AOL Tech

New Hire Training










Participant Guide
AOL WIN Tech New Hire Course Map Revised 03/24/12
Page 1
Day 1 Hrs. Day 2 Hrs. Day 3 Hrs. Day 4 Hrs. Day 5 Hrs.
Review 0.50 Review 0.50 Review 0.50 Review 0.50
GETTING
STARTED
AOL BUSINESS,
PRODUCTS &
SOFTWARE
AOL BUSINESS,
PRODUCTS &
SOFTWARE
TOOLS TOOLS
Welcome to New
Hire Training
1.25
Terms of Service
(elearning)
0.75
Additional AOL
Products &
Services
2.00 Intro to Gandalf 1.50
Tools Overview:
Observing Tool Use
in Action
1.25
Network Connect &
VMWare
0.50 AOL Software 2.50 Gandalf Workflows 1.00 Week 1 Exam 1.00
Webmail 1.00
Protecting Your
Business Account
(elearning)
0.50
Verification
(elearning)
1.50
Week 1 Exam -
Review of Q/A
0.50
AOL BUSINESS,
PRODUCTS &
SOFTWARE
Project Phoenix 1.00 McAfee 1.75 Tech Buddy 0.25
About AOL 1.75 TOOLS Help.aol.com 1.00 CALL FLOW
Your Queue, Your
Role
1.50 Tools Overview 0.50 Call Driver Tracking 0.75
Tech Call Flow
Process
2.00
AOL Membership
Basics
1.00 Pulsar 1.00
Dial-Up Resolution
Validation
0.50
Call Examples 0.75
Exit Slips 0.50 Exit Slips 0.50 Exit Slips 0.50 Exit Slips 0.50 Exit Slips 0.50
Total Hours for
Day 1
6.50
Total Hours for
Day 2
6.25
Total Hours for
Day 3
6.75
Total Hours for
Day 4
7.00
Total Hours for
Day 5
7.00
W
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1
AOL WIN Tech New Hire Course Map Revised 03/24/12
Page 2
Day 6 Day 7 Day 8 Day 9 Day 10
Review 0.50 Review 0.50 Review 0.50 Review 0.50 Review 0.50
CALL FLOW Lifestore
Member Advocacy
& Satisfaction
Basic Technical
Knowledge
Basic Technical
Knowledge
Probing 2.50
Lifestore Offers &
Registrations
1.50
Member Advocacy
& You eLearning
1.00
Basic Computer
Hardware
0.75 Windows 7 0.75
Host Problem
Reports
0.75
Delivering
Personalized
Service elearning
1.00
Windows XP &
Vista
5.00
Escalation
Procedures
0.75 Troubleshooting
Lifestore
Member Advocacy
& Satisfaction
Metrics &
MyPortal
Dial Up Connectivity 2.50
Lifestore Product
Information
1.50
CRES - Customer
Relations Ethics
Standards elearning
1.50 Metrics & MyPortal 3.25
Broadband
Connectivity
2.50
AOL TechGuru 1.00
Customer Service
Techniques
1.00
Accessibility
eLearning
1.00
Exit Slips 0.50 Exit Slips 0.50 Exit Slips 0.50 Exit Slips 0.50 Exit Slips 0.50
Total Hours for
Day 6
6.75
Total Hours for
Day 7
6.00
Total Hours for
Day 8
7.00
Total Hours for
Day 9
6.75
Total Hours for
Day 10
6.75
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2
AOL WIN Tech New Hire Course Map Revised 03/24/12
Page 3
Day 11 Day 12 Day 13 Day 14 Day 15
Review 0.50 Review 0.50 Review 0.50 Review 0.50 Review 0.50
Troubleshooting Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
Practice
Troubleshooting
Practice
Troubleshooting
Practice
SysInfo 1.75
General AOL
Troubleshooting
2.00 Remote Desktop 2.50
Listen to Recorded
Calls (Witness)
1.25
Listen to Recorded
Calls (Witness)
1.25
Install / Uninstall
AOL Software
2.00
Personal Filing
Cabinet
1.50 Final Exam 1.00
Troubleshooting
Practice (Top Call
Drivers) & Debrief
1.25
Troubleshooting
Practice (Top Call
Drivers) & Debrief
1.25
Launching AOL 1.50 Email 1.75 Final Exam Review 1.00
Listen to Recorded
Calls (Witness)
1.50
Listen to Recorded
Calls (Witness)
1.50
Broswer Basics &
Troubleshooting
1.00
Listen to Recorded
Calls (Witness)
1.75
Troubleshooting
Practice (Top Call
Drivers) & Debrief
1.50
Troubleshooting
Practice (Top Call
Drivers) & Debrief
1.50
Exit Slips 0.50 Exit Slips 0.50 Exit Slips 0.50 Exit Slips 0.50 Exit Slips 0.50
Total Hours for
Day 11
7.25
Total Hours for
Day 12
6.25
Total Hours for
Day 13
7.25
Total Hours for
Day 14
6.50
Total Hours for
Day 15
6.50
W
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3
AOL WIN Tech New Hire Course Map Revised 03/24/12
Page 4
Day 16 Day 17 Day 18 Day 19 Day 20
OJT OJT OJT OJT OJT
Brief 0.25 Brief 0.25 Brief 0.25 Brief 0.25 Brief 0.25
Live Practice on the
Phones
2.00
Live Practice on the
Phones
2.00
Live Practice on the
Phones
2.00
Live Practice on the
Phones
2.00
Live Practice on the
Phones
2.00
Debrief 1.00 Debrief 1.00 Debrief 1.00 Debrief 1.00 Debrief 1.00
Live Practice on the
Phones
2.50
Live Practice on the
Phones
2.50
Live Practice on the
Phones
2.50
Live Practice on the
Phones
2.50
Live Practice on the
Phones
2.50
Debrief 0.75 Debrief 0.75 Debrief 0.75 Debrief 0.75 Debrief 0.75
Total Hours for
Day 16
6.50
Total Hours for
Day 17
6.50
Total Hours for
Day 18
6.50
Total Hours for
Day 19
6.50
Total Hours for
Day 20
6.50
W
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4
AOL WIN Tech New Hire Course Map Revised 03/24/12
Page 5
Day 21 Day 22 Day 23 Day 24 Day 25
OJT OJT OJT OJT OJT
Brief 0.25 Brief 0.25 Brief 0.25 Brief 0.25 Brief 0.25
Live Practice on the
Phones
2.00
Live Practice on the
Phones
2.00
Live Practice on the
Phones
2.00
Live Practice on the
Phones
2.00
Live Practice on the
Phones
2.00
Debrief 1.00 Debrief 1.00 Debrief 1.00 Debrief 1.00 Debrief 1.00
Live Practice on the
Phones
2.50
Live Practice on the
Phones
2.50
Live Practice on the
Phones
2.50
Live Practice on the
Phones
2.50
Live Practice on the
Phones
2.50
Debrief 0.75 Debrief 0.75 Debrief 0.75 Debrief 0.75 Debrief 0.75
Total Hours for
Day 21
6.50
Total Hours for
Day 22
6.50
Total Hours for
Day 23
6.50
Total Hours for
Day 24
6.50
Total Hours for
Day 25
6.50
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5
Welcome to New Hire Training
Participant Guide
















Revised: August 16, 2011
Welcome to New Hire Training
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL August 16, 2011
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction Congratulations! You have joined the customer support team for the
world-class company, AOL. In recognition of the valuable role you will
play in satisfying our customers and ensuring the company’s success, we
have designed a comprehensive training program that prepares you to be
your best, and our best.
This module provides you with information about the new hire training
program, expectations of you during this training, and the importance of
your individual contribution in achieving these goals.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
 Describe what the training program contains.
 Explain the class expectations and graduation requirements.
 Be prepared to access your AOL business account.


Welcome to New Hire Training
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL August 16, 2011
Page 2

Introductions

Facilitator
Contact
Information
Facilitator Name

Email Address

Screen Name



Icebreaker
Activity
Follow your facilitator’s instructions to conduct an activity that will allow
you to learn more about your fellow class participants.





Welcome to New Hire Training
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL August 16, 2011
Page 3

Course Overview

Introduction This section provides an overview of the course curriculum including:
 Purpose
 Course Structure and Access
 Daily Culminating Activities
 Course Evaluations
 Course Map and Contents

Purpose The purpose of the New Hire Curriculum is to prepare you to perform your
job as a contact center agent for AOL.
The New Hire Curriculum focuses on:
 Learning by doing
 Teaching and learning skills/content in context
 Practical application of skills through interactive activities
 Recall of job-critical information
 Use of tools to locate additional information when needed
 Top contact drivers
Continued on next page
Welcome to New Hire Training
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL August 16, 2011
Page 4

Course Overview, Continued

Course
Structure
This training curriculum combines live, instructor-led classroom training
(in person or virtual), elearning, hands-on exploration and practice, role
plays, and on-the-job practice.
The activities in this course curriculum are hands-on and interactive.

Daily
Culminating
Activity
There will often be beginning or ending activities where you will review
what you learned that day or the prior day, assess the training, and
prepare for what’s next:
 Discussion of the activities/content and how it relates to the mission
statement created by your class and your queue.
 Exit slips, in some courses, that provide an opportunity for you to
write and provide information about what you think about the class,
the topic under discussion, or a teaching strategy/material being used.

Course
Evaluation
There will be curriculum checkpoints throughout the course where your
facilitator or coach will observe you demonstrating a skill or knowledge of
a concept. At the end of the course, you will be observed while you
demonstrate these behaviors.

Course
Access
You will always have access to this course handbook and the elearning
modules that are a part of the curriculum. You may use them as a
reference or refresher for you in the future. Find the new hire training
curriculum on MSU (Member Services University) at
http://centralservices.ops.aol.com/msu/AOL/, within the link that
represents your queue.
Continued on next page
Welcome to New Hire Training
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL August 16, 2011
Page 5

Course Overview, Continued

Course Map
and Contents

A course map is included at the beginning of your participant binder. It
outlines the content that you will review during each day as well as the
timeframes.
The content in this curriculum addresses these primary elements:
 The company and your queue
 AOL software and products
 Policies and practices for your queue
 Your on-the-job software tools
 AOL membership plans and Lifestore offers
 Queue-specific technical information
 Contact flow procedures
 Customer interaction and sales techniques
 Escalations approach
 Performance and behavioral guidelines
 Practice

Welcome to New Hire Training
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL August 16, 2011
Page 6

Class Expectations

Defining
Expectations
Activity
Follow the instructions from your facilitator to complete the expectations
activity.

Expectations for the Course


Expectations of Class
Participants
Expectations of Facilitator


Continued on next page
Welcome to New Hire Training
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL August 16, 2011
Page 7

Class Expectations, Continued

Integrity Integrity is an important part of being an AOL employee. Working in your
table groups, discuss the following questions.

1. What is professionalism?


2. What is integrity?



Attendance
and
Participation
Attendance and participation are critical to your success as an AOL agent.
Working with a partner, discuss how you think this impacts your success.

Being a
Successful
Learner

Continued on next page
Welcome to New Hire Training
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL August 16, 2011
Page 8

Class Expectations, Continued

Training
Schedule
Record your class training schedule.


Graduation
Requirements
Record the graduation requirements for your queue/site in the space
below.


Welcome to New Hire Training
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL August 16, 2011
Page 9

Importance of Adhering to Class Rules

Local Rules
Use this space to record notes.









Be a
Successful
Learner
What are some critical behaviors necessary for being a successful learner?









Welcome to New Hire Training
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL August 16, 2011
Page 10

Preparing for Training

Screen
Names
You will receive an AOL screen name for your business email account.
Your facilitator will provide you with your screen name. Please take note
of it, as you will use it during this training and also while on the job.

SecurID As an added layer of security, you will need to use a SecurID device when
logging into business accounts and websites. The SecurID displays a
numeric code which changes frequently. You will need to enter this code
when prompted during log in.
Your facilitator will distribute SecurIDs at this point, if they have not
already been distributed.

Training
Room
Computers
Your facilitator will provide information on how to access the training
room computers. If a user name and password are required, please take
note of that information.

Welcome to New Hire Training
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL August 16, 2011
Page 11

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
 Describe what the training program contains.
 Explain the class expectations and graduation requirements.
 Be prepared to access your AOL business account.




Network Connect & VMWare
Participant Guide
















Revised: April 29, 2011
Network Connect & VMWare
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 29, 2011
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction
This module introduces you to the Network Connect and VMWare tools
which enable you to access the AOL Network and utilize a virtual desktop
environment.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
„ Access and log in to Network Connect & VMWare.

Network Connect & VMWare
Module Overview, Continued

Introduction Because your call center is located outside of the AOL Headquarters, you
will use a program called Network Connect to establish a remote
connection to AOL’s network. This will give you access to confidential
information and proprietary tools that reside behind the AOL firewall. For
security purposes Network Connect ensures that only approved users are
permitted access.

Logging in to
Network
Connect
In order to access both the VMWare virtual desktop and Avaya softphone
software, you will first need to follow the steps below to log in through
Network Connect (SERA).
Step Action
1 Launch Network Connect by going to Start> All Programs> Juniper Networks>
Network Connect 7.0> Network Connect.


2
Log in using your CDID and Password.

Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 29, 2011
Page 2

Network Connect & VMWare
Module Overview, Continued

Logging in to Network Connect (continued)

Step Action
3 You will see the window below that shows you the software is
attempting to connect.

4 Once connected, you will see the icon below in the System
Tray. Notice that the icon is initially grey, but changes to yellow
once successfully logged in.



AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 29, 2011
Page 3

Network Connect & VMWare
VMWare

Introduction VMWare is software which provides access to a virtual computer desktop
environment. VM stands for Virtual Machine. When you use VMWare, the
desktop from a remote computer appears on your computer. You can
then use the programs/software on the remote computer as if they were
installed on your own computer. Using VMWare allows AOL to centrally
manage the virtual desktop machine and provide a uniform desktop
across all sites. Many of the tools you will use in the WOW queue will
reside on the virtual machine, rather than physically on your computer.

Signing on to
VMWare
After you are logged in and connected with Network Connect, you need to
log in to VMWare to access your tools. Follow the steps below.

Step Action
1 Double-click the VMWare icon on your desktop.

2 Type the server name, if not already completed, and click
Connect.

Server name = msview.memberservices.office.aol.com.


Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 29, 2011
Page 4

Network Connect & VMWare
VMWare, Continued

Signing on to VMWare (continued)

Step Action
3 Type your VMWare user name and password in the boxes and
click Login.
NOTE: This will be set up with a default password on your first
log in. You must then change it to a unique password.

4 Select the Desktop (shown below) and click Connect.

Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 29, 2011
Page 5

Network Connect & VMWare
VMWare, Continued

Signing on to VMWare (continued)

Step Action
6 Wait for connection to be established.

7 Enter your Teleset Number (same as your Avaya extension).

Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 29, 2011
Page 6

Network Connect & VMWare
VMWare, Continued

Signing on to VMWare (continued)

Step Action
8 You will now see two start buttons. The start button on the
bottom is for the actual physical workstation. The start button
on the top is for the VMWare virtual desktop. You will use the
VMWare Virtual Start button to access your applications and
tools, with the exception of the softphone.


AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 29, 2011
Page 7

Network Connect & VMWare
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 29, 2011
Page 8

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
„ Access and log in to Network Connect & VMWare.





Participant Guide

About AOL



















September 22, 2011
About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 1

Module Content


Slide 1

You are now supporting one of the most exciting companies in the world: AOL. AOL’s unique products
and services generate genuine enthusiasm among members and coworkers alike. This training module,
About AOL, introduces you to the AOL business and culture.


About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 2



Slide 2

At the end of this module, you will be able to:
• State the overall AOL business,
• Recite the AOL mission and core values,
• Explain the six types of products and services the company provides,
• Describe elements of the AOL brand identity, and finally,
• Describe the different Paid Services support queues.




About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 3


Slide 3
This module will be a blended learning experience. Some content will be introduced right here in this
module; other times you will be exploring websites on your own; and sometimes you will be performing
some facilitator-led activities.

When you see this AOL surfer, that’s the signal that you will be performing activities outside of this
elearning. There will also be a caption to alert you about how much time to allocate to that activity.
When you’re ready for that activity, minimize the elearning module, but do not close it. Do the activity,
and return to the elearning module when the activity time is up.

There will be a set of review quizzes at the end of each section. You must answer each question. At the
end of the module, you will have a chance to review the quiz questions and answers.
When you see the Back and Next buttons appear, you can move to another screen. Click Back to return
to a prior screen, or Next to move forward. When you are ready, click Next to continue.



About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 4


Slide 4

As a new consultant with AOL, it is important that you get to know the company. In this part of training
you will learn some basic facts about the culture at AOL and the company itself.





About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 5


Slide 5

Let’s start with a one-sentence picture of the company. OK, it’s a long sentence, but there’s a lot to
say!

AOL is a leading-edge web services company – that’s the big picture – a leading-edge web services
company.

Next are two components: AOL includes a network of premium and niche content sites, and AOL has an
extensive offering of world-class tools and platforms.

What comes to mind when you think about AOL?




About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 6


Slide 6

Want to get a quick idea about the company? Try this website: What Is AOL.com. Spend 10 minutes
clicking on the links. Have fun!



About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 7


Slide 7

To figure out what’s behind the day-to-day business of AOL, you can go right to the source: the
corporate AOL website. There you will see how the company defines itself: its business, the mission
statement, values, and core products and services. Look especially at About AOL, Our Values, and
Products and Services for the answers.

Go ahead, spend 15 minutes reviewing corp.aol.com and learning about the company.



About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 8


Slide 8

You are now supporting one of the most exciting companies in the world. AOL’s mission is simple: to
Inform, Entertain, and Connect the world. You’ll see that reflected in products and services that contain
real news, are fun, and get people onto the Internet and in touch with each other.

