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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
VIOLENT PROTESTS
WORLD PAGE 8
LATE RALLY
DOES IN S.F.
SPORTS PAGE 12
‘WORLD WAR Z’
WILL ENTERTAIN
WEEKEND PAGE 17
BRAZILIAN PRESIDENT DILMA ROUSSEFF ENDS NEAR-SILENCE
ABOUT DAYS OF MASSIVE RIOTS
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Redwood City will hire 19 San Carlos fire-
fighters, with an average salary hike of 13
percent and better benefits, under the new
contract for the cities’ hybrid fire depart-
ment coming before both city councils
Monday night.
Two years after San Carlos dumped its
joint department with Belmont and entered
into an agreement with Redwood City for
primarily management services, the city
wants to expand its arrangement with hopes
a more attractive compensation package
will keep firefighters from leaving.
If the two cities approve the five-year
contract, Redwood City will hire 13 para-
medic firefighters, five fire captains and
one emergency preparedness and outreach
coordinator. The San Carlos employees
will be placed in the Redwood City salary
brackets which will result in salary
increases with an average of 13 percent.
The workers will move back to a pension
plan of 3 percent at 55, meaning they can
receive 3 percent of their salary for every
year of service at the age of 55.
The full-service contract also includes
truck service, fire prevention, code enforce-
ment and investigation, emergency pre-
paredness and training. Either city can pull
out of the contract within the first year with
written notice.
“This is not a move for cost savings but it
Fire servicesharingexpands
Hybrid Redwood City-San Carlos department moving toward full-service
Jobless rate
falls below 9
pct. in state
By Judy Lin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — California’s unemployment rate fell to
8.6 percent in May, marking the first time in nearly five
years the jobless number has dipped below 9 percent, the
state Employment Development Department reported
Friday.
The drop in May — a decrease of 0.4 percentage points
from 9 percent in April — puts California’s unemployment
rate at the lowest level since November 2008.
While California’s rate continues to remain 1 percentage
point above the national average of 7.6 percent, the state’s
improving labor market has narrowed the gap.
According to the U.S. Labor Department, California and
San Mateo to celebrate
summer this weekend
First SummerFest event aiming to bring
traditional street fair back to downtown
California’s rate continues to remain
one point above the national average
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Mateo is inviting families to kick off the season
downtown with the first annual SummerFest.
Food, music, performances, booths and lots of activities
for the kids will be available on B Street between Baldwin
and Sixth avenues from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. both Saturday and
Sunday. Presented by the Downtown San Mateo
Association, SummerFest is a chance to rekindle the tradi-
See FAIR, Page 20
See JOBS, Page 10
See SERVICE, Page 20
DAVID WONG/DAILY JOURNAL (ABOVE), PHOTO COURTESY OF SAN MATEO COUNTY (BELOW)
Above:The San Carlos Airport,nestled between Highway 101 and the San Francisco Bay,is home to more than 500 small aircraft
and 25 aviation-related businesses. Below: Children will be able to check out cockpits and take helicopter tours during San
Carlos Airport Day Saturday.
By David Wong
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
One of the most visible institutions on the Peninsula will
be on exhibition as the San Carlos Airport and surrounding
businesses put on Airport Day.
The free event is on Saturday, June 22nd from 10 a.m to 3
p.m. at 620 Airport Drive, San Carlos.
Attendees can expect a unique array of aircraft on display,
airport tours, children’s helicopter rides and food prepared
by gourmet trucks.
“Airport Day is about showing the airport to the public,
San Carlos Airport is one of the town’s hidden treasures,”
said Brent Carstens, a marketing intern for the San Carlos
Airport Day ready for takeoff
San Carlos Airport invites community to come for a visit
See AIRPORT, Page 20
Weekend • June 22-23, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 265
FOR THE RECORD 2 Weekend • June 22-23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
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twitter.com/smdailyjournal facebook.com/smdailyjournal
Phone:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Actress Meryl
Streep is 64.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1944
President Franklin D. Roosevelt
signed the Servicemen’s
Readjustment Act of 1944, more pop-
ularly known as the “GI Bill of
Rights.”
“To understand is hard. Once one
understands, action is easy.”
— Sun Yat-sen, Chinese statesman (1866-1925)
Sen. Dianne
Feinstein, D-Calif.,
is 80.
Actor-writer Bruce
Campbell is 55.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A man longboards through a flooded downtown street in Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Saturday: Sunny. Highs in the 60s to
lower 70s. Northwest winds 5 to 15 mph
increasing to 15 to 20 mph in the after-
noon.
Saturday night: Mostly clear in the
evening then becoming mostly cloudy.
Lows in the lower 50s. Northwest winds
10 to 20 mph.
Sunday: Mostly cloudy. A chance of rain in the morn-
ing...Then a chance of showers in the afternoon. Highs in
the upper 50s to mid 60s. West winds 5 to 10 mph. Chance
of precipitation 50 percent.
Sunday night: Showers likely in the evening...Then rain
likely after midnight. Lows in the lower 50s. South winds 5
to 10 mph. Chance of precipitation 70 percent.
Monday: Rain. Highs around 60.
Local Weather Forecast
(Answers Monday)
SHYLY WEDGE SYMBOL NIMBLE
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: When he reviewed the plans for the new
water park, he presented a — SLIDE SHOW
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
TIYKT
SUREH
CISNEK
NADTET
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
J
u
m
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in
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-
Print your
answer here:
In 1611, English explorer Henry Hudson, his son and sev-
eral other people were set adrift in present-day Hudson Bay
by mutineers aboard the Discovery; their fate remains
unknown.
I n 1870, the United States Department of Justice was cre-
ated.
I n 1911 , Britain’s King George V was crowned at
Westminster Abbey.
I n 1937, Joe Louis began his reign as world heavyweight
boxing champion by knocking out Jim Braddock in the
eighth round of their fight in Chicago.
I n 1938, Joe Louis knocked out Max Schmeling in the first
round of their rematch at Yankee Stadium.
I n 1940, during World War II, Adolf Hitler gained a stun-
ning victory as France was forced to sign an armistice eight
days after German forces overran Paris.
I n 1943, federal troops put down race-related rioting in
Detroit that claimed more than 30 lives.
I n 1962, Air France Flight 117, a Boeing 707, crashed
while on approach to Guadeloupe, killing all 113 people on
board.
I n 1970, President Richard Nixon signed an extension of
the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that lowered the minimum
voting age to 18.
I n 1977, John N. Mitchell became the first former U.S.
Attorney General to go to prison as he began serving a sen-
tence for his role in the Watergate cover-up. (He was released
19 months later. )
I n 1988, gay rights activist Leonard Matlovich, dis-
charged from the U.S. Air Force because of his homosexual-
ity, died at age 44.
Actor Ralph Waite is 85. Singer-actor Kris Kristofferson is
77. Movie director John Korty is 77. Actor Michael Lerner is
72. Actor Klaus Maria Brandauer is 70. Broadcast journalist
Brit Hume is 70. Singer Peter Asher (Peter and Gordon) is 69.
Actor Andrew Rubin is 67. Actor David L. Lander is 66. Singer
Howard “Eddie” Kaylan is 66. Singer-musician Todd Rundgren
is 65. Actress Lindsay Wagner is 64. Singer Alan Osmond is
64. Actor Murphy Cross is 63. Actor Graham Greene is 61.
Pop singer Cyndi Lauper is 60. Actor Chris Lemmon is 59.
Rock musician Derek Forbes is 57. Actor Tim Russ is 57.
Rock musician Garry Beers (INXS) is 56.
Robert Cocking (1776-1837) suffered
the first recorded parachute fatality in
1837. He jumped from a hot air balloon
5,000 feet over London using a cone
shape parachute of his own design. It
did not open.
***
German engineer Otto Lilienthal (1848-
1896) designed the first hang glider that
could fly a person. He died during a test
flight. His dying words were “Opfer
müssen gebracht werden,” German for
“Sacrifices must be made.”
***
Professional hang glider Manfred
Ruhmer, of Austria, holds the world
record for longest distance traveled in a
hang glider. In 2001 he glided for 437
miles in a flight over Texas.
***
In 1910, Theodore Roosevelt (1858-
1919) became the first president to fly
in an airplane.
***
The first flight attendant was 25-year-
old Ellen Church (1904-1965) of Iowa.
Church, a registered nurse, had the idea
that a medically trained female on board
a plane would help soothe nervous pas-
sengers. United Airlines agreed and
hired her in 1930.
***
Mattel introduced Stewardess Barbie in
1961. She wore an American Airlines
uniform.
***
The Hooters restaurant chain expanded
their business in 2003 to include an air-
line. Hooter girls, dressed in uniforms
of orange shorts and tank tops, enter-
tain passengers with trivia contests and
charades during flights. It ceased opera-
tions in 2006.
***
The first successful takeoff of a seaplane
from water took place in 1910 in
France. Pilot Henri Fabre (1882–1984)
nicknamed his plane “Le Canard, “
French for “The Duck.”
***
Can you name the pilot nicknamed Lady
Lindy who disappeared in 1937? See
answer at end.
***
The Airbus A380 is the world’s largest
airliner. The plane has seats for 525
passengers and cost $13 billion to
build.
***
Before founding the Boeing Airplane
Company in 1917, William E. Boeing
(1881-1956) was successful in the tim-
ber industry. After he resigned as chair-
man of the aviation company in 1934,
Boeing raised thoroughbred horses on
his farm near Seattle, Wash.
***
The U.S. government has two Boeing
747 aircraft that are used for Air Force
One; presidential air transport. The tail
numbers on the planes are 28000 and
29000.
***
Orville Wright (1871-1948) and his
brother Wilbur (1867-1912) did not
have middle names, nor did any of their
five siblings.
***
License plates in North Carolina say
“First in Flight.” It is in reference to the
Wright brothers’ first successful air-
plane flight near Kitty Hawk, N.C., on
Dec. 17, 1903.
***
The 1903 Wright Flyer plane has been
on permanent display at the
Smithsonian National Air and Space
Museum since 1948. Prior to that it was
at the Science Museum in London.
***
Answer: Amelia Earhart (1897-1937)
was the first woman to fly solo over the
Atlantic Ocean. Her nickname Lady
Lindy was in reference to Charles
Lindbergh (1902-1974), the first man
to fly solo across the Atlantic. Earhart
disappeared in 1937 somewhere around
the South Pacific near the end of her
attempted flight around the world.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Gorgeous
George, No. 8, in first place; Lucky Star, No. 2, in
California Classic, No. 5, in third place. The race
time was clocked at 1:41.69.
0 7 9
3 14 17 40 50 3
Mega number
June 21 Mega Millions
7 46 47 52 57 17
Powerball
June 19 Powerball
13 21 33 35 37
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
3 2 6 9
Daily Four
9 0 7
Daily three evening
3 5 32 34 36 20
Mega number
June 19 Super Lotto Plus
3
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HALF MOON BAY
Theft. Awoman’s purse was stolen after she
left it on the beach on the 4100 block of
Highway 1 before 10:30 a.m. Monday, June
17.
Arre s t. A man was arrested for driving
under the influence on State Route 92 and
Main Street before 2:58 p.m. Saturday, June
15.
Arre s t. A man was arrested for driving
under the influence on the 500 block of San
Mateo Road before 2:47 a.m. Saturday, June
15.
Fraud. Aperson’s personal information was
used to attempt to open a fraudulent account
at a company on the 1100 block of Main
Street before 11:47 a.m. Friday, June 14.
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO
Assaul t. Someone was assaulted at Mr.
Pizza Man on El Camino Real before 10:21
p.m. Friday, June 14.
Ci vi l cas e. A customer reported salon
management would not return $50 after an
unsatisfactory haircut on Maple Avenue
before 1:53 p.m. Thursday, June 13.
Threat case. Aman riding a bike yelled at
a woman that he was going to kill her and
then rode away near the intersection of
North Access Road and South Airport
Boulevard before 5:21 p.m. Wednesday,
June 12.
Police reports
Is this a hotel?
Awoman asked to spend the night at a
stranger’s house and propositioned sex
to him on Grand Avenue in South San
Francisco before 11:42 p.m.
Wednesday, May 29.
By Kevin Thomas
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
South San Francisco, San Bruno and
Redwood City businesses are joining others
throughout the Bay Area in donating a por-
tion of their sales through June 30 to sup-
port undocumented youth known as
DREAMers through the “Reach The Dream”
program. The fundraising campaign will
help supplement the cost of applying for
work authorization under the Deferred Action
for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA.
An estimated 60,000 DREAMers will ben-
efit from the effort, as businesses push
toward their goal to raise $50,000 during
the campaign. The program is sponsored by
Transnational Institute for Grassroots
Research and Action, or TIGRI, in Oakland.
TIGRI’s “Reach The Dream” program aims
to raise awareness about the DACAat a time
when the immigration debate enters a cru-
cial phase.
TIGRI was established in 2005. It sup-
ports immigrant families and believe in
strengthening them economically. They’ve
brought the conversation about Asian and
Latino purchasing power, which is about $3
billion in the past year, to the forefront.
Regardless of the status, documented or
undocumented, TIGRI believes that there are
smart economic choices individuals can
make. “Reach The Dream” is their first pub-
lic statement saying that within immigrant
communities we can support actual local
small businesses that are supporting us.
“This is our way of uplifting responsible
businesses in our community,” said Leo
Esclamado of TIGRI. “We have socially
responsible standards to encourage business
owners.”
One of the main barriers for immigrants
not applying for the DACAis the cost of the
application. Prices range from $400-
$1,000 depending on an individual’s case.
All applicants must be reviewed, and the
cost can fluctuate if there is more than one
child in the home, and also if a person has
been in the United States for a certain period
of time. After President Obama announced
deferred action last year, TIGRI was one of
the first groups to partner with legal clinics
and churches for an information session on
DACA application preparation. It has also
developed a project where house meetings
are arranged to discuss and encourage immi-
grants to begin the application process.
There is an ongoing fear within the immi-
grant community to sign government issued
forms. TIGRI has also established The
Dreamer Solidarity Network, which is a
mentorship program where individuals who
have already applied for or received docu-
mentation can help those who haven’t.
“Hopefully, this campaign will be a cata-
lyst to support the national discussion,”
said Esclamado. “The economic lives of
immigrant families are tied to businesses.”
TIGRI has gathered several businesses
throughout the Bay Area including El Patio
in San Jose, Morocco’s Restaurant in
Mountain View, Patio Filipino in San
Bruno, Café Gabriela in Oakland, Kadok’s
in San Francisco, Fort McKinley Restaurant
in South San Francisco, La Casita Chilanga
in Redwood City, Mezcal in San Jose, Pasta
Pomodoro in Union City, Tribu Grill in
Union City, Pulutan in Daly City and
Seafood City in Union City, Concord,
Milpitas, Vallejo, San Jose and Sacramento.
South San Francisco’s Fort McKinley will
host the Global South Street Food Fest on
Sunday, June 30.
“I was once an immigrant that had a dream
and now that I’m living my dream, it’s time
to pay it forward and help other immigrant
families fulfill theirs,” Barry Picazzo, owner
of Fort McKinley, said in a prepared state-
ment.
City unveils parking app
Redwood City motorists might find park-
ing easier now that the city implemented a
pilot smartphone mapping system that lets
them find available spaces, rates and hours
in downtown lots and garages.
The application “Parker” will be tested for
a three-month trial period on approximately
100 on-street spaces on Broadway between
Main and Marshall streets, and on Jefferson
Avenue between Middlefield Road and
Marshall Street. The system uses informa-
tion from sensors embedded in the parking
spaced that detect a vehicle’s presence.
Parker also has a hands-free option.
The free app is available at www.redwood-
city.org/parking.
Businesses raise money for DREAMers
Local brief
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
4
Weekend • June 22-23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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5
Weekend • June 22-23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Three San Bruno family mem-
bers convicted of resisting arrest
after they came to the aid of a rela-
tive who threw a firework under a
police officer’s patrol car on the
Fourth of July 2011 were sen-
tenced Friday to varying jail
terms.
Ephraim DeVera Rapada, 60,
Crystal Anne Rapada, 29, and
Ervin James Rapada, 27, were each
convicted of misdemeanor resist-
ing arrest but acquitted of numer-
ous assault charges. The Rapadas’
defense attorneys had argued they
acted in self-defense and were
themselves victims of police bru-
tality after Wendell Jennings
Rapada, 32, threw the M-1000
then ran to the family’s apart-
ment.
On Friday, Crystal Rapada’s
attorney unsuc-
c e s s f u l l y
sought to have
the case dis-
missed because
of inconsistent
verdicts and
later to have
his client sen-
tenced to time
served. Instead,
she received
120 days in jail on two counts and
cried when remanded into custody,
according to Chief Deputy District
Attorney Karen Guidotti.
Ephraim DeVera Rapada was also
denied a sentence of time served
but Judge Leland Davis imposed
90 days jail. Ervin Rapada, con-
victed on three counts of resist-
ance, received 120 days. They
were also immediately taken into
custody.
We n d e l l
Rapada was
convicted of
felony battery
on a police offi-
cer, misde-
meanor resist-
ing arrest and
violating his
earlier proba-
tion for a June
2010 unlawful possession of a
firearm. On Monday, he was sen-
tenced to two years jail followed
by a year of mandatory supervi-
sion.
The incident began when two
San Bruno police officers, acting
as part of a countywide fireworks
abatement team, saw a M-1000
lobbed from an apartment com-
plex to the street and roll under-
neath their car. They chased the
suspect, Wendell Rapada, to an
East Avenue
complex and up
to an outside
balcony.
The prosecu-
tion argued
that as Rapada
punched at the
officers, his
c o u s i n s
Crystal and
Ervin Rapada and father Ephraim
DeVera Rapada exited the apart-
ment and joined in. The elder
Rapada was also accused of try-
ing to lift an officer over the bal-
cony which is 13 feet above
ground and another reported feel-
ing somebody try to remove his
gun as he lost consciousness.
Another group of officers
responded to calls for backup and
arrested the four Rapadas charged
in the case.
Family sentenced in holiday brawl with officers
Ephraim
Rapada
Crystal Rapada
Ervin Rapada
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
An 18-year-old Foster City man
accused of peeping into girls’ bed-
rooms and masturbating on a teen
girl as she slept is looking at no
more than two years in prison
after pleading no contest to
annoying a child in a home.
The conviction counts as a
criminal strike against Justin
Scott Shing
who will be for-
mally sen-
tenced Aug. 21.
As part of the
plea deal,
r e m a i n i n g
charges of resi-
dential burgla-
ry, peeping,
sexual battery
and possession of burglary tools
were dismissed although they can
be considered by a judge for the
purposes of sentencing.
Foster City police arrested
Shing Aug. 25, 2012 after the
father of a 9-year-old girl reported
finding him inside the Matsonia
Drive home at 3 a.m. staring at
the girl’s empty bed while on his
hands and knees. The father
grabbed him, later identified as
Shing, and called police.
