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REWIND… be kind !!!

A year long art curriculum on respecting one another and our community designed for 2nd Grade Arianne O‟Connor Tufts University/SMFA Art Education Curriculum PK-8 Spring 2013

“Kindness is the language which the deaf can hear, and the blind can see.”
– Mark Twain

Unit 1:

Thoughts

Unit 2:

Words

Unit 3:

Actions

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Table of Contents:
Philosophy Statement + Curriculum Rationale…………………………… …………………. 4 Art Curriculum Goals……………………………………………………………………… 5 Curriculum Map……………………………………………………………………………. 6 UNIT 1: Thoughts…………………………………………………….. 9 Lesson 1: I Am… ………………………………………….. 15 Lesson 2: Caring is Squaring……………………………………………….. 16 Lesson 3: PoeTree……………………………………... 17 UNIT 2: Words……………………………………………….. 19 Lesson 1: Chain Link Letter…………………………………………………………... 25 Lesson 2: Speak UP! Posters for Change……………………………………... 26 Lesson 3: Me…As Liberty …………………………………………. 27

UNIT 3: Actions……………………………………………………... 29 Lesson 1: Lines with Friends ………………………………………. 35 Lesson 2: Birds of a Feather ………………………………………………... 36 Lesson 3: I‟ve got a feeling ……………………………………………………37 Standards-Based Scope + Sequence Chart…………………………………………… 39 Differentiation in Art (Lists and Strategies) …………………………………………….. 40-41 Art Program Assessment…………………………………………………………………. 42-44 Appendix………………………………………………………………………………...…. 45 Glossary……………………………………………………………………………..45-46 National Visual Arts Standards………………………………….……………….. 47 Massachusetts Visual Arts

Frameworks……………………….……………….. References…………………………………………………... 49

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Helping a Student at Angier Elementary School

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Philosophy + Curriculum Rationale
Art education encourages the ability to develop self worth and to recognize the potential in others. Being an Artist Educator is a unique opportunity that allows us to play an important part in shaping a child‟s personal perspectives on the visual world. Within the process of understanding and recognizing of our visual culture, art education

encourages awareness that all people and cultures have important connections. An art educator should not only encourage their students

Teaching 2nd grade students at Angier Elementary

appreciation for art, but should aim to develop critical consciousness of visual imagery, foster creative skills, and teach critical thinking skills regarding their visual culture and its influences. Maintaining a classroom that fosters acceptance and understanding about the world we live in will help children become better students, community members and citizens in our society. I believe a curriculum should implement these aspects, as they will inevitably enrich a students learning process by making their experience child-centered. By implementing a multicultural and childcentered art curriculum executed through differentiate lessons with diverse outcomes and an emphasis on individuality; students will develop an understanding of their needs, as well as the needs of others. Once students have learned problem solving and creative thinking in art, they can be encouraged to connect visual knowledge to other subjects. A complete art curriculum offers every student the opportunity to develop a positive attitude towards themselves, and others, through creative experiences. .

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Course Goals
• To encourage collaboration and learning among students. • To provide a classroom that values kindness, diversity and respect. • To foster an understanding of art and how artists use it as a vehicle for expression. • To ensure that each student feels included and valued within the classroom. • To continuously to provide a safe and engaging environment for students of all backgrounds.

3rd Grade Class exploring an Altered Book Journal at Angier Elementary School (Jan. 2013)

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L1: I Am…

L1: Chain-Link Letter

L2: Caring is Squaring

L2: Speak Up!
Posters For Change

UNIT 1: Thoughts

UNIT 2: Words

L3: PoeTree

CURRICULUM MAP

L3: L3: Me…As Me…As Liberty Liberty

REWIND… be kind!!!
UNIT 3: Actions L1: Lines with Friends L2: Birds of a Feather L3: I‟ve got a feeling

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Curriculum Enduring Understandings:
• Art can teach us about ourselves, others, and the world around us. • Art is a medium through which we communicate. • Working collaboratively in art advances our knowledge and understanding of people and ideas.

Essential Questions:
• How can art inform us about the world we live in? • In what ways can artists communicate through their artwork? • How can collaborating in art teach us about ourselves and others?
Angier Elementary Field Trip to the MFA, Boston

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UNIT

1

Unit 1: Thoughts
LESSON 1 LESSON 2 LESSON 3

I Am…

Caring is Squaring

PoeTree

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Personalities and Strengths Textile Design

Self Portrait

Lesson 1: I Am…

Lesson 2: Caring is Squaring

Artist Swap

Frida Kahlo

UNIT 1: Thoughts
Lesson 3: PoeTree

Faith Ringold

Leaf Printing

Shel Silverstein “The Giving Tree”

Haiku

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UNIT 1:

THOUGHTS
2nd Grade Curriculum

STAGE I – DESIRED RESULTS
UNIT RATIONALE: 2nd Grade marks the entrance into the middle ground of elementary school grades where each students is no longer the youngest in the school, but they are far from the oldest. The students responsibilities have increased quite a bit from their younger years such as the expectations of homework and self reliancy in and out of the school community. This Unit will begin the year long focus on Respect and Kindness of others by starting with themselves. Once respect is recognized within themselves, then it can be recognize in other forms. By starting with the process of how one “thinks” respect or kindness is shown or interpreted, we‟ll begin this year off strong. Through class discussions, critiques and the process of creating and designing, students will be motivated to express their thoughts and reflections of themselves. The three lessons in this unit will take place in 9-10 classes.