The mission cannot be accomplished by one of us, or just a few. It requires ALL of us to focus on
making this mission a success. As representatives of AOL, it is up to us to inform, entertain, and
connect the world through every contact.




About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 9


Slide 9

There are six values that form the backbone of how the company approaches day-to-day decisions and
interactions. Let’s look at these values:
• We are in the business of helping people. Period.
• We say what we mean and do what we say. We act with integrity.
• We embrace change and a DNA of curiosity – we think big and take chances.
• We hire and empower smart people who love what they do.
• We trust and root for each other – we win as a team.
• We take fun seriously.
To wrap up, our values are about: helping people, acting with integrity, embracing change, empowering
our smart employees, working as a team, and having fun.



About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 10


Slide 10

AOL’s business consists of six types of products and services. Roll over each name to learn about that
part of the business.



About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 11


Slide 11

Now, try to identify the AOL group that we are part of. Click right on the name of our group.



About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 12

Slide 12 – Slide 14

QUIZ (questions not included in Participant Guide)

Slide notes: Please answer the review questions on the next three slides. When you have answered the
question, click the Submit button.





About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 13


Slide 15

In this section, you will learn about the AOL brand identity, and the many brands that are part of AOL.



About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 14


Slide 16

AOL has updated its look over the past quarter-century as a leading global Web services company. AOL
has been one of the best known brand names in the world. We helped the world get online, and built a
reputation around providing members with a safe, secure online experience.




About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 15


Slide 17

As we evolve, so does our brand and what we stand for as a future-facing media company making
world-class original content. There's a fun YouTube video that gives you a sense of the brand. The video
opens in a new window or tab, and you may want to adjust the window size, close advertising within the
video, and later close the YouTube window or tab and return to this course. OK, go ahead, click the AOL
logo to watch today's brand identity come to life.




About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 16


Slide 18

The brand today communicates our strategic commitment to content, and it projects confidence,
simplicity, and creativity. Our brand identity is therefore composed of two complementary elements: a
simple and modern logotype – the AOL with a period – and an ever-changing image or “canvas” that
represents our ever-changing content. Our new brand identity is bold and different, and changes the
way people think about our company and our brand.

You will have a chance to pick your own canvas on the aol website, aol.com




About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 17


Slide 19

[Continuation of prior slide.]



About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 18


Slide 20

The AOL name is powerful: almost everyone recognizes the AOL brand, and it is ranked as one of the
top 100 brands consumers “love.” [2010, from the AOL Brand Portfolio]
Click the icon to take a look at a video of the AOL story.



About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 19


Slide 21

AOL has a full community of Internet content and services. The main public-facing entry has always
been through the AOL.com website. Everyone can search and review content through this site. Our
members can also use aol.com to access their web mail.




About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 20


Slide 22

Go ahead, get comfy with AOL.com. Look around, link to things of interest…and come back to look at
something else. Suggestions of what to look for are listed here. You have 20 minutes on your own to
explore the AOL.com website.
Note that when you click links on the AOL.com website, you will go to other AOL web pages. Click on
the browser’s Back button in most cases to return to aol.com.





About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 21


Slide 23

Starting in 2011, AOL has had another front door to its community of internet content and services: the
Huffingtonpost.com website.



About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 22


Slide 24

Now spend a few minutes to take a look at the HuffingtonPost.com website. Note what’s similar…and
what’s different from aol.com. See if you recognize any sites that you link to.




About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 23


Slide 25

AOL houses about 80 brands. If there’s a topic of public interest, we have a site for it! The brands are
organized into these four areas.

The first, the Huffington Post Media Group ( HPMG ), houses a majority of the brands that focus on
content and local experiences. The guiding principle of HPMG is to create real-time engagement and
enlightenment for our millions of users, while continuing to build a comprehensive source of compelling
news, entertainment, information, and opinion.






About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 24


Slide 26
The HPMG content sites span a wide range of topics:
• Autos.
• Business, Finance & Real Estate.
• Sports.
• Travel.
• Technology.
• Education & Impact.
• Politics & Culture.



About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 25


Slide 27
Entertainment. Living. Style & Food. Health. Youth & Multicultural. Local. Products. And Partners.



About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 26


Slide 28

The Applications and Commerce brands group builds inspired products for our customers, including AIM,
AOL Mail, all of AOL’s Mobile (and tablet applications), and new additions to the team like shortcuts.com.




About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 27


Slide 29

AOL’s Business to Business brands serve publishers, advertising partners, and businesses including
Advertising.com, Adtech, 5Min, Studio Now, Goviral, Pictela, SEED, and AOL Answers.
The Applications and Commerce brands group builds inspired products for our customers, including AIM,
AOL Mail, all of AOL’s Mobile (and tablet applications), and new additions to the team like shortcuts.com.



About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 28


Slide 30

The Paid Services brands extend the AOL user base with subscriptions to products, services, and related
support for customers, outside the core email and dial-up business. As a part of the Paid Services group,
you will be exposed to all of these brands:
• Lifestore offers customers a range of subscription products and services – from PC utilities and
top notch tech support to online learning, diet and fitness programs – all geared toward
improving their lives both online and off.
• AOL Help provides customers information about our products, and answers to operating or usage
questions.
• CompuServe, the internet service provider and Netscape, the internet browser, are both part of
the AOL community.





About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 29


Slide 31

You will now take an inside look at a few brands. Follow your facilitator’s instructions to research and
report back on some brands.



About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 30

Slide 32 - 34

QUIZ (Questions not included in Participant Guide.)
Slide notes: Please answer the review questions on the next three slides. When you have answered the
question, click the Submit button.





About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 31


Slide 35




About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 32


Slide 36

Paid Services has a well-organized and comprehensive customer satisfaction organization that ensures
AOL can meet the needs of our customers, AOL Paid Services contributes to profitable membership
growth by delivering industry-leading phone, chat, e-mail and online help support services for customers
of AOL and our affiliated products and services.




About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 33


Slide 37
The way customers can tap into AOL Paid Services support varies with the type of issue, and whether
the customer is on a paid plan. All customers can access the help.aol.com website filled with product
information and troubleshooting tips, and receive email support for their questions.
Our paying customers can reach out live to you, our agents, through a variety of queues. There are both
chat queues (which we call that eSupport), and phone queues, for the US customers with common
billing, account management, and technical questions. That way, customers can type or talk with you as
they prefer. Separate queues address these same questions for international customers. There are
phone queues set up for specialty products and services. Finally, a set of phone queues address
sensitive issues and may receive referrals from the other queues.




About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 34


Slide 38

Find out more about each of the Paid Services Customer support queues. Mouse over each queue name
to learn about that queue.




About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 35

Slide 39 - 42

QUIZ (Questions not included in Participant Guide)

Please answer the review questions on the next three slides. When you have answered the question,
click the Submit button.





About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 36



Slide 43

In summary, you have learned that:
AOL is a leading-edge web services company, with an offering of premium and niche content sites,
world-class tools and platforms.
AOL’s mission is to Inform, Entertain, and Connect the world.
AOL has 6 business areas: Content, Local (content), Paid Services, AOL Advertising, AOL Ventures,
Consumer Applications.
About 80 brands are accessible through aol.com or huffingtonpost.com.
Paid Services offers customer support through online self-service Help, and through email, chat
sessions, and phone calls with agents in different specialty queues.




About AOL

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL September 22, 2011
Page 37


Slide 44

Congratulations! You have completed this training module -- About AOL. Continue to explore the
websites on your own to learn more and follow our ever-changing company.



Your Queue, Your Role: TECH
Participant Guide
















Revised: August 17, 2011
Your Queue, Your Role: TECH
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL August 17, 2011
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction You will now concentrate on what it is like to be part of an AOL Paid
Services Customer Support team, and your queue in particular. This
module provides an overview of the role of a Customer Support agent. It
continues with a focus on what your queue addresses, and the
expectations of you as a Technical Support (TECH) queue agent.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
 Describe what customers appreciate about getting help through a Paid
Services Customer Support team.
 Distinguish between issues that the Technical Support queue does and
does not support.
 Explain the purpose of the Technical Support queue, and identify the
expectations for your role.


Your Queue, Your Role: TECH
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL August 17, 2011
Page 2

Customer Support Queue Role

Mission
Statement
Write a mission statement that you believe sums up your role as a Paid
Services Customer Support agent. Record the final mission statement that
the group agrees upon in the box at the bottom of the page.


















Our Class Mission Statement

Continued on next page
Your Queue, Your Role: TECH
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL August 17, 2011
Page 3

Customer Support Queue Role, Continued

Philosophy The AOL philosophy is clearly expressed as:

“We are in the business of helping people, period.”

The Customer Support Queue philosophy incorporates this in our daily life
to be:

“Resolve the customer’s issue on the first contact.”


 What does this mean?



 How does the Customer Support Queue philosophy mirror the AOL
philosophy?



 What do you need to do, as a Customer Support Queue agent, to
make this happen?



 Why do you think this is important to the customer? To the business?




Continued on next page
Your Queue, Your Role: TECH
Customer Support Queue Role, Continued

The Face of
AOL
When customers contact AOL, who do they interface with?

Not the president, not the sales group, not the contact center manager.
YOU are the face of AOL when the customer reaches out for support. The
impression YOU make on the customer will help that customer decide
whether or not AOL is a company he or she wants to do business with.
Some customers will use the phone queues; others will use chat. Like
customers in any industry, they are willing to try any form of interaction
to have their problem resolved. It’s not the technology that makes a great
customer experience, it’s the service a customer gets from the person
they interact with – that’s YOU!
Are you well-informed and customer-friendly, or not? Do you relate to the
person, or toss out a stream of “canned” responses. Nobody really wants
canned conversation.

A Great
Customer
Experience -
Activity
Write down your ideas about the next question.
 What can you do to guarantee a great experience for the customer?
Think about a time when you had contacted a customer service center
as a customer.













AOL® CONFIDENTIAL August 17, 2011
Page 4

Your Queue, Your Role: TECH
Technical Support Queue

TECH Queue
Overview
The Technical Support (TECH) queue assists customers with AOL
software, and addresses technical issues that prevent customers from
accessing AOL or using AOL products and software.

Core
Objectives
Listed below are the core objectives of the Technical Support (TECH)
queue.
Build and Sustain a High-
Performing Team: Develop and
maintain strong support teams that
can respond to a diverse set of
customer requests, and incorporate
cross-queue policies and processes.
Profitably Drive Customer
Satisfaction and Engagement:
Simplify the customer experience so
that one agent can resolve the
customer’s technical issue, avoiding
repeat contacts to the queue.
Capitalize on Every Sales
Opportunity: Successfully pitch
relevant and appropriate Lifestore
Customer 
Satisfaction/ 
Engagement
> Sales
High 
Performing 
Team
offers, thus driving paid sales.

Goals
tion, as measured by the Member
.
e issue.
 Confirm the resolution, with the following exceptions:
ns
)
ompliance; and soft skills,
such as reassurance and active listening.
Continued on next page
There are several TECH queue goals:
 Generate strong customer satisfac
Satisfaction Index (MSI) results.
 Reduce transfers between queues
 Diagnose and confirm th
 Strive for first-time fix.
 Dial-up customers that need to disconnect to complete instructio
 Lengthy fixes where agents set expectations and customers are
comfortable completing steps on their own (such as install/uninstall
 Maintain current levels of performance across all metrics: average
handle time (AHT); issue resolution; tool c
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL August 17, 2011
Page 5

Your Queue, Your Role: TECH
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL August 17, 2011
Page 6

Customer Support Queue Role, Continued

Technical
Support
Contact
Drivers
There are certain reasons that customers contact the Technical Support
queue for assistance. The business refers to these reasons as contact
drivers (or call drivers). Customers may contact AOL en masse in the
event of a service outage, for example.
Understanding what causes customers to contact the Technical Support
queue will help you understand the ways in which you will be called upon
to help our customers. Later in training you will learn how to use a Call
Driver Tracking (CDT) tool you will use to capture this information.
Following are the top contract drivers for AOL TECH – the most frequent
reasons that customers contact this queue:
1. Unable to connect to the AOL Service.
2. Missing emails.
3. Need assistance installing / uninstalling the AOL Software.
4. Do not see the screen name in the sign on screen.
5. Unable to browse a specific website.
6. Need assistance installing McAfee.
7. Have mail they didn’t send in their Sent folder.
8. Receive an “Invalid screen name or password” message.
Continued on next page
Your Queue, Your Role: TECH
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL August 17, 2011
Page 7

Customer Support Queue Role, Continued

Levels of
Support
The Technical Support queue provides technical support for AOL software
and services in two levels – basic and premium -- as described below.

AOL uses an Interactive Voice Recognition System (IVR) which pre-
screens calls. As a result, free AOL customers are directed to online
support at help.aol.com. In rare cases, a free customer may get through
the IVR and be transferred to the Technical Support queue for support.
Participants will learn more about how to handle these calls later in training.
Basic Premium
Who What Who What
Non paying
accounts
Online support
at help.aol.com

Paid customers
on any price
plan
Live help
through phone
or chat queues
Self help at
help.aol.com

Support
Boundaries
As a Technical Support agent, you will be contacted about issues that are
related to AOL and also for issues that are not. You will provide
troubleshooting assistance for AOL issues, but refer non-AOL issues to the
appropriate third party.
AOL Issue Non-AOL Issue

Continued on next page
Your Queue, Your Role: TECH
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL August 17, 2011
Page 8

Customer Support Queue Role, Continued

Role and
Expectations
Let’s take a few minutes to review the role and expectations for the
agents in the Technical Support queue.
 Complete all training, withpractice scenarios, and familiarize yourself
with the Technical Support workflows.
 Be prepared and set yourself up for success each day:
 Launch and utilize only AOL-approved tools
 Read any communication updates
 Read any emails from your coach
 Comply with all Quality Guidelines:
 Let our valuable customers hear you “smile” on every contact
 Probe and understand the issue the customer is experiencing.
 Read account histories and follow the contact flow on every contact.
 Use tools appropriately to deliver accurate resolutions.
 Code the Call Driver Tracking tool on every contact.
 Report any errors or tool issues you or the customer experienced.
 Pitch the appropriate Lifestore offer, if customer is eligible.

NOTE: Each of these points will be covered in more detail throughout the
training.

Your Queue, Your Role: TECH
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL August 17, 2011
Page 9

Knowledge Check

Activity −
Review
Working with a partner, answer the following questions.
1.
Recall the mission statement the class developed for a Paid
Services Customer Support agent.

2.
Distinguish between issues that the TECH queue does and
does not handle. Write “Yes” or “No” for each situation
below.

TECH Queue?
(Yes/No)
Customer Request.
Printer will not print a PowerPoint file.
Need to install AOL software on a new
computer.
Cannot log in to the Yahoo game site.
Want to sort the AIM buddy list.
Cannot get online with the AOL dial-up
connection.

3. Name four primary goals of the Technical Support queue.


4.
List at least three reasons customers contact the TECH
queue.



Your Queue, Your Role: TECH
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL August 17, 2011
Page 10

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
 Describe what customers appreciate about getting help through a Paid
Services Customer Support team.
 Distinguish between issues that the Technical Support queue does and
does not address.
 Explain the purpose of the Technical Support queue, and identify the
expectations for your role.




AOL Membership Basics
Participant Guide
















Revised: October 5, 2011
AOL Membership Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 5, 2011
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction One of the first steps in providing a world class member experience is
building a solid understanding of the basic AOL membership details. AOL
provides a variety of paid price plans to fit the needs of different
members. Members can also take advantage of the free AOL service.
During this section of training you will learn about the different price
plans, offers, and the features associated with the various AOL
memberships.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
 Describe the different AOL price plans and the features associated with
each.
 Describe the additional features and benefits included with AOL price
plans.

AOL Membership Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 5, 2011
Page 2


Price Plans

Introduction AOL has created several price plans to ensure that members can choose
the plan that best meets their needs. During this section of training you
will research the different AOL price plans and use the offer sequence to
determine the correct plan for a member.

Research
AOL Price
Plans
It is important to understand the available price plans so that you can
ensure you offer the correct one to fit the member’s needs. Go to
Keyword: Change Plan or changeplan.aol.com to learn more about
the available price plans. Use the area below to take notes.













AOL Membership Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 5, 2011
Page 3


Price Plan Features & Benefits

Introduction All AOL memberships have great features; however, some features are
only available for paid memberships. Each plan has a unique set of
included features. This section looks at each of the features in more
depth.

Basic
Security -
McAfee
VirusScan
Plus
AOL offers free, automatically-updating safety and security tools –
protecting the whole PC, not just e-mail. When talking with members
explain that it is free and requires a separate easy download to any PC
with Windows XP or 2000. AOL security products include the following:
 Anti-Virus protection
 Spyware protection
 Basic firewall
 Parental Controls
 Computer Check-up
 Spam protection
NOTE: Downloads and additional information is available for these
services at Keyword: Safety or at safety.aol.com.

Premium
Security -
McAfee
Internet
Security
Suite
The McAfee Internet Security Suite includes all the same features as the
McAfee VirusScan Plus. In addition the Internet Security Suite also
includes the following features:
 PC Health – system tools to help keep your PC running at optimum
performance.
 Identify Protection – Personal information request check and blocking
capability; password protected information
 Network Protection and Tools – Network map and capability to view
and fix network vulnerability
Continued on next page
AOL Membership Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 5, 2011
Page 4


Price Plan Features & Benefits, Continued

Screen
Names
Both free and paid AOL accounts include up to seven screen names. The
primary master screen name is the first screen name that was created on
the account. Only the primary master screen name can add additional
screen names to the account. Master screen names also have the ability
to do the following:
 Change the account’s billing method and price plan.
 Change the Parental Control settings for other screen names on the
account.
 Create, delete, or restore any screen names on the account except the
primary master screen name
 Remove the Guest option from the sign on drop-down menu, allowing
only screen names on your account to use your AOL software.