Authorities say Shing also
looked in the window of a 17-
year-old neighbor girl at 2 a.m. in
May. On Aug. 14, he reportedly
entered the same girl’s bedroom
after midnight as she slept, pulled
back her comforter and masturbat-
ed.
Foster City police reported
Shing admitted entering the
homes.
Shing is free from custody on a
$100,000 bail bond and is barred
from having any contact with the
victims.
Accused peeper looking at two years prison
Justin Shing
S
ections of the internation-
ally celebrated AIDS
Memorial Quilt — the
54 ton, handmade tapestry that
stands as a memorial to more than
94,000 individuals lost to AIDS —
was on view in Aragon High
School ’s student lunchroom in
San Mateo in March. Established
in 1987, The NAMES Proj ect
Foundation is the international
organization that is the custodian
of The AIDS Memorial Quilt. The
quilt is composed of more than
48,000 individual 3 foot by 6 foot
panels, each one commemorating
the life of someone who has died of
AIDS. These panels come from
every state in the nation, every
corner of the globe and they have
been sewn by hundreds of thou-
sands of friends, lovers and family
members into this epic memorial,
the largest piece of ongoing com-
munity art in the world.
Class notes is a column dedicated to
school news. It is compiled by education
reporter Heather Murtagh. You can con-
tact her at (650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at
heather@smdailyjournal.com.
6
Weekend • June 22-23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
Sprinkler system controls Pacifica kitchen fire
A restaurant kitchen caught fire Friday morning in
Pacifica, but damage was kept to a minimum thanks to a
sprinkler system, according to fire officials.
The fire at Rice and Roll, a Chinese restaurant at 683
Manor Drive, was reported around 7:25 a.m., according to
the North County Fire Authority.
Firefighters found fire in the kitchen area that was being
held in check by an installed sprinkler system. The fire was
quickly extinguished with minimal damage and no injuries.
Fire officials said the fire highlighted the importance of
working fire alarms, smoke detectors and sprinkler sys-
tems in businesses and homes.
Two injured in El Camino Real crash
Two people were injured in a crash that blocked south-
bound El Camino Real in Belmont for nearly an hour Friday
morning, according to police.
A22-year-old San Mateo man, who was traveling south
on El Camino Real in a Honda CRX, struck a Ford Focus
driven by a 28-year-old Belmont man around 9:15 a.m.,
Capt. Patrick Halleran said Friday afternoon.
The Ford was apparently turning left from Anita Avenue
on to northbound El Camino Real when the crash occurred,
Halleran said.
Both vehicles sustained major damage. The San Mateo
man was treated at the scene and released, while the
Belmont man was taken to a hospital for treatment of non-
life threatening injuries, Halleran said.
The cause of the crash remains under investigation.
Southbound traffic was diverted on to Anita Avenue dur-
ing the investigation. The road reopened around 10:10
a.m.
Two injured when vehicle struck mobile home
Two people were injured Friday morning when a vehicle
drove into a mobile home in Daly City, according to fire
officials.
The vehicle struck the front porch of the home at 56
Franciscan Drive around 11:30 a.m., according to the
North County Fire Authority.
The passenger and driver, both elderly females, sustained
minor to moderate injuries, and both were taken to hospi-
tals for treatment, fire officials said.
The resident of the mobile home, who was home when
the crash occurred, was not injured.
The cause of the crash remains under investigation.
Local briefs
By Laura Olson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Afee for oil refin-
ery inspections. The loss of tax credits
for an Anaheim hockey arena that
plans to lay off hundreds of unionized
workers. Changes that loosen report-
ing requirements for domestic violence
cases.
Those were among the two dozen
issues crammed into a single bill that
became a flashpoint for controversy in
the Legislature because one of its pro-
visions threatened to undermine the
public’s access to local government
documents.
“The wide-ranging provisions of
this bill can be described as basically
everything but the kitchen sink,”
Assemblyman Bob Blumenfield, D-
Woodland Hills, said when he
described AB76 before last week’s
floor vote.
The dust-up illustrates an issue that
critics have complained about for
years — the Legislature’s practice of
packing provisions they would prefer
not be publicized into essential budg-
et-related and end-of-session bills that
win swift approval.
The governor’s January budget pro-
posal is traditionally followed by
months of meetings. But lobbyists
and others who track legislative action
said it often is unclear which sections
will remain in the final plan — or how
they will be phrased — until days or
even hours before final votes.
Last-minute actions give little time
for outside groups to pinpoint con-
flicts of interest or potential prob-
lems.
“It’s impossible for the general pub-
lic to follow, and it’s not what’s being
taught in civics classes,” said Bob
Stern, who previously served as presi-
dent of the Los Angeles-based Center
for Governmental Studies.
Even lawmakers may not recognize
legislation once bills reach their final
form.
Assemblyman Don Wagner, R-
Irvine, said he was surprised to find out
that the final version of the bill includ-
ed a provision that specifically
addressed Anaheim’s Honda Center,
which is located in his district. Earlier
discussions indicated that changes
would affect the enterprise zone incen-
tive program generally, not the arena
specifically, he said.
Public records act change an
example of overstuffed bills
“The wide-ranging provisions of this bill can be
described as basically everything but the kitchen sink.”
—Assemblyman Bob Blumenfield, D-Woodland Hills
By Juliet Williams
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Legislative lead-
ers on Friday took a long-term step to
end a controversy over access to docu-
ments, introducing a constitutional
amendment to mandate that local gov-
ernments comply with the California
Public Records Act.
The proposed amendment also spec-
ifies that the state would not have to
reimburse those governments for the
cost of complying with the law, poten-
tially saving the general fund millions
of dollars a year. The Senate is expect-
ed to take up SCA3 next week.
The move by Sen. Mark Leno, D-San
Francisco, and Senate President Pro
Tem Darrell Steinberg, D-Sacramento,
comes after Democratic lawmakers and
Gov. Jerry Brown backtracked on a bill
included in the budget package that
was approved last week.
That bill would have made compli-
ance with the records law optional for
local governments, which led to a pub-
lic outcry that the provision could
allow governments to keep public
information secret or not respond to
requests for records.
The Assembly removed the con-
tentious part of the legislation and re-
voted on the bill Thursday, and the
Senate is expected to do the same next
week. Brown’s administration has
indicated he will sign the revised bill.
Brown, a Democrat, had sought the
changes to avoid a requirement that the
state reimburse local governments for
complying with requests under the
California Public Records Act.
State lawmakers seek to enshrine open records law
LOCAL/NATION 7
Weekend • June 22-23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Peter Brice Pitkin
Peter Brice Pitkin passed away peacefully on June 7, 2013
at the age of 84 in San Mateo, California.
Born on May 2, 1929, he was the second son of the late Dr.
Horace Collins Pitkin and Mrs. Mary Isabel Pitkin of San
Francisco, California. His father was a famous orthopedic
surgeon, who, in 1927, invented a new type of bone hammer.
Peter is survived by his wife of 38 years, Marjorie Shotton
Pitkin of San Mateo, California, and three children.
From his first marriage, his son James Brice Pitkin of Saratoga, California and
daughter Susan Letitia Pitkin of Grass Valley, California. And from his current
marriage, his daughter Anne Elizabeth Pitkin of San Mateo, California. Preceded in
death by his brother, Horace Aldridge Pitkin, who died in 1998.
Peter served in the US Army during the Korean War. He taught science and math
at Hillsdale High School for 30 years. He received his undergraduate at UC Davis,
and his Masters Degree at the University of San Jose, where he also received his
teaching credentials. He owned Crystal Springs Wine and Spirits for 20 years, which
he liked to call his hobby, even though he worked hard there everyday, long after his
retirement from teaching.
He was always proud to say he grew up in San Francisco. Known for his witty word
puns, and love of wine, he traveled the world with his loving wife on many cruises
during his retirement. Always an avid golfer, and 49ers fan, Peter had a great love
and appreciation for the Opera. He leaves an everlasting sense of a loving and kind
husband, who was deeply loved and greatly respected by his children and wife.
At the request of Peter, there will be no funeral services.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Defenders of Wildlife
foundation in his name. It was a favorite of his, which he contributed to
yearly. He had a great love for wildlife especially wolves. defenders.org.
Colma Cromation & Funoral Sorvicos, 6bO/7b7-1JOO º www.colmacromation.com
Obituary
CITY GOVERNMENT
• The Redwood City Council will consider whether to back a
proposal changing the board of the South Bayside Wast e
Management Authority from appointed staff of its 12 member
agencies to elected officials. Eight of the 12 agencies must agree
to allow the change.
The City Council meets 7 p.m. Monday, June 24 at City Hall,
1017 Middlefield Road, Redwood City.
By Pete Yost
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Justice Department
has charged former National Security
Agency contractor Edward Snowden with
espionage and theft of government property
in the NSAsurveillance case.
Snowden, believed to be holed up in Hong
Kong, has admitted providing information
to the news media about two highly classi-
fied NSAsurveillance programs.
A one-page criminal complaint unsealed
Friday in federal court in Alexandria, Va. ,
says Snowden engaged in unauthorized com-
munication of national defense information
and willful communication of classified
communications intelligence information.
Both are charges under the Espionage Act.
Snowden also is charged with theft of gov-
ernment property. All three crimes carry a
maximum 10-year prison penalty.
The federal court in the Eastern District of
Virginia where the complaint was filed is
headquarters for
Snowden’s former
employer, government
contractor Booz Allen
Hamilton.
The complaint is dated
June 14, five days after
Snowden’s name first sur-
faced as the leaker of
information about the
two programs in which
the NSA gathered tele-
phone and Internet records to ferret out ter-
ror plots.
The complaint could become an integral
part of a U.S. government effort to have
Snowden extradited from Hong Kong, a
process that could turn into a prolonged
legal battle. Snowden could contest extradi-
tion on grounds of political persecution. In
general, the extradition agreement between
the U.S. and Hong Kong excepts political
offenses from the obligation to turn over a
person.
NSA leak Snowden charged
with espionage and theft
By David Espo and Erica Werner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Supporters of bipartisan
immigration legislation smoothed the way
Friday for likely Senate passage of their
handiwork, overcoming last-minute dis-
agreements at the bill’s controversial core
and tacking on other items certain to build
support.
Atest vote was set for Monday on the bill,
which calls for a military-style surge to
increase security at the U.S-Mexican border.
At the same time it sets out a 13-year path-
way to citizenship for millions of immi-
grants living in the United States unlawfully.
Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska became the
11th Republican to announce her support for
the legislation in the Democratic-controlled
Senate. More were expected to follow, possi-
bly enough to produce 70 votes or more and
easily overwhelm its critics.
Senate immigration bill
boosted by border deal
Edward
Snowden
LOCAL/WORLD 8
Weekend • June 22-23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
A FAMILY SHARING HOPE IN CHRIST
HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM
Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.
Call (650) 349-0100
HopeLutheranSanMateo.org
Baptist
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor
(650) 343-5415
217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services at 8 & 11 am
Sunday School at 9:30 am
Website: www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
Every Sunday at 5:30 PM
Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo ShinshuBuddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo
(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Ryuta Furumoto
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and 2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
Clases de Biblicas Y Servicio de
Adoracion
En Espanol, Si UD. Lo Solicita
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm
Congregational
• THE •
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
OF SAN MATEO - UCC
225 Tilton Ave. & San Mateo Dr.
(650) 343-3694
Worship and Church School
Every Sunday at 10:30 AM
Coffee Hour at 11:45 AM
Nursery Care Available
www.ccsm-ucc.org
Non-Denominational
Church of the
Highlands
“A community of caring Christians”
1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...
To know Christ and make him known.
901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223
Sunday services:
9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org
Non-Denominational
Walter Fredric Zahnd
Walter Fredric Zahnd, a 60-year resident of San Mateo
County, died June 19, 2013 at the age of 92. He was prede-
ceased by his wife of 68 years, Jean. Walter was the father of
Diana (Bruce) Mann, Christopher (Caterina) Zahnd and Susan
(Charles) Caudill; grandfather to Kristen (Leonard) Fisher,
Charlie (Lori) Mann, Aaren-Marie Caudill and Caroline
(Morez) Gutierrez; and great-grandfather to Sienna, Kelsey,
Lanie, Addison, Gabriel, Peyton and Madeline.
Walter was a native of Sioux City, Iowa and proudly served
in the U.S. Coast Guard. He attended art school in Chicago
and became a commercial artist. For years, his artwork graced
the pages of the San Francisco Chronicle and Examiner; as
well as many of the store catalogs in San Francisco.
Donations in his memory may be made to the Alzheimer’s
Association, P.O. Box 96011, Washington, D.C. 20090-
6011.
Shigeto Dick Ishida
Shigeto Dick Ishida, born March 9, 1919, in Oakland; died
peacefully June 13, 2013.
He is survived by his wife of 66 years, Fumiko; children
Gloria Wilmer (Lesley), Naomi (Ryan Iwasa), Philip (Velina)
and Janet Wada (Rick); grandchildren Kristyne and Eric Wada.
Also survived by stepbrother Nobuo Inouye; sister-in-law
Akiko Ishida in Hiroshima, Japan; and many nieces and
nephews.
He served in the U.S. Army as a translator for the Military
Intelligence Service (MIS) during World War II. Awarded the
Congressional Gold Medal in 2012 honoring his service in
the MIS.
Aretired landscape gardener and longtime member of the
San Mateo Buddhist Temple and the Japanese American
Citizens’ League.
Funeral service will be 3 p.m. Tuesday, June 25 at the San
Mateo Buddhist Temple, 2 S. Claremont St., San Mateo.
Arrangements by Sneider & Sullivan & O’Connell’s
Funeral Home.
Betty Margaret Kollerer
Betty Margaret Kollerer, late of San Bruno and San Mateo
County resident for 64 years, died in San Bruno June 21,
2013.
Wife of Fred Kollerer for 69 years. Mother of Kathy,
Reenie, Tina, the late Dan and Sandy. Also survived by her
grandchildren David, Tony, Domenic, Debbie, Jeanine,
Colleen, Taylor and great-grandchildren Adeline, Grace,
Lincoln and Marcus.
Anative of Santa Monica, age 87 years.
Alongtime parishioner at Saint Robert’s Catholic Church.
Amemorial mass will be celebrated 10 a.m. Saturday, June
29 at Saint Robert’s Catholic Church, Oak Avenue and
Crystal Springs Road in San Bruno. Condolences may be
sent to Chapel of the Highlands, 194 Millwood Drive,
Millbrae, CA94030.
In lieu of flowers, her family prefers donations to the char-
ity of your choice.
Obituaries
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BRASILIA, Brazil — Brazilian
President Dilma Rousseff ended her
near-silence about days of massive,
violent protests, saying in a prime
time TV broadcast Friday that peaceful
demonstrations were part of a strong
democracy but that violence could not
be tolerated. She promised to make
improvements to public services and
fight official corruption.
Rousseff said she would soon hold a
meeting with leaders of the protest
movement, governors and the mayors
of major cities. But it remained unclear
exactly who could represent the mas-
sive and decentralized groups of
demonstrators taking to the streets,
venting anger against woeful public
services despite a high tax burden.
Though offering no details, Rousseff
said that her government would create
a national plan for public transporta-
tion in cities — a hike in bus and sub-
way fares in many cities was the origi-
nal complaint of the protests. She also
reiterated her backing for a plan before
congress to invest all oil revenue roy-
alties in education and a promise she
made earlier to bring in foreign doc-
tors to areas that lack physicians.
“I want institutions that are more
transparent, more resistant to wrong-
doing,” Rousseff said in reference to
perceptions of deep corruption in
Brazilian politics, which is emerging
as a focal point of the protests.
Flooding kills three, forces
75,000 from Calgary homes
CALGARY, Alberta — Floodwaters
that devastated much of southern
Alberta left at least three people dead
and forced officials in the western
Canadian city of Calgary on Friday to
order the evacuation of its entire down-
town, as the waters reached the 10th
row of the city’s hockey arena.
Canadian Prime Minister Stephen
Harper called the level of flooding
“stunning” and said officials don’t
know yet if it will get worse, but said
the water has peaked and stabilized and
noted that the weather has gotten bet-
ter.
More than 100K Morsi backers
stage show of force in Egypt
CAIRO — More than 100,000 sup-
porters of Egypt’s Islamist president
staged a show of force Friday ahead of
massive protests later this month by
the opposition, chanting “Islamic rev-
olution!” and warning of a new and
bloody bout of turmoil.
Adding to the combustible mix, com-
ments by the U.S. ambassador that were
interpreted as critical of the opposi-
tion’s planned protests sparked out-
rage, with one activist telling the
diplomat to “shut up and mind your own
business.”
Friday’s mass gathering was ostensi-
bly called by Islamists to denounce vio-
lence, but it took on the appearance of a
war rally instead.
Brazil leader breaks
silence about protests
REUTERS
A policeman fires his weapon while confronting stone-throwing demonstrators
during an anti-government protest in Belem, Brazil.
Around the world
OPINION 9
Weekend • June 22-23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Save the California
Public Records Act
Editor,
I consider the attack on California’s
Public Records Act a stealth attack on
a hard-won citizen’s right, as is the
threat of amending the state
Constitution to weaken a citizen’s
ability to obtain public records in an
easily accessible format and in a rea-
sonable timeliness. I am an involved
citizen who depends on the news
media and on access to government
records to make informed decisions.
The issue of who pays for the
release of public records, the state or
the locality, should be resolved in a
public debate, not by a political
backroom maneuver. The same goes
for any effort to weaken the
California Public Records Act provi-
sions in the state Constitution.
The overly optimistic statement
made by Senate President pro
Tempore Darrell Steinberg about local
government compliance without this
mandate does not reflect a knowledge
of how cleverly evasive local govern-
ments can be and how much legal
expense they are willing to incur
when they do not want to comply
with the existing California Public
Records Act. The First Amendment
Coalition v. Santa Clara County and
Sierra Club v. Orange County are two
recent examples.
I want California’s legislators to
cease efforts to eviscerate constitu-
tional protections to citizen who
wish to access California public
records.
Karen Joffe
Piedmont
Letter to the editor
The Fresno Bee
C
alifornia taxpayers should
not be expected to subsidize
card rooms and strip joints,
legal though these businesses are.
But that’s what’s happening, as The
Sacramento Bee’s Richard Chang
pointed out in a front-page story this
month. The story illustrated the need
to end the $750 million-a-year enter-
prise zone tax break, as Gov. Jerry
Brown and some legislators want.
Originally championed by thought-
ful conservatives such as the late U.S.
Rep. Jack Kemp, enterprise zones
were intended to encourage businesses
to hire unemployed people in impov-
erished inner cities.
In California, however, the enter-
prise zone concept has been twisted
into a profoundly dumb policy.
California allows businesses to
retroactively claim credits, receiving
as much as $37,000 per employee for
hiring decisions made years earlier.
Consultants visit businesses in enter-
prise zones and show them how to
capitalize on the state’s stupidity.