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS: • Artists express themselves through their artwork. • All artwork conveys a message. • Collaborating in art allows us to envision our own thoughts and understand the opinions of others.
Artschool.com

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS: • How can artists express their identity through art? • How can artists communicate? • In what ways can collaborating teach us about our world?

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STANDARDS ADDRESSED:
Visual Arts Learning Standards • Standard 1: Methods, Materials, and Techniques. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the methods, materials, and techniques unique to the visual arts. • Standard 3: Observation, Abstraction, Invention, and Expression. Students will demonstrate their powers of observation, abstraction, invention, and expression in a variety of media, materials, and techniques. • Standard 4: Drafting, Revising, and Exhibiting. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the processes of creating and exhibiting their own artwork: drafts, critique, self-assessment, refinement, and exhibit preparation. • Standard 5: Critical Response. Students will describe and analyze their own work and the work of others using appropriate visual arts vocabulary. When appropriate students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation. • Standard 7: Roles of Artists in Communities. Students will describe the roles of artists, patrons, cultural organizations, and arts institutions in societies of the past and present.

Second grade student at work, Angier Elementary School.

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UNIT OBJECTIVES: • LESSON 1: Students will
express how they think of themselves through creating a clay figure self portrait using imagery depicting a strength or quality they are proud of. A written explanation of their figure will accompany each figure for display.

• LESSON 2: Students will
collaborate to create a quilt of scenes of what they think kindness and respect look like. Each square will be designed by a single student and have a written narrative describing their work. They will then be assembled to create a quilt that will hang in the school or be donated to a local charity. kindness and respect in different ways.

• LESSON 3: Students will
create leaf prints and study the art of poetry through the work of various poets. On the reverse side of their leaf print they will write a haiku and their leaves with be a part of an installation called PoeTree.

• OVERARCHING: Students will
explore how their thoughts can be expressed in art through collaboration with others and learn to respect that each of us can interpret the meaning of

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Image from www.shutterstock.com

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STAGE 2 – ASSESSMENT EVIDENCE EVIDENCE:
Lesson 1: By the end of the lesson the final product will result with a clay figure that depicts the student along with some kind of imagery displaying what the student believes is her/his strength or positive quality. The student will then write a short narrative expressing how this quality is something they respect about themselves. Lesson 2: At the end of the lesson the final product will be a thoughtfully designed textile square that depicts a scene of what the student thinks of when interpreting kindness and respect. The student will then write a description to explain their design and emphasize their understanding of the act of respect and kindness to others.
image from www.google.com

Lesson 3: Concluding the lesson, students will exhibit their leave prints in an installation project of a tree along with their written haiku poems that are mounted on the reverse side of their leaves. The students will express a form a respect for either themselves, for someone or for something in their haiku poem that will be displayed with their work.

• CONTINUUM OF ASSESSMENTS:
Each student will fill out a reflection sheet, self-assessing their progress and artwork at the end of each lesson. See enclosed reflection sheet.

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STAGE 3 – LEARNING PLAN SCOPE AND SEQUENCE OF LESSONS:
LESSON ONE: I Am… In this lesson, students will learn how use a variety of materials to depict themselves in a Self Portrait. Students will also learn how we can express our thoughts through artwork with the use of imagery. We will discuss the meaning of respect and kindness as a group and the importance of recognizing that we are all different and are allowed have different opinions. Each student will begin by creating a simple sketch of themselves with an attribute they admire. The students will create a clay figure of themself from this sketch that depicts something positive they see to show a respect in themself: a strength, good quality, or feature they admire. Art Materials: • Clay • Clay Tools • Water • Slip • Sponges • Colored Pencils • Sharpies • White drawing paper • Pencil • Smooth Surface to work Skills : Clay Building Skills and Techniques are introduced and elaborated on. Resources and Exemplars:
   www.shaniperez.com 500 Figures in Clay: Ceramic Artists Celebrate the Human Form (Lark Books) Henry Moore

Image from www.shaniperez.com

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LESSON TWO: Caring is Squaring In this lesson, students use textile design to create a fabric square that will later be assembled into a large community grade level quilt. The students will be introduced to the work of Faith Ringold and how she used fabric and textile design the express her thoughts and tell a story. The teacher will ask that each student create a scene from memory or imagination that shows respect and/or kindness to others. The student will begin by creating a sketch to work through their idea, emphasizing that artist use this technique when creating their work, and t h e n u s e t h is sketch to influence their design on the fabric square.