Support The level of support a member receives is based on their price plan.
Listed below are the two types of support. Below are the details of both
limited and unlimited support.
Limited Limited support allows a customer to use Keyword: Help
(www.help.aol.com) to answer any questions they might have related
to the AOL. Plans with the limited support option also include:
 24/7 Live online chat support
 24/7 Live technical support for connectivity issues.
Unlimited Like the limited support, unlimited support allows AOL users to access
Keyword: Help (www.help.aol.com). In addition, unlimited support
includes:
 24/7 live online chat support.
 24/7 phone support for technical issues.

Additional
Benefits
Each price plan includes additional value for members in the form of
special member benefits. Review the Price Plan Benefits Pod Sheet in
Pulsar, which provides details on which features are included with each
price plan. The next section of this module describes these benefits.

AOL Membership Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 5, 2011
Page 5


LifeLock ID Theft Protection

Introduction According to the Social Security Administration, identity theft is one of the
fastest growing crimes in America. Personal information is stored in a
variety of places and identity thieves are constantly looking for new ways
to steal this information.
AOL has partnered with LifeLock to provide our members with a complete
identity protection service. During this section of training you will learn
the details of this program and how it can help members protect
themselves and their identity!

Protection
Package
The LifeLock protection service includes the following:
 Identity Threat Detection and Alerts - Alerts members whenever
LifeLock detects their personal information in fraudulent applications
for credit and/or services within their extensive network.
 Lost Wallet Protection - LifeLock will help quickly cancel and replace
the contents of a lost or stolen wallet to help stop fraudulent charges.
 Advanced Internet Monitoring - Patrols the web for the illegal
selling or trading of personal information. If activity is detected,
LifeLock will alert members to the potential issue.
 24/7 365 Member Service – Member Service available for all
LifeLock subscribers anytime.
 Reduced PreApproved Credit Offers - LifeLock will request that the
member’s name be removed from pre-approved credit card offer
mailing lists.
 Address Change Verification - Warns members when a detected
change of address is requested, helping reduce chances of mail fraud.
 $1 Million Total Service Guarantee - As a LifeLock member, if they
become a victim of identity theft because of a failure in LifeLock
service, LifeLock will help fix it at its expense, up to $1,000,000.
Members who want to take advantage of this benefit can use the
link included within the educational email or go to lifelock.aol.com
to sign up.


AOL Membership Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 5, 2011
Page 6


VIP Program

Introduction Building loyal customers is critical for most businesses. Customers have
many different options and developing long-term loyal customers is a
major part of building and maintaining a successful company. Not only is
it easier to sell more things to customers who already love you, but these
raving fans will tell other customers about your brand or company.
Companies spend more than $2 billion on loyalty programs a year, and
statistics show the average American household belongs to about 14
different rewards programs, even if they're only active in six.
During this section of training you will learn the details of the VIP program
and the great benefits these members receive for themselves!

Program
Details
While we are adding great new features like LifeLock to our valued AOL
members, the AOL VIP Program aims to thank those who are among our
most valued customers with priority access to our best customer service.
These currently include a select group of low and high-tenured AOL
members who are customers of our highest price plan available today.
As an AOL VIP, members can enjoy the following benefits:
 Move members quickly through to a skilled AOL VIP Consultant via the
special toll-free number, saving members time.
 Specialized support from our AOL VIP Consultants who reflect our
commitment to world-class customer service
 Efficient resolution to any AOL technical or account issue from our
skilled AOL VIP Consultants
The AOL VIP Program is one way AOL is attempting to increase member
loyalty, and to thank our most valued AOL members for their continued
support of AOL.

AOL Membership Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 5, 2011
Page 7


Extended Computer Protection

Introduction Almost everyone has experienced some sort of computer problem,
ranging from a minor inconvenience to a major problem that includes
hardware issues. AOL has always offered technical support to members
who are on a paid price plan, however, this support is limited to coverage
for an AOL issue.
As an added benefit, members on an eligible price plan will now have
additional coverage for computer hardware issues. The Extended
Computer Protection program provides members with protection for
hardware issues. You will learn the details of this program and how
members can use it to protect their computer purchases.

Program
Details
Depending on their price plan, AOL members can be eligible for an annual
coverage of up to $1250 of extended computer protection to repair or
replace their computer in case of hardware failure. This covers one
personal PC, laptop or tablet as well as the monitor, keyboard and mouse.
This program provides members with the following repair options:
 Remote In Repair: An experienced technician can automatically log
in the member’s computer to help troubleshoot issues.
 In-Home Service Repair: A trained technician can come to
troubleshoot issues on location for those who prefer in-person repair.
 Mailing-In Repair: Members are provided with a pre-paid shipping
label or box to mail in their hardware.
 Facility Repair: In certain locations, members may have to take their
hardware into an approved repair facility for service.
Additional assistance includes phone troubleshooting and support that is
available 24/7, 365 days a year. Phone representatives can troubleshoot
issues and provide real-time scheduling if an appointment is necessary.
If they are unable to restore a hardware issue or if the extended
computer protection amount does not cover the entire repair then the
member will receive a check for the amount of coverage to put towards
the purchase of a new computer or the cost of repair elsewhere.
To initiate a repair, members will call the toll-free number. An
experienced representative will troubleshoot the issue. If it is not a
hardware issue, they will provide general software repair and transfer the
member to the appropriate queue.



AOL Membership Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 5, 2011
Page 8


Sprint Discount

Introduction As you learned in an earlier training session, AOL is now partnering with
Sprint to offer our members a special opportunity to save money on
Sprint monthly service plans. Members on eligible AOL price plans can
apply for a 10% discount off of their Sprint monthly service plan. During
this section of training you will learn how members will apply for this
discount so they can save money and “protect their wallet!”

Program
Details
This offer is available for new or existing Sprint subscribers with a two
year contract. The date of eligibility for this discount depends on the
member’s price plan. Here are the eligibility guidelines:
 $6.99 – 9/1/11
 $11.99 – 9/15/11
 $14.95 – 9/22/11
 $25.90 – 9/26/11

AOL Membership Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 5, 2011
Page 9


Norton Online Backup

Introduction AOL has partnered with Symantec, creator of many familiar Norton
products, to offer valuable online storage to members on specific price
plans at no additional cost. During this section of training you will learn
the details of this program and how members can take advantage of the
program to protect their files.

Program
Details
Members on the AOL Total Advantage ($25.90) and AOL Advantage
Premium ($14.95) price plans are eligible for the Norton Online Backup
benefit. Eligible members can receive up to 5 GB of complimentary online
backup storage to protect valuable documents, photos, and more. Norton
stores the files securely from up to 5 computers and provides easy access
to stored files from any device connected to the Internet.
Members who already subscribe to Norton Online Backup using their AOL
email address will get the complimentary 5 GB storage added to their
existing account.
Benefit Features
 5 GB of online backup to protect your favorite photos, valuable
documents, and more
 Your files are encrypted and stored using government-grade security
 Automatically and quickly keeps files backed up. You can also easily
locate these files by keyword from your storage area.
 Save $50 a year compared to other online backup file storage
services
*

This benefit is expected to be available to eligible members beginning in
October 2011.

Product
Video
Watch the Norton Online Backup Product Video. Use the space below to
write down at least 3 features that you think would appeal to our
members.







AOL Membership Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 5, 2011
Page 10


Hyatt Legal Services

Introduction AOL has partnered with Hyatt Legal Services to provide our members with
an AOL exclusive benefit. AOL members on specific price plans are eligible
to consult with attorneys from Hyatt Legal to prepare and update their
wills for free. During this section of training you will learn the details of
this program and how members can use it to protect themselves and their
families.

Program
Details
AOL Total Advantage ($25.90) members are eligible to receive
complimentary telephone and office counseling, preparation, and updating
of wills and testamentary trusts. These members can also be reimbursed
for preparation of wills by attorneys outside Hyatt Legal Plans’ network.
Hyatt Legal Plans’ attorneys will also provide complimentary consultations
on other legal matters to advise members on their rights and recommend
a course of action.
Benefit Features
 Extensive network of 11,000 attorneys
 Unlimited will preparation, updates, and consultation
 Nearly 35 years of experience providing legal plans
 Save approximately $200-$800 on will preparation
The Hyatt Legal benefit will be available to eligible members beginning in
October 2011. Consult Pulsar for more detailed information as the launch
date approaches.

AOL Membership Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 5, 2011
Page 11


MyBenefits

Mybenefits.a
ol.com
Members can go online to MyBenefits.aol.com to view the following
information:
 Benefits for which the account is eligible
 Activations status
 Link to learn more info on each non activated benefit
 Link to activate
NOTE: This information can also be found at myaccount.aol.com.






AOL Membership Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 5, 2011
Page 12


Special Promotions

Introduction In addition to the standard features that are included with the various
AOL price plans, at times AOL also offers special promotions or benefits to
our members. During this section of training you will review the current
special promotions that are being offered.

Special
Promotions
Quick Link
Working with a partner, review the Special Promotions Quick Link in
Pulsar. Be prepared to present this information to the class.

AOL Membership Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 5, 2011
Page 13


Payment Methods

Introduction AOL offers a variety of payment options to fit the needs of a variety of
potential and existing members. Specifically, AOL accepts the following
payment methods:
 Credit Card
 Direct Debit Card
 Direct Withdrawal from Checking Account/Saving Accounts
 Phone Bill
During this section of training you will review the details of each payment
method.

Credit Cards Most of our members choose to pay for the AOL service with credit cards.
Our members can use the following major credit cards for automatic
payment:
 VISA
 MasterCard
 Discover
 American Express
NOTE: The member or AOL Member Services can update a member’s
account to these credit cards at any time.

Debit Cards A debit card is similar to a credit card, except the funds are taken directly
from the member’s checking account. A debit card has either a Visa or
MasterCard logo. Here are some things to remember about debit cards.
 No transaction fee
 Requires an electronic signature for the electronic funds transfer
(EFT). Gandalf will prompt you with appropriate scripting to allow the
member to verbally agree to the EFT.
 Members can change their debit card information at any time.
NOTE: Remember to ask the member if his Visa or MasterCard is a credit
or debit card. If the member indicates that it can be used as either you
need to enter the card in as debit.
Continued on next page
AOL Membership Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 5, 2011
Page 14

Payment Methods, Continued

Checking /
Savings
Account
REVIEW this section.
EMPHASIZE there is a $7.00 monthly transaction fee for checking and
savings accounts. Members could save $84 a year if they use a credit
card.

Phone Bill EXPLAIN that new members can choose to use their phone bill as their
payment method when registering for an AOL account.
EMPHASIZE that this method of payment includes a $ 7 per month
transaction fee.
Continued on next page
AOL Membership Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 5, 2011
Page 15

Payment Methods, Continued

Checking /
Savings
Account
Members can also choose to use a direct withdrawal from their checking
or savings account to pay their monthly membership fees. This option
offers members the opportunity to use AOL without providing a credit
card. Here are some details about this method of payment.
 Checking/savings accounts can be accepted at any time.
 Members will incur a transaction fee of $7 per month.
 Members will be required to agree to an EFT transfer by going online
and typing I Agree in the form that will automatically pop up the first
time they sign online.
NOTE: Remember, $6.99 and $4.99 members do not incur the $7
transaction fee.

Phone Bill The phone bill payment method is only available when registering a new
account. Existing accounts cannot be changed to this method of payment.
Here are some details about this payment method.
 Members will incur a transaction fee of $7 per month.
 Members will be required to agree to an EFT transfer by going online
and typing I Agree in the form that will automatically pop up the first
time they sign online.
NOTE: Remember, $6.99 and $4.99 members do not incur the $7
transaction fee.
Continued on next page
AOL Membership Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 5, 2011
Page 16

Payment Methods, Continued

Activity:
Payment
Methods
CONDUCT the activity on the participant page by giving the participants a
couple minutes to complete the table on their own or with partners.
ASK the participants to call out the answers to the chart.

Billing Cycle DISCUSS AOL’s billing cycle as needed.
Continued on next page
AOL Membership Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 5, 2011
Page 17

Payment Methods, Continued

Activity:
Payment
Methods
Complete the table below.


Payment Method
Can be Accepted
When?
Transaction Fee
Associated
Electronic
Signature
Required?
Major Credit Card
(Visa, MC, AMEX,
Discover)

Visa or MasterCard
Debit

Checking/Saving
Account

Phone Bill

Billing Cycle Everyday day at 10AM EST AOL closes the billing cycle for accounts that
are scheduled to bill that day and any pending price plan changes are also
completed.
Depending on the type of payment method that is being used it may take
several days for the charges to appear on the member’s account.

AOL Membership Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 5, 2011
Page 18

Acquiring AOL Software

Introduction REVIEW this section.

Acquiring the
AOL
Software
REVIEW how potential members can get the AOL software.

AOL Membership Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 5, 2011
Page 19

Acquiring AOL Software

Introduction AOL offers a variety of ways members can take advantage of the features
that are available. One of these options includes installing the AOL
software on their computer. During this section of training you will learn
how members can get the AOL software.

Acquiring the
AOL
Software
The AOL software is available to members and potential members in a
variety of ways discussed below. The software:
 Is pre-loaded on some new computers.
 Can be downloaded from AOL.com.
 Can be ordered by calling AOL and requesting a CD.

AOL Membership Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 5, 2011
Page 20

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Review AOL offers a variety of price plans and products to members and the
benefits of each plan. Let’s review some of these features and plans.
 Unlimited Customer Support for $11.99 per month.
 Limited Customer Support for $9.99 per month
 Free AOL.
 AOL Dial-Up Advantage for $25.90 per month.
AOL memberships include the following features:
 Basic support: AOL Help with over 4000 Articles
 Basic Safety and Security features: Anti-virus, Anti-Spyware, Anti-
phishing, Basic Firewall, and Parental Controls
 Premium Safety and Security features: PC Health, Identity
protection and Network protection tools
Additional benefits are included with each price plan. Details can be found
in Pulsar.
Members can pay for their monthly charges using:
 Credit/Debit card
 Direct debit from a checking or savings account, including a monthly
$7.00 transaction fee.
 Phone bill, including a monthly $7.00 transaction fee.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
 Describe the different AOL price plans and the features associated with
each.
 Describe the additional features and benefits included with AOL price
plans.


Terms of Service
Participant Guide
















Revised: February 23, 2011
Terms of Service
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 23, 2011
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction This module addresses the Terms of Service that every member agrees to
in order to protect all members’ rights to a secure and harassment free
online experience.
The content for this module is primarily elearning. Your facilitator will
provide instructions on how to access the content online.


User
Interface
This module is designed to prevent “clicking through” the content. It is important
that you ensure your class understands that everyone should take the time to
read through each element of the eLearning module.
NOTE: There may be a delay of five seconds after all of the content has been
displayed on a slide. Users will be unable to move forward until the five seconds
has elapsed.
The following items are a part of the navigation tools for the eLearning content:

Continued on next page
Terms of Service
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 23, 2011
Page 2

Module Overview, Continued

User
Interface
(Continued)
If you attempt to advance a slide before it has completely displayed all of
its content, you will receive the error message below. You must view all
content prior to moving on within the presentation.


Terms of Service
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 23, 2011
Page 3

eLearning Content

Terms of Service

Continued on next page
Terms of Service
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 23, 2011
Page 4

eLearning Content, Continued

Terms of Service (TOS)
•After completing this training you will be able to:
–Explain the importance of the Terms of Service
–Describe the main elements of  the Terms of Service
–Describe the consequences of a Terms of Service violation
The Terms of Service are the foundation by which AOL outlines its usage agreement between itself and
the members. As an AOL consultant you are expected to adhere to the Terms of Service at all times, so
it is important that you clearly understand them. After completing this module you will be able to explain
the importance of the Terms of Service, describe the main elements of the Terms of Service and
describe the consequences of a Terms of Service violation.

Continued on next page
Terms of Service
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 23, 2011
Page 5

eLearning Content, Continued

•The Terms of Service, or  TOS, consists of the guidelines that define 
AOL’s commitment to our members, as well as the rights and 
responsibilities of AOL members to each  other. 
Terms of Service
The Terms of Service, or TOS, consist of the guidelines that define AOL’s commitment to our members
as well as the rights and responsibilities of AOL members to each other.


Terms of Service
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 23, 2011
Page 6

eLearning Content, Continued

Member Agreement
•Terms of  Service (TOS) is a contract between AOL and its members:
–Members agree to abide by the Terms of  Service
–AOL agrees to hold all members accountable to the Terms of 
Service and agrees to abide by it as a company

In order to use the AOL service, every member must agree to the Terms of Service. Members are
prompted to read and agree to the Terms of Service at their first sign-on after the account was created.
As a part of this contract AOL agrees to hold all members accountable to the Terms of Service and
agrees to uphold the Terms of Service as a company.


Terms of Service
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 23, 2011
Page 7

eLearning Content, Continued

ACTIVITY
The Terms of Service is separated into three sections: The Member Agreement, Community
Guidelines and Privacy Policy. Click on the tabs below to review the details of each section.

Member Agreement - The Member Agreement covers all information related to their
membership and the usage of their account. This includes:
„ Qualifications for Membership
„ Registration for Membership
„ Your Responsibility for Use of Your
Account
„ Unsolicited Bulk Communications
„ Billing and Charges
„ Communications Charges
„ Changes to the Service
„ Content
„ License
„ Disclaimer of Warranties
„ Limitation of Liability
„ Indemnification
„ Termination

Community Guidelines - The Community Guidelines includes a code of conduct that
governs users of AOL. They include:

„ Respecting others
„ Abiding by all laws imposed by the government
„ Suggestions for protecting children, accounts and privacy

Privacy Policy - The Privacy Policy provides members with information on the following
topics:
„ Collection of Your AOL Network
Information
„ How Your AOL Network Information is
Used
„ Your Choices About Your AOL Network
Information
„ Cookies and Web Beacons
„ Information for AOL and CompuServe
Subscribers
„ Personal Financial Information
„ Our Commitment to Security
„ Special Note for Parents
„ How to Contact AOL
„ Changes to Privacy Policy
Continued on next page
Terms of Service
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 23, 2011
Page 8

eLearning Content, Continued

ACTIVITY
There are several ways to locate the Terms of Service. New members will receive a pop-up prompting
them to read the Terms of Service the first time they log into their AOL account. They can also be
located by going to Keyword: Terms of Service or Keyword: TOS. In addition members can always
access this information from discover.aol.com or help.aol.com.
The Terms of Service establish codes of conduct, ensuring that all members are free to
enjoy their time online without having to worry.

