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Technical Skills Revision

This PowerPoint offers you a short recap of some of the technical skills topics we have been covering recently.
Use these slides in conjunction with the revision resources document to practise and improve your technical skills.

He sipped his very hot soup slowly before slurping it noisily.


Pronoun
Verb Possessive pronoun Noun

Adverb

Adjective Preposition

Word Classes
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Noun Pronoun Adjective Verb Adverb Preposition
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. A word which denotes a person, place or thing. A word which takes the place of a name. A word which describes a noun. A word showing an action, occurrence or state of being. A word which describes a verb, adjective or another adverb. A word that denotes where something is.

Adverbs Song!

Well everybodys heard about adverbs An adverb is a word that describes a verb An adverb is a word that describes a verb An adverb is a word that describes a verb Or an adjective or another adverb!

Colons
There are two main ways to use a colon:
1) Before a list, summary or quotation. You will need to bring three things to the party: some food, something to drink, and a small gift for the birthday girl. To complete a statement of fact There are only three kinds of people: the good, the bad and the ugly.

2)

Semi-Colons
There are three main ways to use a semi-colon: 1. To link two separate sentences that are closely related. 2. In a list. 3. The easiest one: instead of some connectives in a sentence.

Rule 1: to link two separate sentences that are closely related


The children came home today. They had been away for a week.

The children came home today; they had been away for a week

We all love poetry. Its different interpretations show the interesting possibilities created by language.

We all love poetry; its different interpretations show the interesting possibilities created by language.

Rule 2: in a list with extra information


From this

Mr Parkes went to the shops and bought: a newspaper, some oranges, his favourite food, to help with his cold, some baby food, a present for his three month old niece, some new white board pens, a pair of football boots, a new book, and some water.

To this Mr Parkes went to the shops and bought: a newspaper; some oranges, his favourite food, to help with his cold; some baby food, a present for his three month old niece; some new white board pens; a pair of football boots; a new book; and some water.

Rule 2 explained
Using a semi colon between the ITEMS will Make things easier to understand.
Mr Parkes went to the shops and bought: a newspaper; some oranges, his favourite food, to help with his cold; some baby food, a present for his three month old niece; some new white board pens; a pair of football boots; a new book; and some water.

You only use a semi colon between an item. You still need to use a comma where you have the extra information (acts like a bracket).

Rule 3: instead of some connectives


This is the easiest way to get semi colons into your writing...

You can sometimes use a semi colon instead of the word so or the word because.
Here is an example: I was hungry, so I decided to go and find what I could eat for dinner.

I was hungry; I decided to go and find what I could eat for dinner.

The Active and Passive Voices


The Active Voice Members of a terrorist organisation engineered the explosion. The kidnapper demanded a considerable ransom. The factory owners made a number of workers redundant. The Passive Voice The explosion was engineered by members of a terrorist organisation. A considerable ransom was demanded by the kidnapper. A number of workers were made redundant by the factory owners.

The Active and Passive Voices


The Active Voice The committee approved the decision. Members of Parliament reviewed the bill. The Passive Voice
The decision was approved by the committee. The bill was reviewed by Members of Parliament.

A car struck the victim.


The Head of the Bank of England presented the budget.

The victim was struck by a car.


The budget was presented by the Head of the Bank of England.

The passive voice in action


I made the decision to introduce budget cuts. The decision has been made to introduce budget cuts.

I will be releasing details of a new government policy.

DIRECT SPEECH

David Cameron announced, I will be releasing details of a new government policy.

REPORTED SPEECH
David Cameron announced that he would be releasing details of a new government policy.

THERE ARE TWO REASONS TO USE APOSTROPHES AND ONLY TWO REASONS!
1. Possession (to show something belongs to someone). 2. Omission (to show letters are missing).

Omitted words
A contraction is a word (words) that has been shortened. The apostrophe shows where letters have been removed. Do not = dont They will = theyll It is = its They are = theyre What other contractions do you normally use? List TEN.

THE GOLDEN RULE ABOUT APOSTROPHES:

Only put in apostrophe in its if you mean it is!

Possession
An apostrophe can also be used to show something BELONGS to someone. Peters bag = the bag belonging to Peter Katies house = the house belonging to Katie Possessive Plural This is scholarship! Sometimes a plural word will already have an S at the end. In which case you can put the apostrophe AFTER the S. Girls dresses (more than one girl) The singers voices (more than one singer) The cousins favourite uncle (more than one cousin)