Zone backers refuse to identify
businesses that get the credits, claim-
ing privacy is at stake. For Chang’s
story, however, the Sacramento
Employment and Training Agency did
provide a list of recipients.
FedEx obtained 1,382 tax vouchers
since 2010, making it the zone’s
largest recipient. AutoZone, a car
parts retailer, ranked second with
159. We doubt either company would
abandon the huge California market if
there were no tax credits.
We also doubt that Capitol Casino
would load up the U-Haul and move to
Nevada if it didn’t receive credits for
hiring cooks, servers and card dealers,
or that Gold Club Centerfolds and
Deja Vu Showgirls would relocate to,
say, Texas without credits they
receive.
Brown wants to replace enterprise
zones with $750 million in tax
breaks that might actually encourage
businesses to expand in California
and hire people. State Sen. Jerry Hill,
D-San Mateo, is carrying Senate Bill
434, which would significantly
reshape the program.
Lobbying to keep the enterprise
zones is intense. The question for leg-
islators is simple: Will they make
thoughtful changes to help business-
es provide good jobs to people in
need, or will they buckle to an inter-
est group and maintain a truly dumb
tax break?
Reforming enterprise zones should be state priority
It’s still Earth Day
for small business
By Chuck McDougald
I
t has been three months now. The speeches are long
forgotten, posters have been taken down, school chil-
dren are on vacation and the media are on to the next
crisis of the day. Yet for small business, here in San Mateo
County and across the country, it’s still Earth Day.
Every day is Earth Day for small business, because every
day small businesses endeavor to be
good environmental stewards for their
communities.
Small business is vital to the quality
of life on the Peninsula, in California
and in the nation. According to the latest
data from the Office of Advocacy of the
U.S. Small Business Administration,
California’s 3.5 million small business-
es are 99.2 percent of the employers in
state and they employ more than half of
the private-sector workforce. In San Mateo County, our
19,000 small businesses employ close to 80 percent of all
workers in the county.
These numbers are significant not just for their economic
impact, but also because small business represents what is
best in our communities. What do you remember about
where you grew up? For most people I talk with, their mem-
ories are infused with the sights, sounds and emotions of the
corner store, the local bowling alley or the coffeehouse
where children’s art is displayed. Little League teams spon-
sored by a local garage and community cleanup days led by
business leaders in Kiwanis or Rotary round out the picture.
On Main Street, community involvement, civic pride,
environmental stewardship and the interests of small busi-
ness are deeply intertwined. After all, small business owners
live, work and play where their businesses are located. They
know that their families, neighbors and employees expect
them to keep the community healthy, clean and green.
In one small example, the South San Francisco Chamber
of Commerce — my local chamber — sponsored the
Community Preservation Task Force cleanup along Colma
Creek. More than 40 volunteers removed more than 140 gal-
lons of litter, trash and debris while simultaneously plant-
ing trees that will help clean air and water while providing
shade and habit for wildlife.
Owning an environmentally friendly company can be
good business, too. In Silicon Valley, we hear about large
so-called green firms propped up by large government subsi-
dies, which collapse as soon as taxpayer funds dry up. What
we don’t hear so much about are the small firms that make a
difference every day, and that make a profit while doing so.
Thomas Sullivan, the former chief counsel for advocacy at
the SBApoints out that small businesses from around the
country do well while doing good for the environment. He
has highlighted:
• Henry Molded Products of Lebanon, Penn., which makes
every day Earth Day. The firm manufactures packaging prod-
ucts made from 100 percent recycled fiber and it reuses more
than 6,000 tons of waste paper while keeping 860,000
cubic feet of trash out of landfills every year. That is enough
trash to cover a football field to a depth of 15 feet.
• CG&S Design-Build of Austin, Texas, which recycles
nearly 60 percent (139 tons) of its waste material, including
metal, drywall, concrete, wood, lumber and cardboard.
Known for its sustainable building practices, it has made a
company-wide effort to recycle as much as possible on a
daily basis.
In addition, let me add that in San Carlos’ Kelly-Moore
Paints became the first major paint company in the industry
to collect and remanufacture a quality recycled paint. Kelly-
Moore also diverts more than 85 percent of its waste
through a series of recycling programs for solid waste and
wash water.
Now that the commotion is over, and now that we have
turned our attention to other things, it is worth reflecting
that for small business every day Earth Day. Small business
powers our economy. It provides jobs, income and tax rev-
enue for our cities and county. Small business owners sup-
port their communities and are a source of civic pride and
admiration.
Moreover, since they live where they work, small busi-
ness owners are stewards of their own environment and that
of their employees and families as well. For them, it is still
Earth Day.
Chuck McDougald headed the Veterans Coalition, first for
California, then for the Western Region, when Sen. John
McCain ran for president in 2008. In 2010, he served as
Statewide Volunteer Chair for Carly Fiorina’s campaign for the
U.S. Senate. He is currently the Western Region director for
ConcernedVeteransforAmerica.org. He lives in South San
Other voices
Arizona Republic
I
t’s time for America’s “Well,
duh!” moment. Family-friendly
wonders of the world don’t come
cheap.
Our national parks are suffering
from the meat-ax budget cuts of
sequestration after years of deferred
maintenance. That’s no way to treat
America’s best idea.
Our great-grandparents’ enthusiasm
for preserving some of this nation’s
wow places produced an amazing lega-
cy. We have a duty to preserve that
legacy for our children’s children.
Areport released last month by the
House Natural Resources Committee
shows parks are being forced to cut
hours and services, reduce access to
campgrounds and facilities and further
delay maintenance.
This isn’t just about the aesthetics
or the comfort of visitors.
At the Grand Canyon, seasonal
staffing has been reduced, bathrooms
are cleaned less frequently, the visitor
center closes earlier and there are
fewer ranger-led activities for visi-
tors.
Areport from the advocacy group
Public Employees for Environmental
Responsibility found an increase in
assaults and threats against rangers
and park police. This is no time to cut
staffing.
The sequestration cuts come as
parks face a $12 billion maintenance
backlog, the House report said. The
unfunded to-do list includes repairing
or replacing deteriorated roads,
bridges and trails, as well as upkeep
on facilities and historical sites.
Public support for the parks
remains high. Four of every five of
those polled for the National Parks
and Conservation Association said
they worry about budget cuts degrad-
ing the parks and the visitor experi-
ence.
The zeal for budget-cutting needs to
be balanced with the reality that many
things Americans take for granted
cost money. Well-run, well-main-
tained national parks are among those
national values.
America’s best idea deserves the
proper funding.
National parks need upkeep
Other voices
Guest
perspective
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BUSINESS 10
Weekend • June 22-23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 14,799.40 +41.08 10-Yr Bond 2.514 +0.095
Nasdaq3,357.25 -7.39 Oil (per barrel) 92.92
S&P 500 1,592.43 +4.24 Gold 1,292.80
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Darden Restaurants Inc., down $1.11 at $50.12
The owner of the Olive Garden and Red Lobster chains said that its fourth-
quarter net income fell 12 percent on rising costs.
CarMax Inc., up 2 cents at $44.59
The car dealership chain said that higher sales of used cars drove its first-
quarter profit up more than 21 percent.
Cantel Medical Corp., up $1.34 at $34.41
The maker of anti-infection equipment for hospitals said that its board
declared a three-for-two split of its common stock.
Nasdaq
Oracle Corp., down $3.07 at $30.14
The business software maker reported fourth quarter results that were
below what Wall Street analysts’ were expecting.
Ebix Inc., down $1.48 at $9.52
Shares of the insurance technology provider continued to fall,a day after
Goldman Sachs ended its deal to buy the company.
Idenix Pharmaceuticals Inc., down $1.57 at $3.56
The drugmaker said that the Food and Drug Administration delayed
human testing of the company’s hepatitis C treatment IDX20963.
Dish Network Corp., up $1.23 at $40.41
The satellite TV operator said that it is officially abandoning its efforts to
acquire telecommunications company Sprint Nextel Corp.
Oramed Pharmaceuticals Inc., up $1.39 at $6.81
The drugmaker said that it would cancel a $13 million stock offering,
citing current market conditions.
Big movers
By Joshua Freed
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Traders decided that the stock market
has suffered enough, at least for now.
After a two-day plunge, stocks ended
the week with an advance on Friday,
suggesting that Wall Street may be suc-
cessfully weaned from the Federal
Reserve’s easy money after all.
“Saner heads are prevailing,” said Jim
Dunigan, chief investment officer at
PNC Wealth Management. “People are
looking a little deeper into the message
from the Fed — the economy is getting
better,” he said. “At the end of the day
that’s a positive.”
The Fed’s move also pushed up the
yield on the 10-year Treasury note to the
highest level in almost two years as
investors bet that U.S. interest rates
will rise.
Investors had known that sooner or
later the Fed would quit spending $85
billion per month pumping money into
the U.S. economy.
That money has been a big driver
behind the stock market’s bull run the
last four years. It led to low interest rates
that encouraged borrowing for every-
thing from factory machinery to com-
mercial airplanes to home renovations.
Has the economy been great? No.
Unemployment is still high and U.S.
growth has been anemic. But it could
have been worse. Investors were confi-
dent enough in a growing economy that
the Standard & Poor’s 500 index hit an
all-time high of 1,669 on May 21.
Then on Wednesday, the Fed said it
would aim to turn off that spigot by the
middle of next year as long as the econ-
omy is strong enough.
Just because investors knew it was
coming didn’t mean they liked it. The
Dow dropped 560 points on Wednesday
and Thursday.
Investors recovered their mojo on
Friday. The Dow Jones industrial aver-
age rose 41.08 points, or 0.3 percent,
to close at 14,799.40. The Standard &
Poor’s 500 index rose 4.24 points, or
0.3 percent to close at 1,592.43.
The gains were led by the kinds of
stocks that investors favor when they
want to play it safe. Makers of consumer
staples, utilities, and health care com-
panies rose the most of the 10 industries
in the S&P500 index. The only two cat-
egories that fell were technology stocks
and companies that make basic materi-
als.
Friday’s gain wasn’t enough to erase
the market’s loss for the week. The S&P
500 fell 2.1 percent for the week, and
the Dow was down 1.8 percent. Stocks
have now fallen two weeks in a row, and
four of the past five.
The real question will be whether the
sell-off continues next week, said Frank
Fantozzi, CEO of Planned Financial
Services. So far, the market’s swoon
this week appears to be more of an
adjustment than the beginning of a
long-term rout. “If the flow out of equi-
ties starts to increase, this might be the
pullback we’ve been waiting for,” he
said.
Many investors have been predicting
some kind of pullback in the market fol-
lowing its nearly unbroken advance
since last fall. The S&P 500 index rose
for seven straight months through May.
So far in June it’s down 2.1 percent.
The yield on the 10-year Treasury note
hit 2.54 percent, up from 2.42 percent
late Thursday. It has risen sharply since
Wednesday as investors sold bonds in
anticipation that the Fed would slow,
and eventually end, its bond purchases,
if the U.S. recovery continues.
The yield, which is a benchmark for
interest rates on many kinds of loans
including home mortgages, was as low
as 1.63 percent as recently as May 3.
Technology shares lagged the market
after business software maker Oracle
reported flat revenue late Thursday, even
though analysts expected an increase.
Oracle plunged $3.07, or 9 percent, to
$30.14, the biggest drop in the S&P
500 index. Oracle is struggling to adapt
as customers shift away from software
installed on their own computers toward
software that runs remotely.
Stocks recover after a two-day plunge
By Joan Lowy and Scott Mayerowitz
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The government is
moving toward easing restrictions on air-
line passengers using electronic devices
to listen to music, play games, read
books, watch movies and work during
takeoffs and landings, but it could take a
few months.
An industry-labor advisory committee
was supposed to make recommendations
next month to the Federal Aviation
Administration on easing the restrictions.
But the agency said in a statement Friday
the deadline has been extended to
September because committee members
asked for extra time to finish assessing
whether it’s safe to lift restrictions.
“The FAA recognizes consumers are
intensely interested in the use of personal
electronics aboard aircraft; that is why we
tasked a government-industry group to
examine the safety issues and the feasibili-
ty of changing the current restrictions,” the
statement said.
The agency is under public and political
pressure to ease the restrictions as more
people bring their e-book readers, music
and video players, smartphones and laptops
with them when they fly.
Technically, the FAA doesn’t bar use of
electronic devices when aircraft are below
10,000 feet. But under FAA rules, airlines
that want to let passengers use the devices
are faced with a practical impossibility —
they would have to show that they’ve tested
every type and make of device passengers
would use to ensure there is no electromag-
netic interference with aircraft radios and
electrical and electronic systems.
As a result, U.S. airlines simply bar all
electric device use below 10,000 feet.
Airline accidents are most likely to occur
during takeoffs, landings, and taxiing.
Cellphone calls and Internet use and
transmissions are also prohibited, and
those restrictions are not expected to be
lifted. Using cellphones to make calls on
planes is regulated by the Federal
Communications Commission. There is
concern that making calls from fast-flying
planes might strain cellular systems, inter-
fering with service on the ground. There is
also the potential annoyance factor —
whether passengers will be unhappy if they
have to listen to other passengers yakking
on the phone.
The Wall Street Journal reported Friday
that a draft report by the advisory commit-
tee indicates its 28 members have reached a
consensus that at least some of the current
restrictions should be eased.
A member of the committee who asked
not to be named because the committee’s
deliberations are supposed to be kept pri-
vate told the Associated Press that while the
draft report is an attempt to reach consen-
sus, no formal agreement has yet been
reached.
There are also still safety concerns, the
member said. The electrical interference
generated by today’s devices is much lower
than those of a decade ago, but many more
passengers today are carrying electronics.
FAA moving toward easing electronic device use
West Virginia reported the largest declines in
unemployment among all states. California
also has seen the largest drop in unemploy-
ment among the states over the past 12
months.
State officials reported a non-farm jobs
gain of 10,800 during May for a total gain of
more than 767,000 since the economy
began to rebound in February 2010.
Roughly 1.6 million Californians remain
unemployed, down 364,000 from May of
last year.
California hit a high of 12.4 percent
unemployment for much of 2010 but has
seen steady job gains since then. It now is
tied with New Jersey for the sixth highest
unemployment rate in the nation, according
to the Labor Department. Nevada has the
highest rate, followed by Illinois and
Mississippi, Rhode Island and North
Carolina.
In another indication of the state’s reviv-
ing financial fortunes, the state Department
of Finance on Friday released its monthly
bulletin that showed tax collections in
California running 1 percent, or nearly $1
billion, ahead of projections for the fiscal
year.
The department said housing starts have
accelerated while the prices of existing
homes for sale have been rising.
The state reported there were nearly
18,000 fewer Californians receiving unem-
ployment insurance benefits in May com-
pared to the previous month, even though
the number of new claims rose by 3,500.
The number of Californians holding jobs
continues to grow, but the recent gains may
be deceiving, said Michael Bernick, a former
Employment Development Department
director who is now with the law firm
Sedgwick LLP in San Francisco. The latest
figures show 17 million Californians hold-
ing jobs in May, up 529,000 from the same
period last year.
“The increase is not in payroll jobs; it’s
people who say they’re employed as either
independent contractors or self-employed,”
Bernick said. “Now, that may be very posi-
tive in the sense of new business formation,
but it may be a lot of these people who are
marginally holding on.”
The state also saw the greatest monthly
gains in the leisure and hospitality industry,
which tends to have low-wage jobs, he said.
Six other categories, including manufac-
turing, trade, financial activities, profes-
sional services, government, and education
and health added 37,400 jobs. Mining, con-
struction and information were down 26,600
jobs over the month.
The gains vary greatly among regions.
While the Northern California coastal coun-
ty of Marin had the state’s lowest unemploy-
ment rate of 4.5 percent, Imperial County in
the southeast corner of the state held the
highest at 22.8 percent.
California’s economy still has a way to go
before it can match the state’s historic low
unemployment rate of 4.7 percent in January
2001, the middle of the tech boom.
Bug exposes contacts
of some on Facebook
Facebook says a bug in its system caused
6 million users’ contact information to be
inadvertently exposed.
The social media company said Friday
that a bug led to users’ contact informa-
tion, such as email addresses or phone
numbers, to be accessed by other users who
either had some contact information about
that person or some connection to them.
Facebook said in a blog post that the
cause of the bug is “pretty technical” but
that the problem is tied to its “Download
Your Information” tool.
The company uses the information that
users upload to better tailor the friend sug-
gestions it issues. The bug caused some of
this information to be inadvertently stored
in association with a person’s contact
information as part of their Facebook
account.
As a result, if someone downloaded an
archive of their Facebook account
through the “Download Your
Information” tool, they may have been
provided with additional addresses or
telephone numbers for their contacts or
people with whom they have some con-
nection. Because the contact informa-
tion was provided by other people on
Facebook, it was not necessarily accu-
rate.
Facebook said it has fixed the problem
and is in the process of notifying affected
users via email.
Sean Parker says he
had to pay wedding fines
SAN FRANCISCO — The Big Sur resort
where Sean Parker held his posh, Lord of
the Rings-inspired wedding threatened to
cancel it if he didn’t agree to pay for the
unpermitted wedding construction and the
inn’s past land use violations, Parker told
the Associated Press on Friday.
The co-founder of Napster Inc. and former
Facebook Inc. president said that after two
years of wedding planning, the Ventana Inn
& Spa preferred to cancel 20 days before the
event rather than work out an agreement
with the California Coastal Commission.
“As soon as Ventana found out there was
an issue they threatened to cancel the wed-
ding unless I entered into a broad indemni-
fication agreement,” Parker said in an
email. “We had nowhere to go at that point,
no backup plan, and there was no place in
the Big Sur area that could accommodate
360 guests.”
Continued from page 1
JOBS
Business briefs
<< Heat forming a new legacy, page 13
• Police ready to arrest Patriots’ Hernandez, page 13
Weekend, June 22-23, 2013
TALK IS CHEAP: MALIGNAGGI AND BRONER PUT MOUTHS TO REST, NOW MUST BOX >> PAGE 15
C
hris Bosh told those Heat fans
who had left Game 6 early to stay
home, and judging strictly by his
line in Game 7, he barely bothered to show
up himself.
Fortunately, LeBron James and Dwyane
Wade did.
“The vision that I had when I decided to
come here is all coming true,” James said
after the Heat beat the Spurs 95-88 in Game
7 on Thursday night to capture a second
straight NBAtitle in their third consecutive
Finals appearance.
And he’s right.
James was already
the best player in the
game when he made
“The Decision” nearly
three years ago, a
move that the rest of
the basketball world
pounced on as a sign
of weakness, a tacit
admission that he
couldn’t win a cham-
pionship all by him-
self.
James was right on
that score, too.
Bosh, always destined to be third among
The Big Three, wasn’t much help on this
night, contributing zero points on 0-for-5
shooting with seven rebounds. But Wade
stepped up, despite a shaky knee, and
Shane Battier had a career shooting night
when it counted.