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Art Materials: • 1 0 ” x 1 0 ” c u t m u s l i n f a b r i c • C r a y o n s • Watercolor Paint • Paintbrush es • Water • Sharpie Markers

• Colored Pencils • White Drawing Paper

Skills: Textile Design, Sewing, Fabric Construction

Resources and Exemplars:  Faith Ringold  Childrens Museum of the Arts, NY, NY

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LESSON THREE: PoeTree In this lesson, students will look at how artists can use their thoughts to influence their work and process in creating art. The students will experiment with printmaking in making prints of leaves found in the surrounding area of the school grounds or brought in from home. Once they have successfully created a leaf print, the teacher will read Shel Silverstein‟s “The Giving Tree” and discuss the meaning of poetry. The teacher will explain to the students the art of writing a Haiku poem. The students will then create their own haiku, focusing on the topic of respect (of nature, of people, of animals etc.) and then their haiku will be mounted on the back of one of their leaves they‟ve printed. The students will then work with the teacher to create an installation of a sculptural tree in a public space in the school (i/e: library, main office, cafeteria etc.) and then hang their leaves on the tree, named the “PoeTree”. Art Materi als: 

iety of Leaves         Tempera Paint (Assorted Colors) Brown Mural Paper (for tables) Brayers Paint Trays Sharpie Markers (black) White Drawing Paper White Watercolor paper Scissors Skills: Printmaking and Poetry Writing Resources and Exemplars:  The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein

V a r

Tree Installation at the Children’s Museum in NY, NY

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Name: Assignment:

Period: Date:

Criteria:

Outstanding Excellent You’re On Keep Your Way Working

Your Rating

Teacher Rating

Use of Materials:
Did I use the appropriate materials? Did I respect the materials?

10

9-8

7 7 7 7 7

6 or less

Craftsmanship:
Did I use the techniques learned?

10 10 10 10

9-8 9-8 9-8

6 or less 6 or less 6 or less 6 or less
Your Total: Teacher Total:

Creativity:
Did I use my imagination? Did I experiment?

Relation of Concept to Product: Did I apply the
information learned to my art?

Respect + Participation:
Did I respect my teacher, classmates and materials?

9-8

Possible Points:
50 x 2 = 100 Your Grade: “Rating” x 2 = Grade

Student Comments:

Teacher Comments:

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UNIT 2

WORDS
LESSON 1 LESSON 2 LESSON 3 Chain Link Letter Speak UP! Posters for Change Me… As Liberty!

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Color Theory

Keith Haring

Community Art

Lesson One: Chain Link Letter to the Community

Lesson Two:
Speak Up! Posters for Change

Advertising Messages through Design

Fundraiser

Work Collaborativel y

Design and Composition

UNIT 2: WORDS
Lesson Three: Me… As Liberty ! Using Imagery and Text in Art

Peter Max and Danny O‟Connor

Self Portraits by Frida Kahlo

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UNIT 2: WORDS

2nd Grade Curriculum

STAGE I – DESIRED RESULTS
UNIT RATIONALE: In the early adolescent years students begin to develop their personal voice and identity through their interests and school life. When students live in a community of peers, they can begin to see how the vocalization of their opinions can be helpful or harmful. With bullying on the rise in school and professional setting, this curriculum‟s focus becomes more and more important. This Unit focuses on how to empower the students to understand that their opinions matter, and that this is an important part of this learning process. More importantly, however, is that we are to teach them that by using their words in a respectful and kind manner, this will make them an essential attribute to a fully functioning and supportive school community. Learning and respecting starts within the school community, and then branches out to a support system. This unit will take place during the span of 1012 classes. ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS: • Artists make statements through their artwork. • Art and Language are both communication vehicles by which ideas are transmitted. • Collaborating in art can express the artists role in the community.

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS: • How can artists express their ideas through their art? • How can art and language convey ideas to others? • What is the artists place in the community?

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STANDARDS ADDRESSED:
Visual Arts Learning Standards • Standard 4: Drafting, Revising, and Exhibiting. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the processes of creating and exhibiting their own artwork: drafts, critique, self-assessment, refinement, and exhibit preparation. • Standard 6: Purposes of the Arts. Students will describe the purposes for which works of dance, music, theatre, visual arts, and architecture were and are created, and, when appropriate, interpret their meanings. • Standard 7: Roles of Artists in Communities. Students will describe the roles of artists, patrons, cultural organizations, and arts institutions in societies of the past and present. • Standard 8: Concepts of Style, Stylistic Influence, and Stylistic Change. Students will demonstrate their understanding of styles, stylistic influence, and stylistic change by identifying when and where art works were created, and by analyzing characteristic features of art works from various historical periods, cultures, and genres.

Arianne O‟Connor, Instruction at Angier Elementary

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UNIT OBJECTIVES: • LESSON 1: Students will
collaborate to develop ideas and words of respect and kindness to create a chain link letter to the school community.

