Board Evaluation Review Summary June 10, 2013

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Contents
Section
Process Participants Research Summary Quantitative Highlights Qualitative Highlights Summary Appendices Appendix 1: Board Performance as Described by the Cabinet Members Appendix 2: Board Performance as Described by Board Members Appendix 3: How it Feels to be a Board Director Appendix 4: Trust & Respect Appendix 5: Detailed Quantitative Data – Board Self Evaluation

Slide #
3 4 5 6 13 23 25 26 40 51 54 63

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Process
Surveys  
•  Quan&ta&ve  online  survey   •  7  Board  members  

Interviews  
•  Qualita&ve  interviews   •  6  Board  &  7  Cabinet  members  

Timing  &  Analysis  
•  Surveys  &  interviews  conducted  May  2013   •  Analysis  &  this  report  included  both  qualita&ve   and  quan&ta&ve  inputs  
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Participants
Cabinet  Members  
Name   Jose  Banda   Bob  Boesche   Ron  English   Michael  Tolley   Duggan  Harman   Pegi  McEvoy   Paul  Apostle   Title   Superintendent   Deputy  Superintendent   General  Counsel   Assistant  Superintendent  Teaching  &  Learning   Assistant  Superintendent  Business  &  Finance   Assistant  Superintendent  Opera&ons   Assistant  Superintendent  Human  Resources  

Board  Members  
Name   Title    Sharon  Peaslee   Officer    Martha  (Marty)  McLaren  Director    BeTy  Patu   Vice  President    Michael  DeBell   Director    Harium  Mar&n-­‐Morris   Director    Sherry  Carr   Director    Kay  Smith-­‐Blum   President  
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Research Summary

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Board Self Evaluation: Quantitative Highlights

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Board  Self  Evalua>on  –  Online  Survey
 Confidential online survey completed by 7 Board members  Board members rated Board performance across 29 attributes
Descrip>on   Outstanding   Exceeds  Expecta>ons   Meets  Expecta>ons   Needs  Improvement   Ra&ng   4   3   2   1  

 Given this scale, a midpoint score on average would be 2.55   In reporting results, we have color coded average resulting scores:
Key   Needs  Improvement   1.0  -­‐  1.4   1.5  –  1.9   Meets  Expecta>ons   2.0  –  2.4   2.5  –  2.9   Exceeds  Expecta>ons   3.0  –  3.4   3.5  –  4.0   7

Board  Self  Evalua>on:  Highest  Ra>ngs  
Of 29 total attributes, 18 had an average overall rating of “Meets Expectations” or higher. No single attribute achieved an average rating of “Exceeds Expectations” or “Outstanding”.
Category   Responsibility   Responsibility   Responsibility   Responsibility   Communica&ons  -­‐  Goal   Responsibility   Performance  Measures   Performance  Measures   Responsibility   Responsibility   Performance  Measures   Rela&onships  -­‐  Goal   Rela&onships  -­‐  Goal   ATribute   Uphold  all  applicable  federal  and  state  laws  and  regula&ons.   Maintain  a  strategic  plan  for  the  district  that  clearly  defines  success  and  accountability  for  the  Board,  the  staff,  and   our  students.   Not  use  our  posi&ons  for  personal  or  par&san  gain.   Maintain  the  confiden&ality  of  privileged  informa&on  including  that  shared  in  execu&ve  sessions  of  the  Board.   Communica&on  protocols  are  established  and  followed.  These  include  Friday  Updates,  2x2  mee&ngs,  quarterly   reports,  etc.   Base  our  decisions  upon  available  facts,  vote  our  convic&ons,  avoid  bias  in  any  form,  and  uphold  and  support  the   decisions  of  the  majority  of  the  Board  once  a  decision  is  made.   Are  Board  commiTees  working  effec&vely?   Are  Board  mee&ngs  operated  and  structured  effec&vely?   Maintain  Board  focus  on  the  achievement  of  all  students,  regardless  of  race,  class,  ethnicity,  or  gender.   Model  con&nuous  learning  in  our  roles  as  members  of  the  governance  team.   Is  the  Board  appropriately  assis&ng  the  Superintendent  with  key  district  priori&za&on  decisions?   The  Board  and  Superintendent  understand  and  ar&culate  the  system  of  governance  and  differen&ate  between  policy   and  administra&ve  roles.   Policies  and  procedures  are  established  for  Board  and  superintendent  interpersonal  and  working  rela&onships.   Average   2.7   2.7   2.4   2.4   2.4   2.3   2.3   2.3   2.1   2.1   2.1   2.1   2.1  

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Board  Self  Evalua>on:  Lowest  Ra>ngs  
Of 29 total attributes, 11 (38%) had an average overall rating of below “Meets Expectations.”
Category   Performance  Measures   Rela&onships  -­‐  Goal   Responsibility   Performance  Measures   Performance  Measures   Responsibility   Performance  Measures   Responsibility   Responsibility   Performance  Measures   Communica&ons  -­‐  Goal   ASribute   Is  the  Board  working  together  effec&vely?   The  Board  maintains  a  close  rela&onship  of  trust  with  the  Superintendent  and  strives  to  facilitate   district  success.   Work  to  build  trust  between  and  among  Board  members  and  the  superintendent  by  trea&ng  everyone   with  dignity  and  respect,  even  in  &mes  of  disagreement.   How  is  the  Board  working  with  the  superintendent  and  staff?   Does  the  Board  engage  in  appropriate  communica&on  with  staff  and  the  public  regarding  issues?   Focus  on  the  policy  work  of  the  Board  and  monitor  progress  on  the  indicators  of  success  ar&culated  in   our  strategic  plan,  leaving  the  day-­‐to-­‐day  opera&on  of  the  district  to  the  superintendent  and  staff.   Is  the  governance  team's  policy  development  process  efficient,  effec&ve,  and  produc&ve?   Place  the  interests  of  children  above  all  others  in  every  decision  that  we  make.   Abide  by  the  policies  and  bylaws  of  the  Board  and  work  with  our  fellow  Board  members  to  change   those  policies  as  needed  to  improve  student  learning.   Does  the  Board  adhere  to  its  ground  rules  and  Oath  of  Responsibili&es?   Board  requests  are  made  through  agreed-­‐upon  protocols.   Average   1.3   1.5   1.7   1.7   1.7   1.8   1.8   1.9   1.9   1.9   1.9  

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Board  Self  Evalua>on:  Themes  
The highest Board performance ratings were for areas relating to: •  Responsibility •  Maintaining a strategic plan and upholding applicable laws, regulations, & confidentiality •  Communication protocols
Category   Responsibility   Responsibility   Responsibility   Responsibility   Communica&ons   -­‐  Goal   ATribute   Uphold  all  applicable  federal  and  state  laws  and  regula&ons.   Maintain  a  strategic  plan  for  the  district  that  clearly  defines  success  and  accountability   for  the  Board,  the  staff,  and  our  students.   Not  use  our  posi&ons  for  personal  or  par&san  gain.   Maintain  the  confiden&ality  of  privileged  informa&on  including  that  shared  in  execu&ve   sessions  of  the  Board.   Communica&on  protocols  are  established  and  followed.  These  include  Friday  Updates,   2x2  mee&ngs,  quarterly  reports,  etc.  
Key   Needs  Improvement   1.0  -­‐  1.4   1.5  –  1.9   Meets  Expecta&ons   2.0  –  2.4   2.5  –  2.9   Exceeds  Expecta&ons   3.0  –  3.4   3.5  –  4.0  

Average   2.7   2.7   2.4   2.4   2.4  

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Board  Self  Evalua>on:  Themes  
The lowest Board performance ratings were for areas relating to: •  Working effectively with each other •  Working effectively with the Superintendent & Staff •  Communications
Category   Performance   Measures   Rela&onships  -­‐   Goal   Responsibility   Performance   Measures   Performance   Measures   ATribute   Is  the  Board  working  together  effec&vely?   The  Board  maintains  a  close  rela&onship  of  trust  with  the  Superintendent  and  strives   to  facilitate  district  success.   Work  to  build  trust  between  and  among  Board  members  and  the  superintendent  by   trea&ng  everyone  with  dignity  and  respect,  even  in  &mes  of  disagreement.   How  is  the  Board  working  with  the  superintendent  and  staff?   Does  the  Board  engage  in  appropriate  communica&on  with  staff  and  the  public   regarding  issues?  
Key   Needs  Improvement   1.0  -­‐  1.4   1.5  –  1.9   Meets  Expecta&ons   2.0  –  2.4   2.5  –  2.9   Exceeds  Expecta&ons   3.0  –  3.4   3.5  –  4.0  

Average   1.3   1.5   1.7   1.7   1.7  

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Board  Self  Evalua>on:  Policy  
Responses in this area were unanimous, save for one abstention
Policy   Budget  Development  -­‐  Implemented  a  comprehensive  budget   development  process  that  reflects  the  strategic  plan  priori&es   and  includes  both  internal  and  external  engagement   Audit  Response  -­‐  Developed  and  implemented  a  response  plan   to  address  the  State  Auditor’s  Office  audits,  using  a  project   management  team  structure  with  Board  Directors  and  Chief   Financial/Opera&ng  Officer  as  sponsors;  Implemented  quarterly   governance  work  sessions  to  provide  management  oversight  of   the  district’s  business  systems   Policy  Review  -­‐  Developed  governance  policies  and  a  governance   structure  to  allow  appropriate  management  oversight;  ensured   finance  policies  meet  best  prac&ce  standards   Yes/No   Yes  

Yes  

Yes  

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Board & Cabinet: Qualitative Highlights

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Cabinet  View  of  the  Board  
The  Cabinet  iden>fied  the  following   strengths  of  the  Board  as  a  whole:  
•  Passionate  &  Dedicated   •  Care  About  Children   •  Do  their  Homework  &  Come  Prepared   •  Are  Making  Efforts  to  Improve   •  Bring  Individual  Strengths   •  In-­‐Tune  with  the  Community   •  Respecqul  &  Apprecia&ve  

The  Cabinet  iden>fied  the  following   opportuni>es  of  the  Board  as  a  whole:    

The  Cabinet  respects  the  commitment  of  the  Board,  and   they  feel  strongly  that  the  Board  has  the  poten>al  to   improve.     ““I  respect  them  individually  as  people  who  have   donated  hundreds  of  hours.  You  have  to  respect  the   fact  that  they  are  willing  to  do  that.  Individually  they   are  very  compassionate,  intellectual  people.   Collec&vely,  they  struggle.”    

•  Address  the  Dysfunc&ons  &  Divisions   •  Engage  in  Appropriate  Lines  of  Communica&on   &  Adhere  to  1620   •  Provide  a  Holis&c  View  &  Present  a  Unified   Front   •  Allow  Staff  &  Cabinet  to  do  their  Work   •  Work  Construc&vely  with  the  Cabinet   •  Find  a  Balance  Between  Regional  Advocacy  &   Big  Picture  Focus   •  Collec&vely  Define  “ The  Role  of  the  Board”   •  Work  to  Improve  the  Environment   •  Foster  Honest  &  Open  Communica&on   •  Focus  on  Professional  Development  &  Skill   Improvement  

While  mul>ple  opportuni>es  were  iden>fied,  the  Cabinet  would  like   the  Board  to  focus  on  the  following  over  the  next  6  months:   •  Work  Together  &  Find  Common  Ground   •  Focus  on  Building  Trust  within  the  Board  &  with  the  Cabinet   •  Address  the  Divisions  Amongst  the  Board  
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Board  View  of  the  Board  
The  Board  iden>fied  the  following  strengths   of  the  Board  as  a  whole:  
•  Each  Bring  Individual  Strengths   •  Acknowledge  Areas  Where  they  Aim  to  Improve   •  Dedicated  to  Children  &  the  Work   •  Op&mis&c  About  the  Poten&al   •  Have  made  Progress  on  Governance  Priori&es  &   Policy  Work   •  Knowledgeable  About  the  Community   •  Produc&ve  when  they  Work  Together  

The  Board  iden>fied  the  following   opportuni>es  of  the  Board  as  a  whole:    

•  Address  Inconsistent  Defini&ons  of  the  Board’s   Role   •  Address  Exis&ng  Issues  of  Division  &  Trust   •  Engage  in  Appropriate  Lines  of  Communica&on   •  Come  Together  as  a  Team   •  Focus  on  the  Bigger  Picture   •  Foster  Open  &  Respecqul  Communica&on   •  Find  a  Balance  between  Regional  Advocacy  &  a   Focus  on  the  District  as  a  Whole   •  Con&nue  Professional  Development  &  Clarify   Areas  of  Confusion  

While  mul>ple  opportuni>es  were  iden>fied,  Board  directors  would   like  the  Board  to  focus  on  the  following  over  the  next  6  months:   •  Focus  on  the  Work  &  Iden&fy  Unified  Purpose   •  Focus  on  Building  Trust   •  Aim  for  Fresh  Start  
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Trust  Issues  Affect  the  Board  
The  Board  &  the  Cabinet  iden>fied  the   following  issues  of  trust:  
•  The  Trust  Level  on  the  Board  is  Less  than  Ideal  

The  Board  &  the  Cabinet  iden>fied  the  ways   the  lack  of  trust  impacts  the  work:  
•  Nega&vely  Impacts  the  Morale  &  Rela&onships   •  Hinders  Open  &  Honest  Communica&on   •  Creates  Dysfunc&on   •  Gets  in  the  Way  of  Progress  &  Produc&vity  
“I  think  all  of  this  can  be  synthesized  down  very   simply.  Un&l  we  can  get  a  certain  level  of  trust  going   we  will  be  the  poster-­‐child  for  a  dysfunc&onal  school   Board.  I  don’t  believe  we  are  func&oning  on  all   cylinders.  I  think  we  could  be  and  we  should  be.  If  we   can  get  on  the  road  to  doing  that  it  will  make  a  huge   difference.”   “It  creates  anxiety  and  stress  for  everybody  –  the   community,  the  Cabinet,  the  district  and  the  Board.”  