Wade surrendered his lead-dog role with
the Heat to recruit James in 2010, but took
over during a rocky stretch in the second
quarter and proved he could still be the man
when it mattered. He finished with 23
points and 10 rebounds.
Battier, perhaps the most cerebral guy in
the NBA, snapped out of a poor-shooting
streak to make 6 of 8 attempts from beyond
the arc, and cracked afterward, “It’s better to
be timely than good.”
LeBron’s choice
looks smart now
JIM LITKE
See LITKE, Page 14
By Jay Cohen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO — They keep tinkering, each of
them, looking for any advantage they can
find.
Claude Julien made a line change in Game
2 that led to a victory for the Boston Bruins.
A couple of subtle adjustments by Joel
Quenneville helped the Chicago
Blackhawks get a big win in Game 4.
Back and forth it goes. While the Bruins
and Blackhawks compete on the ice, two
former NHL defensemen are trying to
become the 14th coach with at least two
Stanley Cup titles.
“They’ve got a role to play, just like we do
as players,” Chicago forward Patrick Sharp
said Friday. “Ultimately it’s going to be
decided on the ice, but our coaching staff,
the Bruins as well, they have a lot to say
with what goes on.”
They’ve already had an impact. And the
next move, along with the response from
the other bench, could be a deciding factor in
who wins this tight series between two of
the NHL’s most beloved franchises.
The Blackhawks’ 6-5 overtime victory in
Boston on Wednesday made it a split of the
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Sure June 21 marks the official start of
summer for the rest of the world, but over
in San Mateo County for baseball fans the
real fun begins with the start of local
Little League baseball tournaments.
Saturday marks the start of the tourna-
ment season in District 52 with the
Minors and Majors playing in first round
games of their respective Superbowls.
The Minors begin its 15-team tourna-
ment at 9 a.m. with Trinta Park, home of
San Mateo American little league as the
host site. Foster City All-Stars, behind a
masterful performance by Mitchell Nabeta
in the championship game and a 5-0 run
overall, are the reigning champions.
They’ll battle an always-tough
Hillsborough team at Trinta No. 2 field in
the second of the 11:30 a.m. matchups.
The favorites appear to be Belmont-
Redwood Shores, who are the only team to
earn a first-round bye. They won’t begin
their Superbowl until 10 a.m. on Sunday at
Trinta No. 1. They await the winners of
San Carlos and Half Moon Bay who start
the Superbowl action with a 9 a.m. game.
Redwood City East and Pacifica National
are the second of that 9 a.m. double-head-
er.
San Mateo American defends it home
turf in the first of the 11:30 a.m. games
when they take on Palo Alto American.
It’s an all Menlo affair to begin the 2
p.m. hour. Menlo-Atherton takes on
Alpine-West Menlo. Over in field No. 2,
San Mateo National and Redwood City
West will battle to
face either Palo
Alto National or
Pacifica American
— that last game
will be disputed at
4:30 p.m.
Over at the
Majors Superbowl,
Pacifica American
returns to defend
its title. Pacifica
American went unbeaten in capturing the
Majors Superbowl title in 2012, beating
San Mateo National 4-3 in the champi-
onship game.
Pacifica American won by 10-run mercy-
rule decisions in its first three games of
the tournament, allowing just 10 runs
while scoring 42. This summer, they
earned a bye and won’t play until Sunday
at 9 a.m. at Sea Cloud Park in Foster City
— home of the little league team of the
same name.
San Carlos and Hillsborough are the
other two teams that earned first round
byes. They too will play on Sunday —
San Carlos at 11:30 a.m. and
Hillsborough at 9 a.m. on field No. 5.
Foster City and Alpine-West Menlo get
the fun started with a 9 a.m. game. They’ll
be joined on field No. 3 by San Mateo
National (last year’s runner-up) and Palo
Alto National, and by Belmont-Redwood
Shores versus Redwood City East (on field
No. 5).
The champions of the Majors await the
winner of Redwood City West and Menlo-
Atherton, who play at 11:30 a.m. on field
No. 3.
San Mateo American and Palo Alto
American play at 11:30 a.m. as well for
the right to play Hillsborough in the next
round.
The Minors and Majors Superbowls fin-
ish the summer season with the champi-
onship games scheduled for June 25. Then
those give way to the District 52 champi-
onships which begin Saturday, June 29.
Over in the 9-10 tournament, Pacifica
American in the reigning champion. They
also went on to win the Section 3 tourna-
ment.
In the 10-11 tournament, Belmont-
Redwood Shores returns to defend its title.
And in the 11-12 tournament, everyone
will be gunning for Foster City.
Coaches on spot
for final 3 games
of Stanley Cup
See CUP, Page 14
District 52 Minors
Superbowl
at Trinta Park, San
Mateo
District 52 Majors
Superbowl at Sea
Cloud Park, Foster
City
SUPERBOWLS
SPORTS 12
Weekend • June 22-23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By choosing cremation you have many options. You can
have a viewing before the cremation, a memorial service
or visitation, even a graveside service. Afterward, the
container can be buried, stored in a columbarium, or
cherished as a keepsake, or there is the option of
scattering the cremated remains.
The choices are almost endless,
contact us to find out more.
Marlins take second game
of series against the Giants
A’s Colon stays hot, wins again
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEATTLE — Yoenis Cespedes hit a pair of
two-run homers and Bartolo Colon won his
seventh straight start to lead the Oakland
Athletics past the Seattle Mariners 6-3 on
Friday night.
Cespedes homered in the first inning and
again in the ninth for his third career multi-
homer game — all this month. Jed Lowrie
and Coco Crisp also went deep for the
Athletics, who maintained their one-game
lead in the AL West over Texas.
Colon (10-2) gave up three runs and seven
hits over eight innings, tying unbeaten
Max Scherzer of the Detroit Tigers for most
wins in the American League. Colon is 11-1
in his career at Safeco Field, the best record
for any pitcher with at least seven decisions
in the Mariners’ home park.
Grant Balfour pitched the ninth for his
18th straight save to begin the season.
Nick Franklin hit a three-run homer for
Seattle, which has lost three straight and
five of six.
Hisashi Iwakuma (7-3) lost at home for
the first time this season, giving up four
runs and six hits — including three homers
— in seven innings. His home ERA rose
from 0.92 to 1.46.
The matchup between two of the American
League’s top starters turned into a relative
slugfest.
Iwakuma had never given up more than
two home runs in a game, and it was the first
time in 18 career home starts he allowed
more than one homer.
Franklin’s three-run shot against Colon
marked the first time the pitcher had allowed
a home run or more than two earned runs in a
game since May 14, before he started his
winning streak.
Cespedes gave Oakland a two-run lead in
the first inning with a shot that bounced off
the upper-deck railing above the left field
out-of-town scoreboard. It wasn’t the first
big hit Cespedes has had against Iwakuma
— he is 6 for 15 with three homers against
the Mariners’ starter.
Brendan Ryan singled with one out in the
third for the Mariners’ first hit, and after a
single by Endy Chavez, Franklin’s fourth
home run gave Seattle a 3-2 lead.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Marcell Ozuna hit a
go-ahead single in the eighth after tying it
with an RBI single in the sixth, and the
Miami Marlins beat the San Francisco
Giants 6-3 on Friday night for their ninth
straight win at AT&T Park.
Center fielder Ozuna also threw out Andres
Torres trying to stretch a sixth-inning dou-
ble into a triple. Torres left the game and
was having X-rays on his right knee after a
hard slide on the play.
Logan Morrison hit his first home run in
nearly a year and also had an RBI triple for
the Marlins, who haven’t lost in San
Francisco since July 28, 2010.
A.J. Ramos (1-2) pitched a 1-2-3 seventh
for his first major league win.
Pinch-hitter Greg Dobbs added an insur-
ance run-scoring single in the eighth, when
the Marlins rallied against Jake Dunning
(0-1).
Morrison was activated from the 60-day
disabled list June 9 after missing 11
months because of a knee injury that
required surgery on Sept. 5.
He connected for his first home run since
last July 6 leading off the second and tripled
in the sixth. He now has a four-game hit-
ting streak against the Giants.
Miami’s Ricky Nolasco was tagged for
nine hits — one below his season high —
and three runs in 5 2-3 innings. The right-
hander is still an impressive 4-0 with a
1.47 ERAin five career starts at AT&T Park,
but nearly doubled his ERA in the water-
front ballpark. Steve Cishek, the Marlins’
fourth reliever, allowed a pair of singles
before finishing for his 12th save in 14
opportunities.
San Francisco starter Tim Lincecum
retired 11 straight batters during one stretch
but wound up with a no-decision in one of
his better outings over the past month and
also hit a stand-up triple in the sixth to end
an 0-for-22 funk, sparking a roaring ova-
tion from the sellout crowd of 41,490.
SPORTS 13
Weekend • June 22-23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Michael Casey
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ISTANBUL — Spain showed why it is favored to win the
Under-20 World Cup, beating the United States 4-1 on
Friday in an opening game behind two goals each from star
strikers Jese and Gerard Deulofeu.
The Americans’ lone goal was scored by Luis Gil from
just outside the penalty area in the 77th minute.
France also turned in a strong game in the other Group A
match, scoring two second-half goals within four minutes
to defeat Ghana 3-1. France lost to Spain in the semifinals
of the Under-19 European Championship.
South Korea came from a goal down to beat tournament
newcomer Cuba 2-1 in the Group B opener. In other Group
B match, Portugal downed Nigeria 3-2 after squandering a
2-0 lead.
The Ghana-France match drew about 2,800 fans in a
50,000-seat stadium. Before the tournament, FIFA feared
slow sales, with only 300,000 of the 1.3 million tickets
sold.
Security has been stepped up at all seven sites following
weeks of sometimes violent protests. Riot police had
cracked down on environmental activists who opposed
plans to remove trees and develop Gezi Park in Istanbul.
But the protests this week have given way to peaceful
resistance, and there were no signs of protest at the Ghana-
France game.
Spain opened the scoring when Deulofeu fired a shot
across the goalmouth and Jese volleyed the ball into the
net in the fifth minute.
The Americans could have tied the score in the 13th
minute, but Joaquin Hernandez shot wide when faced with
an open net. The U.S. controlled the tempo for the next 15
minutes but could contain Spain’s strikers for only so
long.
Deulofeu received the ball outside the area, sidestepped a
defender and sent a blistering shot just beyond goalkeeper
Cody Cropper to make it 2-0 in the 42nd. The European
champions caught the defense sleeping two minutes later.
Javier Manquillo made a great run and passed to Jese,
who was lurking in the area. The Real Madrid striker scored
his second goal just before halftime.
Spain seemed to content to sit back for much of the sec-
ond half, but its counterattack again paid dividends.
FIFA: No plans to cancel Confed Cup amid protests
RIO DE JANEIRO — Soccer’s governing body has no
plans to cancel the Confederations Cup in Brazil despite
the violent anti-government protests spreading across the
country.
An estimated 1 million protesters took to the streets in
more than 80 cities on Thursday night in the biggest show
of anger yet against the government, which is being
accused of corruption, high prices and a lack of investment
in public services.
“At no stage, I repeat at no stage, has FIFA, the Local
Organizing Committee, nor the federal government dis-
cussed or considered canceling the Confederations Cup,”
said FIFAspokesman Pekka Odriozola.
U.S. routed 4-1 by Spain
at Under-20 World Cup
By Tim Reynolds
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MIAMI — Dwyane Wade was walk-
ing down the hallway toward the
Miami Heat locker room in the wee
hours of Friday morning, still in uni-
form and fussing with the new champi-
onship hat atop his head as his team
and their families were in the midst of
partying the night away.
He stopped briefly and assessed the
celebration.
“We’re getting pretty good at these,”
Wade said.
That’s understandable, the Heat are
getting plenty of practice at throwing
themselves end-of-season parties.
Four trips to the NBA Finals since
2006, three championships in that
span and with the last two titles com-
ing consecutively, it’s making the
decisions that the Heat and LeBron
James made three summers ago look
pretty smart.
By topping San Antonio in Game 7
of a back-and-forth NBA Finals on
Thursday, the Heat became the sixth
franchise in league history to win con-
secutive championships. It’s their
third title overall; only four clubs have
more. And for James, it capped two
seasons where he won all he could —
two regular-season MVPs, two titles,
two Finals MVPs, even an Olympic
gold medal.
“It feels great. This team is amazing.
And the vision that I had when I decid-
ed to come here is all coming true,”
James said. “Through adversity,
through everything we’ve been
through, we’ve been able to persevere
and to win back to back champi-
onships. It’s an unbelievable feeling.
I’m happy to be part of such a first-
class organization.”
James said winning his first title was
the toughest thing he’s ever done.
It’s now the second-toughest.
Defending the crown, he said, was
even more arduous. He was exhausted
when it was over — and still scored 37
points in the finale, more than he post-
ed in any other postseason game this
season.
“Believe in LeBron,” Heat President
Pat Riley said.
Miami did, all the way to the end.
The Heat rolled past Milwaukee in a
first-round sweep, needed five games to
oust Chicago in the second round, but
then went to the seven-game limit
against Indiana in the Eastern
Conference finals and then to the last
game again against the Spurs, who
actually were 21 seconds away from
ending the series in six games before
James and the Heat engineered a huge
rally.
Without that comeback, a champi-
onship-or-bust season would have
gone bust.
Instead, legacies were enhanced,
more trophies were hoisted, and
Miami’s place atop the NBAlandscape
was cemented.
“To be in the championship three
years in a row, to win two of those
three, is unbelievable,” Wade said.
“Everybody can’t get to the Finals and
win six in a row, like win six and not
lose one like Michael Jordan.
Everyone don’t do that. But we are
excited about the future of this organi-
zation. We are still a good team. And
we’re going to do everything we can to
make sure that we can stay competi-
tive.”
Heat, LeBron securing places in history
REUTERS
LeBron James, left, kisses the Larry
O’Brien trophy following Miami’s Game
7 win over the Spurs.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON — At least one company
yanked an endorsement deal from New
England Patriots
tight end Aaron
Hernandez on Friday
as puzzled family
members of a friend
found slain a mile
from Hernandez’s
home sought
answers about how
he died.
Police have
searched in and
around Hernandez’s sprawling home in
North Attleborough, not far from
where the Patriots practice, but a court
clerk said that as of Friday afternoon
no arrest warrants had been issued in
the case. The Bristol County district
attorney has not released any informa-
tion, other than saying the death of
semi-pro football player Odin Lloyd
was being treated as a homicide.
A jogger found Lloyd’s body in an
industrial park Monday. Family mem-
bers said Friday that Lloyd had been
dating Hernandez’s fiancee’s sister for
about two years.
They said the two men were friends
who were together the night Lloyd
died.
Police in nearby Providence, R.I.,
said they had assisted Massachusetts
state police and North Attleborough
police with activity related to the
Hernandez investigation at a strip club
named Club Desire.
It was unclear if they believed Lloyd
and Hernandez might have been at the
club in the days before Lloyd died.
A reporter was escorted out of the
club Friday afternoon before she could
speak with employees or patrons.
Family members have said Lloyd,
27, was never in trouble.
“I want the person that killed my son
to be brought to justice,” said Lloyd’s
mother, Ursula Ward.
Family seeks answers in death near Hernandez home
Aaron
Hernandez
SPORTS 14
Weekend • June 22-23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
continued from part 1 In Redwood City, any home built prior to 1940 before being developed, must
first go through a historic review to see if there has been an interesting history and a design which
would need to be preserved. This can certainly affect the value of the property if it’s deemed to have
historic significance. I just listed a 1910 built farmhouse style home which is in very rough condition
and may not be salvageable. Nevertheless, if there is any historic significance, it would definitely affect
www.UNrealestate.info
A blog dedicated to UNreal events in Real Estate
Historic, UN-Historic or Hysteric? Part 2
John King has been serving home sellers and buyers on The Peninsula and Silicon Valley for almost 30 years.
Top 1% of Keller Williams agents.
the ability to build a new home in its
place, despite its condition.
It is difficult to ascertain whether the
historic designation actually has an
impact though. Recently, the Juana
Briones home in Palo Alto was
allowed to be razed after many years
of dispute between the owners, the
city and preservationists. There have
also been a number of
ultra-contemporary homes being built
amongst 100 year old homes and that
provides quite a contrast in an older,
established neighborhood. The moral
is that when purchasing a home that
was built over 60 years ago, check out
the possibility of historical
significance, otherwise you might be
hysterical later!
The Heat still look like a chemistry
experiment-in-progress some nights, a
collection of Type-Apersonalities waiting
for their cue to take over. James was reluc-
tant to do so at first, because his personali-
ty — as has been endlessly dissected —
reflects Magic Johnson’s pass-first
demeanor more than Michael Jordan’s
shoot-always attitude.
But as James reminded everyone at the
end of both Game 6, when the Spurs first
dared him to drive the ball to the basket,
then Game 7, when his defender laid back
and dared James to shoot from the perime-
ter, scoring is not a problem. Even if those
long and mid-range jumpers were not
among his strengths before this season
began.
“I put a lot of work into my game over
the offseason and to come out here and see
the results happen on the floor,” he said,
“is the ultimate.”
Amid all the celebrating, Heat president
Pat Riley said he would do his best to bring
everybody back, perhaps because he still
owns the trademark to the term “Three-
peat” dating to his days as coach of the Los
Angeles Lakers.
“I just want this thing to keep going.
I’m at an age right now where I’m ready to,
you know, fly off somewhere. But I’m not
going to, because the good lord has
blessed me with a team that’s allowed me to
grab onto his coattails, for as long as they
want to be together. ”
One storyline that underpinned the
Finals, but didn’t warrant much discussion
until the trophy presentation began, was
the impending retirement of NBAcommis-
sioner David Stern.
Stern couldn’t help patting himself on
the back, noting that the Finals were being
broadcast in 217 countries and 47 different
languages after his 30 years of promoting
the game worldwide. You have to wonder,
though, whether secretly he wasn’t hoping
to hand over the hardware to the Spurs at
least one more time.
These Finals were about opposing strate-
gies on how to build a dominant franchise
in the post-Jordan era. The Spurs, a small-
market operation that built through the
draft and filled out their ranks with a few
shrewd pickups, are a marvel of consisten-
cy. They’re coached by Gregg Popovich,
who’s learned to get by with less and maxi-
mize every shot he gets.
The Heat were convenient villains, fair
or not, for skipping most of the prelimi-
naries and assembling the core of the team
with little more than a checkbook. James’
move to Miami touched off free-agent envy
among his superstar brethren — everybody
wanted to be a part of a Big Three some-
where — and the rest of the league is still
scrambling to put one together as formida-
ble as Riley’s troika in Miami.
That’s what made the Spurs’ fold-up-and-
crumple act in the last two games dispirit-
ing. It’s also why Tim Duncan did his best
to not go gently into that good night,
slamming his palm on the court — a rare
show of emotion — after missing a bunny
hook that would have tied the game with
50 seconds left.