• LESSON 2: Students will
collaborate to create posters that depict ways we can show respect and kindness to one another within our school community and global community.

• LESSON 3: Students will create a
self portrait depicting themselves as a statue of liberty while writing what liberties they are thankful for that others can respect them by.

Arianne O’Connor with CT Debbie Kramer showing our 5th grade students work on display at Newton Education Center April 2013

• OVERARCHING: Students will
collaboratively participate in community related projects to express their ideas and desires relative to respecting each others voices and opinions.

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STAGE 2 – ASSESSMENT EVIDENCE EVIDENCE:
LESSON ONE: By the end of the lesson, students will collaboratively participate in creating a chain link letter to the school community that displays a calling for respect and kindness of one another in an anti bullying type format. LESSON TWO: At the end of the lesson the final product will include team posters that promote a calling for change in the way we show respect to each other, our community and our world. These are posted around the school and possibly community with team-theme names and messages. LESSON THREE: By the end of the lesson the final art piece will take the form of a self portrait of the student as a Statue of Liberty, depicting liberties that people respect them for and showing pride and respect in themselves.

• CONTINUUM OF ASSESSMENTS:
Each student will fill out a reflection sheet, selfassessing their progress and artwork at then end of each lesson. See enclosed reflection sheet.

collaborative drawing project with 2nd Grade students @ Angier Elementary

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STAGE 3 – LEARNING PLAN SCOPE AND SEQUENCE OF LESSONS:
Lesson 1: Chain-link Letter In this lesson, students will create a paper chain link letter to the school after reading Ordinary Mary’s Extraordinary Deed by Emily Pearson. The story aims to promote the idea that one persons actions can cause a chain reaction of good deeds. Taking that into consideration and the focus of this Unit, we will transcribe a list as a class or words that express respect and kindness. We‟ll discuss color theory and mixing and create these colorful strips which we‟ll then write one word from the list on. Once each student has created three word strips, we‟ll work together to create our Chain Link Letter which will be hung up around school premises to promote Respect of one another! Art Materials:       Watercolor paper cut into 12” x 4” strips Watercolor Paint Crayons Word List Staplers Glitter

Image from www.google.com.

 Markers Skills: Color Theory and Mixing Resources and Exemplars:   community artists www.google.com
www.fslide.com

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LESSON TWO: Speak UP! Inspiring Posters for Change In this lesson students will use inspiration from artist Keith Haring to create posters that promote change in the way we verbalize our respect for one another. The students will be divided into teams of four (for a class of 24- so six groups) and will need to come up with a team name for themselves, a team slogan or message, and draft up a poster image which will then be painted and put on display within the school. The teacher will discuss with them the various ways that artists use their artwork to advertise a message and assist the students in creating their concepts. Art Materials:        Large piece of white drawing paper Pencils Markers Tempera Paint (bold colors) Sharpies Paint Brushes Water Cans
These images are from posters created by students at Countryside Elementary School in Newton, MA April 2013

 Papers Towels Skills:  Mural Art, Painting, Team Building

Resources and Exemplars:  Artwork Keith Haring

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LESSON THREE:

Me… As Liberty

In this lesson students will look at the work of Frida Kahlo and create a self portrait of themselves as the Statue of Liberty. Focusing on respecting ourselves and our community, the student will depict themselves in a large scale drawing and have written liberties that they respect within the background, along with images representing these liberties. The students with work together with the teacher to create a running list to define liberty and show things we are respectful of in our lives. These self portraits will serve as a narrative to express the students personal interests and what they desire to be respected of them!!! Art Materials:        Skills:  Self Portraiture, Painting Resources and Exemplars:  Artwork of Frida Kahlo Watercolor paper (16” by 24”) Watercolor Paints Crayons Sharpie Markers Paint Brushes Water cans Paper Towels
Me…As Liberty portraits done by 3r d grade students of Angier Elementary March 2013

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Name: Assignment:

Period: Date:

Criteria:

Outstanding Excellent You’re On Keep Your Way Working

Your Rating

Teacher Rating

Use of Materials:
Did I use the appropriate materials? Did I respect the materials?

10

9-8

7 7 7 7 7

6 or less

Craftsmanship:
Did I use the techniques learned?

10 10 10 10

9-8 9-8 9-8

6 or less 6 or less 6 or less 6 or less
Your Total: Teacher Total:

Creativity:
Did I use my imagination? Did I experiment?

Relation of Concept to Product: Did I apply the
information learned to my art?

Respect + Participation:
Did I respect my teacher, classmates and materials?