Harrassment - A violation occurs when a member badgers, baits, bullies, persecutes or
torments another individual.

Example: "Sure I respect your opinion, I'd just like to shove it down your throat."

Fraud - Pretending to be someone else is against TOS, whether the impersonation is of
another member, someone working for AOL or a celebrity.

Example: "SurveysIntl: On behalf of AOL I'd like to know what you think of Red Lounge.
Would you tell your friends to come here?"

Prejudice - AOL reserves the right to take appropriate action against any account using the
service to post, transmit, promote, distribute or facilitate distribution of content intended
to victimize, harass, degrade or intimidate an individual or group on the basis of age,
disability, ethnicity, gender, race, religion or sexual orientation.

Invasion of Privacy - A violation occurs when a member solicits a product, service, other
chat room or personal web page.

Example: "Hey, I have a business I started where I sell term papers for $10 each. Check
out my web page at www.solicitation.com."

Threats against Children - AOL takes extra steps to protect children and improve their
online experience.

Example: Parents can control their child's experience online using AOL's Parental
Controls (Keyword: Parental Controls or myaccount.aol.com). These simple, flexible tools
allow parents to customize content and functionality to their child's maturity level.

Terms of Service
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 23, 2011
Page 9

eLearning Content, Continued

Locating the Terms of Service (TOS)
Locating the Terms of Service
–During the registration process
–AOL Keyword: Terms of Service or TOS
–Help.aol.com  
–Discover.aol.com
There are several ways to locate the Terms of Service. New members will receive a pop-up prompting
them to read the Terms of Service the first time they log into their AOL account. They can also be
located by going to Keyword: Terms of Service or Keyword: TOS. In addition members can always
access this information from discover.aol.com or help.aol.com.

Continued on next page
Terms of Service
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 23, 2011
Page 10

eLearning Content, Continued

Interpreting the Terms of Service
•Never interpret the meaning or contents of the Terms of Service 
when communicating with members
You should never interpret the meaning or contents of the Terms of Service when communicating with
members. Doing so may have very serious, even legal repercussions.

Continued on next page
Terms of Service
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 23, 2011
Page 11

eLearning Content, Continued


REVIEW QUIZ
Quiz questions can be accessed within the elearning module.
Continued on next page
Terms of Service
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 23, 2011
Page 12

eLearning Content, Continued

Reviewing the Terms of Service
Activity
•Why does AOL advise that members should choose  their access 
numbers carefully?
•What are some things parents can do to safeguard their children 
online?
•Does AOL share, rent or sell members’ personal information?
Take a few minutes to access the Terms of Service on your computer and find the answers to the
questions shown here. To access the AOL service from this course, hold the Alt key down on your
keyboard and then press Tab. This allows you to navigate between the training and another application.
Another option is to minimize the training on your task bar and then launch AOL. In either case, do not
close this window. When you are finished reviewing the Terms of Service click on the forward button to
continue.

Continued on next page
Terms of Service
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 23, 2011
Page 13

eLearning Content, Continued


REVIEW QUIZ

Quiz questions can be accessed within the elearning module.
Continued on next page
Terms of Service
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 23, 2011
Page 14

eLearning Content, Continued

Violations
•A Terms of Service violation occurs when a screen name on an AOL 
account commits any activity in violation of AOL’s guidelines for 
acceptable online behavior

A Terms of Service violation occurs when a screen name on an AOL account commits any activity in
violation of AOL's guidelines for acceptable online behavior. For example, if an AOL screen name uses
vulgar language and verbally attacks another individual this is unacceptable behavior and should be
reported as harassment. Violations must be reported in order for action to be taken on an account.

Continued on next page
Terms of Service
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 23, 2011
Page 15

eLearning Content, Continued

ACTIVITY
Sometimes members do not abide by the Terms of Service. There are several ways to report a violation
depending on where the violation occurred. Click on each tab below to learn how to report a violation in
that forum.

Chat Room - Click on the Notify AOL link in the lower right hand corner of the chat winder
and follow the instructions.

Email - Click on the Report Spam button to report any inappropriate emails.

Instant Message - Click on the Report IM Spam button on the IM window to report an
inappropriate IM.

AOL WebPage, Screen Name or Profile - Go to Keyword: Notify AOL and fill out the
appropriate form.

Continued on next page
Terms of Service
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 23, 2011
Page 16

eLearning Content, Continued

Reporting Violations
•Explore Keyword: Notify AOL and help.aol.com for information on 
how to report violations 
Take a few minutes to explore Keyword: Notify AOL and help.aol.com for information on how to report
violations. To access the AOL service from this course, hold the Alt key down on your keyboard and
then press Tab. This allows you to navigate between the training and another application. Another option
is to minimize the training on your task bar and then launch AOL. In either case, do not close this
window. When you are finished reviewing this section click on the forward button to continue
Continued on next page
Terms of Service
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 23, 2011
Page 17

eLearning Content, Continued

Outcome of Violations
•AOL may:
–Scramble passwords and issue a warning when the member calls 
for assistance
–Temporarily suspend access to the account
–Permanently terminate the account
AOL takes action on Terms of Service violations based on the severity of the violation. AOL may
scramble passwords and issue a warning when the member calls for assistance, the account's online
access may be temporarily suspended, or the account may be permanently terminated.

Continued on next page
Terms of Service
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 23, 2011
Page 18

eLearning Content, Continued

Handling TOS Violation Calls
•Members with a TOS violation on  the account need to  be 
transferred to the CAT Appeals queue  for assistance
•Do not  release any information on the account; simply advise the 
member that you need  to transfer them to another department for 
assistance

Members with a TOS violation on their account need to be transferred to the CAT Appeals queue for
assistance. Do not release any information on the account, simply advise the member that you need to
transfer them to another department for assistance.

Continued on next page
Terms of Service
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 23, 2011
Page 19

eLearning Content, Continued

Module Summary
Now that you have completed this training you should be able to:
–Explain the importance of the Terms of Service
–Describe the main elements of  the Terms of Service
–Describe the consequences of a Terms of Service violation
Now that you have completed this training you should be able to: Explain the importance of the Terms of
Service, Describe the main elements of the Terms of Service, and describe the consequences of a
Terms of Service violation.



Terms of Service
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 23, 2011
Page 20

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
Explain the elements of the Terms of Service and consequences for
related violations.


AOL Software
Participant Guide
















Revised: October 18, 2011
AOL Software
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction As a new employee with AOL, it is important that you understand some
basic facts about the culture at AOL and the company itself. This module
provides you with information about the AOL Business, products and
services, and the importance of your individual contribution as a technical
support consultant.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
 Describe the functionality of primary features of the AOL Software.

AOL Software
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 2

AOL Client Software

The AOL
Client
Software
The most recent versions can be downloaded at http://download.aol.com.

To ensure the best performance of AOL software, AOL highly recommends
that members use the latest version available for their operating system.
When working with members using older (legacy) versions of the AOL
client software, you will promote upgrading to a newer version, following
the guidelines below.

If Member is
using version...
Then ...
8.0 or lower Urge member to upgrade to a newer version of AOL.
“To ensure the best performance of the AOL software it is
highly recommended that you use the latest version of the
Desktop software available for your Operating system.”
Provide information on where/how to download the AOL software.

If Member is not willing to upgrade…
Provide support using limited number of help articles addressing
common fixes.

You are unable to provide support outside of the scope of these
articles.
AOL 5.0 or lower Explain that the member must upgrade to a newer version of AOL to
receive support

Use Help article to provide instructions on how to upgrade and to
provide information on minimum system requirements.
Continued on next page
AOL Software
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 3

AOL Client Software, Continued

Client
Introduction
& Preview
Your facilitator will conduct an activity that provides the opportunity to
preview the latest version(s) of AOL software. Write down any questions
you have about the software as well as features you would like to explore
in more depth.
























Continued on next page
AOL Software
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 4

AOL Client Software, Continued

AOL
Software
Exploration
Your facilitator will conduct an activity that gives you an opportunity for
hands on exploration and comparison with different versions of AOL.
Answer the questions included on the following pages. (Not all questions
are relevant to all AOL client software versions.)
 Launch
 What do you see when software launches?


 What is a TOD?


 Sign On Screen
 What features/options are available?


 How do you add a screen name?


 How do you sign in as a guest?


 How do you save a password?


 What do you do if you forget your password?


 How do you set up or change a connection?


Continued on next page
AOL Software
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 5

AOL Client Software, Continued

AOL
Software
Exploration
(continued)
 Email
 How do you access email?


 How do you write mail?


 How do you access your Address book?


 How do you add/delete an entry in your address book?


 How do you access the spam folder?


 How do you report spam?


 Can/How do you add multiple email accounts?


 How do you set up or change mail settings or preferences?


 What are some options in the mail settings?




Continued on next page
AOL Software
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 6

AOL Client Software, Continued

AOL
Software
Exploration
(continued)
 Email (continued)
 What is a unified inbox? How do you switch to/from this mailbox
view?


 How long is mail automatically saved? What are the storage limits
for mail?


 What is official mail? How can you identify it?


 Web browsing
 How do you open a browser window?


 How do you open your Favorites list?


 How do you add or remove a website to/from your Favorites list?


 How do you open a website in a new tab?



Continued on next page
AOL Software
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 7

AOL Client Software, Continued

AOL
Software
Exploration
(continued)
 Personal File Cabinet
 What is it used for?



 How do you set it up?



 Keywords
 What are they?



 How do you use them?





AOL Software
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 8

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
 Describe the functionality of primary features of the AOL Software.



Webmail
Participant Guide




















Revised: January 18, 2012
Classic Webmail
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 18, 2012
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction In addition to using the AOL downloadable client software, our members
can also access their email directly on the web. AOL offers two webmail
options, Classic Webmail and Project Phoenix Webmail. In this module
you will explore Classic webmail and get hands-on experience exploring
the product and the related content on help.aol.com.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
 Describe the primary features and functionality of current versions of
AOL Mail on the Web.
 Locate and utilize AOL Help articles to find content related to Webmail.

Classic Webmail
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 18, 2012
Page 2


Intro to Webmail

Accessing &
Signing In to
Webmail
Members can access their mail on the web in a couple of different ways.
They can go to http://mail.aol.com, where they will see a prompt asking
for their username or email and password. They can also go to
www.aol.com and click the Sign In link or Mail button. After clicking either
of those, they will receive the same prompt asking for their
username/email and password.


Webmail
Versions
AOL offers multiple versions of webmail. The three versions currently in
use are Classic Webmail, Classic Webmail Refresh, and Project Phoenix.
Classic Webmail and Classic Webmail Refresh are both referred to as AOL
Mail on the Web and have many similarities. During 2012 Classic Webmail
users will have their accounts converted to the Classic Webmail Refresh
version.
Project Phoenix has a different look and feel and different functionality
than Classic Webmail or Classic Webmail Refresh. During 2010 some
members converted to using this version during an “invitation only”
period. Currently invitations for use are no longer being offered, however,
you will still provide support to members who use this version.
All new accounts created in 2012 and going forward will default to the
Classic Webmail Refresh version. The default for accounts opened prior to
2012 is typically set to be directed to Classic Webmail on their initial log
in. However, if a member has been migrated to the Classic Webmail
Refresh version or has been opted in to Project Phoenix, (reviewed in a
later module) they will be directed there instead.

Support for
Webmail
Versions –
ULV ONLY
This section is for ULV agents only!
You will provide support within your scope for questions and issues
related to the Classic Webmail and Classic Webmail Refresh versions.
Any questions or issues related to Project Phoenix should be transferred
to the TLV queue via the AOLPHX Service Line.
Continued on next page
Classic Webmail
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 18, 2012
Page 3


Intro to Webmail, Continued

Switching
between
Versions
As you can see below, if a member is using Classic webmail, they will see
the Switch to Phoenix link.

If a member is using Project Phoenix, they will see the Switch to Classic
Mail link.

If a member is using the Classic Webmail Refresh version, the sign in/sign
out area will be located on the right side of the window. There are no
options to switch back to the Classic Webmail version once a member has
been migrated to the Classic Webmail Refresh version.

There is, however, an option to switch to the Project Phoenix version for
those who had previously accepted an invitation. To switch to Project
Phoenix from Classic Webmail Refresh, the member must click on Options
and select Switch to Project Phoenix.


Classic Webmail
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 18, 2012
Page 4


Webmail Exploration

Mail Tour
Preview
Take a few minutes to preview Webmail and get a first glimpse of the
features within your account. To start off, go through the Mail Tour that is
also available to members. You will find the Mail Tour at the locations
included in the table below for the different Webmail versions.
Classic Webmail Classic Webmail Refresh




Similarities
to AOL
Software
What features and functionality are similar to the downloadable AOL
Software? (continue on next page)

Continued on next page
Classic Webmail
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 18, 2012
Page 5


Webmail Exploration, Continued

Similarities to AOL Software (continued)


Differences
from AOL
Software
What features and functionality are different from the downloadable AOL
Software?

Continued on next page
Classic Webmail
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 18, 2012
Page 6


Webmail Exploration, Continued

Webmail
Help
There is currently help content available at help.aol.com for all webmail
versions. The simplest way to ensure that you are viewing content for the
correct version is to go to help.aol.com and click on AOL Mail on the
carousel below the search bar.

Then you will see screen shots of the Classic Webmail and Refresh
versions. Clicking on the appropriate version will bring you to a help
section specific to that version.

Continued on next page
Classic Webmail
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 18, 2012
Page 7


Webmail Exploration, Continued

How Do I…? Your facilitator will lead you through a jigsaw activity to gain information
the topics/questions below.
Composing Messages
 How do I compose an email?
 What is the Rich Text feature? How do you use
the features?
 How do I spell check an email?
 How do I read or compose emails in a new
window?
 How do I add stationery to an email?
 How do I create an email signature with rich text
or html?

Sending Mail
 How do I Send emails to multiple recipients?
 How do I use the autocomplete feature to find
email addresses?
 Can I recall or unsend email I’ve already sent?
 How can I view the status of sent email?
 How do I send an attachment?
 What is the size limit for attachments?

Reading & Responding to Mail
 How do I automatically move to the next email
after I delete or move an email?
 How do I reply to or forward an email?
 How do I download attachments?
 How can I mark a message as spam?

Text Messages / AIM
 How do I send a text message?
 What mobile providers are currently supported?
 How do I access the Buddy List?
 How do I block a buddy from sending IMs?
 How do I save my IM conversations?

Settings
 What options do I have for General Account
Settings?
 How do I adjust the settings for composing email?
What options do I have?
 How do I adjust spam settings? What options do I
have?
 How do I change my calendar settings? What
options do I have?

Mobile
 How do I adjust my settings for Mobile Mail? What
options do I have?
 How do I sync my contacts and events on a
mobile device?
 What devices are supported?
Continued on next page
Classic Webmail
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 18, 2012
Page 8


Webmail Exploration, Continued

How do I…?
(Continued)
Use the space below to record notes on your topic/questions as well as
those of the other groups in your class.
Continued on next page
Classic Webmail
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 18, 2012
Page 9


Webmail Exploration, Continued

How do I…?
(Continued)
Use the space below to record notes on your topic/questions as well as
those of the other groups in your class.
Continued on next page
Classic Webmail
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 18, 2012
Page 10

Webmail Exploration, Continued

How do I…?
(Continued)
Use the space below to record notes on your topic/questions as well as
those of the other groups in your class.
Continued on next page
Classic Webmail
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 18, 2012
Page 11

Webmail Exploration, Continued

How do I…?
(Continued)
Use the space below to record notes on your topic/questions as well as
those of the other groups in your class.





























Classic Webmail
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 18, 2012
Page 12

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
 Describe the primary features and functionality of current versions of
AOL Mail on the Web.
 Locate and utilize AOL Help articles to find content related to Webmail.


Project Phoenix
Participant Guide




















Revised: February 16, 2012
Project Phoenix
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 16, 2012
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction In addition to using the AOL downloadable client software, our members
can also access their email directly on the web. AOL offers two webmail
options, Classic Webmail / Webmail Refresh and Project Phoenix. In this
module you will explore Project Phoenix webmail and get hands-on
experience exploring the product and the related content on help.aol.com.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
 Describe the primary features and functionality of Project Phoenix by
AOL Mail.
 Locate and utilize AOL Help articles to find troubleshooting content
related to Project Phoenix.

Project Phoenix
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 16, 2012
Page 2

Intro to Project Phoenix

Product
Overview
AOL has made improvements to the webmail experience with Project
Phoenix. We believe it's a leap forward for email, and we think you will
too. Built from the ground up, Project Phoenix was designed with one
thing in mind – to make connecting and communicating with each other
simpler.
We started small, testing Project Phoenix with AOL employees, and then
expanded to include some of our members. In the past AOL members
were able to request an invitation for access to Project Phoenix by going
to http://phoenix.aol.com and clicking the “Invite Me” link.
Watch the “Introducing Project Phoenix” video at http://phoenix.aol.com.
This video provides some highlights of the new and improved features of
the product.