He broke up trying to answer which of
the last two losses would haunt him most.
“For me, Game 7,” Duncan began.
“Missing a layup to tie the game. ...
Making a bad decision down the stretch. ...
Unable to stop Dwyane and LeBron.
“For me,” he said finally, haltingly,
“Game 7 will always haunt me.”
It’s not just that Duncan knows his
advancing age will make even a return to
the Finals a Herculean task — again. It’s
more that the Spurs, for all the things
they’ve done right throughout a sneaky-
good decade run, have almost certainly
exhausted their chances.
The Heat, on the other hand — especially
if James continues to improve season after
season as convincingly as he has — may
just be finding their stride.
Continued from page 11
LITKE
first four games.
The series resumes on Saturday night in
Chicago, with the rest of league’s coach-
ing fraternity enjoying the chess match
between two of its most accomplished
members.
“What has been fun to watch is, nei-
ther guy is hoping for chemistry to
develop,” St. Louis Blues coach Ken
Hitchcock said. “They’re not sitting on
a combination. They’re moving guys
around to try to find something and their
proactive approaches have been one of
the great things about the series.”
Quenneville’s team appeared to be in
trouble heading into Game 4. The Bruins
controlled the last part of a 2-1 overtime
victory in Game 2, stealing home-ice
advantage from Chicago, and shut down
the Blackhawks in a 2-0 victory Monday
night that put Boston up 2-1 in the finals.
Looking for an offensive spark,
Quenneville put captain Jonathan Toews
back on the same line with Patrick Kane
ahead of Game 4. Toews responded with
his second goal of the playoffs, and Kane
had a goal and an assist.
The Blackhawks’ defensemen also were
more active in the offensive zone, with
Brent Seabrook scoring the winning goal.
Shortly after the series-tying victory,
Quenneville still managed to poke fun at
himself when asked about putting Toews
and Kane together again.
“Maybe it looks like I didn’t know what
I was doing,” he said with a chuckle.
The moment of levity in the middle of a
taut series was a prime example of why
Quenneville has been so successful in his
third stint as a head coach in the NHL.
“I think he’s always been the same guy, ”
defenseman Duncan Keith said. “I think
you always know what you’re going to get
with him and I think that’s probably the
biggest thing for us, why we have success.
He’s level-headed, brings that even-keel
attitude to the team.”
The Bruins were struggling on the sec-
ond night of the series when Julien put
Chris Kelly, Daniel Paille and Tyler
Seguin together on the same line, and they
were responsible for both of Boston’s
goals in a victory that gave the Bruins a
split of the first two games in Chicago.
“I think Claude has always been leading
the same way and kind of coaching the
same way,” center Patrice Bergeron said. “I
think a little adjustment during the series
is a little different because you’re playing
the same team over and over again. So it’s
about little tweaks here and there and I
think the whole coaching staff is good at
that.”
Boston has made it to the playoffs in
each of Julien’s six seasons in charge, and
two more victories would make it two
Stanley Cup titles in three seasons. It also
won it all in 2011, coming back to beat
Vancouver in seven games after losing the
first two of the series.
Continued from page 11
CUP
SPORTS 15
Weekend • June 22-23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Tim Dahlberg
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Paulie
Malignaggi is as good with his
mouth as he is with his fists, so
proficient when talking about the
sweet science that Showtime uses
him as a commentator when he is
not in the ring.
Adrien Broner isn’t a bad talker
himself, though much of what he
says couldn’t even be repeated on
late night cable. It’s his punching
that speaks louder, and he has
developed a reputation as a knock-
out artist while winning titles at
junior lightweight and light-
weight and beating everyone put
in front of him.
The two meet Saturday night
when Broner moves up two weight
classes to challenge Malignaggi
in his hometown for his 147-
pound title in an intriguing fight
that headlines another card at the
Barclays Center, fast becoming a
place for boxing.
“You always strive to get to
fights like this,” Malignaggi said.
“That’s what we live for as fight-
ers. You dream of that moment so
it’s a motivating factor to be a part
of something like this.”
If that wasn’t enough motiva-
tion, Malignaggi can get more
from the prefight buildup, where
he and Broner talked a lot of trash
and Broner went so far as to call
Malignaggi’s ex-girlfriend at one
appearance and claim her as his
“sweetheart.”
“It’s gotten a little bit crazy,
we’ll admit that,” Malignaggi
said. “I can only apologize for my
end but at the end of the day, this is
how the creation of Adrien Broner
happened. They put everything
that’s wrong with boxing in one
room, did everything that’s wrong
with boxing in that room, and
gave birth to Adrien Broner. ”
Both fighters have a lot riding
on the bout. Through most of his
12-year career, Malignaggi has
been viewed mostly as a talented
boxer who doesn’t have enough
power for big fights. He wants a
victory that will define him before
he hangs up the gloves and moves
into broadcasting on a more full-
time basis.
Broner, on the other hand, is a
brash knockout artist who sees
himself as the next Floyd
Mayweather Jr. — only better.
“I mean in boxing if it isn’t
Adrien Broner or Floyd
Mayweather then I don’t really see
anybody,” Broner said. “He
(Malignaggi) wouldn’t be a world
champion if he wasn’t somebody,
but at the end of the day he’s fight-
ing Adrien Broner and I will be the
ruler of boxing in about a year or
two.”
Malignaggi appeared on the
downside of his career after losses
to the likes of Ricky Hatton and
Amir Khan, but revived it when he
traveled to Ukraine last April and
upset hometown fighter
Vyacheslav Senchenko, who was
previously unbeaten, with a ninth
round stoppage to win a piece of
the welterweight title.
He defended it with a split deci-
sion over Pablo Cesar Cano in
October at Barclays, a fight in
which he was down in the 11t h
round. Now he faces the big
punching Broner, who has
stopped 22 opponents in winning
all 26 of his fights.
“He’s a little guy and he’s going
to see how overrated his power
is,” Malignaggi said. “I think
they were better off letting him
fight a lightweight or someone
below that. He’s fighting this big-
ger guy all in one jump so I don’t
think that was the most intelli-
gent move on his team’s part.”
Done talking, now Malignaggi
and Broner must actually box
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 43 32 .573 —
Washington 37 36 .507 5
Philadelphia 35 39 .473 7 1/2
New York 29 41 .414 11 1/2
Miami 24 49 .329 18
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 47 27 .635 —
Pittsburgh 44 30 .595 3
Cincinnati 44 31 .587 3 1/2
Chicago 30 42 .417 16
Milwaukee 30 42 .417 16
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 40 33 .548 —
San Diego 38 36 .514 2 1/2
San Francisco 37 36 .507 3
Colorado 37 38 .493 4
Los Angeles 30 42 .417 9 1/2
Friday’s Games
Chicago Cubs 3, Houston 1
Washington 2, Colorado 1
N.Y. Mets 4, Philadelphia 3
Milwaukee 2, Atlanta 0
Texas 6, St. Louis 4
Arizona 11, Cincinnati 5
Pittsburgh 5, L.A. Angels 2
San Diego 5, L.A. Dodgers 2
Miami 6, San Francisco 3
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 45 31 .592 —
Baltimore 42 32 .568 2
New York 40 33 .548 3 1/2
Tampa Bay 38 36 .514 6
Toronto 36 36 .500 7
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 40 32 .556 —
Cleveland 37 35 .514 3
Kansas City 34 37 .479 5 1/2
Minnesota 33 37 .471 6
Chicago 30 41 .423 9 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 44 32 .579 —
Texas 42 32 .568 1
Los Angeles 33 41 .446 10
Seattle 32 43 .427 11 1/2
Houston 28 47 .373 15 1/2
Friday’sGames
Chicago Cubs 3, Houston 1
Cleveland 5, Minnesota 1
N.Y.Yankees 6,Tampa Bay 2
Toronto 7, Baltimore 6
Boston 10, Detroit 6
Chicago White Sox 9, Kansas City 1
Texas 6, St. Louis 4
Pittsburgh 5, L.A. Angels 2
AMERICAN LEAGUE
@Colorado
CSN-CAL
6/15
@D.C.United
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/22
vs.Galaxy
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/29
@Chicago
5:30p.m.
CSN-PLUS
7/3
@NERev
4:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/6
vs.Seattle
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/13
vs.Padres
12:45p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/19
vs.Marlins
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/20
@Texas
5:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/19
vs.Marlins
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/21
vs.Marlins
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/22
vs.Marlins
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/23
@Texas
11:05a.m.
CSN-CAL
6/20
@Mariners
7:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/21
@Mariners
7:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/22
@Mariners
1:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/23
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
BOSTON RED SOX—Signed C Jon Denney, LHP
Corey Littrell, LHP Jake Drehoff, LHP Gabe Speier
and OF Jordon Austin to minor league contracts.
CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Recalled RHP Brian
Omogrosso from Charlotte (IL).Optioned RHP De-
unte Heath to Charlotte.
DETROITTIGERS—DesignatedRHPJoseValverde
for assignment.RecalledRHPAl Alburquerquefrom
Toledo (IL). Placed OF Matt Tuiasosopo on the 15-
day DL. Recalled OF Avisail Garcia from Toledo.
KANSASCITYROYALS—Signed LHP Sean Man-
aea to a minor league contract.
LOSANGELESANGELS—PlacedLHPJasonVargas
on the 15-day DL, retroactive to June 18. Recalled
RHP Billy Buckner from Salt Lake City (PCL).
NEWYORKYANKEES—Selected the contract INF
Alberto Gonzalez from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.Re-
leased INF Reid Brignac. Acquired RHP Yoshinori
Tateyama from Texas for future considerations and
assigned him to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. Assigned
OF Corey Patterson and LHP Mike Zagurski to
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.
TEXASRANGERS—Activated 1B Mitch Moreland
from the 15-day DL.Optioned RHP Josh Lindblom
to Round Rock (PCL).
National League
ATLANTABRAVES—Placed INF Ramiro Pena on
the 15-day DL.Recalled INF Paul Janish from Gwin-
nett (NL).
CHICAGOCUBS—Traded INF-OF Brent Lillibridge
to the New York Yankees for a player to be named
or cash considerations.
NEWYORK METS—Placed LHP Jonathon Niese
on the 15-day DL, Recalled RHP Greg Burke from
Las Vegas (PCL).
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES—Activated 2B Chase
Utley from the 15-day DL.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Signed RHP Neil
Kozikowski and RHP Henry Hirsh to minor league
contracts.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Agreed to terms
with RHP Nicholas Pivetta, RHP John Simms and
RHP Andrew Cooper on minor league contracts.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
SACRAMENTOKINGS—Named Mike Bratz assis-
tant general manager.
Women’sNational Basketball Association
INDIANAFEVER—Signed F Jasmine Hassell as a
replacement player.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
DALLASCOWBOYS—Signed TE Gavin Escobar.
HOCKEY
National HockeyLeague
DALLASSTARS—Named Lindy Ruff coach.
NEWYORK RANGERS—Named Alain Vigneault
coach.
TRANSACTIONS
16
Weekend • June 22-23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
REAL ESTATE
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By Jocelyn Noveck
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Might there be a real-life zombie apoca-
lypse one day? Not likely, but then again,
the way zombies have chomped their way
into our pop culture the last several years,
it’s maybe a bit less implausible than it once
was.
What IS increasingly quite plausible,
alas, is a scary global pandemic, and “World
War Z,” the long-awaited Brad Pitt thriller,
cleverly melds that real-life threat into the
more fanciful zombie premise. Talk about
more bang for your buck: Once you’ve set-
tled back into your seat after a good snarling
zombie chase, there’s nothing like the
thought of a SARS outbreak to get the
blood racing again.
But let’s just say right here that
the one apocalypse you won’t
see in “World War Z,” based on
the 2006 novel by Max
Brooks (son of Mel), is
an artistic one.
There was lots
of talk
about this mega-budget
3D movie, co-produced
by Pitt and directed by
Marc Forster, falling on
its $200-million plus
feet, what with a post-
poned release, a re-shot
ending, endless script
drafts and major crew
changes along the way.
But in the end, it’s pret-
ty much what you’d want in a summer block-
buster: scary but not-too-gross zombies, a
fast-paced journey to exotic locales, a few
quite thrilling action scenes, and did we men-
tion Brad Pitt?
Oh right, we did. Surely this isn’t a per-
formance to rival Pitt’s work in
“Moneyball” or “The Tree of Life,” but given
the lack of time for nuanced character devel-
opment, it hardly seems meant to be. What
Pitt offers the film is pretty much what his
character, a level-headed former U.N. inves-
tigator, offers the endangered planet:
Nothing too flashy, just a comfortable, intel-
ligent presence that keeps things grounded
and just might win the day.
That last part, of course, remains to be
Walk with a Doc
Walk with a Doc encourages
healthy physical activity for
county residents of all ages. Enjoy
a one-hour walk with physician
volunteers and ask questions
about general health topics along
the way. A program of the San
Mateo County Medical
Association’s Community Service
Foundation.The walk is 10 a.m.
Saturday at San Mateo Central
Park, 50 E. Fifth Ave., San Mateo.
Free.
San Mateo
Radio Club Field Day
See an amateur radio station
operating under emergency field
conditions at one of the largest
emergency preparedness
exercises in the country.The
event is 1:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m.
Beresford Park Picnic Shelter, 27th
Avenue and Parkview Way, San
Mateo. www.w6uq.org. Free.
The San Mateo
Buddhist Temple Bazaar
Enjoy Japanese and American
food, game booths, bingo and
entertainment. Admission is free
but food and game prices vary.
The event is 3 p.m.-9 p.m.
Saturday and 11 a.m.-8 p.m.
Sunday at the San Mateo
Buddhist Temple, 2 S. Claremont
St., San Mateo. 342-2541 or
sanmateobuddhisttemple.
Belmont concert series
Highwater Blues is the second of
the seven Belmont Summer
Concerts. Danceable rhythm and
blues.The show is 1 p.m.-4 p.m.
Sunday at Twin Pines Meadow,
Belmont. Admission is free and
refreshments sold. 595-7441.
Best bets
Summer trip
San Juan Island
National Historical Park
SEE PAGE 18
Bonds of home
Pitt and his zombies entertain
‘W.W.Z.’
is killer
By Sandy Cohen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Looks
like some (undead) body has
been hitting the treadmill.
The zombies in “World War
Z” move with Carl Lewis
speed and a swarm-like men-
tality inspired in part by rabid
dogs, furthering the eternal fan
debate over whether the walk-
ing dead should actually run.
Traditionalists — fans of
George Romero’s 1968 horror
classic “Night of the Living
Dead” — prefer their zombies
slow and lumbering. But mod-
ern incarnations of the undead
are often more agile.
“Some people think slow-
moving zombies aren’t that
much of a threat, because
‘World War Z’ shows speedy undead
By Carly Bertolozzi
I
recently received a friend
request on Facebook from
my sophomore English
teacher. After accepting the
request, I noticed that the only
past teachers I am now “friends”
with on Facebook are my English
teachers. I found this amusing
since English is my favorite sub-
ject and writing
is a passion of
mine, hence I
am writing to
you all now.
Yet it is the
subject I strug-
gled to receive
distinguished
grades in
amongst all
others. But then I began to think,
maybe that’s why. Maybe my
struggle with the subject and my
passion for some aspects of it are
why I feel as if, over the years,
the teachers I have had the best
relationships with are my English
teachers.
I have been incredibly lucky to
have relationships with a few of
my teachers that span beyond ask-
ing questions about last night’s
homework and checking up on my
grade. Many of them have given
me advice about friendships or
tips for job interviews, helped me
discover the kind of person I want
to be in the future, and aided me in
my continuous efforts to get
there.
As a recent high school gradu-
ate, I have seen emotion after
emotion in the past month.
Friends lament the fact that their
childhood friend will soon reside
in a different country, the senior
class as a whole realizes that they
will likely never see again the
people who have surrounded them
since elementary school and mid-
dle school. Afew fortunate stu-
dents say goodbye to faculty
members who have supported and
nurtured them almost as much as
their parents. No matter the expe-
riences and efforts you have over-
come in high school, there is
always one bond that the move to
college will make you sincerely
miss.
Graduating means we have sur-
vived high school and are off to
bigger and better things, but it
also means we have two to three
months to think about our lives.
What will living on our own be
Pitt tries to
build better
blockbuster
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Brad Pitt want-
ed to build a better blockbuster.
During the years Hollywood
shifted toward increasingly bigger
spectacles and superhero tent-
poles, one of the movies’ biggest
stars largely stayed on the side-
lines, focusing instead on ambi-
tious ensembles (“The Tree of
Life,” “Inglourious Basterds”)
and unlikely dramas
(”Moneyball”).
But the zombie apocalypse
“World War Z,” which opens
Friday, is Pitt’s bold, long-gestat-
Brad Pitt
See W.W.Z., Page 19
See PITT, Page 19
See SPEED, Page 19
See STUDENT, Page 19
18
Weekend • June 22-23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEEKEND JOURNAL
EXPIRES: June 30, 2013
JACK’S RESTAURANT & BAR: SAN BRUNO
1050 Admiral Court, Suite A
San Bruno, CA 94066
Phone: (650) 589-2222 | Fax: (650) 589-5042
iLoveJacks.com
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
A PIG AND POTATOES BRING COUNTRIES TO
THE BRINK OF WAR: WASHINGTON STATE’S SAN
JUAN ISLAND HOLDS ONE OF AMERICAN HISTO-
RY’S MOST FASCINATING FOOTNOTES. It started
with a hungry pig and ended in a 12-year standoff between
the mighty British Empire and the young United States.
Today, San Juan Island, which lies between Vancouver
Island and the North American mainland, is an important
tourist destination, celebrated for its verdant beauty and
known for its sea kayaking and orca whale watching. But in
1859, it was the center of an international border dispute
resulting from an ambiguity in The Oregon Treaty of 1846,
which had set the boundary between the United States and
British North America. Both sides claimed San Juan Island
and tensions grew. Then, on June 15, 1859, an American
settler shot and killed a British-owned pig that was rooting
in his potato garden. When the British sought to arrest the
settler, the 25 American citizens on the island objected and
requested U.S. military protection. It arrived on July 27,
1859, when a 66-man unit of the Ninth U.S. Infantry under
Capt. George E. Pickett (later of Civil War fame) landed on
the southeast corner of the island and established what is
now designated “American Camp.” On March 21, 1860,
British Royal Marines landed on the island’s northwest
coast and established “English Camp.” Forces built up on
both sides but no shots were fired. Ultimately the dispute
was resolved by the signing of the Treaty of Washington in
1871, which
referred the
matter to
K a i s e r
Wilhelm I of
Germany who
in October of
1872 found
in favor of
the United
States. The
British aban-
doned their camp in November 1872, while the American
camp was disbanded in July 1874. Both camp sites are
included in San Juan Island National Historical Park, also
known as American and English Camps, San Juan Island, a
U.S. National Historical Park owned and operated by the
National Park Service.