9-8

Possible Points:
50 x 2 = 100 Your Grade: “Rating” x 2 = Grade

Student Comments:

Teacher Comments:

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UNIT 3: Actions

LESSON ONE:

LESSON TWO:

LESSON THREE:

Lines with Friends

Birds of a Feather

I‟ve got a Feeling

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Influence from others

Sculpture

Variations in Line and Composition

Lesson 1: Lines with Friends

Lesson 2: Birds of a Feather

Work Collaboratively

Color Theory Henry Moore

UNIT 3: Actions

Jackson Pollack

Lesson Three: I’ve got a feeling

Student Mural
Action Jackson by Jan Greenburg

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UNIT 3:

ACTIONS
2nd Grade Curriculum

STAGE I – DESIRED RESULTS
UNIT RATIONALE: Learning to work together as a team is a valuable lesson. Students begin interacting with others in their school and communities early in their school age years. These environments teach us about the importance of teamwork and building lasting relationships and the actions we make within them speak volume of our roles within these settings. Taking ownership and responsibilities of our actions is a continual learning process throughout our lives, but it begins in our youth and this Unit will focus on this specific development. Through our actions, we can show respect and kindness towards one another and these lessons are designed to promote this theory. This unit will take place during a span of 9-12 weeks. ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS: • Art can be related to all of human exisitence. • Everyday we make art related choices. • Art connects people across geographic boundaries.

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS: • How can artists relate themselves to others? • What choices can be considered artistic? • What ways can artists collaborate?

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STANDARDS ADDRESSED:
Visual Arts Learning Standards • Standard 1: Methods, Materials, and Techniques. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the methods, materials, and techniques unique to the visual arts. • Standard 3: Observation, Abstraction, Invention, and Expression. Students will demonstrate their powers of observation, abstraction, invention, and expression in a variety of media, materials, and techniques. • Standard 10: Interdisciplinary Connections. Students will apply their knowledge of the arts to the study of English language arts, foreign languages, health, history and social science, mathematics, and science and technology/ engineering.

Arianne O‟Connor helping a student at Angier Elementary School

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UNIT OBJECTIVES:
• LESSON 1: Students will work together to help each other create collaborative pieces of art while respecting each others artwork.

LESSON 2: Students will work together to construct 3D bird sculptures while offering advice and techniques learned along the way to others for assistance.

LESSON 3: Students will create a mural together in a energetic and fun environment that promotes interaction with one another and respect for each others space, opinions and feelings

OVERARCHING: Students will collaborate with each other while creating art to infuse the idea that their actions may be influential on one another in a positive way while displaying respect for each other and themselves

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STAGE 2 – ASSESSMENT EVIDENCE EVIDENCE:
Lesson 1: By the end of this lesson students will have produced a collaborative composition of a variety of lines created by themselves and their peers in which they will give up control of their overall design and allow their peers to contribute and influence their end product. The students will apply their knowledge of warm and cool colors and well as interactions between colors and themselves as artists! Lesson 2: At the end of this lesson students will each create their own bird sculpture through working together as an understanding that many artists work collaboratively to create a piece of artwork. Their finished product will show an expression of a bird that relays the message that we are not all the same, but just as birds of a feather flock together, so do we as a community. Lesson 3: By the end of this lesson students will have created a class mural in the style of Jackson Pollack where the focus of their actions as artist are conveyed through their brush strokes, paint texture and overall experience through participating in creating this class mural.

• CONTINUUM OF ASSESSMENTS:
Each student will fill out a reflection sheet, selfassessing their progress and artwork at then end of each lesson. See enclosed reflection sheet.
student creating bird sculpture at Angier Elementary March 2013

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STAGE 3 – LEARNING PLAN SCOPE AND SEQUENCE OF LESSONS:
LESSON ONE: Lines with Friends In this lesson, students will work together to create a composition that expresses the variety of lines and variety of themselves as a community. We‟ll read Peter Reynold‟s books Ish and The Dot to help get us inspired about the different types of lines and markings artists make. Sitting at their tables, the students will begin their composition by drawing one type of horizontal line, and then passing their paper to the person next to them, and repeat so that eventually their paper is filled with a variety of horizontal lines that have been marked by each person in their classroom. Once they receive their paper back, they will then begin to fill in their composition using warm and cool colors influenced by their mood in creating this piece of art. To finish this lesson each student will submit an artist interview with the teacher to express their reaction to creating this piece of work. Art Materials:       12” by 16” piece of watercolor paper Black Sharpie Markers Opaque and Transparent Watercolors Paint Brushes Paper Towels Water Cans

 

The Dot by Peter Reynolds Ish by Peter Reynolds

Skills: Painting, Color Blending, Working Collaboratively Resources and Exemplars: 3 5

3 5

LESSON TWO: Birds of a Feather In this lesson students will learn the technique of creating sculptures and how artists are influenced from the natural world in creating sculptures. The focus will be on working as a team to achieve the end goal of creating the sculptures. We‟ll begin by discussing how to draw birds by using a parts-to-whole technique so that students can understand the assemblage of a figure to later conceptualize the assemblage of their sculpture in the same parts to whole technique. Using this as a building block is crucial for the students to understand how artists create sculpture using an armature. The students will assist one another in assembling their sculptures and later will decorate their birds with the pop art influence of Nikki de Sainte Phalle and Peter Max‟s vibrant colors.
Art Materials :  Newsprint Paper  Masking Tape, Wide and Thin  White Drawing Paper  Colored Pencils  Acrylic Paint  Paint Brushes  Hot Glue Gun  Gloss Modge Podge or Gel Medium  Wire (thick gauge for creating feet)