“There’s  plenty  of  blame  to  go  around.  We  all  need  to   address  it,  and  improve  the  way  we  func&on  by   improving  our  processes  as  well  as  our  behavior.”   “Right  now  trust  is  low.”  

Board  directors  &  Cabinet  members  feel  that  in  order  to  build  trust  the   Board  should  focus  on  the  following  efforts:   •  Demonstrate  Accountability   •  Start  Fresh   •  Iden&fy  a  Unified  Purpose   •  Work  to  Understand  &  Relate  to  Each  Other  
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Trust  Issues  Affect  the  Cabinet  
The  Board  &  the  Cabinet  iden>fied  the   following  issues  of  trust:  
•  The  Trust  Level  between  the  Cabinet  &  the  Board   is  Inconsistent   •  Past  Controversies  have  let  the  Board  Hesitant  to   Trust  the  Cabinet  
“Both  the  Cabinet  and  the  Board  have  trust  issues   internally.”   “They  feel  because  of  past  indiscre&ons  and  scandal   that  they  can’t  trust  staff.  It  doesn’t  make  it  a  great   place  to  work.”  

The  Board  &  the  Cabinet  iden>fied  the  ways   the  lack  of  trust  impacts  the  work:  
•  Morale  is  Low  &  People  Feel  Threatened   •  Policy  Work  Suffers   •  The  Cabinet  Feels  Their  Contribu&ons  Go   Unheard   •  The  Rela&onship  is  Strained  

“Staff  feels  threatened  by  the  Board.  Their  jobs  and   future  feel  threatened  by  the  Board.  The  Board   members  will  not  give  up  –  if  they  care  about   something  they  will  get  their  way.  So  I  ask  myself,  do  I   really  want  to  put  my  career  in  front  of  that?  It’s   uncomfortable.  It  puts  us  in  a  very  uncomfortable   posi&on.”  

Board  directors  &  Cabinet  members  feel  that  in  order  to  build  trust  the   Board  should  focus  on  the  following  efforts:   •  Share  Informa&on  &  Listen  to  Feedback  from  the  Cabinet   •  Be  Accountable   •  Go  Through  Proper  Communica&on  Channels   •  Speak  with  One  Voice  
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Cabinet  &  Board  Agreements  
The  Cabinet  and  the  Board  agree  that  the  Board  exhibits  the  following  strengths  &   opportuni>es:   Strengths  
•  Passionate  &  Dedicated   •  Care  About  Children   •  In-­‐Tune  with  the  Community   •  Bring  Individual  Strengths  

Opportuni>es  

•  Engage  in  Appropriate  Lines  of  Communica&on   •  Address  Exis&ng  Issues  of  Division   •  Define  “ The  Role  of  the  Board”   •  Find  a  Balance  Between  Regional  Advocacy  &  Big  Picture  Focus   •  Foster  Open  Communica&on   •  Con&nue  Professional  Development  

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Exis>ng  Board  Issues  Impact  the  Work  
Both  the  Cabinet  and  the  Board  believe  these  issues  are  nega>vely   impac>ng  the  work  of  the  Board,  the  staff  and  the  district.   Impacts:   Cabinet Views
• Negatively Impacts the Morale & Relationships • Affects the Reputation & Stability of the District • Creates Additional Work • Narrows the Focus

Board Views
• Hinders the Work of the Superintendent & the Staff • Negatively Impacts the Reputation & Forward Movement of the District • Creates Instability & Hampers Leadership • Hurts the Morale • Distracts from the Purpose
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The  Cabinet  Believes  the  Board’s  Opportuni>es  Impact  the  Work  
“My  sense  is  that  the  percep&on  of  many  in  the  community  is  that  the  Board  is  dysfunc&onal.  And  it  is   because  of  behavior  that  is  done  in  public.  Having  construc&ve  conversa&ons  around  disagreement  is   necessary  –  but  it  shouldn’t  happen  in  public.  In  public  they  should  represent  a  unified  front.”     “It’s  difficult  to  watch  this  behavior  if  you  don’t  think  its  going  to  change.  You  start  to  feel  like  you  are  just   biding  your  &me.  And  I  think  it  makes  us  frustrated,  because  people  feel  like  they  can’t  wait  it  out.  People   are  leaving.”     “It  creates  anxiety  and  stress  for  everybody  –  the  community,  the  Cabinet,  the  district  and  the  Board.”     “People  do  their  homework  and  see  our  Board  as  one  they  don’t  want  to  work  with.”     “The  unnecessary  requests  for  data  or  mee&ngs  called  by  Board  members  –  those  things  need  to  stop.   They  can’t  be  doing  that.  It’s  not  appropriate.  It’s  not  their  role.  They  can’t  get  into  micro-­‐managing  or   dealing  with  personnel.”     “So  many  people  are  just  focusing  on  their  own  agendas.  That  doesn’t  send  the  right  message  to  the   broader  community.”     “Certain  members  have  specific  agendas.  And  everything  they  do  gets  funneled  through  those  agendas.”     “Represen&ng  individual  districts  vs.  the  district  as  a  whole  is  an  issue.  It  impacts  their  decisions.  It  creates   a  problem  and  makes  them  work  like  poli&cians.  They  have  to  think  about  “what  can  I  go  back  to  my   cons&tuents  and  say?”    
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The  Board  Believes  the  Board’s  Opportuni>es  Impact  the  Work  
“The  division  causes  stress  among  the  staff.  They  come  before  the  Board  afraid  because  of  the  type  and   style  of  ques&ons  they  ask.”     “The  educa&on  community  knows  about  our  Board,  and  they  don’t  want  to  work  with  us.  And  that  is  a  big   loss.  SeaTle  should  be  able  to  aTract  some  of  the  best  leaders  in  the  country.  We  are  in  the  top  5%  of   urban  districts  in  the  country.”   “It’s  hard  to  keep  strong  rela&onships  with  the  community.  In  order  to  improve  our  spending  profile  with   grants,  etc.  people  need  to  have  faith  in  the  Board.  That  faith  is  not  there.  We  used  to  have  mee&ngs  with   the  City  Council.  No  one  wants  to  work  with  our  Board.  Our  philanthropic  partners  are  star&ng  to  ques&on   their  rela&onship  with  us.  This  kind  of  dynamic  keeps  us  from  winning  grants.”     “We  are  not  going  to  aTract  professional  staff  leaders  and  we  are  losing  the  strong  leaders  we  have.  That  is   a  terrible  thing.  That  is  what  we  need  most.  We  need  leadership  and  stability.”     “If  we  can’t  get  aligned  and  we  are  leading,  how  can  anybody  follow  us?  How  can  anyone  be  effec&ve  if  we   are  all  over  the  place?  The  organiza&on  sees  this,  the  parents  see  this,  the  schools  see  this.”     “I  have  been  told  mul&ple  &mes  by  staff  members  that  they  were  threatened  (an  implied  threat)  that  they   would  lose  their  job  if  they  didn’t  comply  with  the  school  Board’s  wishes.  The  Cabinet  talks  about  a  List.”     “We  have  to  leave  staff  alone.  They  are  overworked  already.  And  we  are  losing  them.”     “I  think  the  greatest  source  of  frustra&on  is  that  I  don’t  feel  like  we  are  working  on  educa&on.”    
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Cabinet  &  Board  Priori>es  
The  Board  and  the  Cabinet  offered  similar  sets  of  priori>es  for  the  Board   to  focus  on  in  the  next  six  months.   Priorities per the Cabinet Priorities per the Board
• Work Together & Find Common Ground • Focus on Building Trust • Address the Divisions • Focus on the Work & Identify Unified Purpose • Focus on Building Trust • Aim for Fresh Start

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Summary

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Summary
 The Board is a group of strong individuals who are committed to improving Seattle Public Schools  The Board’s self evaluation of it’s performance shows it “Needs Improvement” or “Meets Expectations”  Board fissures are impacting the work and the level of trust, within the Board and with the Cabinet  Growth opportunities have been identified that can serve as the basis for the Board’s future focus  A group facilitation may give the Board an opportunity to address existing issues and be a more positive force moving forward
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Appendices

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Appendix 1: The Board’s Performance As Described By Cabinet Members

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The  Board’s  Overall  Performance  per  the  Cabinet  
Highlights Strengths:
Committed to the Work and Public Education •  Passionate & Dedicated •  Care About Children •  Do Their Homework & Come Prepared Strong Individuals Make a Strong Team •  Bring Individual Strengths •  Making Efforts to Improve Relationships & the Community •  In-Tune with the Community •  Respectful & Appreciative

Opportunities:
Divided •  Address Dysfunctions & Divisions Working Relationships & Environment •  Work Constructively with the Cabinet •  Allow Staff & Cabinet to do their Work •  Engage in Appropriate Lines of Communication & Adhere to 1620 •  Work to Improve the Environment •  Foster Honest & Open Communication 10,000 Foot View •  Provide a Holistic View & Present Unified Front •  Find Balance Between Regional Advocacy & Big Picture Focus •  Define “The Role of the Board” Individual Training •  Focus on Professional Development & Skill Improvement

Details

See following slides… 27

The  Board’s  Strengths  per  the  Cabinet    
Passionate  &  Dedicated   “They  all  are  passionate.  They  are  not  just  going  through  the  mo&ons.”     “They  are  all  each  individually  deeply  commiTed.”     “Commitment.  The  &me  commitment  is  admirable.  They  give  up  a  lot  of  their  own  lives  and  free  &me.”     “They  have  a  lot  of  passion  for  the  work.  I  can  only  have  true  apprecia&on  for  them  as  individuals  and  as  a  group.  I  can’t   imagine  volunteering  as  much  &me  as  they  give.  I  really  admire  their  dedica&on  to  this  work.”   “I  know  they  are  bombarded  with  so  much  informa&on  and  I  don’t  know  how  they  even  have  the  &me  to  wade  through   everything.”     “They  are  a  very  hard  working  Board  and  put  an  enormous  amount  of  &me  in.  Their  commitment  is  strong.”     “I  feel  like  every  Board  member  puts  the  &me  in,  if  not  more  than  is  required.”     “Each  one  dedicates  a  great  deal  of  &me  to  this  Board  and  district.”     “They  do  work.  They  put  in  long  hours.  20  hours  a  week.  And  some  of  them  have  full-­‐&me  jobs.”     Care  About  Children   “They  do  care…they  want  to  do  what  is  right  for  kids.”     “I  feel  confident  and  have  to  believe  that  they  will  act  on  the  best  interest  of  the  students.  I  think  they  always  care  about   suppor&ng  children.  I  do  think  they  get  distracted,  but  ul&mately  they  care  about  working  for  the  kids.  “     “They  are  all  here  for  kids.  All  personali&es  and  poli&cs  aside,  they  are  on  the  Board  to  serve  students.”     “I  really  do  believe  they  are  focused  in  on  the  kids  in  this  district.”     “They  all  care  very  much  about  public  educa&on.”     “When  we  have  mee&ngs  about  doing  work  for  the  district  things  get  done.”    