OH, AND DID YOU KNOW? The British Camp is the
only part of a United States national park that commemo-
rates a British military site and the only one that flies the
British Union Flag.
MORE ABOUT SAN JUAN ISLAND’S CIVIL WAR
CONNECTIONS. San Juan Island National Historical Park
explores the relationships between the American Civil War
and the San Juan Islands with Connections: The Far West
and Civil War, a series of free lectures and performances at
the San Juan Island Library and San Juan Community
Theatre. The library programs take place at 7 p.m. on July
20, Aug. 2, 10 and 17, and at 7:30 p.m. on Aug. 3. The Life
and Times of General George Pickett, now in its 16th year,
commemorates the sesquicentennial of Pickett’s Charge
with a special July 3 production at the San Juan Community
Theatre, with a second show Aug. 7. Call the park at (360)
378-2240, ext. 2227 or 2233; the theatre at (360) 378-
3210; or the San Juan Island Library at (360) 378-2798 for
information.
ON ISLAND. San Juan Island may be reached by the
Washington State Ferry system or by plane (float plane
included). The San Juan Island National Historical Park is a
day-use only area with no camping permitted. The charming
waterfront town of Friday Harbor nearby offers a range of
accommodations. Ashort walk from the ferry terminal is the
Island Inn at 123 West, a modern, state of the art boutique
hotel offering panoramic views of the harbor. Abit inland is
the restored 1907 veranda-wrapped Kirk House Bed &
Breakfast, set in 2/3 acres of landscaped grounds on the
edge of Friday Harbor’s town center.
GOOD EATS IN FRIDAY HARBOR. Seafood and local
produce are always on the menu at Coho Restaurant, in an
historic Craftsman House three blocks from the ferry land-
ing in Friday Harbor. House specialties include Shrimp and
Pistachio Encrusted Halibut with Shiitake Mushroom, Kale
Quinoa Cake and Grilled Asparagus, or Wild Troll Caught
King Salmon with Wild Rice and Chickpea Socca, Roasted
Summer Squash and Heirloom Tomato Salsa. Desserts
include the Coho Trio, a house specialty of Creme Brulee,
Chocolate Pot au Crème and Fruit Crisp. 120 Nichols St.
Friday Harbor, Wash. 360) (378-6330. www.cohorestau-
rant.com.
AND REMEMBER: To be anonymous and travelling in
an interesting place is an intoxication. — Paul Theroux.
san Cohn is a member of the North American Travel Journalists
Association and Bay Area Travel Writers. She may be reached at
susan@smdailyjournal.com.
SUSAN COHN/DAILY JOURNAL
Visitors look down on the blockhouse and formal garden at
English Camp on the edge of Garrison Bay,part of the San Juan
Island National Historical Park in the State of Washington.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 19
Weekend • June 22-23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
like? How difficult will it be to move
to a different city knowing very few
people, or none at all? Is moving
away from your parents really that
liberating? Or, will we be so wrapped
up in the intriguing, new and simply
fun things at college that we’ll com-
pletely forget about what we have left
behind?
When I think of what’s ahead and
what I’ll leave behind in good old
Belmont I think of the bonds I’ve
made. I am lucky enough to have a
close relationship with my parents,
friends that I would move mountains
for, and previous teachers who I cher-
ish. So when you move to a new city,
a new school and a new home how do
you replace those aspects of your life?
I will never have a similar friendship
to the one I have with my best friend,
a girl who was one of my first friends
in kindergarten. I doubt I will ever
have the chance to become acquainted
with a college professor enough for
him or her to provide me with person-
al advice. And, even though I give
“too much attitude” and my room is
“never clean,” I couldn’t live without
my parents’ love and support.
So, my conclusion is this: College
is an amazing time for anyone; it’s
there that you really learn who you are
and what you want to do with your
life, or so I’m told. Make amazing
friends, experience new things, but
always try to keep the bonds that
you’ve previously made intact. This
doesn’t mean become preoccupied
with what’s going on at home, but the
people you leave behind helped you
get to where you are today, so even
though you may be miles, states or
even countries away never let time
and silence push you farther apart.
Carly Bertolozzi is a recent graduate at
Carlmont High School. Student News
appears in the weekend edition. You can
email Student News at news@smdailyjour-
nal.com.
Continued from page 17
STUDENT
seen: The filmmakers hope “World War
Z” is just the first in a franchise. And
so, the story may have a long way to
go.
But the beginning — especially the
first half of this movie — is promis-
ing. As fans of the book know, it was
written as an oral history, a collection
of individual accounts. The filmmakers
wisely ditched that format for the sake
of immediacy.
We begin in Philadelphia, on a
sunny morning in the kitchen of Gerry
Lane (Pitt), his wife Karin (Mireille
Enos, expressive well beyond her few
lines), and their two daughters. We
learn quickly that Gerry has abandoned
his former harrowing work — investi-
gating crimes in places like Rwanda,
Bosnia and Liberia — in favor of a nice
home life.
As the family drives off for the day,
though, life changes in an instant. The
streets of Philadelphia are suddenly
and terrifyingly overrun by packs of
wild, raging zombies. Once bit, it
takes only seconds for a human to turn
into one.
Talk about a leadership vacuum: The
president is already dead. Thanks to
his former U.N. boss, Gerry’s family is
whisked to an aircraft carrier, but
there’s a wee price for this protection:
Gerry must head out to find the source
of the outbreak.
For an hour, the action is swift:
Clues gathered at a prison complex in
North Korea lead Gerry to Israel, the
only country to have smartly
employed the use of walls, artificial
and ancient. But then those persistent
zombies stretch themselves into a
teeming, terrifying tower of un-
humanity. Gerry escapes just in time
— for a seriously harrowing plane-
crash sequence.
The final act takes place on a dramat-
ically smaller scale, and at a slower
pace. Not to give away too much, but
this is where Gerry’s scientific
instincts — and that Brad Pitt calm —
will come into play.
It’s worth noting that there are, amid
the mayhem, occasional touches of
humor. And one of them serves as a
prudent reminder — to turn off those
cellphones. After all, it’s not just your
movie-going partner you’ll annoy
here.
Cellphones also happen to awaken
zombies. Consider yourself warned.
“World War Z,” a Paramount Pictures
release, is rated PG-13 for intense
frightening zombie sequences, vio-
lence and disturbing images. Running
time: 116 minutes. Three stars out of
four.
Continued from page 17
W.W.Z.
ing, big-budget effort to enter the fran-
chise fray. It’s his attempt to engineer
not just a disaster thrill ride like
1974’s “The Towering Inferno” (a
beloved film to Pitt, who saw it repeat-
edly as a kid growing up in Missouri),
but to make a thought-provoking
action flick filled with geopolitical
questions.
It’s been a humbling crusade.
“These films are much more difficult
than I realized,” Pitt said in a recent
interview over coffee at a restaurant off
Times Square.
Based on the 2006 sci-fi novel
“World War Z: An Oral History of the
Zombie War” by Max Brooks (son of
Mel), the $200 million-plus film has
had a rocky path to theaters. It’s gone
through a swarm of screenwriters, sev-
eral key crew changes, a postponed
release date and, most notably, a
reshot ending.
But most moviegoers that make it to
the film — far from the flop many pre-
dicted — will likely wonder what all
the fuss was about. As Pitt’s producing
partner Dede Gardner points out, no
one ever says: “Honey, let’s go to this
movie this Friday. I swear it was on-
budget and on-schedule.”
The reviews have largely been posi-
tive for “World War Z,” a riveting,
brisk thriller with a refreshingly —
and, for summer movies, atypically —
human protagonist who relies purely
on his intellect and experience as he
shuttles around the world trying to
solve the zombie pandemic that’s
engulfed most of the planet. Pitt’s for-
mer United Nations investigator has
no superpowers, no gun, and as Pitt
says, “can’t even run that fast.”
It may sound paradoxical, but
though “World War Z” is awash with
gruesome hordes of snarling zombies,
it is — alongside Superman and
Godzilla-sized sea monsters — one of
the most human-scaled blockbusters of
the summer.
While Hollywood awaits the film’s
box office performance with bated
breath, Pitt is confident. He’s shaped
the film as a producer since his produc-
tion company, Plan B, acquired the
book rights in 2006.
“I know it works,” the 49-year-old
actor says. “I know everyone involved
is going to be happy. It’s just a ques-
tion of how happy. We’re proud of it.
When you get involved with a film like
this at this scale, at this cost, there’s
more responsibility to meet that num-
ber immediately.”
Not unlike his character, Pitt has
been flying around the world to pro-
mote “World War Z.” He spent Father’s
Day with his family, but at 40,000
feet, he says. “I’ve got a few countries
to go,” he says with a grin.
Though he acknowledges the film
has been “a learning experience,” he’s
upbeat, repeatedly citing the “good
fun” of making a big movie for the
multiplexes. Adapting the book — a
series of first-person dispatches from
around the globe — required not just
finding a narrative drive to the story,
but capturing the novel’s theorizing of
how self-interested nations would fare
in a global catastrophe.
Continued from page 17
PITT
they’re pretty easy to maneuver
against,” said Roger Ma, author of
“The Zombie Combat Manual: AGuide
to Fighting the Living Dead.” “I’m
more a fan of the slow-moving genre,
and that’s how I approach the strategy
in my book. Fast-moving zombies
present a whole new host of issues you
have to deal with.”
Films such as “Dawn of the Dead”
and “28 Days Later” have also shown
more lithe living dead. Romero blamed
the shift to swift-footed undead on
video games.
“It makes sense if you think about it.
Those games are all about hand-eye
coordination and how quickly can you
get them before they get you. So the
zombies have to keep coming at you,
crawling over the walls and across the
ceiling,” he told Vanity Fair in 2010.
“I still don’t agree with it. If zombies
are dead, how can they move fast? My
guys don’t run. They never have and
they never will. They’re just lumber-
ing oafs that are easy to dispose of
unless you make a mistake. Those are
the rules, and I’ll stick with what I’ve
got.”
In the Brad Pitt thriller opening
Friday, those infected with the zombie
virus move slowly until they detect
prey. Inspired by images of attack
dogs and feeding insects, filmmakers
said they wanted to honor the zombie
genre, but also “try to do something
new and different.”
Director Marc Forster likens the
movement of “World War Z” zombies
to “the way flocks of birds or fish or
ants move together. ”
“I thought it would be interesting
to see these zombies, who have no
intellect since they are the walking
dead, react in this swarm mentality, ”
he said. “When the feeding frenzy
starts, it’s almost like a shark that
smells blood. In the moment they
sense that there’s something to
attack, they will just go for it.”
Pitt plays a former United Nations
investigator searching for the source
of the worldwide plague that turns peo-
ple into athletically inclined zombies
that can scale walls and overtake cities
in minutes. Soldiers shoot down some
of the zombies, but without a weapon,
humans don’t stand much of a fighting
chance.
“With fast-movers, you really lose
the ability to strategize, both from an
individual perspective and an agency,
law enforcement or government per-
spective,” said Ma, whose book deals
with fighting zombies without guns.
“You don’t have time to think. That’s
the most challenging thing with the
fast movers.”
But can devotees of traditional
depictions of the undead appreciate the
sportier zombies of today?
“It’s always great to see zombies,”
Ma said. “As a fan, we’ll take whatever
we can get. Fast moving, slow mov-
ing... as long as the story is good,
there’s a place for both.”
Continued from page 17
SPEED
Food Network won’t
renew Deen’s contract
By Russ Bynum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAVANNAH, Ga. — The Food Network said Friday it’s
dumping Paula Deen, barely an hour after the celebrity cook
posted the first of two videotaped apologies online begging
forgiveness from fans and critics troubled by her admission
to having used racial slurs in the past.
The 66-year-old Savannah kitchen celebrity has been
swamped in controversy since court documents filed this
week revealed Deen told an attorney questioning her under
oath last month that she has used the N-word. “Yes, of
course,” Deen said, though she added, “It’s been a very long
time.”
The Food Network, which made Deen a star with “Paula’s
Home Cooking” in 2002 and later “Paula’s Home Cooking”
in 2008, weighed in with a terse statement Friday after-
noon.
“Food Network will not renew Paula Deen’s contract when
it expires at the end of this month,” the statement said.
Network representatives declined further comment. Arepre-
sentative for Deen did not immediately return phone and
email messages seeking comment on the decision.
The news came as Deen worked to repair the damage to her
image, which has spawned a vast empire of cookbooks, a
bimonthly cooking magazine, a full line of cookware, food
items like spices and even furniture.
She abruptly canceled a scheduled interview on NBC’s
“Today” show Friday morning, instead opting for a direct
appeal via online video — one that allowed her and her staff
complete control of what she said and how she said it.
“Inappropriate, hurtful language is totally, totally unac-
ceptable,” Deen said in the first 45-second video posted on
YouTube. “I’ve made plenty of mistakes along the way but I
beg you, my children, my team, my fans, my partners - I
beg for your forgiveness.”
Deen adopted a solemn tone as she looked straight into
the camera. Still, her recorded apology featured three obvi-
ous edits — with the picture quickly fading out between
splices — during a statement just five sentences long.
It was soon scrapped and replaced with a second video of
Deen talking unedited for nearly two minutes as she insists:
“Your color of your skin, your religion, your sexual prefer-
ence does not matter to me.”
“”I want people to understand that my family and I are not
the kind of people that the press is wanting to say we are,”
Deen says in the later video. “The pain has been tremendous
that I have caused to myself and to others.”
Deen never mentions Food Network or its decision to
drop her in either of her online videos.
Deen initially planned to give her first interview on the
controversy Friday to the “Today” show, which promoted
her scheduled appearance as a live exclusive. Instead, host
Matt Lauer ended up telling viewers that Deen’s representa-
tives pulled the plug because she was exhausted after her
flight to New York. Deen said in her video she was “physi-
cally not able” to appear.
Court records show Deen sat down for a deposition May
17 in a discrimination lawsuit filed last year by a former
employee who managed Uncle Bubba’s Seafood and Oyster
House, a Savannah restaurant owned by Deen and her broth-
er, Bubba Hiers. The ex-employee, Lisa Jackson, says she
was sexually harassed and worked in a hostile environment
rife with innuendo and racial slurs.
During the deposition, Deen was peppered with questions
about her racial attitudes. At one point she’s asked if she
thinks jokes using the N-word are “mean.” Deen says jokes
often target minority groups and “I can’t, myself, determine
what offends another person.”
REUTERS FILE PHOTO
Food Network personality Paula Deen laughs before
throwing out the first pitch prior to the Washington Nationals
versus New York Mets on May 19.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Weekend • June 22-23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SATURDAY, JUNE 22
Sen. Jerry Hill Launches ‘Mobile
Officer Hours’ at Half Moon Bay
Farmers’ Market. 9:30 a.m. to 10:30
a.m. Coastside Farmers’ Market, 225
Cabrillo Highway. Free. For more
information email
leslie.quevarra@sen.ca.gov.
Walk with a Doc.10 a.m. Central Park,
50 E. Fifth Ave., San Mateo. A free
program of the San Mateo County
Medical Association’s Community
Service Foundation that encourages
healthy physical activity for county
residents of all ages.Walkers enjoy one-
hour walks with physician volunteers
and can ask questions about general
health topics along the way. Free. To
sign up visit www.smcma.org.
Caregiver University (not for
professional caregivers). 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Senior Focus Center, 1720 El
Camino Real, Suite 10, Burlingame.
Second of two parts: Space limited.
Free. To register call 696-3660.
San Carlos Airport Day. 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. San Carlos Airport, 620 Airport
Drive, San Carlos. Free. This event
features aircraft displays, exhibitors and
vendors, activities and airplane rides
for kids, food trucks and airport tours.
For more information call 573-3700.
Garden Tour. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Redwood City High School, 1968 Old
Country Road, Redwood City. Check in
at Redwood City High School will be
open from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Late check-
ins (after 1 p.m.) should proceed to the
garden at 102 Britton Ave., Atherton.
The Master Gardeners of San Mateo
and San Francisco Counties will
present their garden tour. Master
Gardeners will be available until 1 p.m.
to talk about agriculture. Tickets are
$20. For more information or to
purchase tickets go to http://smsf-
mastergardeners.ucanr.org.
Birth and BabyFair. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
San Mateo County Events Center, 1346
Saratoga Drive, San Mateo. Pregnancy,
parenting, birth and baby resources.
Parking is $10. For more information
visit birthandbabyfair.com.
CuriOdyssey’s ‘FORCES’ Exhibition.
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. CuriOdyssey, 1651
Coyote Point Drive, San Mateo. This
exhibit empowers children to
experiment with the powerful forces
in nature present in their daily lives.
They can manipulate fast-moving
magnets, experiment with the sound
of reverberation and spin a giant panel
to create the sound of rain, among
others. Free with admission. For more
information go to
www.CuriOdyssey.org.
Friends’ Summer Sale. 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. Belmont Library, 1112 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. All books, CDs,
DVDs and tapes are 20 to 50 percent
off. All proceeds benefit the Belmont
Library. For more information call 593-
5650.
SummerFest. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., B
Street, between Baldwin and Sixth
avenues, Downtown San Mateo. The
First Annual Downtown SummerFest
is coming to San Mateo. Enjoy a variety
of fun summertime activities including
shopping, beer gardens and live bands.
Free. For more information call the
Downtown San Mateo Association at
342-5520.
Reach and Teach Grand Opening. 11
a.m. 144 W. 25th Ave., San Mateo.
Celebrate the opening of the peace
and social justice learning store on
25th Avenue with music, storytelling,
poetry and food. Free. For more
information email
craig@reachandteach.com.
State Sen. Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo,
holds ‘Mobile Office Hours’ at
College of San Mateo Farmers’
Market.11 a.m. to noon. College of San
Mateo, 1700 W. Hillsdale Blvd., San
Mateo. Free. For more information
email leslie.quevarra@sen.ca.gov.
Cottage Lane, Twin Pines Park,
Belmont. Paperbacks are three/$1.
Trade paperbacks are $1. Hardbacks
are $2 and up. Children’s books are 25
cents and up. Get $1 off your total
purchase during the Summer Concert
Series. For more information call 593-
5650 or go to www.thefobl.org.
SanMateoRadioClubFieldDay.1:30
p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Beresford Park Picnic
Shelter, 27th Avenue and Parkview
Way, San Mateo. This is one of the
largest emergency preparedness
exercises held in the country. Visitors
are encouraged to visit the site and see
an amateur radio station operating
under emergency field conditions.
Free. For more information go to
www.w6uq.org.
The San Mateo Buddhist Temple
Bazaar. 3 p.m. to 9 p.m. San Mateo
Buddhist Temple, 2 S. Claremont St.,
San Mateo. Enjoy Japanese and
American foods, game booths, bingo
and entertainment. Admission is free
but food and game prices vary. For
more information call 342-2541 or go
to sanmateobuddhisttemple.org.