Continued on next page
Project Phoenix
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 16, 2012
Page 3

Intro to Project Phoenix, Continued

Project
Phoenix
Email
Addresses
When registering for a Project Phoenix account, members were able to
create new screen names with special characters such as periods and
underscores and also within the domains listed below:
 @love.com
 @wow.com
 @games.com
 @ygm.com

"Enhanced" Phoenix screen names with periods and/or underscores can
be used to sign into AOL Mail (Classic), AIM, and other AOL sites, but will
not work with:
 AOL Software
 AOL’s Parental Controls
Review the Pulsar/AOL Help article on Enhanced Screen Names/User
Names for more details.

Continued on next page
Project Phoenix
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 16, 2012
Page 4

Intro to Project Phoenix, Continued

Signing In Members who have been granted an invitation to Project Phoenix can log
in using their AOL Screen Name and password at http://phoenix.aol.com.

Switching to
Classic View
Members do have the option of switching back to the Classic view of mail
using the link in the upper left corner of the Project Phoenix page.





Continued on next page
Project Phoenix
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 16, 2012
Page 5

Intro to Project Phoenix, Continued

Welcome
Email
Project Phoenix users received a welcome email, similar to the one below,
which highlighted some new features.


Project Phoenix
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 16, 2012
Page 6

Intro to Project Phoenix, Continued

Welcome Email (continued)

Continued on next page
Project Phoenix
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 16, 2012
Page 7

Project Phoenix Exploration

Mail Tour
Preview
Take a few minutes to preview Project Phoenix and get a first glimpse of
the features. To start off, go through the Mail Tour that is also available to
members by clicking on Help in the top left corner of the page and
selecting Mail Tour.

Find the answers to the questions below. You will participate in activities
during the remainder of this training that give you more hands-on time
with the product!
 What can you do from the Quick Bar?
Email, text, I nstant Message and/ or update status messages on
social networks


 What can you view in the “At a Glance” area on the right side of
Project Phoenix?
Attachments, photos, maps


 Can you preview the contents of an email message prior to opening it?
Yes, if you select the view that includes the reading pane


 What are some of the email types that can be aggregated (pulled into)
Project Phoenix?
Hotmail, MSN, Gmail, Yahoo, other AOL accounts


Continued on next page
Project Phoenix
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 16, 2012
Page 8

Project Phoenix Exploration, Continued

Project
Phoenix Help
Click on Help on the top left corner of the Project Phoenix window and
select Mail Help. This will bring you to an area of help.aol.com where you
can search for content specifically related to Project Phoenix.


Project
Phoenix
Exploration
Your facilitator will conduct an activity for hands on exploration of Project
Phoenix and the related help.aol.com articles. Use these articles to
answer the questions included below and on the following pages.

Question Answer
What are some of the
features of Project
Phoenix that differ
from Classic Webmail?

What are the password
requirements for
Project Phoenix?

What other email
accounts can I add to
my Phoenix account?

Continued on next page
Project Phoenix
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 16, 2012
Page 9

Project Phoenix Exploration, Continued

Project Phoenix Exploration (continued)

Question Answer
Why can't I add my
free Yahoo! Mail
account to Project
Phoenix?

Is it safe to give the
Usernames and
Passwords of my other
email accounts to AOL?

What’s the Subject
when I send a brief
email using the Quick
Bar?

What is the difference
between composing a
Full email and a Quick
Bar email?

Why are emails
missing, or showing up
in my Old, Recently
Deleted or Trash
folders?

What is Smart View?
Continued on next page
Project Phoenix
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 16, 2012
Page 10

Project Phoenix Exploration, Continued

How Do I…? Your facilitator will lead you through a jigsaw activity to gain information
the topics/questions below.
Composing Messages
 How do you compose an email without using the Quick Bar?
 How do I send email to multiple recipients?
 How do I CC or BCC someone?
 How do I send a text message?
 How do I create an Away message?
 How do I send mail from another account outside of Project Phoenix?
Setting Up Multiple Accounts
 How do I add my other accounts to Project Phoenix?
 How do I set it up so I get all my messages from the other account or
from this point going forward?
 How do I set up my mail to save a copy of the messages from other
accounts on the provider’s server?
 How do I set up POP and IMAP in other email applications?
 If I delete an email from an added account in Project Phoenix, is it
also deleted from that account’s inbox?
Organizing Email
 How do I flag or group important messages?
 How can I sort messages in my inbox?
 How do I find an email someone sent me?
 Can I set up mail to be automatically saved to my saved folder?
 How do I empty my trash folder?
 What is the Starred folder?
Filters & Folders
 How do I make a new folder?
 How do I change the name of a folder?
 How do I move messages to a folder manually?
 What is a filter? How do I set one up?
Continued on next page
Project Phoenix
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 16, 2012
Page 11

Project Phoenix Exploration, Continued

How do I…?
(Continued)
Use the space below to record notes on your topic/questions as well as
those of the other groups in your class.
Continued on next page
Project Phoenix
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 16, 2012
Page 12

Project Phoenix Exploration, Continued

How do I…?
(Continued)
Use the space below to record notes on your topic/questions as well as
those of the other groups in your class.

Project Phoenix
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 16, 2012
Page 13

Project Phoenix Exploration, Continued

How do I…?
(Continued)
Use the space below to record notes on your topic/questions as well as
those of the other groups in your class.
Continued on next page
Project Phoenix
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 16, 2012
Page 14

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
 Describe the primary features and functionality of Project Phoenix by
AOL Mail.
 Locate and utilize AOL Help articles to find troubleshooting content
related to Project Phoenix.



Additional AOL Products & Services
Participant Guide
















Revised: October 18, 2011
Additional AOL Products & Services
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction As a new employee with AOL, it is important that you understand some
basic facts about the culture at AOL and the company itself. This module
provides you with information about the AOL Business, products and
services, and the importance of your individual contribution as a technical
support consultant.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
 Provide general information about primary AOL Products and Services
and how to determine level of support.
 Define terms related to AOL products.

Additional AOL Products & Services
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 2


Additional Products & Features

Introduction In this section you will explore additional products and features provided
by AOL.

Additional
Products &
Features
Exploration
Record notes about additional products and features in the space below
and on the following page.

























Additional Products & Features, Continued
Additional AOL Products & Services
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 3

Additional Products & Features, Continued

Additional
Products &
Features
Exploration
Record notes about additional products and features in the space below.






















Support for
Additional
Products and
Features
The technical support queue provides different support depending on the
product or feature.
The tools used in the tech queue, mainly Help.aol.com and Pulsar, provide
specific information on the type of support to provide.
It is important to always consult tools to find the most up to date support
information, as this could change.

Additional AOL Products & Services
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 4


Terms & Definitions

Terms &
Definitions
Scavenger
Hunt
It is important that you understand and are able to explain Web terms to
members when appropriate. Record the description of each of the terms
and how they relate to AOL in the table below.
Term Definition How it Relates to AOL
IMAP/SMTP






Streaming






Mailer
Daemon





SPAM





SPIM





Continued on next page
Additional AOL Products & Services
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 5


Terms & Definitions, Continued

Terms & Definitions Scavenger Hunt (continued)
Port





Web filter





Wiki





Online
Banking,
Bill Pay,
and
Shopping

Web Email





Continued on next page
Additional AOL Products & Services
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 6

Terms & Definitions, Continued

Terms & Definitions Scavenger Hunt (continued)
News and
Blogging





Online
Auctions &
Classifieds





Internet
Radio and
purchasing
music
electronically





Search
Engines






Additional AOL Products & Services
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 7

Summary

Learning
Objectives
Now that you have completed this module you should be able to:
 Provide general information about primary AOL Products and Services
and how to determine level of support.
 Define terms related to AOL products.


Protecting Your Business Account
Participant Guide
















Revised: April 28, 2011
Protecting Your Business Account
Module Overview

Introduction The content for this module is primarily elearning. Your facilitator will
provide instructions on how to access the content online. Within your
participant guide you will see screen shots of each elearning screen as
well as the text for any narration. Please use the additional space on each
page to take notes as you work through the elearning.

User
Interface
This module is designed to prevent “clicking through” the content. It is important
that you ensure your class understands that everyone should take the time to
read through each element of the eLearning module.
NOTE: There may be a delay of five seconds after all of the content has been
displayed on a slide. Users will be unable to move forward until the five seconds
has elapsed.
The following items are a part of the navigation tools for the eLearning content:


Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 28, 2011
Page 1

Protecting Your Business Account
Module Overview, Continued

User
Interface
(Continued)
If you attempt to advance a slide before it has completely displayed all of
its content, you will receive the error message below. You must view all
content prior to moving on within the presentation.


AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 28, 2011
Page 2

Protecting Your Business Account
eLearning Content

Protecting Your Business Account

Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 28, 2011
Page 3

Protecting Your Business Account
eLearning Content, Continued

Module Overview
After completing this training you will behave able to:
• Explain the reasons behind protecting your business account
• Describe how AOL restricts access to company assets
• Identify the threats facing AOL and how to avoid them
• Describe special measures which protect AOL email

This module is designed to give you the skills and knowledge you need to protect your business
account. After completing this training you will be able to: Explain the reasons behind protecting your
business account, describe how AOL restricts access to company assets, identify the threats facing AOL
and how to avoid them and describe special measures that protect AOL email.

Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 28, 2011
Page 4

Protecting Your Business Account
eLearning Content, Continued

Protecting Your Business Account
Way to protect your business account from:
•Intrusion
•Fraud
•Malicious code
AOL issued you a business account to be used exclusively by you. This business account gives you
access to proprietary and private corporate information. It is a tool you will use to help you assist our
members. In this module you will learn the measures you can take to protect your business account from
intrusion, fraud or malicious code.

Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 28, 2011
Page 5

Protecting Your Business Account
eLearning Content, Continued

Why Should You Protect Yourself
•Protect your personal files
•Protect proprietary information
•Protect the reputation of AOL 
It is your responsibility to keep your business account secure and to protect any proprietary information.
If an unauthorized user gains access to your account, they could use it to send a virus to others in your
address book or on your buddy list, to view AOL confidential information, or to modify, corrupt or destroy
personal files. These types of actions not only affect your account, but also your reputation. Think of the
impact to AOL if hackers are constantly using AOL accounts to send viruses or spam email.

Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 28, 2011
Page 6

Protecting Your Business Account
eLearning Content, Continued

•Do not allow anyone to use 
your AOL business account
•Do not excessively web surf on 
your business account
•Do not use your business email 
to send personal email
•Do not participate in chat 
rooms unless they relate to 
work
AOL Business Account Guidelines
•Do not create a profile, web 
page, or AIM page using your 
AOL business screen name
•Go to Keyword: AIM Password 
and enter a password different 
from your business account 
password to ensure no one can 
use your business account with 
AIM but you
•Change your business account 
password every 30 days
Follow these guidelines to help keep your business account secure.

Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 28, 2011
Page 7

Protecting Your Business Account
eLearning Content, Continued

Attraction to AOL
•AOL has credit card and other financial information stored in their 
network
–Hackers see this as a potential for financial gain
•AOL is a widely known and prestigious company in the Internet 
world
–Hackers see this as a challenge
•Many businesses use the AOL network
–Hackers see this as starting point to access other sites

So why would hackers target AOL? There are several reasons AOL could be viewed as a viable target.
First, AOL has credit card and other financial information stored in their network and hackers could see
this as a potential for financial gain. Second, AOL is a widely known and prestigious company in the
internet world so hackers could see this as a challenge. Lastly, many businesses use the AOL network
so hackers see this as a starting point to access other sites.

Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 28, 2011
Page 8

Protecting Your Business Account
eLearning Content, Continued

AOL Confidentiality 
INFORMATION
•Protect company information
•Prevent and monitor against its loss or compromise
•Provide legal support to defend the company against unauthorized use
All information AOL creates, stores transmits or uses is the exclusive property of AOL. Information is
anything that concerns AOL’s business, information systems, employees, or members that is in written
form, spoken or overheard, stored electronically, or transmitted. AOL needs to protect company
information, prevent and monitor against its loss or compromise, and provide legal support to defend the
company against unauthorized use.

Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 28, 2011
Page 9

Protecting Your Business Account
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 28, 2011
Page 10

eLearning Content, Continued



KNOWLEDGE CHECK


Quiz questions can be found in the elearning module.
Continued on next page
Protecting Your Business Account
eLearning Content, Continued

SecurID
•Code changes every 60 seconds
•Bars on left hand side count down every 10 seconds
•Can only use each passcode once
One of the tools that you will use to help protect your business account is your SecurID. The SecurID
system helps you protect yourself and the confidential information you access. Here are some things
you should know about your SecurID: The six digit display window changes every sixty seconds. The
bars on the left hand side of the SecurID count down every ten seconds until it changes. You cannot use
the passcode more than one time, so if you need to log into multiple tools you must wait for the
passcode to change between logins.

Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 28, 2011
Page 11

Protecting Your Business Account
eLearning Content, Continued

SecurID Policy
•Hackers may attempt to get your SecurID through fraudulent emails
•Never enter any information in an unknown website
•Contact your coach if you receive a suspicious communication
Hackers may attempt to gain access to your account by sending fraudulent emails or instant messages
asking for your SecurID or advising you to click on a link to verify your screen name, password and
SecurID. If you enter this information in the website, your account will likely be compromised and the
hacker could gain access to your AOL account and potentially to Gandalf. You should never give out
your SecurID passcode or enter it in an unknown website. If you have any questions about the
legitimacy of a website, contact your coach.

Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 28, 2011
Page 12

Protecting Your Business Account
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 28, 2011
Page 13

eLearning Content, Continued



KNOWLEDGE CHECK


Quiz questions can be found in the elearning module.
Continued on next page
Protecting Your Business Account
eLearning Content, Continued

Identifying Threats ‐ Viruses
•Viruses – Infect your computer and allow unauthorized individuals 
to access your account or computer. 
•Computers can by infected by:
–Downloading an attachment
–Website pop‐ups
–Unknown hyperlinks
Hackers use viruses to attempt to take control of your AOL account or computer and gain access to
confidential information. Some common ways to infect your computer with a virus are by downloading an
email attachment, through website pop-ups or by clicking on unknown hyperlinks.

Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 28, 2011
Page 14

Protecting Your Business Account
eLearning Content, Continued

Identifying Threats – Avoiding Viruses
•Contact email sender to confirm validity
•Frequently scan your computer for viruses
•Regularly update your antivirus software
•Be cautious of any hyperlinks or file attachments

You can avoid viruses by following these guidelines. Contact the email sender to confirm the validity if
you have concerns about a hyperlink or attachment. This is important even if you know the sender,
because some viruses infect address books and send out copies to everyone listed. You should also
frequently scan your computer for viruses and regularly update your antivirus software. Be cautious of
any hyperlinks or file attachments included in email and do not download files or click on hyperlinks from
strangers or unknown sources.

Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 28, 2011
Page 15

Protecting Your Business Account
eLearning Content, Continued

Identifying Threats ‐ Spoofing
•Forging an email header 
•Typically contain hyperlinks asking for account information
•You can avoid issues by:
–Be cautious of communications with hyperlinks
–Manually navigate to official AOL websites 
–Look for misspelled words, sensational subject lines, or unfamiliar 
email addresses
–Beware of emails with “Urgent” or “Important” in the subject line
Spoofing can be described as the forging of an email header to make it appear as if it came from
someone or somewhere other than the actual source. You could be the target of email scams attempting
to spoof legitimate corporate communications. These scam emails may contain links asking you to enter
your screen name, password and SecurID. You should always be cautious of hyperlinks within emails or
instant messages. You should manually navigate to official AOL websites that require you to enter your
screen name, password and SecurID. Scam emails can often be identified by looking for things such as
misspelled words, sensational subject lines or unfamiliar email addresses. You should also beware of
emails that have urgent or important in the subject line.

Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 28, 2011
Page 16

Protecting Your Business Account
eLearning Content, Continued

Identifying Threats ‐ Phishing
•Legitimate looking emails
•Typically include hyperlink to enter personal information

Phishing, which is sometimes called carding or brand spoofing, is a scam where the hacker sends out
legitimate looking emails that appear to come from well known sites such as eBay, PayPal or AOL.
These emails typically ask for personal and financial information.

Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 28, 2011
Page 17

Protecting Your Business Account
eLearning Content, Continued

Activity
•Navigate to help.aol.com to complete the following activity:
–Research phishing
–Research scam emails
Take a few minutes to access help.aol.com to research phishing and scam emails. To access AOL you
can hold down the Alt key and press tab or you can minimize the training on your task bar and then
launch AOL. To return to the training, minimize AOL on your task bar. In either case, do not close this
window. When you are finished, return to this screen and click the forward button to continue.

Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 28, 2011
Page 18

Protecting Your Business Account
eLearning Content, Continued

Summary
Now that you have completed this training you should be able to:
• Explain the reasons behind protecting your business account
• Describe how AOL restricts access to company assets
• Identify the threats facing AOL and how to avoid them
• Describe special measures which protect AOL email
Now that you have completed this training you should be able to: Explain the reasons behind protecting
your business account, describe how AOL restricts access to company assets, identify the threats facing
AOL and how to avoid them and describe special measures that protect AOL email.




AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised April 28, 2011
Page 19

McAfee – Emerald Version
Participant Guide
















Revised: March 1, 2012
McAfee
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 1, 2012
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction Because McAfee software is available with all paid AOL Advantage Plans, it
is important that you understand what this benefit has to offer to our
members.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
 Determine which version of McAfee members are eligible to download
 Describe the download and installation process
 Explain the features and set up of software functionality.
 Locate support content for troubleshooting at help.aol.com.

McAfee
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 1, 2012
Page 2

McAfee

Introduction In this section you will learn about the co-branded McAfee products
offered to AOL members and non-members for increased security. You
will learn about the features of the products and eligibility requirements.