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The  Board’s  Strengths  per  the  Cabinet    
Do  Their  Homework  –  Come  Prepared   “They  take  the  &me  to  do  their  homework.  They  aTempt  to  understand  it.”     “I  think  that  they  are  really  well  versed  on  what  is  going  on.  They  are  in  tune  with  the  communi&es  that  they  serve.  I  am   always  impressed  with  the  depth  of  knowledge  they  have  on  certain  items.  They  ask  good  ques&ons.”     “They  clearly  express  the  desire  to  understand  and  learn  the  informa&on  that  will  inform  decision-­‐making.”     “If  something  is  coming  up,  the  Board  will  feel  comfortable  enough  to  call  a  Cabinet  member  to  get  as  much  informa&on   as  possible.  They  want  to  understand  things  and  they  trust  us  to  inform  them.”     “They  really  do  seem  to  be  aware  of  State  trends,  na&onal  trends  –  for  the  most  part.  They  do  their  homework.  I  feel  like   most  of  them  do  their  homework  before  they  talk  about  something.”     “Some  other  school  Board  members  in  other  districts  just  go  along  with  whatever  the  superintendent  tells  them  –  that   isn’t  going  to  happen  here.  They  ask  ques&ons.  And  they  should.”     Making  Efforts  to  Improve   “They  have  tried  to  get  Board  mee&ngs  under  control.”     “When  they  were  called  out  in  the  past  for  lack  of  oversight  it  was  a  jumpstart  for  them.”     “I  am  glad  that  they  are  doing  this  (evalua&on).  I  think  this  is  a  healthy  process  for  them.”   “Some  Board  members  are  willing  to  accept  feedback  and  some  are  willing  to  listen.”   “Some  of  the  newer  Board  members  are  s&ll  just  trying  to  find  their  way.”   “I  do  think  it  has  goTen  beTer  than  it  was  before.”     “I  think  it’s  a  good  thing  for  the  Board  to  evaluate  their  work  &  con&nue  to  be  more  effec&ve.  We  are  all  trying  to  do   that.”  

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The  Board’s  Strengths  per  the  Cabinet    
Bring  Individual  Strengths     “There  are  several  members  that  have  been  in  place  for  awhile  and  they  bring  a  lot  of  knowledge,  in  terms  of  ins&tu&onal   knowledge.”   “Each  one  is  bright  in  their  individual  way.”     In-­‐Tune  with  the  Community   “I  think  that  they  are  really  well  versed  on  what  is  going  on.  They  are  in-­‐tune  with  the  communi&es  that  they  serve.  I  am   always  impressed  with  the  depth  of  knowledge  they  have  on  certain  items.  They  ask  good  ques&ons.”     “They  will  ask  ques&ons  in  public  to  allow  staff  members  to  clarify  things  for  the  broader  community.”     “They  have  a  pulse  of  the  community.  They  have  a  sense  of  the  system.  Many  of  them  have  or  have  had  their  children  in   the  system.  They  are  able  to  bring  that  input  to  the  work.”     “Periodically  they  will  give  me  a  call  to  follow  up  on  a  call  they’ve  received  from  a  parent  or  community  member  or   teacher.  They  will  ask  for  clarifica&on  and  it  will  always  be  an  amiable  conversa&on.”     “I  can  tell  they  spend  a  lot  of  &me  away  from  here  doing  the  work  of  a  school  Board  member.  And  they  seem  preTy  aware   of  issues.”     “They  really  feel  passionately  about  their  region.  They  take  it  very  seriously  that  they  represent  their  individual  regions.   They  want  to  hear  from  their  cons&tuents.  They  encourage  that  conversa&on  by  sewng  up  opportuni&es,  aTending   events,  making  appointments  –  they  really  focus  on  community  outreach.”   “They  listen  well  to  their  par&cular  community  and  make  sure  they  bring  those  issues  forward.”     “They  will  listen  to  the  parents  in  their  district  and  are  advocates.”    

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The  Board’s  Strengths  per  the  Cabinet    
Respec_ul  &  Apprecia>ve   “I  feel  respected  and  treated  with  dignity.”     “I  know  that  it  is  my  job  to  educate  them  around  all  materials  regarding  my  area  of  focus  –  and  in  most  situa&ons  they  are   very  apprecia&ve  of  the  work  I  do.”   “I  think  they  appreciate  our  commitment  to  gewng  them  the  informa&on  they  need.”     “My  experience  is  that  I  have  felt  supported.  They  listen  to  my  perspec&ve…”    

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The  Board’s  Opportuni>es  per  the  Cabinet    
Address  the  Dysfunc>ons  &  Divisions   “In  my  opinion  it  is  a  very  dysfunc&onal  Board.  That  being  said  I  can  work  with  anybody.”     “Right  now,  there  are  open  hos&li&es.  They  have  been  flaring  up  since  December.”     “I  think  you  can  make  a  preTy  good  case,  that  decisions  have  been  calculated.  Going  back  to  commiTee  assignments.”     “It’s  not  a  highly  func&oning  Board.”     “They  have  to  speak  with  one  voice.  It  can’t  be  this  4-­‐3.  I  think  it  is  a  divided  group.”     “They  need  to  have  argumenta&ve  conversa&ons  in  private,  not  at  public  mee&ngs.”     “I  think  it’s  beTer  to  try  to  address  the  issues  on  the  Board  than  it  is  to  not,  even  if  it  is  in  public.”     “I  hear,  but  don’t  see,  that  there  are  certain  Board  members  that  don’t  get  along  with  each  other.  I’ve  just  heard  it   around.  I  think  there  are  conversa&ons  amongst  the  Cabinet  and  even  execu&ve  directors.  The  most  obvious  indicator  is  a   split  vote  in  public.”     “We  have  communica&on  issues.  If  they  discuss  their  individual  inten&ons  and  agree  to  move  forward,  it  could  be   beneficial.”     “The  school  Board  is  split.  They  aren’t  always  split  with  the  votes.  They  are  split  with  the  dynamics  of  1620  and  what  that   looks  like  –  how  it  should  be  implemented.”     “When  they  disagree,  finding  consensus  is  very  difficult.”     “I  don’t  think  the  public  would  be  surprised  to  hear  that  they  are  divided.”     “Some  disagree  with  each  other  just  for  the  sake  of  disagreement.”    

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The  Board’s  Opportuni>es  per  the  Cabinet    
Work  Construc>vely  with  the  Cabinet     “Instead  of  spending  all  our  &me  catching  each  other  in  moments  where  we  don’t  agree  or  when  policy  is  being  stepped   on,  if  we  were  working  together  we  could  get  so  much  done.”     “We  have  all  made  mistakes  and  sinned.  But  what  can  we  do  to  make  a  fresh  start  and  move  forward?  If  we  can  get  the   Cabinet  &  the  Board  working  together  well,  everything  will  change.”   “Oten  we  get  ques&ons  the  night  before  (a  presenta&on).  Are  we  being  setup?  That  doesn’t  help  staff  be  responsive.   When  we  send  the  deck  out  we  ask  that  they  send  their  ques&ons  as  soon  as  possible.”     Allow  Staff  &  the  Cabinet  to  Do  their  Work   “They  micro-­‐manage.  They  are  down  in  the  weeds  on  every  issue.  And  they  all  do  it,  but  they  won’t  acknowledge  it.  They   see  it  in  each  other,  but  they  don’t  see  it  in  themselves.”     “I  have  pointed  out  moments  in  the  past  when  they  have  been  micro-­‐managing…and  when  I  give  feedback  some  Board   members  will  back  off.  Others  will  explain  that  that  is  not  the  case.  They  will  ra&onalize  the  behavior.”     “I  think  they  feel  preTy  free  to  call  anyone  on  Cabinet.”     “I  think  the  Board  was  accused  in  the  past  of  lack  of  oversight.  And  so  I  think  they  are  trying  to  make  sure  that  doesn’t   happen.”     “They  are  en&tled  to  say  “tell  me  why  you  are  doing  what  you  are  doing”  because  I  am  at  the  Asst  Superintendent  level  –   but  then  they  need  to  trust  me  to  do  my  job.”     “There  is  oten  a  ques&on  of  whether  or  not  the  staff  has  the  stomach  to  make  the  decisions  that  the  Board  will  fight  us   on.  We  will  ask  ourselves  “Do  we  really  want  to  go  there?”  or  “Will  the  Board  really  go  there?”  But  people  in  the  Cabinet   will  fight  to  do  the  right  thing.”     “They  are  a  disaster  when  it  comes  to  leaving  the  Superintendent  alone  and  allowing  the  staff  to  do  its  job”    

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The  Board’s  Opportuni>es  per  the  Cabinet  
Engage  in  Appropriate  Lines  of  Communica>on  –  Adhere  to  1620   “Board  members  have  been  sharing  things  with  staff  members  about  other  Board  members  and  decisions.”     “I  do  think  there  are  some  Cabinet  members  that  are  very  cozy  with  Board  members.”     “We  have  some  senior  staff  that  will  go  directly  to  the  Board  members  which  is  just  invi&ng  micro-­‐management.  The   Board  needs  to  redirect  those  folks  back  to  the  Superintendent.”     “If  we  talk  about  favori&sm  and  direc&on,  I  think  there  is  some  of  that.”     “I  had  a  mee&ng  where  a  school  Board  member  was  in  aTendance.  He/She  was  very  vocal  in  pushing  their  opinions.  That   is  advocacy  work,  not  governance.  I  don’t  know  if  that  is  the  role  of  the  Board.  His/Her  aTendance  was  not  a  problem  for   me  personally.  But  it  drives  the  ques&on,  is  that  appropriate  behavior  for  a  school  Board  member?  Should  he/she  be   there,  should  he/she  be  vocal,  should  he/she  be  calling  the  mee&ng?  This  mee&ng  didn’t  par&cularly  have  to  happen.  And   it  happened  for  this  school  Board  director,  around  his/her  schedule  to  meet  his/her  needs.  Is  that  appropriate?”     “I  need  to  pull  policy  1620  out  more.”     “I  think  they  are  aware  of  1620.  Some  just  don’t  follow  it.”   “The  Board  chair  and  the  superintendent  should  hold  the  Board  members  accountable  to  follow  1620.”     “The  culture  here  is  that  the  Board  will  go  directly  to  the  source.  It  feels  different  for  me.  I  have  always  felt  as  Cabinet   members  that  we  should  let  the  Superintendent  know  when  a  Board  member  contacts  us.  I  want  to  give  him  a  heads  up.   Especially  if  a  Board  member  wants  to  come  meet  with  me.”     “The  difficulty  for  me  is  that  some&mes  they  get  involved  in  personnel  issues.”     “They  should  work  through  the  Superintendent  and  asst.  Superintendents  to  address  concerns  rather  than  going  straight   to  the  staff  or  schools.  If  we  received  ques&ons  in  a  &mely  manner,  if  we  didn’t  get  blindsided  at  Board  mee&ngs  –all  of   that  would  be  helpful.  I  am  looking  for  behavioral  change.”    