Two Person Exhibit Opening
Reception. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Galleri Citi,
1115 Howard Ave., Burlingame. Come
enjoy the photography of Alyson
Belcher and the paintings of William
Stanisich.The exhibit is open until Aug.
9. For more information call 577-3799.
Screeningof newRobertGreenwald
film: War on ‘Whistleblowers.’ 7 p.m.
to 9 p.m. Unitarian Universalists of San
Mateo, 300 E. Santa Inez Ave., San
Mateo. Free. For more information call
342-8244 or go to
http://www.sanmateopeaceaction.org.
TheSpokenWordSlammaJamma. 8
p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Sweet Connections,
430 San Mateo Ave., San Bruno. Open
Mic. Poetry, music, drama, comedy,
improv and artistic expression are
welcome. Family oriented event. Free.
To perform RSVP by emailing Tuese
Ahkiong at apolojedi2@yahoo.com.
Stanford Jazz Festival: Herbie
Hancock. 8 p.m. Braun Music Center,
541 Lasuen Mall, Stanford. An integral
part of every jazz movement since the
’60s, Hancock has received an
Academy Award for his Round
Midnight film score and 14 GRAMMY
Awards. A limited supply of tickets will
be available at the Bing Concert Hall
Box Office, which opens at 7 p.m.
Tickets start at $50, $15 for students.
For more information visit
stanfordjazz.org.
SUNDAY, JUNE 23
Ryan’s Phua Memorial Kids’ Ride.
9:30 a.m., corner of Lorton Avenue and
California Drive, downtown
Burlingame. A bike race for children 12
and under. The course is on a closed
street in downtown Burlingame. Same
day registration starts at 8 a.m. at
booth, corner of Lorton Avenue and
California Drive. Races are in age
groups. Races start at 10:20 a.m.
Participants receive a medal and ice
cream. Free. For more information visit
www. ryansride.org.
Sunday Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. San Mateo Avenue between
Jenevein and Sylvan avenues, San
Bruno. For more information go to
www.westcoastfarmersmarkets.org.
SummerFest. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., B
Street, between Baldwin and Sixth
avenues, Downtown San Mateo. The
First Annual Downtown SummerFest
is coming to San Mateo. Enjoy a variety
of fun summertime activities including
shopping, beer gardens and live bands.
Free. For more information call the
Downtown San Mateo Association at
342-5520.
The San Mateo Buddhist Temple
Bazaar. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. San Mateo
Buddhist Temple, 2 S. Claremont St.,
San Mateo. Enjoy Japanese and
American foods, game booths, bingo
and entertainment. Admission is free
but food and game prices vary. For
more information call 342-2541 or go
to sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Jazz, blues and adult contemporary
music. Noon to 2 p.m. Mistral
Restaurant and Bar, 370-6 Bridge
Parkway, Redwood Shores. Featuring
Eric Van James on piano.Van James will
play jazz, pop standards and show
tunes. For more information call 802-
9222.
Highwater Blues.1 p.m. to 4 p.m.Twin
Pines Meadow, Belmont. This is the
second of the seven Belmont Summer
Concerts. Concert will feature
danceable rhythm and blues.
Admission is free and refreshments will
be sold. For more information call 595-
7441.
Affordable Booksat the BookNook.
Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage Lane, Twin
Pines Park, Belmont. Paperbacks are
three/$1. Trade paperbacks are $1.
Hardbacks are $2 and up. Children’s
books are 25 cents and up. Get $1 off
your total purchase during the
Summer Concert Series. For more
information call 593-5650 or go to
www.thefobl.org.
Carne Asada Festival. Noon to 6 p.m.
Courthouse Square, 2200 Broadway
St., Redwood City. Bring your entire
family and enjoy live bands at the
second annual Chavez Super Festival
de la Carne Asada. Free. For more
information go to
www.latinbayarea.com.
Mimi Fox Trio. 4:30 p.m. Douglas
Beach House, 307 Mirada Road, Half
Moon Bay. $35. For more information
go to www.bachddsoc.org.
Eric Van James Piano Playing. 5:30
p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Sondini’s Bertoluccis,
421 Cypress Ave., South San Francisco.
Eric Van James performs music by
Ellington, Gershwin, Mancini and
others. Free. For more information call
588-1625.
Mustache Harbor-Yacht Rock. 6 p.m.
to 8 p.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Free. For
more information call 780-7311.
Red Desert Dance Company
PresentsMosiacof Dance.7 p.m. Club
Fox, 2209 Broadway, Redwood City.
$15. For more information go to
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
Stanford Jazz Festival: Claudia
Villela Band. 7:30 p.m. Campbell
Recital Hall, 541 Lasuen Mall, Stanford.
General Admission is $45, students are
$15. For more information visit
stanfordjazz.org.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
tional street fair missing from San
Mateo in recent years.
DSMA Executive Director Jessica
Evans is excited to close a busy street
and hopes to see the downtown full of
families who want to enjoy restau-
rants and shops. If the crowd becomes
too much, the event is right next to
Central Park, she said.
Evans challenged the community to
embrace the event, experience what
this inaugural year has to offer and
provide constructive feedback so it
can grow in the years to come.
Sarah Tipple from Steve Restivo
Event Services, which is producing
the event, said it will have the tradi-
tional fun of a street fair with some
local flare. Stages will be set up at
either end of B Street. The stage on
Sixth Avenue is dedicated to local per-
formers. Evans has at least five acts
lined up for each day ranging from
cultural dancers to different musi-
cians.
“We love showcasing local flavor, ”
said Tipple. “That’s what makes each
event unique.”
Evans, who is still acclimating to
San Mateo, said that the community
really loves Wine Walk. But, that’s a
lot of work. Also, with wine in the
name, it’s not the most family-friend-
ly event. SummerFest is trying to
bring back the traditional street fair,
which of course offers beer and wine,
but also something for families to
enj oy. Activities for the younger
crowd will be set up near the Sixth
Avenue stage.
Booths throughout the fair will fea-
ture various crafts and food for sale
but also information about local
organizations.
“People from San Mateo don’t have
this right now,” Evans said.
Previously San Mateo’s downtown
got its street fair fix through Festa
Italiana. The last one was held in
2010 and there has yet to be a new
event to take its place.
Sean Sims, public affairs director
for the San Mateo Firefighters
Association, said the members are
excited to have the experience to be
mingling with residents while cook-
ing up Italian sausages and raising
money for a good cause, Muscular
Dystrophy.
For more information about
Summerfest visit
SanMateoSummerFest.com.
heather@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
FAIR
still costs less than what we would be
spending with the Belmont and San
Carlos department ... It’s sort of a mid-
dle road,” said San Carlos Assistant
City Manager Brian Moura.
Prior to dissolution, the city paid
$6.3 million for fire service with
Belmont with projections of spending
$8 million in 2013 and $8.2 million
in 2014. The proposed amended con-
tract calls for San Carlos to pay an
estimated $5.6 million the first year
for full service.
The significant savings the city has
from either outsourcing or changing
several city services like fire and parks
maintenance is what allows the con-
tract’s expansion, Moura said.
The joint venture also has the poten-
tial for more savings in the future by
consolidating fire stations on Alameda
de las Pulgas and Jefferson Avenue into
one station to be constructed. San
Mateo County is also interested in
having the two cities assume emer-
gency response to the Fire Station 19
area on Edmonds Road. Doing so could
save each city up to $400,000.
But while cost savings prompted
San Carlos’ past decisions on fire serv-
ice, the current proposal is largely
about staff retention. In July 2012, the
fire chief said staffing was at “a tipping
point” because of the high number of
vacancies. Between Oct. 1, 2011 and
July 9, 2012, the department had four
resignations of which three were
returned from the now-defunct
Belmont-San Carlos Fire Department.
The hiring of lateral firefighters has
been difficult and the chief doesn’t rec-
ommended hiring laid-off firefighters
because they tend “to move around
more often,” according to the staff
report.
Redwood City Manager Bob Bell and
Fire Chief Jim Skinner, in a report to
the Redwood City Council, called the
expanded contract an example of the
city’s strategy to make government
operations more effective.
The San Carlos City Council meets 7
p.m. Monday, June 24 at City Hall,
600 Elm St., San Carlos. The Redwood
City Council meets 7 p.m. Monday,
June 24 at City Hall, 1017 Middlefield
Road, Redwood City.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
SERVICE
Flight Center.
The San Carlos Flight Center,
opened in March 2012, is a flying
club, provides aerial tours and is a fly-
ing school.
Carstens said the event has just as
much to do with increasing the visibil-
ity of the organizations and groups
surrounding the airport as it does with
the site itself.
Dan Dyer, owner and instructor at the
San Carlos Flight Center, said the area
has a significant historical aviation
heritage, to go along with its impor-
tance in serving the community.
“The airport itself has a really good
history of flight training, there’s
always been a lot of schools operating
out of here, flying clubs operating out
of here, it’s a very social airport,”
Dyer said.
The San Carlos Flight Center is an
active member of the community
through outreach activities, such as
sponsoring local baseball, high
school arts programs and scholar-
ships.
“Instead of hanging out on Laurel
Street, you could come hang out at the
airport, and understand that we’re all
connected together [as a community],”
Dyer said.
Aviation novices can learn about the
subject during Airport Day, Dyer said.
“If you learn to fly here, because of
the rest of the airspace — the Bay Area
is very sophisticated with all of the
big airports — you become a very
competent pilot in dealing with con-
gested airspace, whereas, if you learn
to fly, even out in Modesto, you don’t
have to deal with anything,” Dyer
said.
Jim Wadleigh, airport operations
deputy manager, said the area will be
busy as the airport will still be in oper-
ation during the event to go along with
helicopter and plane rides for atten-
dees.
Located at its current site since
1948, the San Carlos Airport is home
to more than 500 small aircraft and 25
aviation-related businesses. San
Carlos Airport hosts air ambulance,
law enforcement aviation, emergency
response craft, charter airlines, aerial
photography and flight training serv-
ices. The airport is owned and operated
by San Mateo County.
For more information go to
www.sancarlosairportday.com.
Continued from page 1
AIRPORT
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
COMICS/GAMES
6-22-13
friday’s PUZZLE sOLVEd
PrEViOUs
sUdOkU
answErs
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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6 Rowboat
11 Athena’s shield
12 Spooky
13 Christmas decor
15 Kind of split
16 Writer Allende
18 Harden
19 Happy sighs
21 Plopped down
22 Arrivederci!
23 “Laugh-In” name
25 U.K. channel
28 Protein-building acid
30 Fergie’s daughter
31 Coach Parseghian
32 Aunt or bro.
33 Sharp — — tack
35 Herald of spring
37 NFL gains
38 Luxury coats
40 Bog fuel
41 Caltech rival
42 Admiral’s org.
43 Scamp
46 Bogart’s love
48 Celt’s language
50 Griped
54 Urged (on)
55 Take potshots
56 Comes to the top
57 Scarecrow stuffng
dOwn
1 Gullet
2 — Lingus (Dublin carrier)
3 Size above med.
4 Contact
5 Old Concorde feet
6 Apply caulking
7 Howard or Berry
8 Tax-deferred plans
9 Penalty
10 Amazing act
14 — — cow (fips out)
15 Davis or Midler
17 Savage
19 Intended
20 Rains ice pellets
22 Filmdom’s — Grant
24 Corn serving
25 Naive ones
26 Boitano or Wilson
27 Is unable to
29 Big galoot
34 Wild shrub
36 Luxurious
39 Iffy attempt
43 Disney CEO Bob —
44 Biblical trio
45 Cribbage markers
46 Auction offers
47 Not as much
49 Kung fu expert Bruce —
51 Pine cousin
52 Ecol. watchdog
53 Flower droplet
diLBErT® CrOsswOrd PUZZLE
fUTUrE sHOCk®
PEarLs BEfOrE swinE®
GET fUZZy®
saTUrday, JUnE 22, 2013
CanCEr (June 21-July 22) -- The people who are
willing to assist you today might not be of the same
mind tomorrow. Be sure to take advantage of any
help they offer you.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- You are likely to make a
much better impression on people than you realize.
New acquaintances will likely be eyeing you as a
future friend.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Conditions infuencing
your material security are apt to be far better today
than tomorrow. If you have anything of a fnancial
nature pending, take care of it now.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Don’t neglect any matter
that requires some kind of communication, be it verbal
or via your computer. You shouldn’t have any trouble
expressing your thoughts in either venue.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- You could be
especially good at spotting some real bargains.
When working at your computer or out and about,
keep a lookout for anything special that you need.
saGiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Free yourself of
any encumbrances and you should be able to make
some impressive achievements. You’ll be dynamic
operating independently.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- You’re likely to fare
unusually well if you put yourself in the background
for as long as you can. Keep in touch with events,
but don’t try to alter or run them.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- You could be rather
lucky through an involvement with either a club
or a social organization. More than one of your
associates will put you onto something good.
PisCEs (Feb. 20-March 20) -- If you conduct
yourself with self-assurance, you’ll fare much better
than your opposition in most competitive situations.
The secret is to think like a winner.
ariEs (March 21-April 19) -- Usually, you’re the one
who comes up with the bright ideas, but today there
is likely to be a plethora of fresh thinking among your
peers. Listen carefully and you may learn something.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) -- There is a strong
chance that you could team up with someone
to generate a second source of income. The
partnership element will be essential.
GEMini (May 21-June 20) -- Group endeavors
should work out rather well, provided you’re not
intent on playing the dominant role. You’ll be more
effective in a support capacity.
DISTRIBUTED BY UNIVERSAL UCLICK FOR UFS
Weekend • June 22-23, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Weekend • June 22-23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
AUTMOTIVE -
NOW HIRING
SERVICE TECHNICIANS
OILSTOP DRIVE-THRU
OIL CHANGE
• Excellent benefits
• No experience necessary
• Complete training program
• Retirement program
• Advancement opportunities
• Competitive pay
APPLY IN PERSON AT
2009 El Camino Real, San Mateo
Monday-Saturday 8-6
For more info: www.oilstopinc.com
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
LEAD COOK, CASHIERS, AND DRIV-
ERS Avanti Pizza. Menlo Park.
(650)854-1222.
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
182 Biz Opportunities
SUSHI RESTAURANT FOR SALE - Ex-
cellent location in San Francisco. Good
cash flow, Asking $350K, Call Peter
(707)815-3640
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 521602
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Vanessa M. Gianelli
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Vanessa M. Gianelli filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Vanessa M. Gianelli
Proposed name: Vanessa M. Jaco
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on July 24,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 06/07/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 06/06/2013
(Published, 06/22/13, 06/29/13
07/06/2013, 07/13/2013)
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 521692
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Justin Makepeace James
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Justin Makepeace James filed
a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Justin Makepeace James
Proposed name: Justine Makepeace
James
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on July 23,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 06/07/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 06/06/2013
(Published, 06/15/13, 06/22/13
06/29/2013, 07/06/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255991
The following person is doing business
as: Silver Cup 2014, 3500 Woodside
Rd., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Peter Rieman, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 05/08/2013.
/s/ Peter Rieman /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05221/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/01/13, 06/08/13, 06/15/13, 06/22/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255985
The following person is doing business
as: Ricky to the Rescue Auto Repair, 219
Old County Rd. Shop D, SAN CARLOS,
CA 94070 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Ricky Wade, 164 South
Wildwood, Hercules, CA 94547. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Ricky Wade /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/01/13, 06/08/13, 06/15/13, 06/22/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256050
The following person is doing business
as: Dana’s Flower Basket 40 37th Ave.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Dana Lo
Schiavo, and Joseph Lo Schiavo, 947
Lurline Dr, Foster City, CA 94404. The
business is conducted by a General Part-
nership. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
02/08/1985.
/s/ Dana Lo Schiavo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/01/13, 06/08/13, 06/15/13, 06/22/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256179
The following person is doing business
as:Vocal One Studio, 825 Kathryne Ave.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Margaret
Mefford, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Margaret Mefford /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/08/13, 06/15/13, 06/22/13, 06/29/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256180
The following person is doing business
as: GeekyBug, 240 Arbor Ln. SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Drewry Wolf, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Drewry Wolf /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/08/13, 06/15/13, 06/22/13, 06/29/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256232
The following person is doing business
as: Betty Yuan Insurance Services
Group, 119 Woodbridge Cir., SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered by
the following owner: EBAA Insurance
Services, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 06/07/2013.
/s/ Anndrew Yuan/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/08/13, 06/15/13, 06/22/13, 06/29/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256142
The following person is doing business
as: Great Clips, 917 Briana Ct., SAN
JOSE, CA 95120 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Grace GCCA, LLC,
CA. The business is conducted by a Lim-
ited Liability Company. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Mark Grace /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/08/13, 06/15/13, 06/22/13, 06/29/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255803
The following person is doing business
as: Sunny Day Cleaning Service, 1101
Elmer St., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Maria Del Carmen Valdez, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Maria Valdez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/08/13, 06/15/13, 06/22/13, 06/29/13.)
23 Weekend • June 22-23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255942
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Peninsula Building Design, 2) Pen-
insula Building Design & Drafting, 735 In-
dustrial Rd., Ste. 207 SAN CARLOS, CA
94070 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: David Howell, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
01/01/2012.
/s/ David Howell /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/08/13, 06/15/13, 06/22/13, 06/29/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255754
The following person is doing business
as: Kiosko Mexicano, 726 Grand Ave.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Maria Luz Gonzalez, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ Maria Luz Gonzalez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/15/13, 06/22/13, 06/29/13, 07/06/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255898
The following person is doing business
as: Gold Rush Limo, 2575 Galway Pl.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
AA Royale, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Rizza Allas /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/15/13, 06/22/13, 06/29/13, 07/06/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256304
The following person is doing business
as: Los Andes Smart Services, 45 Studio
Circle #7, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Ninfa De Terceros and Eber H. Terceros.
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Married Couple. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Eber Terceros /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/15/13, 06/22/13, 06/29/13, 07/06/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256189
The following person is doing business
as: Bay Area Aesthetic Surgery, 66 Bo-
vet Road, Suite 101, SAN MATEO, CA
94402 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Joel B. Beck, M.D., Inc, CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Joel B. Beck /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/22/13, 06/29/13, 07/06/13, 07/13/13.)
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
CHANGE IN OWNERSHIP OF
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE
Date of Filing Application: June 19, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
Xiao Long Bao, Inc.
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
331 Grand Ave.
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080
Type of license applied for:
41-On-Sale Beer And Wine-Eating
Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
June 22, 2013
THE SAN Mateo County Board
of Education (SMCBE) is seek-
ing individuals to serve on a
County Board Advisory Commit-
tee to advise the SMCOE re-
garding real property and its sta-
tus as “surplus.” Committee
makeup must reflect the follow-
ing: a) demographic composition
of the county; b) the business
community; c) landowners and
renters; d) teachers; e) adminis-
trators; f) parents of students; g)
persons with expertise in envi-
ronmental impact, legal con-
tracts, buildings codes, and land
use planning.
Under California law (Education
Code Section 17389) a govern-
ing board must appoint a com-
munity advisory group of no few-
er than seven (7) and no more
than eleven (11) members.