Skills: Creating Sculptures from unique materials Painting Drawing Resources and Exemplars:  Artwork of Henry Moore  Artwork of Nikki de Sainte Phalle  Artwork of Peter Max

Images are of 2nd Grade student artwork Bird Sculptures created with Arianne O’Connor at Angier Elementary School in March 2013

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LESSON THREE:

I’ve got a feeling

In this lesson the class will read Action Jackson by and learn how artists use expressive body language when creating their art. We will then discuss how artists are respectful of each other when creating their artwork and then introduce the idea of murals. The class will then work collaboratively to create a class mural using their emotions as creative fuel for this project inspired by the art of Jackson Pollack. Art Materials:  Large Canvas for Mural 5‟ by 8‟  Space to work Outdoors  Large Brown Mural Paper (to cover floor surface if working indoors)  Variety of Tempera, Acrylic and Household Paints  Large Paint Brushes  Variety of Sticks  Paper Towels  Water Cans  Smocks Skills: Painting, Mural, Collaboration, Community Art Resources and Exemplars:  Action Jackson by Jan Greenberg  MFA Collection of Jackson Pollack Work  Powerpoint Presentation  www.artstor.com  www.google.com
A student works on a Jackson Pollock inspired painting at MFA Saturday Studios Internship Fall 2012

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Name: Assignment:

Period: Date:

Criteria:

Outstanding Excellent You’re On Keep Your Way Working

Your Rating

Teacher Rating

Use of Materials:
Did I use the appropriate materials? Did I respect the materials?

10

9-8

7 7 7 7 7

6 or less

Craftsmanship:
Did I use the techniques learned?

10 10 10 10

9-8 9-8 9-8

6 or less 6 or less 6 or less 6 or less
Your Total: Teacher Total:

Creativity: Did I use my
imagination? Did I experiment?

Relation of Concept to Product:
Did I use the information learned to my art?

Respect + Participation:
Did I respect my teacher, classmates and materials?

9-8

Possible Points:
50 x 2 = 100 Your Grade: “Rating” x 2 = Grade

Student Comments:

Teacher Comments:

Curriculum Standards-Based Scope + Sequence
UNIT 1: Thoughts
Lesson 1: CHAIN-LINK LETTER… Lesson 2: CARING IS SQUARING

UNIT 2: Words
Lesson 2: Speak UP! INSPIRING POSTERS…

UNIT 3: Actions

Massachusetts Frameworks

Lesson : LINES WITH FRIENDS

Lesson 1: I AM…

S1:Media, Materials
and Techniques

X

X X

X

X

X

X

Lesson 2: POP ART BIRD SCULPTURES X X X X

Lesson 3: PoeTree

M Elements and S2:
Principles of Design

S3: Observation,
Attraction, Invention, and Expression

X

X X

X X X X X X X X X

X

S4: Drafting, Revising,
and Exhibiting

X

S5: Critical Responses S6: Purpose of the Arts S7: Roles of Artists in
Communities

X

X

X

X X X

S8: Concepts of Style,
Stylistic Influence, & Stylistic Change

S9: Inventions,
Technologies, and the Arts S10: Interdisciplinary Connections

X

X

X

Lesson 3: I‟VE GOT A FEELING (Pollack Mural) X X X X

Lesson 3: ME…AS LIBERTY!

DIFFERENTIATION IN ART
The lists below provide a comparison between the Traditional classroom and the Differentiated Classroom

Traditional Classroom

Student differences are masked or acted upon when problematic  Assessment is most common at the end of learning to see “who got it”  A relatively narrow sense of intelligence prevails  A single definition of excellence exists  Student interest is infrequently tapped  Relatively few learning profile options are taken into account  Whole-class instruction dominates  Coverage of texts and curriculum guides are the focus of learning  Mastery of facts and skills out-ofcontext are the focus of learning  Single option assignments are the norm  Time is relatively inflexible  A single text prevails  Single interpretations of ideas and events may be sought  The teacher directs student behavior  The teacher solves problems  The teacher provides whole-class standards for grading  A single form of assessment is often used

Differentiated Classroom

 Student differences are studied as a basis for planning  Assessment is ongoing and diagnostic to understand how to make instruction more responsive to learner need  Focus on multiple forms of intelligence is evident  Excellence is defined in large measure by individual growth from a starting point  Students are frequently guided in making interest-based learning choices  Many learning profile options are provided for  Many instructional arrangements are used  Student readiness, interest, and learning profile shape instruction  Use of essential skills to make sense of and understand key concepts and principles is the focus of learning  Multi-option assignments are frequently used