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The  Board’s  Opportuni>es  per  the  Cabinet  
Engage  in  Appropriate  Lines  of  Communica>on  –  Adhere  to  1620  (cont.)   “There  has  to  be  a  dis&nct  separa&on  between  the  superintendent  roles  and  Board  roles.  The  number  one  no-­‐no  is   gewng  involved  with  personnel.  It’s  not  that  they  want  to  make  the  decisions,  but  some  Board  members  might  get  in  the   way.  We  have  a  process.  I  don’t  think  there  is  anything  wrong  a  Board  member  having  an  opinion.  But  that  opinion  should   not  get  in  the  way  of  the  work  and  process.  That  is  how  Boards  normally  func&on.”     “Commit  to  the  policy  and  governance  structure.  S&ck  to  it.”   “I  think  it’s  important  for  policies  to  be  clear.”     “Some&mes  they  do  very  well  and  some&mes  they  slip  into  being  more  opera&onal  regarding  1620.  Some&mes  when   that  happens  we’ll  try  to  push  it  back  with  finding  out  what  their  concerns  are  rather  than  encourage  them  to  tell  us  what   to  do.  They  go  to  their  own  community  mee&ngs  and  hear  things  and  they  want  to  make  sure  we  are  hearing  those   things.”     “Some&mes  they  will  go  around  the  more  senior  leadership  and  go  to  the  staff  –  and  then  we  hear  that  from  the  people   we  work  with.  We  try  to  encourage  them  not  to  do  that  but  it’s  difficult.”     “There  should  be  a  constant  check-­‐in  with  1620.”     “Really  understand  1620  –  to  train  new  members  on  it  and  make  sure  they  all  understand  it.  It  will  build  more  trust  in  the   Board.  It  will  help  them  in  how  they  phrase  their  sugges&ons  or  thoughts.  “Have  you  thought  about  this…”  or  “Have  you   heard  this…”  vs.  “I  really  want  you  to  do  this…”  or  “I  really  want  you  to  do  it  this  way…””     “We  need  to  clarify  what  kind  of  communica&on  is  appropriate  and  with  whom.”     “There  is  a  consistent  paTern  of  Board  micro-­‐management.  It  manifests  itself  on  a  daily  basis.  It  is  a  very  hands-­‐on   Board.”     “There  is  a  percep&on  of  how  much  power  they  have.  They  feel  empowered  to  call  a  principal  and  tell  them  what  to  do.   There  isn’t  a  principal  alive  that  is  going  to  report  on  the  Board  member.”     “I’ve  had  to  tell  Board  members  to  not  call  principals.  They  acted  surprised.  There  was  silence.”     “I  think  all  the  Board  members,  with  one  excep&on,  tell  staff  what  to  do.  And  it  is  gewng  worse  by  the  month.”     35

The  Board’s  Opportuni>es  per  the  Cabinet    
Provide  a  Holis>c  View  &  Present  a  Unified  Front   “They  need  to  set  the  direc&on  of  the  district.”     “When  the  Board  is  making  requests  or  weighing  in  on  something  they  all  have  different  priori&es.  Some&mes  I’d  like   them  to  just  go  into  a  room  and  have  to  stay  in  there  un&l  they  agree  on  something.”     “We  need  to  get  people  to  focus  on  the  big  picture.”     “I  am  going  to  assume  that  school  Board  members  are  going  to  push  to  make  sure  that  their  agendas  or  passions  are  put   into  place  before  they  leave  –  leave  a  legacy,  if  you  will.”     “They  feel  they  have  to  represent  their  cons&tuents  and  they  respond  to  the  bloggers,  as  well.”     “They  just  all  need  to  get  on  the  same  page  as  to  what  they  would  like  to  see  happen.”     “I  think  that  they  get  into  the  minu&a  some&mes.  I  don’t  know  if  its  legacy  building  or  coming  in  and  trying  to  understand   the  policy-­‐making.”     Find  a  Balance  Between  Regional  Advocacy  &  Big  Picture  Focus   “They  refer  to  their  region  of  the  city  only.  Yes,  they  represent  a  region  –  but  they  are  supposed  to  be  ac&ng  in  the  best   interest  of  every  child  in  the  city.”     “Some  really  love  the  area  that  they  represent  and  will  do  whatever  they  can  to  be  representa&ve  of  their  region.  I   personally  think  that  it’s  beTer  to  be  a  representa&ve  of  just  the  en&re  district.”     “When  you  are  a  representa&ve  of  a  certain  region  you  tend  to  focus  on  it.  But  I  think  the  community  really  appreciates   having  different  region  representa&ves.”    

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The  Board’s  Opportuni>es  per  the  Cabinet    
Collec>vely  Define  “The  Role  of  the  Board”   “There  is  an  ongoing  conversa&on  of  what  the  interac&ons  should  look  like.  Ideally  it  should  be  a  governance  policy  where   they  create  policy,  guide  policy  and  encourage  the  superintendent  to  engage  that  policy.”     “The  real  ques&on  is  –  do  they  agree  with  the  governance  structure?  My  guess  is  that  they  don’t.”     “They  don’t  understand  their  role  –  so  they  need  clarity.  I  think  they  truly  want  to  do  the  right  work,  the  right  way.  They   just  don’t  know  what  that  is.”     “We  had  an  epic  baTle  in  the  retreats  a  year  ago.  The  notes  are  incredibly  long.  We  got  that  policy  approved.  But  there   were  debates  back  and  forth  about  what  the  role  of  the  Board  is.  I  don’t  think  they  want  to  go  back  and  read  it  because  it   would  mean  they  would  have  to  stop  what  they  are  doing.”     Work  to  Improve  the  Environment   “If  I  end  up  leaving  it  will  be  because  of  the  environment.”     “I  hear  that  some  people  professionally  want  to  advance  themselves.  But  when  you  get  underneath  it,  you  find  that  some   people  (not  all)  feel  with  the  expecta&ons  of  the  job  combined  with  the  dysfunc&ons  of  the  Board  that  this  is  not  a  good   environment.  We  want  to  give  people  reasons  to  stay,  not  reasons  to  leave.”   “The  teachers,  the  administrators  –  they  feel  like  they  have  to  do  their  work  in  spite  of  what  is  going  on  in  the  central   office.”     “I  think  people  have  been  around  a  while,  and  some  just  don’t  feel  like  things  are  gewng  beTer.  There  is  no  standardized   exit  interview  process  –  but  we  are  working  on  it.”     “I  think  the  Board  func&oning  is  a  contribu&ng  factor  to  turnover  –  not  the  sole  factor.”    

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The  Board’s  Opportuni>es  per  the  Cabinet    
Focus  on  Professional  Development  &  Skill  Improvement   “Given  that  the  Board  is  elected  how  it  is  elected  I  don’t  think  we  should  expect  it  to  be  a  professional  Board  –  and  it’s   not.  There  is  a  wide  range  of  skill  level  there.”     “Everyone  needs  to  make  strong  commitments  to  effec&ve  management  and  effec&ve  rela&onship  skills.”     “We  might  have  some  concerns  about  their  interpersonal  skills  and  approach  to  working  with  others.”     Foster  Honest  &  Open  Communica>on   “For  them,  it  appears  to  be  frustra&ng  because  they  are  not  communica&ng  well.”     “Given  the  current  assignments  with  the  commiTees  some  Board  members  feel  disenfranchised  –  so  not  all  members  feel   like  they  have  a  seat  at  the  table.  The  ra&onale  that  I  heard  was  based  on  &me  commitment  –  because  people  were   complaining  about  &me  commitments.  I  think  having  a  group  conversa&on  about  this  would  have  been  helpful.  It  has   been  a  preTy  divisive  issue.”     “Some&mes  they  won’t  check-­‐in  with  each  other.  Perhaps  that  is  because  they  don’t  want  to  seem  like  they  are   manipula&ng  votes.  But  I  think  it’s  because  they  also  don’t  communicate  and  don’t  feel  they  can  talk  to  each  other.”     “They  need  to  be  honest  and  respecqul  to  each  other.  In  retreats  you  can  see  it  in  their  body  language.  They  are   posturing.”     “The  Board  members  need  to  be  honest  with  each  other.  They  have  walked  away  from  the  conflict.  They  need  to  look   each  other  in  the  eye.”    

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The  Board’s  Future  per  the  Cabinet    
Work  Together  &  Find  Common  Ground   “What  happens  in  the  next  six  months  will  ul&mately  affect  how  the  new  Board  works.  If  they  work  together  in  these  next   six  months  it  could  set  the  new  Board  members  up  for  success.”     “In  the  Cabinet,  when  push  comes  to  shove  everyone  is  willing  to  come  together  for  the  beTerment  of  the  work.  I  would   love  to  see  the  Board  president  (any  Board  president)  lead  the  team  to  consensus  or  agreement.”     “I  think  the  en&re  Board  would  agree  that  being  able  to  work  together  as  a  team  is  as  important  as  having  trust  in  the   Superintendent.”     “Learning  to  work  in  a  more  collabora&ve  fashion.  Learning  to  work  through  disagreements.  Learning  to  become  more   ac&ve  listeners  and  make  efforts  to  come  to  common  solu&ons.  Be  willing  to  come  to  an  agreement.  Work  towards  trying   to  get  7-­‐0.  I  think  some  of  them  seTle  for  4-­‐3.    Be  willing  to  work  together  to  get  the  work  done.”     “They  stayed  out  of  the  fray  at  the  MAP  controversy.  Once  it  was  dealt  with  it  they  all  supported  it.  If  they  had  been  split   on  that  it  would  have  kept  it  going.  But  when  they  went  on  record  to  support  it,  it  put  it  to  rest.  When  they  are  united  in   support  of  children  no  one  can  push  back  on  that.”     Focus  on  Building  Trust   “In  order  for  forward  movement,  the  Board  needs  trust  in  the  Cabinet  and  the  Cabinet  needs  trust  in  the  Board.   Otherwise,  the  real  fallout  is  effec&veness,  cohesiveness  and  people  walking  away.”     “They  have  to  build  trust  among  themselves.  And  they  have  to  work  on  the  trust  with  the  Superintendent  and  senior   staff.”     “I  would  like  us  to  focus  on  moving  forward.  Think  about  that  and  come  up  with  a  plan  to  move  forward.”     Address  the  Divisions   “If  we  pretend  that  the  dysfunc&ons  don’t  exist  and  haven’t  happened,  how  can  we  build  for  the  future?”     “What  is  cri&cal  here  is  trying  to  ferret  out  what  the  real  issues  are.”    

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Appendix 2: The Board’s Performance As Described By Board Directors

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The  Board’s  Overall  Performance  per  the  Board  
Highlights Strengths:
Committed to the Work and Public Education •  Dedicated to Children & the Work •  Optimistic About the Potential Strong Individuals Make a Strong Team •  Each Bring Individual Strengths Progress •  Progress on Governance Priorities & Policy Work •  Productive when they Work Together Community •  Knowledgeable About the Community

Opportunities:
Divided •  Come Together as a Team •  Address Existing Issues of Division & Trust Working Relationships & Environment •  Foster Open & Respectful Communication •  Engage in Appropriate Lines of Communication 10,000 Foot View •  Clearly Define “The Role of the Board” •  Focus on the Bigger Picture •  Find a Balance between Regional Advocacy & a Focus on the District as a Whole Individual Training •  Continue Professional Development & Clarify Areas of Confusion

Details

See following slides… 41

The  Board’s  Strengths  per  the  Board  
Bring  Individual  Strengths     “I  think  each  of  us  bring  something  posi&ve  to  this  Board.”     “I  think  that  some  Board  directors  have  been  pivotal  in  strengthening  our  internal  audit  controls.  Their  leadership  in  A&F   has  been  an  asset.”     “Some  Board  directors  are  very  focused  on  “what  are  we  doing  for  these  kids”  and  the  emo&ons  behind.  They  are  very   focused  on  equitable  access  and  great  outcomes.”     “Some  Board  directors  have  great  policy  focus.  They  definitely  get  engaged  regarding  policy  process.  They  are  very   enthusias&c  about  it  and  passionate.”     “Some  Board  directors  love  and  understand  the  importance  of  connec&ng  with  the  city  council  and  the  state  legislator.   They  understand  the  importance  of  enlis&ng  our  legisla&ve  partners  to  get  work  done.  They  understand  how  those   connec&ons  work.”     “I  think  every  Board  member  has  a  par&cular  set  of  skills  and  interests.”     “Great  range  of  experience,  exper&se  in  disciplines  and  sectors  which  are  relevant  to  district  systems  and  success.”     “I  think  there  is  some  good  knowledge.”    

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The  Board’s  Strengths  per  the  Board  
Dedicated  to  Children  &  the  Work   “We  are  here  for  the  kids.  I’m  not  here  for  only  my  district.  My  focus  is  on  every  child  having  the  equity  to  get  a  good   educa&on.”     “Commitment  to  working  on  behalf  of  students  and  improving  the  system.”     “There  is  some  compassion  for  children.  Everyone  that  is  on  the  Board  does  have  compassion.  They  do  want  kids  to  do   beTer.  I  do  believe  that.”     Op>mis>c  About  the  Poten>al   “I  believe  changes  can  take  place.”     “I  think  this  Board  has  vision  for  what  can  be.  Many  Board  members  see  many  amazing  things  that  we  can  implement.”     Progress  on  Governance  Priori>es  &  Policy  Work   “We  are  doing  a  preTy  good  job.”     “Policy  and  Governance  is  one  of  our  strengths  I  think.  And  I  think  we  have  a  very  good  system  in  place  in  iden&fying  the   departments  we  need  a  regular  oversight  work  session  on.”     “Policy  work  –  I  think  we  have  done  a  good  job  with  that,  but  could  do  a  beTer  job.”     “I  see  policy  development  as  arising  organically  from  the  work;  policy  development  happens  effec&vely  and  coopera&vely   between  Board  CommiTees  and  staff,  with  individual  Board  Directors  pitching  in  as  they  see  the  need.”     “I  have  great  respect  for  our  Audit  and  Finance  CommiTee's  work.  The  Audit  Response  has  been  extremely  effec&ve,   despite  media  magnifica&on  of  one  area  of  con&nuing  concern.”     “We  are  s&ll  making  progress  on  basic  policy.  That  is  something  that,  by  and  large,  all  members  respect.”     “We  are  working  on  a  strategic  plan  and  that  process  is  moving  forward.  Once  you  put  a  process  together  and  it  is  public  –   it  dampens  down  any  backroom  meddling.”    