Committee proceedings will be
open to the public and is subject
to the Brown Act. Estimated
time commitment is approxi-
mately 8 hours per month for the
next 3 months. Interested par-
ties should contact: Nancy Ma-
gee, nmagee@smcoe.k12.ca.us
or (650) 802-5553.
Deadline to apply is 5:00 p.m.
June 26, 2013.
203 Public Notices
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CLJ520223
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): JOSE MARTINEZ-ALVAREZ,
AKA JOSE GABRIEL MARTINEZ-AL-
VAREZ, ELIZABETH RAKEL MO-
RALES, AKA RAKEL ELIZABETH MO-
RALES, and DOES 1 TO 10.
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): STATE
FARM MUTUAL AUTOMOBILE INS.CO.
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
Superior Court of California, County of
San Mateo
400 County Center
Redwood City, CA 94063-1655
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Harlan M. Reese, 118226, Joseph M.
Pleasant, 179571, Max A. Higgins,
270334, Dana N. Myers, 272640
Reese Law Group
6725 Mesa Ridge Road, Ste. 240
SAN DIEGO, CA 92121
(858)550-0389
Date: (Fecha) March 5, 2013
John C. Fiton, Clerk
(Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
June 1, 8, 15, 25, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
210 Lost & Found
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, $90.,
(650)610-9765
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIER 5200 BTU window air conditioner
- never used, in box, $95. obo, (650)591-
6842
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $90.,
(650)596-0513
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
67 USED United States (50) and Europe-
an (17) Postage Stamps. Most issued
before World War II. All different and de-
tached from envelopes. All for $4.00,
(650)787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MENORAH - Antique Jewish tree of life,
10”W x 30”H, $100., (650)348-6428
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
STAINED GLASS WINDOW - 30” x 18”,
diamond pattern, multi-colored, $95.,
SOLD!
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $700 obo
(650)766-3024
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
303 Electronics
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HARMON/KANDON SPEAKERS (2)
mint condition, great, for small
office/room or extra speakers, 4 1/2 in.
high, includes cords $8., (650)578-9208
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center draw locks all comes with
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame SOLD!
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
2, 5 drawer medal cabinets 5' high 31/2'
wide both $40 (650)322-2814
3 MEDAL base kitchen cabinets with
drawers and wood doors $99
(650)347-8061
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
304 Furniture
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR (2), with arms, Italian 1988 Cha-
teau D'Ax, solid, perfect condition. $50
each or $85 for both. (650)591-0063
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COPENHAGEN TEAK dining table with
dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions. 48/88"
long x 32" wide x 30" high. $95.00
(650)637-0930
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 draw dresser 61" wide,
31" high, & 18" deep $50., (650)592-
2648
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
GLASS DINING Table 41” x 45” Round-
ed rectangle clear glass top and base
$85 (650)888-0129
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
Bath
TUBZ
Over 400 Tubs on display!
World’s Largest “Hands-On, Feet-In”
Showroom
4840 Davenport Place
Fremont, CA 94538
(510)770-8686
www.tubz.net
24
Weekend • June 22-23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Miller Park team
nickname
9 Manifesto fodder
15 Prickly growth
16 Flying star
17 Certify
18 Van Morrison
song whose title
is spelled out in
the chorus
19 Computer __
20 Sets
22 Dusters,
perhaps
23 Record holder for
most games
played at
shortstop for one
team
25 More pallid
29 Capital of
Österreich
30 Modern address
ending
32 Double
34 She married
during her
father’s
presidency
35 Like soft carpets
36 “Friends” actress,
familiarly
37 They may be
warnings
38 “Without __”:
Grateful Dead
album
39 Lenten fare, say
41 QB protectors
42 Alliance
43 Parfait features
44 Former Crayola
color that’s still
one when its
name is reversed
47 Squeaky sound?
48 Mideast’s House
of __
49 Feudal estate
53 Clashing
55 Vivaldi opera
based on “The
Decameron”
57 Rome’s Via __
58 Time’s Person of
the Century, 1999
59 Childish retort
60 Barbershop chair
features
DOWN
1 Name-drop, say
2 Mechanical
method
3 Cádiz-to-Málaga
dirección
4 Quarter segment
5 “The Big Bang
Theory” airer
6 “Jersey Roots,
Global Reach”
university
7 Methyl bisulfate,
e.g.
8 Breakfast choice
9 The U.N.’s
Hammarskjöld
10 Crude guys?
11 Old fourpence coin
12 First female
professor at the
University of Paris
13 Singer covering
“Purple Haze,”
probably
14 Vast expanses
21 Squaw Valley sport
23 Needing a charge
24 Fly, in a way
25 How some bonds
are bought
26 Candidate’s
concern
27 Aces
28 Sarcastic retort
31 Visibility
impediments
33 Throws out
34 Fictional cocker
spaniel
37 Scottish
countryside sight
39 Sally __
40 Getting around
42 Admitted guilt for
45 Utah city
46 Pulitzer author
Alison
47 Soap containing
ground pumice
49 Bash
50 Dots on cartes
51 Work on a proof
52 Ballpark figures
54 Inebriate
56 Uzbekistan, once:
Abbr.
By Barry C. Silk
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
06/22/13
06/22/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
304 Furniture
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
LIGHT WOOD Rocking Chair & Has-
sock, gold cushions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
RECLINER ROCKER - Like new, brown,
vinyl, $99., (650)365-0202
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR with wood carving,
armrest, rollers, and it swivels $99.,
(650)592-2648
SOFA 71/2' $25 (650)322-2814
304 Furniture
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TALL OUTSIDE BISTRO TABLE -
glass top with 2 chairs $75 (firm) SOLD!
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEAK TV stand, wheels, rotational, glass
doors, drawer, 5 shelves. 31" wide x 26"
high X 18" deep. $75.00 (650)637-0930
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
WICKER DRESSER, white, good condi-
tion, ht 50", with 30", deep 20". carry it
away for $75 SOLD
WICKER ENTERTAINMENT CABINET -
H 78” x 43” x 16”, almost new, $89.,
(650)347-9920
WOODEN DESK 31/2' by 21/2' by 21/2'
$25 (650)322-2814
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
3 PIECE fireplace set with screen $25
(650)322-2814
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
BREVILLE JUICER - Like new, SOLD!
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
306 Housewares
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, (650)578-9208
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
1/2 HORSE power 8" worm drive skill
saw $40 OBO (650)315-5902
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
BLACK & DECKER CORDLESS 18 volt
combo drill, vacuum, saw, sander, two
batteries & charger, brand new, $95.
obo, (650)591-6842
BOB VILLA rolling tool box & organizer -
brand new with misc. tools, $40. obo,
(650)591-6842
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
308 Tools
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTMANS PROFESSIONAL car buf-
fer with case $40 OBO (650)315-5902
CRAFTSMAN 14.4 VOLT DRILL - bat-
tery & charger, never used, $35. obo,
(650)591-6842
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 3/8” 16.8 volt drill & vac-
uum combo, brand new, with charger,
$45. obo, (650)591-6842
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DEWALT 18 volt battery drill with 2 bat-
tery & charger $45 OBO SOLD!
DREMEL HIGH SPEED ROTARY TOOL
- all attachments, never used, $25. obo,
(650)591-6842
ELECTRIC HEDGE trimmer good condi-
tion (Black Decker) $40 (650)342-6345
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LADDER - 24' aluminum 2 section ladder
$20., SOLD
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 21” Belt Sander with long cord,
$35 (650)315-5902
MILLWAUKEE SAWSALL in case with
blades (like new) $50 OBO SOLD!
NEW DRILL DRIVER - 18V + battery &
charger, $30., (650)595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SANDER, MAKITA finishing sander, 4.5
x 4.5"' used once. Complete with dust
bag and hard shell case. $35.00 SOLD!
SMALL ROTETILLER 115 Volt Works
well $99.00 (650)355-2996
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
TOOL BOX - custom made for long
saws, $75.,SOLD!
TOOLAND INC
Name brands * Huge inventory
Low prices
Personalized service
M-F 7"30 - 6; Sa: 9 - 4:30
1369 Industrial, San Carlos
(650)631-9636
www,tooland.com
TORO ELECTRIC POWER SWEEPER
blower - never used, in box, $35. obo,
(650)591-6842
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $65 (650)341-8342
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
3 LARGE old brown mixing bowls $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History,
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
5 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $9. for all
(650)347-5104
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEO 75 with jackets 75 with-
out $100 for all, SOLD!
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99., (650)580-
3316
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASTRONOMY BOOKS (2) Hard Cover
Cambridge Encyclopedia of Astronomy,
World of Discovery, $12., (650)578-9208
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection SOLD!
310 Misc. For Sale
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14., (650)578-9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, excellent
condition, $43., (650)347-5104
BAY BRIDGE Framed 50th anniversary
poster (by Bechtel corp) $50
(650)873-4030
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY Jake AB Scissor Exercise Ma-
chine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
C2 MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES -
style wall mount, plug in, bronze finish,
12” L x 5”W , good working condition,
$12. both, (650)347-5104
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
(650)578-9208
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOOD HEALTH FACT BOOK - un-
used, answers to get/stay healthy, hard
cover, 480 pages, $8., (650)578-9208
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HABACHI BBQ Grill heavy iron 22" high
15" wide $25 (650)593-8880
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
IBM SELECTRIC II typewriter self cor-
recting $25 (650)322-2814
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
KELTY SUPER TIOGA BACKPACK -
$40., (650)552-9436
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model", $250., (650)637-0930
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LAUNDRY SORTER - on wheels, triple
section, laundry sorter - $19., (650)347-
9920
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, (650)341-1861
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW COWBOY BOOTS - 9D, Unworn,
black, fancy, only $85., (650)595-3933
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., (650)578-9208
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
310 Misc. For Sale
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. White Rotary
sewing machine similar age, cabinet
style. $85 both. (650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STAINED GLASS panels multi colors
beautiful work 35" long 111/2" wide $79
OBO (650)349-6059
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TENT - one man packable tent - $20.,
(650)552-9436
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, (650)341-1861
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLKSWAGON NEW Beatle hub cap,
3, $70 for All (650)283-0396
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WEBER GO ANYWHERE GAS BARBE-
QUE - never used, in box, $40., SOLD!
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
MARTIN D-18S 1971 Guitar $1500.
Great sound. Great Condition
(650)522-8322
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
ATTRACTIVE LADIES trench coat red,
weather proof size 6/8 $35
(650)345-3277
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
25 Weekend • June 22-23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
316 Clothes
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS JACKET - size XXL, Beautiful
cond., med., $35., (650)595-3933
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW! OLD NAVY Coat: Boy/Gril, fleece-
lined, hooded $15 (415)585-3622
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
brand new, never worn for $25
(650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$25.(650)368-0748.
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
BIKE TRAINER Ascent fluid $85
(650)375-8021
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
FOR SALE medium size wet suit $95
call for info (650)851-0878
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BAG with 15 clubs $35 (
650)322-2814
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels, $85.
obo, (650)223-7187
ROWING MACHINE. $30.00
(650)637-0930
SCHWINN STATIONARY RECUMBENT
BIKE, $45., SOLD!
STATIONARY EXERCISE BICYCLE -
Compact, excellent condition, $40. obo,
(650)834-2583
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL EXERCISE- Pro Form 415
Crosswalk, very good condition $200 call
(650)266-8025
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40.,
(408)764-6142
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALE
REDWOOD CITY
508 Lincoln Ave.
(x-st. Cleveland)
Sat., June 22
9 am - 2 pm
No Junk Garage Sale
Don't Miss!!
Lots of great costume
jewelry, make-up, good
womens and kids clothes,
Household items, some
furniture, Black Sea Gallery
dresser and bakers rack.
Great Prices Saturday Only!
HUGE
FLEA
MARKET
At Saf
Keep Storage
Saturday,
June 22nd.
9am-3pm.
Tenants will be selling
Items right out of their
units.
Lots of good stuff!
Come have fun.
2480 Middlefield
Redwood City,
Next to Costco
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
325 Estate Sales
ESTATE
GARAGE SALE
SAN MATEO
24 Baytree Way
(x-st. El Camino)
Sat. & Sun.
June 22 & 23
8 am - 1 pm
Furniture, kitchen
items, collectibles,
books, clothing, and
much more!
No Early Birds!
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
SLEEP APNEA breathing machine com-
plete in box helps you breathe, costs $$$
sacrifice for $75, (650)995-0012
379 Open Houses
1405 DIX STREET
San Mateo
Open
Saturday & Sunday
1-4 p.m.
3 Bedrooms, plus bonus room, 2
full baths, granite counter tops,
new kitchen flooring New Car-
pet, Fresh Paint, Beautiful yard,
new fencing. $598,000
Call Elaine 650-888-9905/
Bill 650-888-9906
Elaine DRE#00785080
Bill DRE#00344774 R
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
381 Homes for Sale
VOLUNTEER WITH
Habitat for Humanity
and help us build homes and
communities in East Palo Alto.
Volunteers welcome
Wed-Sat from 8:30-4pm.
415-625-1022
www.habitatgsf.org
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$59.-69.daily + tax
$350.-$375. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
515 Office Space
SAN MATEO DRIVE beautiful Medical
Office space for rent only $75/day.
Paulsurinder1@yahoo.com
620 Automobiles
2001 MBZ ML320 SVU with third row
seating with 133k miles loaded sharp
looking and roomy mid size luxury
suv.#4430 on sale for $7500.00 plus fees
(650)637-3900
2001 PORSCHE 911 Carrera 4 cabriolet
automatic with 90k miles hard top and
power soft top in excellent conditions
black on black leather loaded navigation
#5033 on sale for $27995.00 plus fees.
(650)637-3900
2001 TOYOTA Tundra access cab 4
door automatic with 220k miles. Must
see this truck up close to see how nice
she is been taken care of .#5038 on sale
for $7995.00 plus fees. (650)637-3900
2002 LEXUS is 300 special edition, with
91k miles she is loaded with all options
including navigation clean car fax #4519
asking price is $11995.00 plus fees
(650)637-3900
2002 VOLVO s80 t6 sedan, 107k miles
in great new conditions. Fully loaded with
options. Looks & drives excellent
#5040.on sale for $5995.00 plus fees.
(650)637-3900
2003 FORD Mustang GT convertible with
102k miles. Ready for summer with auto-
matic and power top,loaded sharp look-
ing with nice ride #5031 sale price
$7995.00 plus fees. (650)637-3900
2004 SATURN Ion 3 sedan with 94 k
miles. Comes with manual 5 speed
transmission. One owner clean car and
free warranty #4521 priced to sell quick
$5850.00 plus fees (650)637-3900
2005 MAZDA RX8 sport coupe with 112
k miles. come with automatic transmis-
sion. Looks great and very good on gas.
Hard to find black color #4502 reduced
sale price $7500.00 plus fees
(650)637-3900
2006 VW gti two door hatchback
with121k miles 6 speed manual in red
sporty color. Runs great and fun to drive
#4426 on sale for only $7995.00 plus
fees. (650)637-3900
2012 TOYOTA Camery LE automatic
with 24 k miles. Comes with factory war-
ranty. save thousands instead of buying
new, comes with brand new alloy rims
and tiers #4420 priced $17995.00 plus
fees. (650)637-3900
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
ACCURA 1997 3.0 CL CP Black, Auto-
matic $3300, (650)630-3216
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBIL”79Royal Delta 88, 122k
Miles, in excelleny Condition $1,800
(650)342-8510
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$2,500 Bid (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,400.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo Rob SOLD!
HONDA 1983 ASCOT VT 500 Motorcy-
cle, looks like 2012, must see. $1100,
obo, SOLD!
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $50. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
NEW MOTORCYCLE HELMET - Modu-
lar, dual visor, $69., (650)595-3933
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., SOLD!
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
670 Auto Service
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $60 for all
(650)588-7005
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Four steel
13in rims. Factory Hub Caps. $150. San
Bruno. SOLD!
JEEP TJ 2004-2006 (1) ALUMINUM
WHEEL & TIRE, brand new condition,
$90., SOLD!
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Asphalt/Paving
AIM CONSTRUCTION
John Peterson
• Paving • Grading
• Slurry Sealing • Paving Stones
• Concrete • Patching
We AIM to please!
(650)468-6750
(408)422-7695
Lic.# 916680
Cabinetry
Contractors
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Concrete, decks, retaining
walls, fences, bricks, roof,
gutters, & drains.
Call David
(650)270-9586
Lic# 914544 Bonded & Insured
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Home repairs &
Foundation work
Retaining wall • Decks • Fences
No job too small
Gary Afu
(650)207-2400
Lic# 904960
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
Concrete
CHETNER CONCRETE
Lic #706952
Driveways - Walkways
- Pool Decks - Patios - Stairs
- Exposed Aggregate - Masonry
- Retaining Walls - Drainage
- Foundation/Slabs
Free Estimates
(650)271-1442 Mike
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete • Brickwork • Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers • Landscaping
Tile • Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
26
Weekend • June 22-23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Concrete
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Solas
Electric
Best Rates
On all electrical work
7 days a week
Free Estimates
(650) 302-7906
CA License 950866
Bonded and Insured
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
JOSE’S
COMPLETE GARDENING
Complete gardening &
Landscaping
Commercial & Residential
Licensed
Free Estimates
(650)315-4011
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Landscaping
ASP LANDSCAPING
• All kinds of Concrete • Stamp
• Retaining Wall • Tree Service
• Brick • Roofing • Fencing
• New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435
(650)834-4495
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Painting
VICTOR’S FENCES
House Painting
•Interior •Exterior
Power Wash
•Driveways •Sidewalk •Houses
Free Estimates
(650)583-1270
or (650)808-5833
Lic. # 106767
Plumbing
HAMZEH PLUMBING
5 stars on Yelp!
$25 OFF First Time Customers
All plumbing services
24 hour emergency service
(415)690-6540
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tree Service
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
27 Weekend • June 22-23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)868-0082
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Health & Medical
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Home Care
MY ERRAND SERVICES
Help is on the way
• New Mother Assistance
• Senior Assistance • General Errands
• House & Pet Sitting • Event Help
• House Keeping • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
(650)201-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GREAT FULL BODY
MASSAGE
Tranquil Massage
951 Old County Rd. Suite 1,
Belmont
10:00 to 9:30 everyday
(650) 654-2829
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
UNION SPA & SALON
Grand Opening
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT
SENIOR LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
Video
ADULT VIDEOS $99 (415)298-0645
28
Weekend • June 22-23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins ª Dental ª Jewelry ª Silver ª Watches ª Diamonds
1Z11 80fll0¶8M0 ß90 ª ëâ0·J4¡·¡00¡
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
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t6OFRVBM$VTUPNFS$BSF
XXX#FTU3BUFE(PME#VZFSTDPN
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRYsBURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 6/30/13
WEBUY
$â0 $â0
OFF
Established 1979
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR

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