McAfee
Product
Offerings
Members with Paid AOL Advantage Plans receive complementary McAfee
software. The version of the software they receive depends on their price
plan. Consult the AOL Price Plan Benefits pod sheet in Pulsar for details on
which version is offered for each price plan.
Another way to determine the version for which a member is eligible is to
check the Member Benefits area of Gandalf Window Left. You will see
either McAfee MIS or McAfee VSP.


McAfee
Product
Features
At http://daol.aol.com/security/mcafee,click the Find Out More link to
learn more about the different versions of McAfee available to AOL
members. Review the information you see here about McAfee Internet
Security Suite (MIS) and McAfee VirusScan Plus (VSP). Compare the two
products by clicking the Product Features and Comparison Chart link &
reviewing the comparison chart.

What are the main differences between the two versions? Which version
has the greater feature set?



Continued on next page
McAfee
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 1, 2012
Page 3

McAfee, Continued

Support
Scope– WIN
& TLV ONLY
Technical Support consultants provide full support for paid AOL members
with McAfee® Internet Security Suite - Special edition from AOL (MIS).
Use the available contact reasons and AOL Help articles to answer the
members’ inquiries or resolve technical issues with MIS.
Use Gandalf to check if the member is eligible for support. Remember
that only paying members are eligible for our support.
You should not refer members to McAfee Support or
www.mcafeehelp.com unless directed by Help.aol.com.
You should use the “free member calling for support” article in
Help.aol.com for free/ non AOL members with paid McAfee subscription.

Support
Scope– ULV
ONLY
In the ULV queue, you are able to provide assistance with general
questions about how McAfee works. You are also able to provide
assistance if a member needs help downloading, installing and
uninstalling the software.

Please refer members who experience issues while downloading, installing
or uninstalling the McAfee software to the TLV queue.

Downloading
MIS
McAfee can be downloaded from the three areas below. Members who are
downloading from the Internet will be required to enter their AOL screen
name and password.
• AOL’s Safety toolbar icon
• Keyword: Safety
• www.aol.com/safety or safety.aol.com

Installing
MIS
Practice installing McAfee by working through the Install McAfee
simulation on MSU.

Upgrading
MIS
The Emerald version of McAfee was released in March 2012. Many users
of the older version of McAfee will have the software set up to
automatically download upgrades. Those who do not can upgrade
manually. You will see how to upgrade the software in the McAfee Virtual
Tour simulation later in this module. This information is also available at
help.aol.com.
Continued on next page
McAfee
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 1, 2012
Page 4

McAfee, Continued

User
Interface &
Functionality
Work through the McAfee Virtual Tour simulation on MSU to familiarize
yourself with the features and functionality of the MIS software. Use the
space below and on the following page to record notes. Be prepared to
discuss the features/functionality with your class after you complete the
tour.



























Continued on next page
McAfee
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 1, 2012
Page 5

McAfee, Continued

User
Interface &
Functionality































Continued on next page
McAfee
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 1, 2012
Page 6

McAfee, Continued

Troubleshoot
ing Issues
with
McAfee–
WIN & TLV
ONLY
Two frequent contact drivers for McAfee are:
• Unable to download the McAfee software
• Computer not protected error messages
As with any troubleshooting, you will use help.aol.com articles to obtain
the necessary steps to resolve these issues. In the upcoming sections,
you will review some of the common solutions used in McAfee help
articles.

System
Requirements
– WIN & TLV
ONLY
Check whether the computer meets the minimum system requirements
for McAfee, as included in McAfee help articles. This simple check could
provide a valid reason for a McAfee issue if the member’s computer does
not meet the specifications.

McAfee
Virtual
Technician–
WIN & TLV
ONLY
McAfee Virtual Technician software can be helpful if members are having
trouble using McAfee software. McAfee Virtual Technician (MVT) is an
automatic issue-detection and repair tool. MVT is a McAfee online support
process that resolves nearly 50 percent of McAfee product issues. This
small utility program can be downloaded for free by visiting
mvt.mcafee.com or using the link within help articles. Your facilitator will
demonstrate how to download and use this utility. Use this space for
notes.





MCPR Tool–
WIN & TLV
ONLY
Some McAfee issues can be resolved using the McAfee consumer product
removal tool (MCPR) and then reinstalling McAfee. Your facilitator will
demonstrate how to download and use this software. Use this space for
notes.






Continued on next page
McAfee
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 1, 2012
Page 7

McAfee, Continued

mCare– WIN
& TLV ONLY
You will notice that the McAfee articles at help.aol.com usually contain
CCC Only text at the top. Be sure to review this text each time you use a
help article to ensure that you are getting the most up to date
information.
In some cases McAfee related errors can be resolved using a tool called
mCare. Your coaches/team leads have access to this tool. The CCC only
information in these articles provide the specific types of errors which can
be resolved using mCare and instructs you to consult your coach if you
encounter these errors so they can potentially assist by using mCare. If
all troubleshooting fails, including the use of mCare, you should file a Host
Problem Report.


McAfee
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 1, 2012
Page 8

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
 Determine which version of McAfee members are eligible to download
 Describe the download and installation process
 Explain the features and set up of software functionality.
 Locate support content for troubleshooting at help.aol.com.



Tools Overview
Participant Guide
















Revised: September 20, 2011
Tools Overview
_________________________________________________________________________

AOL Confidential Revised September 20, 2011
Page 1

Overview

Introduction This section introduces you to the tools used to provide support for
members. You will complete a graphic organizer with information about
accessing and logging in to each tool, which will serve as a reference
guide as you begin your role as a consultant.

Learning
Objectives
After completing this section, you will be able to:

 Explain the purpose/use of each tool.
 Log in to each of the technical support set of tools.
 Effectively use tools to find information and troubleshoot member
issues.

Tools Overview
_________________________________________________________________________

AOL Confidential Revised September 20, 2011
Page 2


The Tools

Tools
Overview
You use multiple tools while you perform your job role.

Your tool set includes:

 Network Connect (not used at all sites)
 VMWare
 AOL Software
 Pulsar
 Avaya Softphone
 Gandalf
 TechBuddy
 Call Driver Tracking
 Help.aol.com
In the upcoming sections, you will learn about the purpose or general
functionality of each tool.
Continued on next page
Tools Overview
_________________________________________________________________________

AOL Confidential Revised September 20, 2011
Page 3


The Tools, Continued

Network
Connect
Because your call center is located outside of the AOL Headquarters, you
may use a program called Network Connect to establish a remote
connection to AOL’s network. This will give you access to confidential
information and proprietary tools that reside behind the AOL firewall. For
security purposes Network Connect ensures that only approved users are
permitted access.





Continued on next page
Tools Overview
_________________________________________________________________________

AOL Confidential Revised September 20, 2011
Page 4


The Tools, Continued

VMWare VMWare is software which provides access to a virtual computer desktop
environment. VM stands for Virtual Machine. When you use VMWare, the
desktop from a remote computer appears on your computer. You can
then use the programs/software on the remote computer as if they were
installed on your own computer. Using VMWare allows AOL to centrally
manage the virtual desktop machine and provide a uniform desktop
across all sites. Many of the tools you will use in the WIN queue will reside
on the virtual machine, rather than physically on your computer.




Continued on next page
Tools Overview
_________________________________________________________________________

AOL Confidential Revised September 20, 2011
Page 5


The Tools, Continued

AOL
Software
You will be provided with an AOL email address which will be used for
company email, Instant Messaging and web access for on the job needs.
You can download and install the AOL Client Software and/or AOL Instant
Messenger at http://download.aol.com or you can access your mail via
webmail at http://mail.aol.com.


Continued on next page
Tools Overview
_________________________________________________________________________

AOL Confidential Revised September 20, 2011
Page 6


The Tools, Continued

Pulsar Pulsar is a web portal used for communication between headquarters and
sites/consultants across the AOL business. This site provides easy access
to dynamic, real time updated information about AOL products/services,
policies, processes and news. You will review this site at the start of each
shift and then check back frequently for updates. Pulsar also provides
access to forms and pod sheets/job aids that you will use frequently.



Continued on next page
Tools Overview
_________________________________________________________________________

AOL Confidential Revised September 20, 2011
Page 7


The Tools, Continued

Avaya
Softphone
Avaya Softphone software allows you to make/receive phone calls using a
computer. You will use the softphone to handle calls that come in to the
queue.




Continued on next page
Tools Overview
_________________________________________________________________________

AOL Confidential Revised September 20, 2011
Page 8


The Tools, Continued

Gandalf Gandalf is a web-based tool that you will use to locate and action member
accounts for all AOL brands. It is also used for the LCA brands,
CompuServe and Netscape Connect. It is linked to a database that stores
and provides information about every AOL account created. Gandalf
contains workflows that allow you to make changes to an account on
behalf of the member; for example, reset a password or update account
information. You will also use Gandalf to record and view notes that
others have recorded about previous calls/emails from the member on the
account and the actions taken.
You will also use Gandalf to pitch and register customers for Paid Services
products. The tool contains all of your offer scripts and information about
products for which customers have previously cancelled or are currently
subscribed.



Tools Overview
_________________________________________________________________________

AOL Confidential Revised September 20, 2011
Page 9


The Tools, Continued

TechBuddy Tech Buddy is a Web-based tool that provides information on each
member’s technology setup. It makes the troubleshooting process more
efficient by providing critical information for support, including:
Operating system
AOL Client Version
Connection method


Continued on next page
Tools Overview
_________________________________________________________________________

AOL Confidential Revised September 20, 2011
Page 10


The Tools, Continued

Call Driver
Tracking
The Call Driver Tracking tool (CDT) is a web-based form that you will
complete for every member interaction. This form collects important
information regarding member contacts with AOL. The tool improves
AOL’s ability to track:

 Call drivers/symptoms
 Products impacted
 Solutions/ending actions
 Potential root causes involved in each member interaction


Continued on next page
Tools Overview
_________________________________________________________________________

AOL Confidential Revised September 20, 2011
Page 11


The Tools, Continued

Help.aol.com Help.aol.com is a web-based portal where members can go to get
information and troubleshooting solutions for AOL products and services.
You will use this site to access the troubleshooting solutions that you will
use during member contacts.

Additional consultant-only information is provided at the top of many
articles. You must log in with your AOL business screen name and
password. This allows you to see the consultant content.



Tools Overview
_________________________________________________________________________

AOL Confidential Revised September 20, 2011
Page 12

The Tools

Tool Access
& Log In
Use the chart below to record access and log in information for each tool
as you learn about them in training.

Tool Access Log In
Network
Connect
http://remote.aol.com
(or Desktop Shortcut)

VMWare Desktop Shortcut

AOL
Software
Start>Programs>AOL
(or Desktop Shortcut)

Pulsar
http://pulsar.ops.aol.com/
selfservice/login.do

Avaya
Software
Start>All
Programs>Avaya> Avaya
IP Agent>Avaya IP Agent
– English (or Desktop
Shortcut)

Gandalf
Start>All Programs>Web
Resources>UAT

TechBuddy http://tb2.ms.aol.com/

Call Driver
Tracking
http://myportal.ops.aol.co
m/cdt/

Help.aol.com http://help.aol.com



Tools Overview
_________________________________________________________________________

AOL Confidential Revised September 20, 2011
Page 13

Observing Tool Use in Action

Tool Use
Checklist

Call Example – Tool Use Checklist
Tool Function
Call Examples
1 2 3
Pulsar
Referred to article for information
Opened/Used Pod Sheet
Gandalf
Locate an Account
Review Account Histories
Verify account
Use a workflow (password reset, write
manual history, add ASQ)



Pitch a Paid Service
Register for Paid Service product
Leave note on account
Send Member Education Email
Use CTI toolbar
Tech Buddy
Locate account
Confirm trinity information
Help.aol.com
Search for a symptom
Open/Use an article
Review CCC Only information in article
Call Driver
Tracking
Record Outcome of Contact

Tools Overview
_________________________________________________________________________

AOL Confidential Revised September 20, 2011
Page 14

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
Now that you have completed this section, you should be able to:

 Explain the purpose/use of each tool.
 Log in to each of the technical support set of tools.
 Effectively use tools to find information and troubleshoot member
issues.


Pulsar
Participant Guide
















Revised: February 14, 2012
Pulsar
AOL Confidential Revised February 14, 2012
Page 1

Overview

Introduction In this module, you will explore Pulsar to become familiar with features
and will conduct a scavenger hunt for information that you will need to be
able to locate while on the call floor.


Learning
Objectives
After completing this section, you will be able to:

 Log in and out of Pulsar.
 Describe the seven main areas you will use.
 Navigate to articles about specific topics.


Pulsar
AOL Confidential Revised February 14, 2012
Page 2

Getting Started with Pulsar

Accessing &
Logging in
Pulsar should be opened after you have launched the AOL software on
each shift. It is mandatory for you to access Pulsar when you first begin
your shift. By doing so, you will become aware of all the latest news and
updates that will help you perform your job.
The initial password is your employee ID number. Follow the steps below
to change the password to one that is secure, but that you will remember.
These steps can also be followed if you forget your password and need to
change it. NOTE: You cannot change your log in name.

Step Action
1
Click on the Forgot your password or user name? link to reset your
password.

2
Enter your internal AOL e-mail address which is associated with your Pulsar
account. An e-mail with a temporary password will then be sent to your e-mail
address from AOLPhoneTech@aol.com.

3
When you log back into Pulsar using this temporary password the system will
automatically prompt you to change your password.

Continued on next page
Pulsar
AOL Confidential Revised February 14, 2012
Page 3

Getting Started with Pulsar, Continued

Basic
Navigation
& Search
There are 7 main areas that you will need to use in Pulsar.
Record a description of each numbered section in the chart below.

Description
1
MY FAVORI TES - Allows you to save links for items you commonly
use. These items are saved within your Pulsar log in and will be
available from any computer. I f an article is updated, these updates
will automatically be made to articles stored in your favorite places.
2
WHAT’S NEW - Displays articles that have recently been posted to the
Pulsar site. These articles could be new or older articles that have
been updated with new information. Articles will be posted in this
section for seven days and the most recent articles will show at the
top of the list.
3
WHAT’S POPULAR - Displays the most commonly searched for articles
within the Pulsar site. This list of articles is generated automatically
based on search information.
4
BREAKI NG NEWS - Contains new articles with critical information that
you need to be aware of. The content of this section is controlled by
AOL and articles will remain here for up to seven days.
5
QUI CK FORMS - Contain links to frequently used forms such as the
Host Problem Report form. The content of this section is controlled by
AOL.
6
QUI CK LI NKS - Contains frequently used information and articles, such
as the AOL Phone and Address List or the Password Reset Policy. The
content of this section is controlled by AOL and can be changed based
on the needs of the business and feedback from consultants like you.
7
SEARCH - Search for Pulsar articles by entering a keyword into the
search field at the top of the Pulsar window and then clicking on
Search to the right.
Continued on next page
Pulsar
AOL Confidential Revised February 14, 2012
Page 4

Getting Started with Pulsar, Continued

Guided
Exploration
Use the following steps and questions to guide you through an
exploration of the features of Pulsar. Record your answers after each
question.

 Open an article in Pulsar. Click the Add to Favorites button at the top
left of the Pulsar article, as seen below. What happens? (Close the
small window when finished.)



The Add Documents to Favorites window appears and you can
give the article a name you will recognize and click Submit to add
it to your list of favorite articles.



 Click the Pulsar tab at the top of the article, as seen below. What
happens?



You are taken back to the main page of Pulsar.



 On the main page of Pulsar, what do you now see at the top of the
list under Saved Documents on the right?
The name of the article j ust added to favorites.




Continued on next page
Pulsar
AOL Confidential Revised February 14, 2012
Page 5

Getting Started with Pulsar, Continued

Guided
Exploration
(continued)
Click the Edit Profile link at the top right of the Pulsar main window. Then
click on Search Preferences, as seen below. What options can you
change here?



Search Mode Default, Results Display Default, Results Per Page,
What’s New.

EMPHASI ZE that it is not recommended to change the amount of
time for What’s New unless participants are on an extended
leave.



 Go back to the Pulsar main page. Open several articles. What are
some of the similarities in the layout of the articles?
Article listed in dark blue at top of article.

Updates and Reminders often appear in purple text below the
article title.

Section headers are in bold black text.

I f there are multiple sections, often there are anchor links which
you can click on to go directly to that section. These sections also
have “Back to Top” links.

Links to related articles and information are included within the
article.

I nformation on when the article was last updated is included at
the bottom of the article.

 Search for the term “password” and look at the titles of the articles
found during the search. What appears at the end of each article
title?
The name of the relevant queue ( all, Tech, SMS, FPS, etc.) .

Pulsar
AOL Confidential Revised February 14, 2012
Page 6

Reviewing Pulsar Articles

Scavenger
Hunt Activity
Your facilitator will provide instructions for a scavenger hunt activity to
search for and review articles in Pulsar to find important information.
Record the information you find in the space below.










































Pulsar
AOL Confidential Revised February 14, 2012
Page 7

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:

 Log in and out of Pulsar.
 Describe the seven main areas you will use.
 Navigate to articles about specific topics.



Introduction to Gandalf
Participant Guide
















Revised: September 7, 2011
Introduction to Gandalf
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised September 7, 2011
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction You have a variety of tools that you will use on a daily basis to assist
members. Two of these are Gandalf and your Avaya softphone. These
tools work together to help you take calls and locate the member’s
account information.
This module introduces you to the basic functions of your Avaya
softphone as well as how to log in to your phone and Gandalf so that
these two tools function together.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
 Demonstrate how to log in and out of Avaya.
 Demonstrate how to log in and out of Gandalf and the Computer
Telephony Integration (CTI) system.
 Use your Avaya phone to handle calls.

Introduction to Gandalf
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised September 7, 2011
Page 2


Avaya Softphone

Introduction The Avaya softphone uses your computer to place and receive phone calls
in place of a regular desktop phone. The performance and functionality of
your phone will be very similar to a physical phone; you will simply use
software on your computer rather than a physical phone. During this
section of training you will learn how to use Avaya softphone.