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The  Board’s  Strengths  per  the  Board  
Knowledgeable  about  the  Community   “Each  one  of  us  know  our  districts  and  we  can  really  put  our  knowledge  together  to  help  the  district  as  a  whole.”     “We  try  to  be  the  voice  of  the  schools  and  bring  it  to  the  Board  lewng  everyone  know  what  is  going  on.”     Produc>ve  When  Working  Together   “I  think  the  Board  has  done  a  lot  of  good  work  and  I  think  the  district  has  done  a  lot  of  good  work.”     “When  we  come  together  to  get  things  done,  we  are  produc&ve.”    

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The  Board’s  Opportuni>es  per  the  Board  
Address  the  Inconsistent  Defini>ons  of  the  Board’s  Role   “Our  fundamental  disagreements  are  based  around  what  role  the  Board  plays.”     “The  overall  responsibility  is  to  really  support  the  work  that  we  want  done  by  the  Superintendent.  We  are  not  supposed   to  tell  him  what  to  do,  but  we  are  supposed  to  collaborate  with  him.  We  are  not  meant  to  dictate  to  him.  We  hired  him   for  a  reason.  We  are  not  meant  to  overrun  him.  But  it  is  our  job  to  oversee  him  and  to  keep  him  held  accountable  to  make   sure  everything  is  running  smoothly.  ”     “We  need  to  keep  the  Superintendent  apprised  of  what  is  bubbling  up,  keeping  him  informed  with  what  is  going  on.”     “To  me,  it  is  being  a  conduit  of  informa&on  that  I  have  received,  bringing  it  to  staff  members  and  having  that   conversa&on.”     “I  would  say  we  have  three  dis&nct  roles.  The  first  is  around  policy  and  governance.  That  is  one  of  our  strengths  I  think.     We  are  also  ambassadors  at  large.  Lewng  people  know  there  is  a  face  to  the  district  and  sharing  the  changes  we  are   making.  Hiring,  Firing  and  Evalua&ng  the  Superintendent.  Also,  being  the  best  possible  advisor  to  the  superintendent   without  direc&ng  him  or  her.”     “Governance  is  our  responsibility.  Governance  should  only  be  three  things:  Making  policy,  performing  oversight  (that  is   not  looking  over  the  staff’s  shoulder  all  the  &me  –  it’s  once  a  year  looking  at  the  performance),  and  budget  (we  approve   the  budget  –  so  we  need  a  formal  process  for  priori&zing  what  is  cut  and  what  new  spending  goes  to).  The  other  thing  –   which  is  a  liTle  more  abstract  –  is  advoca&ng  for  SeaTle  Public  Schools.  But  that  is  not  a  primary  responsibility.  It’s  an   op&onal  area  that  some  Board  members  pursue.”     “Policy  governance  and  fiduciary  oversight  -­‐  those  are  our  two  core  businesses,  as  it  were.”     “Going  back  to  the  role  of  the  Board,  the  work  on  the  strategic  plan  –  I  am  worried  that  people  are  going  to  get  down  into   the  weeds,  again.”     “I  take  my  defini&on  right  out  of  state  statute.  We  are  here  to  hire  the  superintendent,  follow  policy  framework,  and   ensure  the  strategic  plan,  to  evaluate  the  budget  in-­‐line  with  the  strategic  plan,  to  put  measures  in  front  of  voters.”     “We  are  here  to  provide  parameters  and  create  the  framework  and  not  make  decisions.”     45

The  Board’s  Opportuni>es  per  the  Board  
Come  Together  as  a  Team   “We  need  to  move  forward  and  work  together  as  a  team.  We  need  to  support  the  Superintendent  and  we  need  to   support  the  schools  as  a  team.”     “We  need  more  opportuni&es  to  actually  work  together:  Our  work  sessions,  either  as  a  Board  alone  or  working  together   with  staff,  are  usually  very  produc&ve,  and  I  would  like  to  see  more  chance  to  work  together  in  that  venue.”     “We  are  supposed  to  be  working  together.  It  says  that  in  our  bylaws.  We  are  not  just  purely  a  legisla&ve  body  –  we  are  a   governance  body.  We  are  supposed  to  be  in  a  coopera&ve  rela&onship.  We  don’t  have  a  distribu&on  of  power  –  the  Board   is  supposed  to  provide  long-­‐term  guidance.”     “I  feel  good  that  when  we  focus  on  the  work,  we  can  get  there  and  make  decisions  –  even  when  we  have  a  difference  of   opinion.”     “We  need  to  drop  the  animosity  and  focus  on  working  together.  We  aren’t  all  going  to  agree  on  everything,  but  we  can   concentrate  on  things  together.”     Address  Exis>ng  Issues  of  Division  &  Trust   “I  think  improvements  can  be  made,  but  only  if  we  are  honest.  The  Board  members  that  are  leaving  –  they  have  nothing   to  lose  by  being  honest.”     “What  makes  it  good  not  great  is  when  some  colleagues  are  not  working  for  the  good  of  the  process.”     “It  almost  has  a  par&san  feel  some&mes.  Which  is  ridiculous  because  there  are  no  par&es.”     “This  is  the  first  &me  I  have  seen  an  actual  dispropor&onal  division  in  terms  of  commiTee  assignments.”     “We  have  had  close  votes  –  so  we  have  public  disagreement.  That  some&mes  has  not  gone  well.  People  have  become   very  upset.”     “In  terms  of  how  we  disagree  on  process  –  it’s  like  Kabuki  Theater.  We  talk  about  the  same  things  over  and  over  again  and   nothing  changes.”     ““Each  person  doesn’t  know  who  is  doing  what,  what  direc&on  they  are  going.  That  is  not  a  good  thing.  There  is  a  split.”     “Have  a  truly  candid  conversa&on.  Part  of  it  is  being  very  upfront  with  people.  We  have  not  done  that  yet”     “I  think  we  have  to  face  our  working  together  issues.”     46

The  Board’s  Opportuni>es  per  the  Board  
Foster  Open  &  Respec_ul  Communica>on   “We  need  to  focus  on  how  we  communicate  with  each  other.  We  need  to  be  mindful  of  how  we  say  things  to  each  other   and  respect  each  other.  We  need  to  appreciate  the  colleagues  that  agree  with  us,  but  more  importantly  not  inten&onally   discredit  how  others  are  feeling.”     “It  would  probably  be  useful  to  make  a  prac&ce  of  framing  conversa&ons,  for  example,  in  commiTees,  in  terms  of  the   governance/administra&on  implica&ons.”     “Some  Board  directors  stopped  communica&ng  with  the  others  on  very  basic  things  like  “I’m  going  to  pull  this  off  the   agenda”  or  basic  func&onality.  So  it  made  us  feel  like  we  were  not  a  part  of  the  process.”     “In  our  guiding  principles  as  a  Board  it  is  wriTen  in  that  we  don’t  surprise  the  Board.”     Focus  on  the  Bigger  Picture   “We  have  to  decide  whose  agenda  we  are  pushing.  Are  we  here  for  the  kids  or  our  own  agenda.  Some  of  us  have  our  own   private  agendas,  and  some  of  us  are  so  stubborn.”     “We  spend  a  great  amount  of  &me  on  the  individual  priori&es  of  Board  members,  on  bad  process  that  has  to  be  fixed   because  we  go  off  the  rails,  bad  communica&on  because  we  are  not  sharing  informa&on  universally.”     “The  single  most  important  impact  is  that  inside  of  urban  educa&on  in  Washington  State,  a  Board  like  this  will  repel  all   people  of  quality.”   “We  just  talk  about  single  issues.  They  are  important  issues  –  but  we  need  to  be  addressing  these  issues  as  they  relate  to   everyone.  They  are  all  linked.  We  can’t  change  disciplinary  rules  –  they  come  from  the  state.”     “People  work  for  their  own  passions.”     “It  could  be  that  people  are  worrying  about  their  legacy,  so  they  won’t  be  worrying  about  the  kids  and  just  working  to  get   their  legacy  set.”    

47

The  Board’s  Opportuni>es  per  the  Board  
Engage  in  Appropriate  Lines  of  Communica>on     “I  do  talk  to  the  Superintendent…  But  if  I  talk  to  him  and  don’t  see  changes,  then  I  will  move  to  the  Ed  Directors.  Some   would  say  it’s  inappropriate  contact.  It  is.  But  when  nothing  happens,  someone  has  to  do  something.  And  if  something  is   going  on  in  a  school  and  nothing  is  being  done  about  it  –  then  I  feel  like  it’s  my  job.”   “Yes,  I  know  it  is  not  my  job  to  meet  with  principals.  But  some&mes  you  have  to  do  things  to  make  change.  We  need  the   principals  to  know  that  we  support  them  and  that  we  will  help  them.”   “I  know  it  happened  on  several  occasions  that  there  have  been  sequen&al  conversa&ons  about  vo&ng  because  it  was   brought  to  me.  I  asked  that  we  were  all  reminded  by  email  that  this  is  not  appropriate.  There  are  supposed  to  be  a  set  of   rules  in  terms  of  engagement  between  the  Board  and  the  Cabinet.”     “When  Board  members  get  very  pushy  and  the  staff  is  fed  up  I  try  to  intervene  and  help,  to  maintain  some  modicum  of   process.”     “I  have  heard  some  Board  members,  in  some  of  their  more  honest  moments,  say  “You  have  to  get  rid  of  this  person”  to   the  Superintendent.  That  is  a  direct  conversa&on  with  the  Superintendent,  which  isn’t  completely  out  of  bounds.  But  he   works  for  us  –  so  it’s  tricky.  ”     “I  think  the  Cabinet,  at  &mes,  wishes  we  weren’t  as  aTuned  to  the  issues  as  we  are…  I  think  we  are  in  their  hair  a  bit.  But  I   think  there  is  a  liTle  bit  of  understanding  that  our  focus  is  student  focused.”     “As  a  Board  member  you  have  to  resist  the  tempta&on  to  jump  into  the  middle.  This  is  another  way  that  the  trust  gets   lost.  There  might  be  things  you  don’t  know  about  happening  in  the  background.”     “If  a  school  Board  member  asks  a  staff  member  to  do  something  they  don’t  understand  what  kind  of  posi&on  that  puts   that  staff  member  in.  That  staff  member  looks  at  that  conversa&on  as  a  command  “go  do  this.””     “The  staff  needs  to  be  able  to  push  back  to  us.  No  one  feels  empowered  to  say  no.  People  feel  their  jobs  are  threatened.   They  are  driven  out  by  the  poor  treatment.”    

48

The  Board’s  Opportuni>es  per  the  Board  
Find  a  Balance  Between  Regional  Advocacy  &  a  Focus  on  the  District  as  a  Whole   “We  were  all  elected  citywide.  We  all  have  cons&tuents.  And  our  cons&tuents  have  different  priori&es.  The  hot  buTon   issues  in  each  region  are  different.”     “It’s  important  to  be  able  to  respect  the  fact  that  as  Board  members  we  are  going  to  advocate  for  the  issues  that  affect   our  cons&tuents.”     “When  people  do  that  “in  my  district”  thing  –  I  wince  because  my  district  is  the  en&re  city  of  SeaTle.  So  all  of  the  kids  in   the  city  of  SeaTle  are  in  need  of  representa&on.  If  we  were  only  voted  on  by  our  district,  that  would  be  a  fair  statement.”     “I  am  an  advocate  for  any  family  in  the  district  not  just  the  families  in  my  individual  district.  I  know  more  about  the   schools  in  my  district.  I  do  see  my  role  as  an  advocate  for  voices  from  all  over  the  city.  I  don’t  see  myself  as  a  district  x   representa&ve.”     Con>nue  Professional  Development  &  Clarify  Areas  of  Confusion   “I  s&ll  have  some  confusion  about  how  to  be  most  effec&ve  and  how  to  understand  what  is  going  on  more  clearly.”     “I  would  like  more  clarity  about  Exec  team  work;  for  example,  would  like  to  know  more  completely  how  agendas  are  set   for  work  sessions,  retreats,  etc.”     “There  are  such  differing  levels  about  understanding  of  the  work  and  contradictory  levels  of  what  the  role  is  –  and  that   makes  it  difficult.”     “Some  Board  members  just  don’t  know  what  management  vs.  governance  looks  like.”     “We  need  con&nued  professional  development.  We  need  to  ask  ourselves  if  we  are  commiTed  to  good  governance   training.”    

