
399-6534.
MAMMoTH. SKI IN - SKI oUT
at lift 15, 2 bedroom including
master suite, 2 bath condo. TV/
DVD in living room. Good sound
system. Gym, spa, freplace, very
roomy, underground parking,
tennis courts, pools, and outside
BBQ area. (310) 476-4784. Email:
barbarawinters@yahoo.com or
visit website:
www.mammothrental.com
MAUI BEACH FRoNT CoNdo
oN NAPIlI BAY - 50’ from water.
Studios and 1 bdrm. Luxury
furnishings + full kitchen. All the
amenities! Maui’s best snorkel-
ing/beach. All island activities &
Kapalua within 4 minutes. 5-day
minimum, from $150 per night
(regularly $310 night). Call Sherrie
or Bill for info/reservations (805)
530-0007 or email: pmimaui@
aol.com
or visit: www.napilibaymaui.com
MAUI CoNdo 1 ANd 2 BEd-
RooMS. Centrally located on
beautiful Maalaea Bay. Excellent
swimming and snorkeling; white
sandy beach. Minutes from golf,
tennis, fshing, shopping, airport
and resort areas. Marsha Smith or
Jeanne McJannet. Toll free (800)
367-6084. www.maalaeabay.com
MAUI’S MoST BEAUTIFUl
BEACH - Napili Bay. Beautiful
furnished condo with kitchen and
daily maid service. 15% discount
off already lowest prices in the
area. Don Sprenger (949) 548-
5659 or (800) 336-2185.
NICARAGUA SURF CoNdo -
Enjoy UNREAL surf in a FRIEND-
LY SAFE COUNTRY. Golf a new
60 • July 2013
course and hang out by the pool.
Walking distance to beach. 3 bed-
room 2 bath. See for yourself at:
nicasurfnturf.com. Contact Chris
Hart (714) 742-3325 or email:
Chrismhart22@verizon.net
PAlM dESERT-3 bed/2bath,
one level. New re-model, fully
furnished w/linens. Cable TV/DVR,
Private Patio, BBQ, Laundry, Ga-
rage, Gated Community, 2(Pools,
Jacuzzi’s, Tennis Courts). Near
College of the Desert. $175 Dan
Cook 310 418 1577.
PGA WEST (lA QUINTA) TPC
STAdIUM GolF CoURSE
CoNdo. Luxurious 3+2 lake front
condo on the 11th green of the
world famous Stadium Course.
Gated, community pool & spa,
4 TV’s/cable/dvd, washer/dryer,
BBQ, garage, no smoking or pets
please. $150/night w/6 night min. +
cleaning. Seasonal/extended stay
discounts. Buzz - LAFD (949) 322-
7979 PGAWestVacation.com
VACATIoN RENTAl - So Lake
Tahoe, 3 Bd 2 Ba home with
all amenities. Close to Lake,
Casino’s and Ski Slopes $650 wk
or $130 nt $100 Cleaning. www.
SLTgetaway.com. Call Cal or
Linda @ 805 584-2718 or email
LSchlotzhauer@gmail.com
VACATIoN
VEHIClES
MoToR HoMES FoR RENT:
Several 2006 Class A 32’ Foot
Motor Homes, with Double Slide
Outs, Fully Loaded, Free House-
keeping Kit, Camping Kit, Discount
Prices Starting at $150.00 to
$180.00 per night. Serving family
& friends of LAPD , LASD, IPD,
OXPD, OX Fire, LA CO., LA City,
Ski Clubs ask for our 25% off
weekly rental rates. Visit us at
www.so-calrv.com or call 661-
714-7689 or 661-297-2398. ALSO
AVAILABLE BIG BEAR CABINS, 3
bedroom 2 bath with pool tables &
spas. PLEASE CALL FOR MORE
DETAILS.
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July 2013 • 61
Built before 1900 and used by the Fire Department until 1940.
It was a combination fre and police station.
Source: LAFD Photo Album Collection via lafre.com
815 Colorado Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90041 • 800-231-1626 • www.lafirecu.org/business
• Expand your business and generate income
• Ref your existing commercial real estate loan
• Customized fnancing
• Competitive rates
Give us a call to discuss how we can help.
We’ll even come to your fre station.
Representatives can be reached at
800-231-1626, Option 6.
Available through
FIREHOUSE Business Services
Funds on deposit are insured up to $500,000 per
account. This institution is not federally insured,
and if the institution fails, the Federal Government
does not guarantee that depositors will get back their money.
Accounts with this institution are not insured by any state government.
Self-Storage Facilities
Apartment Complexes
Investment Properties
Commercial Properties
Fireghters First.
Commercial
Real Estate Loans
815 Colorado Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90041 • 800-231-1626 • www.lafirecu.org/business
• Expand your business and generate income
• Ref your existing commercial real estate loan
• Customized fnancing
• Competitive rates
Give us a call to discuss how we can help.
We’ll even come to your fre station.
Representatives can be reached at
800-231-1626, Option 6.
Available through
FIREHOUSE Business Services
Funds on deposit are insured up to $500,000 per
account. This institution is not federally insured,
and if the institution fails, the Federal Government
does not guarantee that depositors will get back their money.
Accounts with this institution are not insured by any state government.
Self-Storage Facilities
Apartment Complexes
Investment Properties
Commercial Properties
Fireghters First.
Commercial
Real Estate Loans
Los Angeles Firemen’s Relief Association
815 Colorado Blvd FL 4
Los Angeles CA 90041-1745

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