Avaya
Softphone
Interface
The Avaya Voice Over Internet Protocol (VoIP) softphone system is the
tool you use to receive incoming calls and interact with AOL members.
VoIP functionality allows the Avaya phone to use the Internet instead of
traditional telephone lines to transmit calls. In all other regards, the
Avaya softphone functions exactly like a traditional telephone set. A
picture of the AVAYA softphone is shown below.

Continued on next page
Introduction to Gandalf
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised September 7, 2011
Page 3


Avaya Softphone, Continued

Logging into
Avaya
Softphone

Logging in to an Avaya softphone allows you to place and receive phone
calls. CTI allows Gandalf to communicate with the Avaya soft phone and
retrieve the member’s account information based on the telephone
number they are calling from.

Step Action
1 Open the Avaya software, by going to Start>All Programs>Avaya>Avaya
IP Agent>Avaya IP Agent – English. You may also use the Avaya IP Agent
icon on your desktop, if available.

2 In the Login window all of the information will be automatically populated
except for your password. Enter your Avaya password and then click
Login.

NOTE: You can select to have the Avaya softphone remember your password for
your next login.
Continued on next page
Introduction to Gandalf
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised September 7, 2011
Page 4


Avaya Softphone, Continued

Logging into Avaya Softphone (continued)

Step Action
3 A new window will appear where you need to type in your Agent number and
password.

4 Now you will need to log in to Gandalf with CTI, following the steps in the next
section. This will establish the connection between Gandalf and your softphone.
You will see that more buttons are now available in the softphone software and
that Auxiliary Work Mode is automatically selected.


Introduction to Gandalf
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised September 7, 2011
Page 5


Gandalf CTI Login

Introduction Gandalf is a web based tool. You will access Gandalf using a link within
your Web Resources folder. During this section of training you will learn
how to launch and sign into Gandalf.

Launching
Gandalf
You will access Gandalf by accessing the following path on your computer:
Programs > Web Resources > UAT. This will launch an Internet
Explorer window. You will need to enter your AOL screen name, password
and SecurID to log in.
NOTE: You will need to log into your Avaya phone prior to logging into
Gandalf for the CTI functions to work correctly.

Continued on next page
Introduction to Gandalf
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised September 7, 2011
Page 6


Gandalf CTI Login, Continued

Logging In Follow the steps outlined below to successfully log into Gandalf.

Step Action
1. Once you click on the link to launch Gandalf you will be navigated to the Sign In
screen. You will need to enter your AOL screen name and password.

2. Enter your SecurID code.

3. Agree to the Confidentiality Agreement by clicking on I Accept.

Continued on next page
Introduction to Gandalf
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised September 7, 2011
Page 7


Gandalf CTI Login, Continued

Logging in
with CTI
Once you have successfully logged into Gandalf you will see the CTI login
box. You will need to enter your Avaya information and then click on the
Login button to complete the CTI connection.

The Instrument number is the five digit station id listed on the blue
toolbar at the top of your Avaya phone window.

Once you have completed the CTI login you will see the Avaya toolbar at
the top of your Gandalf screen.



Logout – Log off CTI and Avaya
Available – Ready
Answer – Allows you to answer an incoming call
Hold – Places the call on hold
Transfer – Allows you to transfer the call to another queue
Call – Allows you to place outbound calls.
Status – Displays the phone status
Continued on next page
Introduction to Gandalf
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised September 7, 2011
Page 8


Gandalf CTI Login, Continued

Auto In When you log into Gandalf you will automatically be placed in Available.
This means if there are calls in the queue you will automatically receive a
call.



As you finish every call you will need to click End Contact in Gandalf.
This will reset the system and allow it to automatically search for an
account when you receive another call.

Call Status The Status option on the CTI toolbar reflects the state of your Avaya
phone. Below is a chart of how these statuses correspond with the
statuses displayed on your Avaya phone.
CTI Toolbar Agent State Avaya PBX Agent State
Avaya IP Agent
Softphone State
Login AUX Auxiliary Work Mode
Logout <Blank> <Blank>
NotReady AUX Auxiliary Work Mode
Available AVAIL Manual-In <OR> Auto-In
Talking ACD IN Manual-In <OR> Auto-In
WorkReady ACW After Call Work Mode
Hold OTHER Manual-In <OR> Auto-In

Taking Calls Once a call comes in you will hear a ring and the Answer option will
change to green. Click on Answer to accept the call.

You will then hear the whisper and be connected with the member.
Gandalf will load the appropriate account, list of suggested accounts or
will navigate you to the Account Search workflow. This is dependant on
the ability to automatically locate an account with the member’s phone
number (ANI).
Continued on next page
Introduction to Gandalf
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised September 7, 2011
Page 9


Gandalf CTI Login, Continued

Placing a Call
on Hold
If you need to place a member on hold you will use the Hold option
within the Gandalf CTI toolbar. The status will update to Hold and start
counting the amount of time the member has been on hold.
NOTE: You should always ask permission before placing a member on
hold. For example: May I place you on hold for a moment while I research
XXXX?



After the member has been on hold for a minute the system will remind
you that the member is on hold. You should not leave the member on
hold for longer than a minute without providing them with an update.


NOTE: Always remember to thank the member for holding when you
return to the call. For example: Thank you for patiently waiting Mr/Mrs
Smith, I have found XXXX….
Continued on next page
Introduction to Gandalf
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised September 7, 2011
Page 10


Gandalf CTI Login, Continued

Transferring
a Call
If you determine you need to transfer the call to another queue you will
select the Transfer option from the toolbar.

Gandalf will then provide you with a list of transfer options. You will select
the appropriate option and then click on Transfer to complete the
transfer.


Introduction to Gandalf
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised September 7, 2011
Page 11


Using the Avaya Softphone

Introduction During this section of training you will review the different functions of the
Avaya softphone.
NOTE: You will only use these functions on the Avaya softphone if the
CTI functions in Gandalf are unavailable.

Avaya
Softphone
Functions

The Avaya softphone has a menu of choices that are accessible using your
PC keyboard or mouse. The screen shot and chart below describe the
functions of the softphone software that you will use.



# Function
1 The Auto-In and Manual-In buttons are used to place you in the Available work
mode so you can receive calls. If you are in Auto-In mode and you complete a
call, you are automatically available to receive another call. If you try to change
agent modes while active on a call, the change is not made until you disconnect
from the call.
2
If you are in Manual-In mode and complete a call, you are automatically placed
in After-Call Work (ACW) mode. To become available to receive another ACD
call, you must manually select the Auto-In or Manual-In mode.
3 You will use the auxiliary work mode to indicate that you cannot receive calls.
Usually, this indicates that you are not in the proximity of the telephone
because of meals, approved periods of inactivity, meetings, training, and so
forth. This work mode can be selected while you are on an active call. The
change will not occur until the current call is finished and released.
4 & 5
When placing a member on hold, you need to click the “pause” button. This will
cause the “Release Button” to change to “Reconnect”. To take member off hold,
you can either click pause button again or click reconnect. This will reconnect
the call.
Continued on next page
Introduction to Gandalf
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised September 7, 2011
Page 12


Using the Avaya Softphone, Continued

Adjusting
Audio
Options
To change your audio options, go to the Audio menu within the Avaya
software and select Audio Options.



You can adjust the following options:



NOTE: It is important to adjust the Avaya audio options before starting
your shift to ensure the volume is properly set.

# Function
1 Headset or Handset - Select this option to use your headset.
2 Receive Gain - Use the slider control to set the gain for incoming sound during
a call. The default value is 1.00.
3 Transmit Gain - Use the slider control to set the gain for outgoing sound during
a call. The default value is 0.25.
Continued on next page
Introduction to Gandalf
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised September 7, 2011
Page 13

Using the Avaya Softphone, Continued

Transferring
Calls with
the
Softphone
DISCUSS how to use the Avaya phone to transfer a call.
EMPHASIZE that the participants will only use these functions if CTI
phone options in Gandalf are unavailable.
Continued on next page
Introduction to Gandalf
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised September 7, 2011
Page 14

Using the Avaya Softphone, Continued

Transferring
Calls with
the
Softphone
Most transfers will be completed using the transfer options listed in
Gandalf. If the Gandalf transfer option fails, you can complete a manual
transfer using Avaya and the transfer codes listed in Pulsar.
Follow the steps below to use Avaya to complete a manual transfer.

Step Action
1 Click the Transfer dropdown box and select Enhanced Transfer.

2 Enter the number for the transfer.

3 Click OK to complete the transfer.


This is called a cold transfer. The member is automatically connected with
the new department and you are ready to take the next call. Another
option is a warm transfer. This allows you to take to the new department
prior to connecting the member. This is only done in special
circumstances and will be covered later in training.

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Introduction to Gandalf
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised September 7, 2011
Page 15

Using the Avaya Softphone, Continued

Telset States REVIEW this section.

Two-Digit
AUX Codes
REVIEW the definitions of each AUX code.

EXPLAIN that these codes are used by all sites/queues across AOL to
show the status of each consultant at any given time.

DISPLAY the Using Two-Digit Avaya Auxiliary (AUX) Codes article in
Pulsar, using the projector.

REVIEW the article.

Tips for
avoiding AUX
Work/ ACW
DISCUSS the following question.

What are ways to minimize being in the AuxWork or After Call
Work states?

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Page 16

Using the Avaya Softphone, Continued

Telset States Throughout a call your telset can enter three states, as follows:

Telset
State
Receive
Calls?
Definition
AuxWork
No The default state when you log into telset.
NOTE: Do not use this state at any other time.
AutoIn
Yes This state receives a new call as soon as the current call
has ended.
After Call
Work
(ACW)
No
Use this state when you need to do any work between calls
or according to your site’s policy.
NOTE: This state can negatively impact your performance
because you are not in a position to receive a new call.
When you are in Manual-In mode, you automatically go into
ACW when a call completes. You must click Available to
move out of this state.

Two-Digit
AUX Codes
Two digit AUX codes are used by all sites/queues across AOL to show the
status of each consultant at any given time. You will use these codes to
accurately reflect your status while working. The table below provides the
most common AUX codes.
Code Definition
AUX01
Break ( 15 minutes )
AUX02
Lunch
AUX03 Training, Calibration, Team Meeting, Roundtable
AUX04 PSM/ Coaching
AUX05 System or tool issue
AUX06 Supervisory AUX or Supervisory Escalation
AUX07 Technical Assistance
AUX08 Bio Break
AUX09 Sick
AUX10 Undefined

Tips for
avoiding AUX
Work/ ACW
Below are best practices for avoiding unwanted AuxWork/ACW states:
 Position your tools and resources for maximum capability.
 Only use AuxWork or ACW when you intend to sign off your telset.
 Sign off your telset before leaving for a break, meal, or when leaving
at the end of the day.
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Using the Avaya Softphone, Continued

Knowledge
Check

CONDUCT the following activity.

Step Action
1
TELL participants to answer the questions in their guides.
(5 minutes).
2
DISCUSS the answers by having individual participants
share their responses with the class.
3 Debrief the activity.
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Page 18

Using the Avaya Softphone, Continued

Knowledge
Check
Working with a partner, answer the following questions.

1. What is the different between Auto-In and Manual In?


2. Describe the steps to follow when adjusting the audio options.


3. Describe the process of transferring calls to another queue using the
Avaya softphone.


4. What are the three telset states?


5. Which state do you automatically go into at log in?


6.
Which state can receive calls?


7.
What happens when you finish a call in the AutoIn state?


8.
What do the AuxWork / ACW states indicate?


9. What AUX code you need to use when going out to lunch?


10. What AUX code should you use when attending a team meeting?



Introduction to Gandalf
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised September 7, 2011
Page 19

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
 Demonstrate how to log in and out of Avaya.
 Demonstrate how to log in and out of Gandalf and the Computer
Telephony Integration (CTI) system.
 Use your Avaya phone to handle calls.



Gandalf Workflows
Participant Guide
















Revised: February 17, 2012
Gandalf Workflows
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 17, 2012
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction When members contact AOL for assistance, they expect to receive world-
class service. As you learned previously one of the tools that you will use
to assist members is Gandalf. This module introduces you to the primary
Gandalf workflows that you will use to assist members.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
 Demonstrate how to search for an account.
 Explain the primary workflows shown on the Account Overview
screen.
 Explain how to locate account information using Window Left.
 Describe the basic functions of the Gandalf workflows.
 Demonstrate how to read and interpret Gandalf histories.

Gandalf Workflows
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 17, 2012
Page 2

Accessing Gandalf

Introduction It is your responsibility to handle member concerns, review member
account history, promote AOL value, register new members and motivate
existing members to remain with AOL.
Using Gandalf correctly helps you exceed the members’ expectations,
resolve concerns, reduce cancels, sign up new members and supports
world-class customer service.
Gandalf is a web based tool that You will access Gandalf using a link
within your Web Resources folder. During this section of training you will
learn how to launch and sign into the Gandalf tool.

Launching
Gandalf
You will access Gandalf by accessing the following path on your computer:
Programs > Web Resources > UAT. This will launch a Firefox window.
You will need to enter your AOL screen name, password and SecurID to
log in.


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Accessing Gandalf, Continued




Account
Search
When you log into Gandalf with CTI, the system will automatically search
for an account using the information the member provided. If an account
is located Gandalf will populate the account information. If an account is
not located you will be navigated to the Account Search workflow.
The Account Search workflow will allow you to search for an account if
the system does not automatically locate the account. Within this
workflow you will see the following options:
 Fast Search – Allows you to search using the member’s screen name,
phone number or account number.
 Detailed Search – Allows you to search using the member’s first name,
last name and area code.
 Search CC/DD – Allows you to search using the member’s billing
information.
 Create Account – This workflow will be discussed more later in
training.
 Registration Inq – Allows you to find an duplicate a method of
payment.
 Order AOL CD – Allows you to track or place an order for an AOL CD.
NOTE: The Evening Phone option will search both evening and daytime
phone number. This is the option you will use to search for a billed
telephone number.
If the system locates more than one account you will see a list of the
relevant accounts as shown below. You can access a specific account by
clicking on the Account # link or the Screenname link.
Gandalf Workflows
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 17, 2012
Page 4

Searching for an Account

Introduction There are several ways you can use to attempt to locate an account.
During this section of training you will review each of these methods.

Fast Search A fast search attempts to locate an account with one of the following:
 Customer ID – Allows you to search with the member’s screen name
or AOL account number.
 Evening Phone – Allows you to search with a telephone number. The
system will search both the day and evening phone numbers that are
listed on the account.
 Email – Allows you to search with an email address. This applies to
non-AOL email addresses associated with Lifestore subscriptions.
In order to complete a fast search you will simply type the account
information into the appropriate field and click on the Search button.

Detailed
Search
A detailed search attempts to locate an account using a combination of
the following information:
 First Name
 Last Name
 Area Code
You can enter all or some of this information and the system will search
for an account based on the information you entered. Due to the quantity
of accounts in the database, this type of search can be slow and generate
a large list of accounts.
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Page 5

Searching for an Account, Continued

Search
CC/DD/ANI
Using the Search CC/DD/ANI option, the system will search for an
account based on the member’s method of payment. Follow the steps
listed below to use this search option.



Step Action
1. Select United States (AOL) as the service.
2. Select the radio button by the appropriate method of payment.
 Credit/Debit Card – Allows you to search with credit or debit card
information
 Direct Debit - Allows you to search with checking account information
 ANI – Allows you to search with a phone number billing method
3. Enter the billing information.
4. Click Search to search for an account.

Handling
Multiple
Accounts
In some scenarios, suspicious individuals may contact AOL and attempt to
gain unauthorized access to multiple accounts. In order to prevent this
type of fraudulent activity, you are limited to assisting members with two
accounts. Since each account can have up to seven screen names this
means you can provide assistance for up to 14 screen names if necessary.
If the member requests support for additional accounts you will need to
have a supervisor take the contact at your desk. Supervisors will attempt
to provide support for the additional accounts and report any suspicious
activity as needed.
The goal of this policy is to deter hackers and social engineers while
continuing to provide world class support to our members.

Gandalf Workflows
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 17, 2012
Page 6

Gandalf Workflows Overview

Introduction Once you locate an account you will be navigated to the Account
Overview workflow. This is the main screen that you will use to access
different workflows that will allow you to take action on an account.
During this section of training you will learn about the various Gandalf
workflows.

Verification
Screen
Prior to accessing any of the workflows in Gandalf the verification screen
will appear. For most tech calls you do not need to verify the account and
can simply click the “Unverified” button. If you later determine that
verification is required for the purposes of the interaction, you can launch
the verification workflow manually from the Account Overview window.




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Page 7

Gandalf Workflows Overview, Continued

Window Left


Verification
BC Billing Contact
SBC Secondary Billing Contact
Validator Last four digits of payment method
ASQ Account Security Question
Account Information
Address Billing address
Screen Names Account screen names; Identity Trust Status
Eve Phone Evening phone number
Day Phone Daytime phone number
Account # AOL account number
Account Status Status of the account
Block Status Displays any blocks
Account Type Type of AOL account
Email Address Email address associated with acct
Comment Information entered by AOL
Verification Achieved verification level
Billing Information
Payment Method Access billing information
Billing Date Access billing date
Billing Info Price plan details
Balances Available credit
Since Account creation date
CC Exp Date Access billing expiration
Other Information
Usage caps Usage cap details
Version AOL software version
Last Session Last AOL login
Brand Brand version
Related Screen
Names
Email information listed in View/Edit Morf
workflow
Paid Services Link if Lifestore subscriptions exist
Premium Services Link if Voice Services/Privacy Wall
subscriptions exist
Priority Services Legacy Broadband Info (type & pricing)
Member Benefits Shows benefits available to member, bold
= active, plain text = eligible, but not yet
active
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Gandalf Workflows Overview, Continued

Account
Overview
The Account Overview screen functions as the main menu of Gandalf.
From this screen you can access the following workgroups:
 Account Status
 Payment Information
 Subscription Information
 Account History and Credit
 Security Update
 General Information
NOTE: The workflows that are visible with each workgroup depend on the
level of verification you have achieved. If a workflow requires a specific
level of verification, it will not be visible until that level has been achieved
in the verification workflow.
During the next pages you will review each one of these sections in more
detail.