49

The  Board’s  Future  per  the  Board  
Focus  on  the  Work  &  Iden>fy  Unified  Purpose   “We  need  to  focus  on  moving  the  schools  forward.”     “We  all  need  to  search  ourselves  and  figure  out  what  our  purpose  is  on  this  Board.  What  do  we  want  to  do  for  the  future   of  SeaTle  Public  Schools.  We  need  to  focus  on  the  plan  that  we  have.”     “We  need  to  bring  the  Board  together  and  support  the  Superintendent.”     “I  would  really  like  it  if  we  would  all  concentrate  on  the  work  and  stop  concentra&ng  on  the  swirl.  From  my  frame,  in  our   next  work  sessions  we  need  to  concentrate  on  the  work.”     “This  Board  needs  to  allow  the  workload  that  we  already  have  on  our  plates  to  get  done  well.  Don’t  keep  running  it  off   the  rails.  We  have  very  important  work  to  do.  If  we  just  stayed  focused  on  that  work,  we  could  get  important  things   done.”     Focus  on  Building  Trust   “There  have  been  some  efforts  to  work  to  develop  beTer  working  rela&onships.  We  have  had  professional  development   with  some  great  facilitators.  But  we  have  not  had  an  actual  facilitated  work  session.”     “Regaining  trust  is  really  hard.  The  ac&ons  have  to  be  there  and  they  have  to  be  deliberate.”     “If  you  look  at  a  highly  func&oning  Board,  trust  is  a  key  element.  That  doesn’t  mean  lock  and  stop  agreement.  It  just   means  that  there  is  trust  behind  the  decisions.”     “We  have  to  figure  out  how  to  get  trust.  I  think  most  members,  not  all,  of  the  Board  would  genuinely  like  to  see  us  be  high   func&oning.  I  am  not  willing  to  write  most  Board  members  off.”     Aim  for  Fresh  Start   “If  we  can  all  come  together  and  put  our  cards  out  on  the  table  we  can  move  the  Board  forward.”     “We  all  need  to  give  each  other  a  break.  We  all  need  to  just  back  off.  And  realize  that  the  same  voters  elected  every  single   one  of  us.”     “I  just  want  it  to  be  fixed.  As  a  Board  we  are  failing,  and  there  is  no  reason  for  us  to  be  failing.”     50

Appendix 3: How it Feels to be a Board Director

51

The  Feeling  of  the  Board  
Some  Board  members  feel  frustrated,  unhappy,  and  embarrassed.  While  other  Board  members  acknowledge  moments  of   disagreement  but  feel  the  rela>onships  are  strong.   “I  think  I  have  great  rela&onships  with  all  the  Board  members.  We  have  had  good  working  rela&onships  and  we  have  had   disagreements.”     “Not  so  good,  I’ll  be  honest.”     “There  are  a  few  of  us  that  complain,  and  a  few  of  us  just  want  things  to  get  back  to  normal.”     “I  think  I  have  a  good  working  rela&onship  with  some  Board  members.  One  Board  member  doesn’t  talk  to  me  at  all.”     “This  would  be  really  hard  stuff  to  talk  about  in  public.”     “I  am  embarrassed.  Every  day  I  am  embarrassed.  We  are  not  doing  work  I’m  proud  of.  We  are  not  sewng  the  bar  high.  We   are  not  doing  work  to  help  these  kids.”     “Most  of  the  &me  I  am  embarrassed.  I  am  not  proud  of  where  we  are.”    

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Some  Board  Members  Feel  Marginalized  
Some  Board  Members  feel  they  are  being  marginalized  –  while  others  don’t  see  marginaliza>on  as  a  pressing  issue.   Some  Board  Members  Feel  Marginalized   “CommiTee  distribu&ons  are  not  evenly  distributed.  So  it’s  kind  of  marginalized…  I  don’t  think  that  the  distribu&ons  were   fair  or  right.  I  don’t  think  it  should  have  been  done  that  way.”     “I  feel  quite  frustrated.  Marginalized.”     “At  &mes  I  will  view  something  right  before  it  goes  to  introduc&on.  Rather  than  knowing  or  par&cipa&ng  in  important   decisions  early  on.”     “There  has  been  a  culture  amongst  some  trying  to  really  dominate.”     “Some  Board  members  gewng  one  commiTee  assignment  a  piece  and  another  person  gewng  three?  Are  you  serious?  It   sent  me  into  orbit  that  some  Board  members  were  so  marginalized.  I  voiced  my  opinion  and  the  ac&on  was  ra&onalized.”     Some  Board  Members  don’t  see  Marginaliza>on  as  a  Problem   “Today,  the  marginaliza&on  isn’t  really  happening.”     “The  Board  President  called  up  everyone  regarding  the  commiTees  and  the  folks  that  called  back  told  her  what  they   wanted  to  do…I  didn’t  find  out  that  other  people  were  unhappy  un&l  three  months  in  –  and  I  didn’t  find  out  directly  at   first.  Who  knew  they  would  all  feel  marginalized  because  they  weren’t  on  more  commiTees?”     “I  didn’t  ask  for  anything.  And  I  am  quite  happy  with  it.  I  have  a  lot  of  things  on  my  plate  that  other  Board  members  don’t,   so  I  don’t  mind  being  on  only  one  commiTee.  I  had  more  than  enough  stuff.  “    

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Appendix 4: Trust & Respect

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Trust  Between  the  Cabinet  &  Board  is  Inconsistent  
The  trust  level  between  the  Cabinet  and  the  Board  is  inconsistent.  Some  believe  that  past  controversies  have  leg  the  Board   hesitant  to  trust  the  Cabinet.   The  Trust  Level  is  Inconsistent   “I  think  the  trust  is  person  specific.  I  know  which  Board  members  trust  me.  There  are  some  that  don’t  have  a  whole  lot  of   love  for  me.  I  know  that  Board  members  don’t  trust  some  of  my  peers.  They  have  told  me.  That  makes  me  wonder  what   they  are  saying  about  me  to  others.”     “Both  the  Cabinet  and  the  Board  have  trust  issues  internally.”     “I  want  to  see  SeaTle  making  a  commitment  to  trust.  I  want  a  strategic  plan  that  is  aimed  at  building  trust.  I  think  this   Board  can  do  it.  It  won’t  be  without  considerable  difficulty.”     “We  made  some  adjustments  to  a  certain  policy.  I  didn’t  think  it  was  ready  to  go  forward,  but  we  brought  it  to  the  Board   and  presented  it.  They  said  to  go  ahead  and  move  it  forward.  At  a  public  mee&ng  a  school  Board  member  basically   aTacked  the  policy  and  tore  it  (and  us)  apart  bringing  up  public  concerns.  That  member  tore  apart  his/her  own  policy   from  a  commiTee  he/she  had  been  siwng  on.  He/She  had  voted  for  it  at  commiTee.  We,  as  staff,  were  embarrassed.  We   felt  set  up.  We  could  have  pulled  it  if  he/she  had  come  to  us.  Or  he/she  could  have  prepared  us  with  ques&ons.  Those   things  cause  staff  to  not  trust  Board  members.”     “I  have  seen  the  trust  level  between  the  Cabinet  and  the  Board  improve.  I  think  that,  yes,  there  is  trust.”     “I’d  like  to  think  I  am  trusted.”     “I  am  surprised  when  some  Board  members  do  the  right  thing.  I  am  surprised  when  they  trust  me.  What  does  that  say?”       Past  Controversies  have  leg  the  Board  Hesitant  to  Trust  the  Cabinet   “They  feel  because  of  past  indiscre&ons  and  scandal  that  they  can’t  trust  staff.  It  doesn’t  make  it  a  great  place  to  work.”    

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The  Trust  Level  between  the  Board  &  the  Cabinet   Impacts  the  Work  
The  inconsistent  level  of  trust  between  the  Cabinet  &  the  Board  impacts  the  work  in  the  following  ways:   The  Rela>onship  is  Strained     “In  the  end,  we  as  staff  just  really  want  to  support  the  Board.  But  when  the  Board  is  manipula&ng  us  it  strains  the   rela&onship.”     Policy  Work  Suffers   “We  help  them  work  policy,  work  on  decisions  –  but  we  don’t  know  what  we  will  get.”     “We  could  be  a  lot  more  effec&ve  if  they  s&ck  to  policy.  The  examples  I  can  think  of,  they  only  have  half  the  story  and  push   for  what  they  decide  is  best  or  want.”     Morale  is  Low  &  People  Feel  Threatened   “I  would  say  that  some  of  the  Execu&ve  Directors  have  felt  Board  Directors  threatened  their  job.  I  have  heard  that  second-­‐ hand.  I  have  heard  “if  you  don’t  do  it  this  way,  that  Board  member  won’t  support  you  and  will  do  everything  in  their   power  to…””   “I  would  say  there  have  been  threats  of  a  reputa&on  being  marred  –  if  you  don’t  always  support  a  certain  policy  or  don’t   do  it  their  way  then  you  are  considered  a  racist.”     “Staff  feels  threatened  by  the  Board.  Their  jobs  and  future  feel  threatened  by  the  Board.  The  Board  members  will  not  give   up  –  if  they  care  about  something  they  will  get  their  way.  So  I  ask  myself,  do  I  really  want  to  put  my  career  in  front  of  that?   It’s  uncomfortable.  It  puts  us  in  a  very  uncomfortable  posi&on.”     “People  in  the  district,  especially  employees,  feel  beTer  and  more  trus&ng  if  they  know  that  there  isn’t  someone  looking   over  their  shoulder.”     The  Cabinet  Feels  Their  Contribu>ons  Go  Unheard   “If  we  remind  them  that  they  are  overstepping  they  might  reply  with  “oh,  that’s  not  what  I  meant  to  do”  or  “we  didn’t   know  that  was  over  the  line.””     “They  do  have  individual  agendas  that  run  counter  to  what  we,  as  a  staff,  might  be  sugges&ng.  That  can  run  in  conflict  to   what  they  are  hearing  from  their  cons&tuents.”     56

How  to  Build  Trust  with  the  Cabinet  
Both  Cabinet  and  Board  members  feel  that  in  order  to  rebuild  the  trust  with  the  Cabinet,  the  Board  needs  to  focus  on  the   following:   Be  Accountable   “The  first  step  in  building  trust  is  defining  roles:  what  is  the  Boards  role,  what  is  staff’s  role,  what  lines  are  not  to  be   crossed.  Or  beTer  yet,  we  need  to  define  the  accountability  because  we  do  have  1620.”   “We  brought  up  the  inappropriate  communica&on  or  work  of  the  Board  at  a  retreat.  We  were  asked  to  give  examples  and   no  one  felt  comfortable  speaking  up,  especially  in  a  sewng  like  that.  And  those  examples  were  negated  or  apologized  for   –  but  it  keeps  happening.”   “When  we  give  feedback  they  ra&onalize  their  behavior.  They  see  themselves  as  helpful  and  trying  to  move  the  district   forward.”     “They  need  to  acknowledge  that  they  don’t  agree  with  each  other  and  that  they  micro-­‐manage.”     “Only  one  Board  director  stepped  forward  and  owned  their  micro-­‐managing.  Others  don’t  want  to  step  forward.”     “Some  Board  directors  are  masters  at  redirec&ng  aTen&on  and  blame...  Others  at  least  own  up  to  micro-­‐managing.”     “We  need  to  self-­‐monitor  and  self-­‐control.  The  staff  needs  an  invita&on  from  us  to  say  no.  I  really  think  that  the  Board   members  that  ask  for  examples  really  need  some  help  understanding  that  what  they  are  doing  is  out  of  line.”     Go  Through  Proper  Communica>on  Channels   “I  would  like  to  think,  as  they  build  more  trust  for  the  Superintendent  and  the  Cabinet,  there  will  be  more  trust  in  the   Superintendent  to  resolve  any  concerns  they  have  so  they  don’t  have  to  seek  answers  out  themselves.  That  is  a  trust   issue.  Right  now  they  think  this  is  the  best  way  to  do  their  work  –  I  don’t  think  they  do  it  to  go  around  the   Superintendent.”    