 Time is used flexibly in accordance with student need  Multiple materials are provided  Multiple perspectives on ideas and events are routinely sought  The teacher facilitates students‟ skills at becoming more self-reliant learners  Students help other students and the teacher solve problems  Students work with the teacher to establish both whole-class and individual learning goals  Students are assessed in multiple ways

DIFFERENTIATION IN ART
Strategies that may be helpful in and out of the art classroom                Design open ended assignments Use students interests as guides for suitable activities Make individual adjustments to projects assigned to whole class Allow partial participation Use flexible groupings Employ the use of VISUALS for instruction and demonstrations Demonstrate processes to whole class Give verbal and visual step by step directions for all students, posting the visuals Assign buddies/partners Use multi-level approaches Encourage creativity: flexibility, fluency, elaboration, originality Challenge students to stretch or modify possibilities of assignments Involve kids in activities which reflect their own cultures Provide a supportive and safe environment Make sure all students are successful based on their own needs

* As the art teacher, make sure to collect any and all applicable IEP‟s from the classroom teachers so that you can successfully get to know your students and understand any limitations of special needs that they may have so that necessary accommodations may be made! This is crucial to a successful classroom culture.

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Assessment:
Throughout the year-long curriculum entitled Rewind…be Kind, students will be able to reflect on their personal achievement by filling our a self-assessment form on behalf of their own progress. Students will decide on a scale from 1-10 where they rate their achievement in categories such as use of materials, craftsmanship, creativity, relation of concept to product, and respect and participation. At the end of each lesson and unit, students will fill out a self-assessment form, which gives them responsibility over their work. The teacher will then assess each student on the same criteria, keeping in mind the score that the student rated him or herself.

Student reflecting on his repousse project at Angier Elementary

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Name: Assignment:

Period: Date:

Criteria:

Outstanding Excellent You’re On Keep Your Way Working

Your Rating

Teacher Rating

Use of Materials:
Did I use the appropriate materials? Did I respect the materials?

10

9-8

7 7 7 7 7

6 or less

Craftsmanship:
Did I use the techniques learned? Was I accurate?

10 10 10 10

9-8 9-8 9-8

6 or less 6 or less 6 or less 6 or less
Your Total: Teacher Total:

Creativity:
Did I use my imagination? Did I experiment?

Relation of Concept to Product: Did I apply the
information learned to my art?

Respect + Participation:
Did I respect my teacher, classmates and materials?

9-8

Possible Points:
50 x 2 = 100 Your Grade: “Rating” x 2 = Grade

Student Comments:

Teacher Comments:

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Rubric for Year-Long Curriculum

Criteria

KEEP WORKING!
Does not utilize appropriate materials in their intended way

YOU'RE ON YOUR WAY !
Makes an effort and shows some skills with materials.

EXCELLENT!

OUTSTANDING!

USE OF MATE.RIALS

Makes an effort and shows average skill level of materials.

Goes above and beyond simple effort and shows high level of materials .

TECHNIQUES/ CRAFTSMANSHIP

Does not make an effort in using new
techniques or

neat
craftsmanship .

Sometimes makes an effort to try new techniques and model neat craftsmanship.

Always makes an effort to try new techniques and model neat craftsmanship

Goes above and beyond by trying and mastering new techniques and neat craftsmanship.
Goes above and

CR.EATIVITY

Gets work done quickly without the use of imagination.

Gets work done quickly and sometimes adds uses innovative thinking.

Thinks creatively and takes time to

generate more
innovative Ideas Into their artwork.

beyond by thinking creatively and
always modeling innovative thinking in their artwork.

RELATION OF CONCEPT TO PRODUCT

Does not relate theme of lesson to artwork.

Sometimes Always relates relates theme of theme of lesson to lesson to artwork artwork.
.

Goes above and
beyond by participating and

Applying
know l edge to artwork.

RESPECT

Does not respect teacher,
students,

Respects
teachers, students, materials, and themselves most of the time in the classroom.

Always respects teacher,

Goes above and

materials, or
themselves in the cl assroom.

students, materials
and themselves the whole time in the classroom.

beyond by showing others proper leadership

and caring.

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GLOSSARY
Clay Slip- suspension in water of clay and other materials used in the production of ceramic ware. Ceramic- of or pertaining to products make from clay Bisque – clay that has been fired but not glazed. Respect - esteem for or a sense of the worth or excellence of a person, a personal quality or ability, or something considered as a manifestation of a personal quality or ability Kindness – the state or quality of being kind Quality- an essential or distinctive characteristic, property, or attribute Characteristic - a distinguishing feature or quality Personality - the visible aspect of one's character as it impresses others: Imagery - the visible aspect of one's character as it impresses others Portrait - a likeness of a person, especially of the face, as a painting, drawing, or photograph Scene - any view or picture Textile - any cloth or goods produced by weaving, knitting, or felting Assemblage - the act of assembling; state of being assembled Design - to prepare the preliminary sketch or the plans for (a work to be executed), especially to plan the form and structure of Poetry - the art of rhythmical composition, written or spoken, for exciting pleasure by beautiful, imaginative, or elevated thoughts Installation - the act of installing Printmaking – the art or technique of making prints, especially as practiced in engraving, etching, drypoint, woodcut, or serigraphy.