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How  to  Build  Trust  with  the  Cabinet  
Share  Informa>on  &  Listen  to  Feedback  From  the  Cabinet   “Last  &me  staff  was  asked  for  input  on  the  Board  it  was  by  and  large  ignored.  ”     “I  wonder  if  the  mistrust  and  fall  out  that  came  from  the  undisclosed  previous  review  (by  the  Alliance)  was  worse  than  the   actual  sharing  of  that  review.”     “I  think  that  this  is  good.  I  think  sharing  the  posi&ves  as  well  as  construc&ve  cri&cism  is  very  healthy.”   “They  have  had  opportuni&es  to  work  through  their  divisions  when  the  public  wasn’t  there.  The  topic  of  Board   governance  came  up.  It  was  addressed,  but  nothing  changed.  If  they  address  their  issues  in  private  again,  I  don’t  know   that  anything  would  ever  come  of  it.”     “I  feel  good  that  we  are  actually  having  this  conversa&on.  In  previous  retreats,  it  feels  like  our  previous  input  has  not  been   validated.  So  the  fact  we  are  being  asked  these  ques&ons  is  important.”     “I  think  it  is  important  for  us  to  build  trust  to  hear  back  about  the  input  and  findings.  It  might  not  be  something  that   everyone  wants  to  hear  and  talk  about.  It’s  a  sensi&ve  issue  and  hard  to  make  folks  feel  safe  to  air  it.”     “Last  &me  we  were  told  the  informa&on  would  be  publicized  and  it  got  hidden.  If  we  don’t  share  it  this  &me,  that  could  be   detrimental.”     “We  have  to  face  the  feedback  from  the  staff.  We  need  to  make  adjustments  to  make  our  work  successful.  And  we  need   to  empower  the  Superintendent  in  order  to  make  him  successful.”     “We  should  have  public  exit  interviews.  We  need  to  be  willing  to  hear  what  people  have  to  say.”     Speak  With  One  Voice   “They  need  to  build  trust  with  the  Cabinet,  as  well.  We’ll  get  conflic&ng  informa&on  from  different  Board  groups.  The   Finance  CommiTee  will  say  one  thing  and  then  the  Opera&ons  CommiTee  will  say  something  contradictory.  And  we  are   let  not  knowing  where  to  go.  This  happened  even  before  the  current  commiTee  assignments.  The  current  commiTee   assignments  have  definitely  changed  the  way  the  opera&ons  func&on.”    

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The  Trust  Level  on  the  Board  is  Less  than  Ideal  
The  trust  level  on  the  Board  is  less  than  ideal.   “There’s  plenty  of  blame  to  go  around.  We  all  need  to  address  it,  and  improve  the  way  we  func&on  by  improving  our   processes  as  well  as  our  behavior.”     “I  think  the  trust  level  is  very  low.”     “At  &mes  I  ques&on  others  mo&ves.  When  we  vote  on  policies,  I  don’t  always  know  why  people  vote  the  way  they  do.  I   don’t  know  if  they  are  vo&ng  to  push  a  policy  they  believe  in  or  if  they  are  working  for  something  else.”   “Some  people  do  bad-­‐mouth  each  other  behind  peoples  backs.  It’s  no  secret  that  there  has  been  animosity  between   some  of  the  Board  directors.”   “Who  do  Board  members  listen  to  for  advice  and  insight?  This  is  a  problem  we  have  as  a  Board.  The  majority  of  the  Board   feels  inclined  to  listen  to  outside  en&&es  rather  than  trust  the  other  Board  members  and  the  staff.”     “It  is  hard  for  an  organiza&on  this  size  for  the  Board  members  and  the  superintendent  to  not  have  a  lot  of  trust.  We  use   trust  as  currency.”     “I  think  a  lot  of  the  lack  of  trust  has  to  do  with  the  percep&on  that  while  we  have  rules  about  how  we  are  going  to   engage,  they  are  not  followed.  We  even  have  protocols.”     “I  try  to  walk  in  as  an  open  slate.  I  used  to  walk  in  openly  trus&ng  everyone  every  &me.  I  don’t  feel  that  way  anymore.  The   way  folks  have  treated  the  staff.  I  don’t  feel  comfortable  with  that.  They  come  off  to  me  as  approaching  the  staff  in  a  non-­‐ trus&ng  way.  And  that  disturbs  me.  I  don’t  like  people  being  treated  badly.  I  would  say  that  has  shown  more  in  the  last   several  months.”     “Right  now  trust  is  low.”     “They  need  to  get  past  their  trust  issues.”    

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The  Trust  Level  on  the  Board  Impacts  the  Work  
The  lack  of  trust  on  the  Board  impacts  the  work.   Nega>vely  Impacts  the  Morale  &  Rela>onships   “The  commiTee  assignments  were  preTy  divisive.  I’ve  never  seen  them  that  unbalanced.  Whether  it  was  inten&onal  or   uninten&onal,  it  was  not  good  for  the  morale  or  the  rela&onships.  What  does  that  do  to  the  trust?”   “It  creates  anxiety  and  stress  for  everybody  –  the  community,  the  Cabinet,  the  district  and  the  Board.”     “I  don’t  feel  supported  on  this  Board.”     Hinders  Open  &  Honest  Communica>on   “There  is  a  lack  of  trust  and  respect  resul&ng  in  difficul&es  in  listening  openly  to  input  from  all  directors.”     “We  shouldn’t  think  less  of  each  other  because  we  don’t  vote  the  same  way.”   “We  need  to  appreciate  the  colleagues  that  agree  with  us,  but  more  importantly  not  inten&onally  discredit  how  others   are  feeling.  “   Creates  Dysfunc>on   “I  think  all  of  this  can  be  synthesized  down  very  simply.  Un&l  we  can  get  a  certain  level  of  trust  going  we  will  be  the   poster-­‐child  for  a  dysfunc&onal  school  Board.  I  don’t  believe  we  are  func&oning  on  all  cylinders.  I  think  we  could  be  and   we  should  be.  If  we  can  get  on  the  road  to  doing  that  it  will  make  a  huge  difference.”     “Pretending  that  everything  is  all  right  is  dishonest.”   Gets  in  the  Way  of  Progress  &  Produc>vity   “We  have  seven  cooks  in  the  kitchen  and  it’s  tough  gewng  a  meal  out.”     “Instead  of  working  on  important  educa&onal  issues  we  end  up  focusing  on  damage  control.”   “Going  back  to  the  work  on  the  strategic  plan…we  don’t  have  &me  to  con&nue  to  revise.  I  don’t  want  a  list  of  20  things   because  that  is  not  clear  and  will  be  a  target  that  we  will  never  meet…People  keep  adding  stuff  because  they  want  to   leave  their  liTle  fingerprints  in  there.”   60

How  to  Build  Trust  on  the  Board  
Cabinet  and  Board  members  feel  that  in  order  to  rebuild  the  trust  on  the  Board,  Board  members  need  to  focus  on  the   following:   Demonstrate  Accountability   “I  would  have  to  see  direct  evidence  that  there  are  no  hidden  agendas,  that  there  is  a  clear  communica&on  about  what   you  are  doing.  I  hear  a  lot  of  protesta&ons  about  transparency  and  openness,  and  so  many  things  are  being  done  that  are   the  an&thesis  of  that.”     “We  are  public  officials.  So  when  you  say  something  you  have  to  own  it.  If  you  are  man  or  woman  enough  to  sit  in  a  room   and  say  something,  then  you  need  to  own  and  stand  by  it.”     “We  need  to  figure  out  a  way  to  hold  ourselves  accountable.  We  need  to  be  able  to  have  honest  and  open  conversa&ons.”     “We  need  an  increased  level  of  self-­‐awareness.”     Iden>fy  a  Unified  Purpose   “I  think  that  if  we  really  come  to  a  consensus  as  to  why  we  are  here  –  if  we  really  look  inside  ourselves  as  to  what  our   reasons  are…”     “I  don’t  care  about  minority  vs.  majority.  I  don’t  care  about  old  guard  vs.  new  guard.  I  care  about  the  kids.”     Start  Fresh   “Everyone  needs  to  bury  their  hatchets  and  work  toward  respecqul,  collegial  engagement.  This  will  go  far  to  improving   our  func&oning.”     “I  wish  we  could  just  move  forward  and  start  fresh.”     “Rebuilding  trust  is  possible.  But  it  would  have  to  be  an  honest,  open  and  visible  thing.  The  challenge  is,  when  the   conversa&on  starts  –  there  will  most  likely  be  an  instantaneous  response  of  defense.”     Work  to  Understand  &  Relate  to  Each  Other   “The  Board  members  need  to  beTer  understand  each  other.  That  will  help  them  beTer  understand  where  each  person  is   coming  from,  which  will  enable  them  to  work  well  together.”     61

The  Cabinet  Respects  the  Board  
The  Cabinet  respects  the  commitment  of  the  Board,  and  they  feel  strongly  that  the  Board  has  the  poten>al  to  improve.     “I  respect  them  individually  as  people  who  have  donated  hundreds  of  hours.  You  have  to  respect  the  fact  that  they  are   willing  to  do  that.  Individually  they  are  very  compassionate,  intellectual  people.  Collec&vely,  they  struggle.”     “The  Cabinet  is  learning  to  respect  them  more.”     “I  think  all  Cabinet  members  are  awed  by  and  respect  the  fact  that  these  Board  members  are  willing  to  commit  the  &me   and  effort  that  they  do.  We  are  willing  to  work  with  them  in  spite  of  any  personal  agendas  or  personality  issues  we  might   run  into.  I  hope  we  all  have  an  apprecia&on  for  them.”     “I  think  the  Cabinet  respects  some  Board  members,  but  it  depends  on  whom  you  are  asking.  I  think  they  respect  the   ins&tu&on.”     “I  would  say  yes  the  Cabinet  does  respect  the  Board  because  the  Board  has  the  posi&on.  But  I  don’t  feel  the  feeling  is   reciprocated.  By  and  large,  the  feeling  is  that  they  know  beTer  than  we  do  how  to  do  our  job.  They  hired  professionals;  let   the  professionals  do  their  job.  If  they  don’t  respect  us,  they  don’t  deserve  the  git  of  our  respect.”     “I  think  they  treat  staff  with  dignity  and  respect  for  the  most  part.  I  have  heard  that  some  will  publicly  admonish  others.  I   haven’t  experienced  that  –  but  I  have  cringed  at  &mes.”     Op>mis>c   “I  am  here  because  I  want  it  to  be  beTer.”     “I  envision  it  gewng  beTer,  not  worse.  There  was  a  bad  &me  on  the  Board  not  too  long  ago.  It  was  a  preTy  bad  storm.  It’s   s&ll  stormy,  but  gewng  beTer.  Last  spring  it  was  so  bad  that  it  was  affec&ng  the  ability  for  staff  to  focus  on  their  work.”    

62

Appendix 5: Detailed Data
The Board

63

Detailed  Quan>ta>ve  Ra>ng  Scale  –  Avg.  
Responsibility  
Place  the  interests  of  children  above  all  others  in  every  decision  that  we  make.   Uphold  all  applicable  federal  and  state  laws  and  regula&ons.   Abide  by  the  policies  and  bylaws  of  the  Board  and  work  with  our  fellow  Board  members  to  change  those  policies  as  needed  to  improve  student  learning.   Maintain  Board  focus  on  the  achievement  of  all  students,  regardless  of  race,  class,  ethnicity,  or  gender.   Not  use  our  posi&ons  for  personal  or  par&san  gain.   Model  con&nuous  learning  in  our  roles  as  members  of  the  governance  team.   Maintain  a  strategic  plan  for  the  district  that  clearly  defines  success  and  accountability  for  the  Board,  the  staff,  and  our  students.   Focus  on  the  policy  work  of  the  Board  and  monitor  progress  on  the  indicators  of  success  ar&culated  in  our  strategic  plan,  leaving  the  day-­‐to-­‐day   opera&on  of  the  district  to  the  superintendent  and  staff.   Base  our  decisions  upon  available  facts,  vote  our  convic&ons,  avoid  bias  in  any  form,  and  uphold  and  support  the  decisions  of  the  majority  of  the  Board   once  a  decision  is  made.   Work  to  build  trust  between  and  among  Board  members  and  the  superintendent  by  trea&ng  everyone  with  dignity  and  respect,  even  in  &mes  of   disagreement.   Maintain  the  confiden&ality  of  privileged  informa&on  including  that  shared  in  execu&ve  sessions  of  the  Board.   Recognize  that  authority  rests  only  with  majority  decisions  of  the  Board  and  make  no  independent  commitments  or  take  any  independent  ac&ons  that   may  compromise  the  Board    as  a  whole.   Refer  cons&tuent  complaints  and  concerns  to  the  appropriate  person  within  the  district  chain  of  command.   Respect  the  leadership  roles  of  the  Board  president  and  superintendent.   Average   1.9   2.7   1.9   2.1   2.4   2.1   2.7   1.8   2.3   1.7   2.4   2.0   2.0   2.0   1.3   1.7   2.3   2.3   2.0   1.9   1.7   1.8   2.1  

Performance  Measures  
Is  the  Board  working  together  effec&vely?   How  is  the  Board  working  with  the  superintendent  and  staff?   Are  Board  commiTees  working  effec&vely?   Are  Board  mee&ngs  operated  and  structured  effec&vely?   Do  Board  members  par&cipate  in  professional  development?  Are  there  areas  of  content  training  needed?   Does  the  Board  adhere  to  its  ground  rules  and  Oath  of  Responsibili&es?   Does  the  Board  engage  in  appropriate  communica&on  with  staff  and  the  public  regarding  issues?   Is  the  governance  team's  policy  development  process  efficient,  effec&ve,  and  produc&ve?   Is  the  Board  appropriately  assis&ng  the  Superintendent  with  key  district  priori&za&on  decisions?  

Key   Needs  Improvement   1.0  -­‐  1.4   1.5  –  1.9   Meets  Expecta&ons   2.0  –  2.4   2.5  –  2.9   Exceeds  Expecta&ons   3.0  –  3.4   3.5  –  4.0  

Continued…

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Detailed  Quan>ta>ve  Ra>ng  Scale  –  Avg.  
Rela>onships  -­‐  Goal  
The  Board  and  Superintendent  understand  and  ar&culate  the  system  of  governance  and  differen&ate  between  policy  and   administra&ve  roles.   Policies  and  procedures  are  established  for  Board  and  superintendent  interpersonal  and  working  rela&onships.   The  Board  maintains  a  close  rela&onship  of  trust  with  the  Superintendent  and  strives  to  facilitate  district  success.   2.1   2.1   1.5   2.4   1.9   2.0  

Communica>ons  -­‐  Goal  

Communica&on  protocols  are  established  and  followed.  These  include  Friday  Updates,  2x2  mee&ngs,  quarterly  reports,  etc.   Board  requests  are  made  through  agreed-­‐upon  protocols.   The  Board  respects  the  role  of  the  Board  President  as  spokesperson.  

Policy  
Budget  Development  -­‐  Implemented  a  comprehensive  budget  development  process  that  reflects  the  strategic  plan  priori&es   and  includes  both  internal  and  external  engagement   Audit  Response  -­‐  Developed  and  implemented  a  response  plan  to  address  the  State  Auditor’s  Office  audits,  using  a  project   management  team  structure  with  Board  Directors  and  Chief  Financial/Opera&ng  Officer  as  sponsors;  Implemented  quarterly   governance  work  sessions  to  provide  management  oversight  of  the  district’s  business  systems   Policy  Review  -­‐  Developed  governance  policies  and  a  governance  structure  to  allow  appropriate  management  oversight;   ensured  finance  policies  meet  best  prac&ce  standards   Yes*   Yes   Yes  

Key   Needs  Improvement   1.0  -­‐  1.4   1.5  –  1.9   Meets  Expecta&ons   2.0  –  2.4   2.5  –  2.9   Exceeds  Expecta&ons   3.0  –  3.4   3.5  –  4.0  

*Responses were unanimously “Yes,” except for one abstention, for all three questions in this section

65

ASributes  by  Average  –  High  to  Low  
No attributes had average ratings in the Outstanding or Exceeds Expectations range.
Category   Responsibility   Responsibility   Responsibility   Responsibility   Communica&ons  -­‐  Goal   Responsibility   Performance  Measures   Performance  Measures   Responsibility   Responsibility   Performance  Measures   Rela&onships  -­‐  Goal   Rela&onships  -­‐  Goal   ATribute   Uphold  all  applicable  federal  and  state  laws  and  regula&ons.   Maintain  a  strategic  plan  for  the  district  that  clearly  defines  success  and  accountability  for  the  Board,  the  staff,  and   our  students.   Not  use  our  posi&ons  for  personal  or  par&san  gain.   Maintain  the  confiden&ality  of  privileged  informa&on  including  that  shared  in  execu&ve  sessions  of  the  Board.   Communica&on  protocols  are  established  and  followed.  These  include  Friday  Updates,  2x2  mee&ngs,  quarterly   reports,  etc.   Base  our  decisions  upon  available  facts,  vote  our  convic&ons,  avoid  bias  in  any  form,  and  uphold  and  support  the   decisions  of  the  majority  of  the  Board  once  a  decision  is  made.   Are  Board  commiTees  working  effec&vely?   Are  Board  mee&ngs  operated  and  structured  effec&vely?   Maintain  Board  focus  on  the  achievement  of  all  students,  regardless  of  race,  class,  ethnicity,  or  gender.   Model  con&nuous  learning  in  our  roles  as  members  of  the  governance  team.   Is  the  Board  appropriately  assis&ng  the  Superintendent  with  key  district  priori&za&on  decisions?   The  Board  and  Superintendent  understand  and  ar&culate  the  system  of  governance  and  differen&ate  between  policy   and  administra&ve  roles.   Policies  and  procedures  are  established  for  Board  and  superintendent  interpersonal  and  working  rela&onships.   Average   2.7   2.7   2.4   2.4   2.4   2.3   2.3   2.3   2.1   2.1   2.1   2.1   2.1  

Key   Needs  Improvement   1.0  -­‐  1.4   1.5  –  1.9   Meets  Expecta&ons   2.0  –  2.4   2.5  –  2.9   Exceeds  Expecta&ons   3.0  –  3.4   3.5  –  4.0  

66

ASributes  by  Average  –  Low  to  High  
Category   Performance  Measures   Rela&onships  -­‐  Goal   Responsibility   Performance  Measures   Performance  Measures   Responsibility   Performance  Measures   Responsibility   Responsibility   Performance  Measures   Communica&ons  -­‐  Goal   Responsibility   Responsibility   Responsibility   Performance  Measures   Communica&ons  -­‐  Goal   ATribute   Is  the  Board  working  together  effec&vely?   The  Board  maintains  a  close  rela&onship  of  trust  with  the  Superintendent  and  strives  to  facilitate  district  success.   Work  to  build  trust  between  and  among  Board  members  and  the  superintendent  by  trea&ng  everyone  with  dignity   and  respect,  even  in  &mes  of  disagreement.   How  is  the  Board  working  with  the  superintendent  and  staff?   Does  the  Board  engage  in  appropriate  communica&on  with  staff  and  the  public  regarding  issues?   Focus  on  the  policy  work  of  the  Board  and  monitor  progress  on  the  indicators  of  success  ar&culated  in  our  strategic   plan,  leaving  the  day-­‐to-­‐day  opera&on  of  the  district  to  the  superintendent  and  staff.   Is  the  governance  team's  policy  development  process  efficient,  effec&ve,  and  produc&ve?   Place  the  interests  of  children  above  all  others  in  every  decision  that  we  make.   Abide  by  the  policies  and  bylaws  of  the  Board  and  work  with  our  fellow  Board  members  to  change  those  policies  as   needed  to  improve  student  learning.   Does  the  Board  adhere  to  its  ground  rules  and  Oath  of  Responsibili&es?   Board  requests  are  made  through  agreed-­‐upon  protocols.   Recognize  that  authority  rests  only  with  majority  decisions  of  the  Board  and  make  no  independent  commitments  or   take  any  independent  ac&ons  that  may  compromise  the  Board    as  a  whole.   Refer  cons&tuent  complaints  and  concerns  to  the  appropriate  person  within  the  district  chain  of  command.   Respect  the  leadership  roles  of  the  Board  president  and  superintendent.   Do  Board  members  par&cipate  in  professional  development?  Are  there  areas  of  content  training  needed?   The  Board  respects  the  role  of  the  Board  President  as  spokesperson.   Average   1.3   1.5   1.7   1.7   1.7   1.8   1.8   1.9   1.9   1.9   1.9   2.0   2.0   2.0   2.0   2.0  

67

Board  Self  Evalua>on:  Responsibility  
The two highest-rated attributes (2.7) were in the Responsibility area
Responsibility   Uphold  all  applicable  federal  and  state  laws  and  regula&ons.   Maintain  a  strategic  plan  for  the  district  that  clearly  defines  success  and  accountability  for  the  Board,  the  staff,   and  our  students.   Not  use  our  posi&ons  for  personal  or  par&san  gain.   Maintain  the  confiden&ality  of  privileged  informa&on  including  that  shared  in  execu&ve  sessions  of  the  Board.   Base  our  decisions  upon  available  facts,  vote  our  convic&ons,  avoid  bias  in  any  form,  and  uphold  and  support   the  decisions  of  the  majority  of  the  Board  once  a  decision  is  made.   Maintain  Board  focus  on  the  achievement  of  all  students,  regardless  of  race,  class,  ethnicity,  or  gender.   Model  con&nuous  learning  in  our  roles  as  members  of  the  governance  team.   Recognize  that  authority  rests  only  with  majority  decisions  of  the  Board  and  make  no  independent   commitments  or  take  any  independent  ac&ons  that  may  compromise  the  Board    as  a  whole.   Refer  cons&tuent  complaints  and  concerns  to  the  appropriate  person  within  the  district  chain  of  command.   Respect  the  leadership  roles  of  the  Board  president  and  superintendent.   Place  the  interests  of  children  above  all  others  in  every  decision  that  we  make.   Abide  by  the  policies  and  bylaws  of  the  Board  and  work  with  our  fellow  Board  members  to  change  those   policies  as  needed  to  improve  student  learning.   Focus  on  the  policy  work  of  the  Board  and  monitor  progress  on  the  indicators  of  success  ar&culated  in  our   strategic  plan,  leaving  the  day-­‐to-­‐day  opera&on  of  the  district  to  the  superintendent  and  staff.   Work  to  build  trust  between  and  among  Board  members  and  the  superintendent  by  trea&ng  everyone  with   dignity  and  respect,  even  in  &mes  of  disagreement.  
Key   Needs  Improvement   1.0  -­‐  1.4   1.5  –  1.9   Meets  Expecta&ons   2.0  –  2.4   2.5  –  2.9   Exceeds  Expecta&ons   3.0  –  3.4   3.5  –  4.0  

Average   2.7   2.7   2.4   2.4   2.3   2.1   2.1   2.0   2.0   2.0   1.9   1.9   1.8   1.7  

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Board  Self  Eval.:  Performance  Measures  
The lowest average rating (1.3) for an attribute was in the Performance Measures area, and highlights the alignment issues the Board currently faces
Performance  Measures   Is  the  Board  working  together  effec&vely?   How  is  the  Board  working  with  the  superintendent  and  staff?   Does  the  Board  engage  in  appropriate  communica&on  with  staff  and  the  public  regarding  issues?   Is  the  governance  team's  policy  development  process  efficient,  effec&ve,  and  produc&ve?   Does  the  Board  adhere  to  its  ground  rules  and  Oath  of  Responsibili&es?   Do  Board  members  par&cipate  in  professional  development?  Are  there  areas  of  content  training  needed?   Is  the  Board  appropriately  assis&ng  the  Superintendent  with  key  district  priori&za&on  decisions?   Are  Board  commiTees  working  effec&vely?   Are  Board  mee&ngs  operated  and  structured  effec&vely?  
Key   Needs  Improvement   1.0  -­‐  1.4   1.5  –  1.9   Meets  Expecta&ons   2.0  –  2.4   2.5  –  2.9   Exceeds  Expecta&ons   3.0  –  3.4   3.5  –  4.0  

Average   1.3   1.7   1.7   1.8   1.9   2.0   2.1   2.3   2.3  

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Board  Self  Eval.:  Rela>onships  &  Communica>ons  
Most average ratings in the Relationships & Communications areas fell in or around “Needs Improvement” and “Meets Expectations”
Rela>onships  -­‐  Goal   The  Board  and  Superintendent  understand  and  ar&culate  the  system  of  governance  and  differen&ate   between  policy  and  administra&ve  roles.   Policies  and  procedures  are  established  for  Board  and  superintendent  interpersonal  and  working   rela&onships.   The  Board  maintains  a  close  rela&onship  of  trust  with  the  Superintendent  and  strives  to  facilitate   district  success.   Communica>ons  -­‐  Goal   Communica&on  protocols  are  established  and  followed.  These  include  Friday  Updates,  2x2  mee&ngs,   quarterly  reports,  etc.   Board  requests  are  made  through  agreed-­‐upon  protocols.   The  Board  respects  the  role  of  the  Board  President  as  spokesperson.  
Key   Needs  Improvement   1.0  -­‐  1.4   1.5  –  1.9   Meets  Expecta&ons   2.0  –  2.4   2.5  –  2.9   Exceeds  Expecta&ons   3.0  –  3.4   3.5  –  4.0  

Average   2.1   2.1   1.5   Average   2.4   1.9   2.0  

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