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Haiku - a major form of Japanese verse, written in 17 syllables divided into 3 lines of 5, 7, and 5 syllables, and employing highly evocative allusions and comparisons, often on the subject of nature or one of the seasons

GLOSSARY:
Collaborate - to work, one with another; cooperate, as on a literary work Community - a social group of any size whose members reside in a specific locality, share government, and often have a common cultural and historical heritage Liberty - freedom from control, interference, obligation, restriction, hampering conditions, etc.; power or right of doing, thinking, speaking, etc., according to choice Secondary Colors – a color, such as orange, green or violet produced by mixing two primary colors Self-Portait – a portrait of oneself done by oneself. Shade - the degree of darkness of a color, determined by the quantity of black. Tint – a color diluted with white; a color of less than maximum purity, chromo, or saturation. Transparent – so sheer as to permit light to pass through Opaque – not transparent or translucent Mural - a large picture painted or affixed directly on a wall or ceiling

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NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR ARTS EDUCATION
What Every Young American Should Know and Be Able To Do in the Arts
The National Standards for Arts Education are written for all students. The Standards affirm that a future worth having depends on being able to construct a vital relationship with the arts, and that doing so, as with any subject, is a matter of discipline and study. The Standards spell out what every student should know and be able to do in the arts. The Standards say the students: • Should be able to communicate at a basic level in the four arts disciplines- dance, music, theater, and the visual arts. • Should be able to communicate proficiently in at least one art form. • Should be able to develop and present basic analysis of works of art. • Should have an informed acquaintance with exemplary works of art from a variety of cultures and historical periods. •Should be able to relate various types of arts knowledge and skills within and across the arts disciplines.

The Visual Arts Standards
There are six Content Standards in the National Standards which relate to all four of the arts areas. Individual Achievement Standards have been set at grades K-4, 5-8, and 9-12 for each of the four arts disciplines. The Content Standards are: Content Standard 1: Understanding and applying media, technique, and process. Content Standard 2: Using knowledge of structures and functions. Content Standard 3: Choosing & evaluating a range of subject matter, symbols, and ideas. Content Standard 4: Understanding the visual arts in relation to history and culture. Content Standard 5: Reflecting upon and assessing the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others. Content Standard 6: Making connections between visual arts and other disciplines.

The National Standards for Arts were developed by the Consortium of National Arts Education Associations under the guidance of the National Committee for Standards in the Arts. The Standards were prepared under a grant from the U.S Department of Education, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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Massachusetts Arts Curriculum Frameworks Massachusetts Department of Education November, 1999
The PreK-12 Learning Standards for the Visual Arts:
1. Methods, Materials, and Techniques. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the methods, materials, and techniques unique to the visual arts. 2. Elements and Principles of Design. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the elements and principles of design. 3. Observation, Abstraction, Invention, and Expression. Students will demonstrate their powers of observation, abstraction, invention, and expression in a variety of media, materials, and techniques. 4. Drafting, Revising, and Exhibiting. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the processes of creating and exhibiting their own artwork: drafts, critique, self-assessment, refinement, and exhibit preparation. 5. Critical Response. Students will describe and analyze their own work and the work of others using appropriate visual arts vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

The PreK-12 Connections Strands for the Visual Arts:
6. Purposes of the Arts. Students will describe the purposes for which works of dance, music, theater, visual arts, and architecture were and are created, and, when appropriate, interpret their meanings. 7. Roles of Artists in Communities. Students will describe the roles of artists, patrons, cultural organizations, and arts institutions in societies of the past and present. 8. Concepts of Style, Stylistic Influence, and Stylistic Change. Students will demonstrate their understanding of styles, stylistic influence, and stylistic change by identifying when and where art works were created, and by analyzing characteristic features of art works from various historical periods, cultures, and genres.

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9. Inventions, Technologies and the Arts. Students will describe and analyze how performing and visual artists use and have used materials, inventions, and technologies in their work. 10. Interdisciplinary Connections. Students will apply their knowledge of the arts to the study of English language arts, foreign languages, health, history and social sciences, mathematics, and science and technology/engineering.

References:
         Wiggins, G and McTighe, J. (2005) Understanding by Design. 2nd Edition. ASCD, Alexandria, VA. Stewart, M. and Walker, S. (2005) Rethinking Curriculum in Art. Davis Publications. Worcester, MA. Silverstein, S. (2004) The Giving Tree. HarperCollins. Reynolds, P. Ish. (2004) Candlewick; First Edition edition Reynolds, P. (2003) The Dot. Candlewick; 1st edition ( Greenberg, J. (2007) Action Jackson. Square Fish. www.google.com www.shutterstock.com www.dictionary.com

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