Gandalf Workflows
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 17, 2012
Page 9

Account Status

Introduction The Account Status workgroup contains workflows used to update
account information and change the status of the account (reactivate or
cancel). For technical support calls, only Account Update is used by level
1 consultants. The remaining workflows in this workgroup are only used
by Level 2 consultants.

Account
Update
The Account Update workflow allows you to update the members
contact information, including:
 Account Holder’s name
 Address
 Day / Evening phone number
 Secondary Billing Contact (SBC)

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Account Status, Continued

Account
Cancel (Level
2 only)
The Account Cancel workflow will continue all the scripting and
information necessary for you to process an account cancelation or
migration to free AOL service. As an eSupport consultant you will continue
to follow your standard process to refer members requesting cancelation
to SMS. If the member specifically requests to migrate their account to
the free AOL service, you will use the workflows shown below to process
that request.
Once you click on the Account Cancel workflow the system will prompt
you to select the member’s connection type.

Once the connection type has been selected you will then click on the
Chose Cancellation Reason drop down to select the appropriate
cancelation reason.

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Page 11

Account Status, Continued

Account
Cancel (Level
2 only)
(continued)
After you select the appropriate cancel reason the Get Offers workflow
will populate. The appropriate offer sequence is automatically presented
to you. You will click on the radio button next to the offer to populate that
script.

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AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 17, 2012
Page 12

Account Status, Continued

Account
Cancel (Level
2 only)
(continued)
If the member agrees to a lower price plan you will need to provide them
with the details of the benefits they will no longer be eligible for. Once
you have read this information you will click on the radio box and then
select the appropriate button based on the member's decision.



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AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 17, 2012
Page 13

Account Status, Continued

Account
Terminate
(Level 2
Only)
In some circumstances, such as minor listed as BC, you will need to
terminate an account. This can be accomplished with the Account
Terminate workflow. You will select the appropriate termination reason
and leave any applicable notes.


Gandalf Workflows
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 17, 2012
Page 14

Payment Information

Introduction The Payment Information workgroup allows you to assist members
with a variety of billing related questions and concerns. During this
section of training you will learn how to use each of the applicable
workflows for your queue.

View
Statement
The View Statement workflow has two tab of information.
Billing Statements
This tab allows you to view any charges that have been submitted on the
account for the last seven months. This includes AOL account charges as
well as Paid Services subscription charges. You can click on the billing
cycle link to view specific information about a charge.

Continued on next page
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AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 17, 2012
Page 15

Account Status, Continued

View
Statement
(continued)
Session Activities
This tab allows you to view screen name usage on the AOL account. This
includes sessions that generated charges as well as free sessions. To view
session activity for a specific billing cycle you will need to click on the link
for that billing cycle.

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Page 16

Account Status, Continued

Access
Payment
Method
When you access the Manage Payment Options workflow in Gandalf,
you will see a tab specifically for the Access method of payment. This
displays the method of payment that is being billed for the AOL monthly
membership fee.

The Edit button will allow you to change the Billing contact’s name,
address, phone number or expiration date for the billing info. It will not
allow you to update the actual billing account number.
The Add Payment button will allow you to add a new method of payment
to the account.
The Switch button will allow you to switch the Access billing to a different
method of payment that is listed on the account.
NOTE: Editing the expiration date will update the information for that
method of payment on all screen names. All other information is updated
only on the screen name level.
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Page 17

Account Status, Continued

Lifestore
Payment
Methods
Also within the Manage Payment Options workflow you can see
payment method associated with each screen name and any Lifestore
subscriptions tied to each method of payment. Similar to the Access
payment information, the Edit button will allow you to change the name,
address, phone number or expiration date for the billing info. It will not
allow you to update the actual billing account number.
NOTE: Each screen name is limited to five methods of payment.


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Page 18

Account Status, Continued

Adding a
Method of
Payment
If you need to add a new method of payment to the account you will click
on the Add Payment button at the bottom of either the Access or
Lifestore workflows.

Gandalf will generate a warning indicating that the method of payment
can be used for any master or designated master screen names. You will
need to click on the OK button to continue.

NOTE: If you enter checking account information as the new method of
payment the Lifestore products will be grayed out. This is because
Lifestore products do not accept checking or phone bill as a method of
payment.
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Account Status, Continued

Adding a
Method of
Payment
(continued)
Gandalf will then display the workflow to enter new billing information.

After entering the billing information you will select the subscriptions,
including the AOL monthly membership fee (Access) that the member
would like to be billed to the new method of payment.
NOTE: If the member indicates they are using a Visa or Mastercard you
need to determine if it is a debit or credit card prior to entering the
information.
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Account Status, Continued

Switching a
Lifestore
Subscription
Payment
Method
Within the Manage Payment Options workflow you can also switch the
method of payment that is being used for a Lifestore subscription. In
order to change to an existing method of payment listed on the account
you will click on the Switch link next to the subscription.

This will launch the workflow with the available method of payment.
Simply click on the radio button next to the appropriate one. Remember,
Gandalf will not list any checking or phone bill payment methods within
this workflow since these are not billing options for the Lifestore products.

If the method of payment you are changing to is a debit card, Gandalf will
populate the EFT scripting. You will need to read this information to the
member prior to completing the change.

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Account Status, Continued

Update
Payment
Method
The Manage Payment Methods workflow will allow you to enter new
billing information. This includes updating the payment method for the
access service as well as any Paid Services subscriptions associated with
the account. You can also use this workflow to update the address
information listed on the account by selecting the Update Address box.
Once you have finished entering the information you will click on the
Update button to submit the changes.


Key Points –
Update
Payment
Information
Remember these key points when updating a member’s payment
information.
 If credit card authorization fails due to incorrect data input, try again
after verifying the information is correct and the card is active (and
valid).
 If no information has changed, it is pointless to try to receive a credit
card authorization again. If you do, the authorization will fail a second
time.
 If you have changed information and the authorization fails once again
you should advise the member to check with their credit card company
to confirm all information. Once they have done this they can either
contct Member Services again or go online to update their information.

Gandalf Workflows
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 17, 2012
Page 22

Subscription Information

Introduction The Subscription Information workgroup allows you to view
subscription information for both AOL Voice Services products and any
Lifestore subscriptions. It also enables you to pitch products and register
customers for subscriptions. During this section of training you will learn
how to use these workflows.

Subscriptions The Subscriptions workflow is divided into three section:
 Included in your AOL Plan
 Lifestore Subscriptions
 Legacy Premium Services
You can select the appropriate screen name from the top to see
subscriptions associated with each.

NOTE: Screen names that have been deleted from the account will be
listed in red.

Included in
Your AOL
Plan
The first section of the Subscriptions workflow outlines what is included
with the member's AOL price plan. You can also see which benefits have
been activated.


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Account Status, Continued

Lifestore
Subscriptions
The Lifestore Subscriptions section contains details about all Lifestore
subscriptions that are associated with the account. You can see
additional details by clicking on the arrow next to the product. This
information will be covered in more detail later in training.


Legacy
Premium
Services
The Legacy Premium Services section provides details about all AOL
Voice Services products as well as any Legacy Broadband subscriptions.
Again, you will learn more details about these products later in training.



Lifestore
Sales
The AOL Paid Services Sales workflow allows pitch and register
members for Lifestore products.

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Account Status, Continued

AOL Paid
Services
Sales
The AOL Paid Services Sales workflow allows you to manage Paid
Services/Lifestore subscriptions. This includes:
 Sales
 Resending emails
 Billing
 Cancellations



Gandalf Workflows
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 17, 2012
Page 25

Account History and Credit

Introduction The Account History and Credit workgroup allows you to complete the
following tasks.
 View account histories
 Write a manual history
 Handle credit questions / requests
During this section of training you will review each of the workflows
associated with these tasks.

View
Account
Activity
The Account Activities workflow is divided into two sections, Account
Actions and Account History.
Account Actions
This tab shows information about specific actions that were taken on an
account, such as completing verification or issuing a credit. This is the
type of history note that will be left on any actions taken in Gandalf.

If you want to see additional information about the action you will click on
the + at the end of the line item. This will populate a new window with
the history details.



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Account History and Credit, Continued

View
Account
Activity
(continued)
Account History
This workflow allows you to view all legacy histories that were written on
the account. Similar to the Account Actions workflow, if you want to see
more details about a specific history you will click on the + at the end of
the line item to expand the history.



Within this workflow you have the ability to sort this information by
history type. For example, if you are providing support for a billing
question, you can sort for billing histories, simplifying the process of
reviewing the histories.
To sort by a specific history type, simply select the appropriate radio
button. The system will automatically display only those histories.
ITS History
This workflow allows you to view all histories associated with the Identity
Trust Service (ITS). This status helps identify accounts that have been
flagged as compromised.
ITS status is displayed with colored dots next to each screen name to
indicate the status. Green indicates the account is in good status with no
issues, yellow indicates the account is in a suspicious, compromised or
abusive status, Red indicates it is a newly created screen name that
appears to have been created for the sole purpose of sending spam and
black indicates the account status could not be determined.
You will learn how to assist these members later in training.
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Account History and Credit, Continued

Using
Gandalf for
Account
History/
Actions
Notes for technical support contacts will be recorded in Gandalf. You will
be able to review notes left in Gandalf by previous agents under the
Account Actions tab.
After the late September 2011 release of Gandalf, you will also be able to
sort the information under this tab by history/action type, as you see
below. You will click on the Tech radio button to view only tech related
histories/actions.

You can also use the search box to search for specific types of notes, such
as when:
 Tech issue has been resolved
 Solution needs to be tested by the member
 Host Problem Report has been filed
 Member was referred to Third Party
NOTE: Fusion will be available for a short time after the tool transition in
case you should need to access and view notes on previous service
request. Fusion should ONLY be used for this purpose and SHOULD
NOT be used to search for articles or record notes, etc.
Because you need to record notes throughout the contact, you will need
to utilize multiple tabs/windows of Gandalf so that you can leave one
instance open with your notes, while performing other actions in the tool.
After you locate an account, you can right click on any workflow and
choose to open it in another tab or window. It will automatically open that
workflow focused on the appropriate account. You must remember to End
Contact on all open windows at the end of each contact.

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Page 28

Account History and Credit, Continued

Write History In order to write a manual history note or leave notes on an interaction,
you will simply click on the Write History link from the Account
Overview screen. Then fill out the appropriate information based on the
actions taken on the account. For the Action Category, you will select
TECH Actioned.

You will enter specific information in the Problem and Resolution fields.
1. Problem – Solution (Article title) & troubleshooting steps, which
can be copied/pasted from help.aol.com similar to how you
currently write Gandalf notes.
2. Resolution – Final step taken related to the tech interaction, with
detail. For example:
 If you refer to a third party, you would include the name of
the third party in this field.
 If you immediately transferred the call to another queue
without performing any tech-related actions, you would
indicate the transfer and name of the queue.

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Account History and Credit, Continued

Write History
(continued)
You will select a reason code based on the outcome of the contact. That
means you will initially skip this drop down and go back to it later, near
the end of the contact, after all notes have been recorded and all actions
taken on the account.
New Reason codes are being added to the tool and include:
 Issue Resolved
 Solution to Test
 Host Problem Report
 Referred Third Party
 Non Tech Issue


Request /
Deny Credit
The Request/Deny Credit workflow is used by the Tech queue to view
credits previously issued on an account and also by the FPS queue to
issue credit for a Voice Service. This workflow has four tabs of
information:
 Account – Within this tab you can view credits associated with the AOL
monthly service fee.
 WOW – Not used in Tech queue.
 Paid Services – View credits associated with Paid Services
subscriptions.
 Premium Services – Manage credits for Premium Services (Voice
Services) – FPS Only

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Account History and Credit, Continued

Request /
Deny Credit
(Continued)
To view credits issued on an AOL account, click on the Account tab and
the List/Deny radio button.


To view credits issued on a Paid Service / Lifestore product, click the Paid
Services tab, select View and the appropriate screen name.


For FPS agents who need to issue credit for a Premium Service, click the
Premium Services tab, select Issue, complete the form and click “Post
Credit”.


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Page 31

Security Update

Introduction The Security Update workgroup in Gandalf allows you to complete
actions aimed at protecting the member’s account, such as changing a
password or account security question (ASQ). During this section of
training you will learn how to use these workflows.

Update
Password
The Update Password workflow will allow you to change the password
on any or all screen names associated with an AOL account. Remember to
follow your verification guidelines to properly verify the account prior to
resetting a password.


Continued on next page
Gandalf Workflows
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 17, 2012
Page 32

Security Update, Continued

Update
Account
Security
Question
(ASQ)
The Update Account Security Question workflow will allow you to reset
the ASQ for any screen name on the account. Again, remember to follow
your verification guidelines to properly verify the account prior to
updating the ASQ.


Continued on next page
Gandalf Workflows
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 17, 2012
Page 33

Security Update, Continued

Online
Status/Bump
The Online Status/Bump workflow allows you to determine if a
member’s screen name is currently signed on and, if necessary, bump the
screen name offline. Follow the steps below to bump a screen name
offline.

Step Action
1. Click the Online Status/Bump workflow.

2. Select the check box next to each screen name that should be bumped.

3. Click on the Bump button to bump the screen name(s) offline.


Gandalf Workflows
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 17, 2012
Page 34

General Information

Introduction The General Information tab provides you with workflows to launch the
verification screen as well as the Member Education workflow. During
this section of training you will learn how to use both of these workflows.

Verification The Verification workflow allows you to access the Verification screen.
Gandalf will only populate the workflows that are appropriate based on
the level of verification you complete. Since you typically bypass
verification by selecting “Unverified” at the start of a contact, you would
use this workflow to go back and verify the account if needed at some
point during the contact.
In these cases, you will begin by clicking the radio button next to the
description of the person with whom you are speaking. Depending on the
options you select at the top, different options/verification elements will
automatically populate on this screen.

Follow the verification policy to verify the account using the information
provided on this screen. Once you verify and select the appropriate
information you will click on the Submit button to continue to the
Account Overview screen.
Continued on next page
Gandalf Workflows
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 17, 2012
Page 35

General Information, Continued

Member
Education
The Member Education workflow allows you to send emails to any or all
of the screen names listed on the account. Member Education emails will
be grouped by category. For each contact, you are required to send a
Tech email based on the outcome of the contact. Depending on current
policy, you may also be required to send an email related to the AOL
Advantage plan a member is subscribed to and/or an email related to a
Lifestore product.
You will place a checkmark next to the appropriate topic to indicate which
email to send. These emails are always sent to the primary and
designated master screen names on the account. You can check off
additional AOL screen names listed on the account or add any other email
address into the Additional Recipients field.

Continued on next page
Gandalf Workflows
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 17, 2012
Page 36

General Information, Continued

Order AOL
CD
The Order AOL CD workflow allows you to search for any existing AOL
CD orders as well as place a new order for an AOL CD. To search for an
existing order, enter the first or last name or telephone number and click
“Start Search”. Review the information included in the search results.


To place a new order, click on the New Order tab. The member’s address
information will be automatically completed. You will simply need to verify
that this information is correct prior to processing the order.

NOTE: Remember to follow the current policy and guidelines for when to
order a CD Rom, as included in Pulsar.

Gandalf Workflows
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 17, 2012
Page 37

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
 Demonstrate how to log into Gandalf.
 Identify the functions of the various workflows in Gandalf.
 Demonstrate how to use Gandalf to register a potential member for an
AOL account.
 Explain how to locate a Paid Services subscription tied to a non-AOL
email address.



Verification
Participant Guide


















Revised: April 28, 2011
Verification

Module Overview

Introduction This is the live, facilitated component that accompanies the Verification
elearning module. Together, the live and elearning modules will provide
you with the information and skills necessary to properly verify an AOL
®

account. This live component will reinforce your understanding of the
different levels of verification, and provide practice time to master
verification in regular and special situations.

Learning
Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:

„ Differentiate Level 1 and 2 verification requirements, and associated
account changes and information to release.
„ Demonstrate how to verify a call or chat session, using the
Verification Guidelines pod sheet.
„ Describe how to handle a call/session in situations where the person
is unable to verify, and what information you can disclose.
„ Demonstrate how to apply the verification guidelines to a range of
situations.

AOL
®
Confidential Revised April 28, 2011
Page 1
Verification

Levels of Verification

Introduction There are two main levels of verification that you can use to assist
people contacting AOL. Only Billing Contacts (BCs), Secondary Billing
Contacts (SBCs), and Account Holders (AHs) are eligible for Level 1
verification and the full range of account changes and information
allowed at this level. Level 2 verification, available for any person who
can confirm the identifiers, allows assistance with price plan or
save/cancel/migrate changes, and sharing of limited account
information.
During this section you will review the Level 1 and Level 2 verification
conditions, also addressed in the elearning module.

NOTE FOR UNIVERSAL eSupport consultants ONLY: You do not
need to verify an account to provide technical support unless you are
changing or releasing account information.
Continued on next page
AOL
®
Confidential Revised April 28, 2011
Page 2
Verification

Levels of Verification, Continued

Verification
Require-
ments and
Services
When verifying an account, make sure that the person first states the full
BC, SBC, or Account Holder name. Use the order of preference of the
requirements shown below when attempting to obtain the necessary
verification information. Try to obtain the top identifier on the list, the
ASQ (Account Security Question), then try the billing validator, etc. You
can make account changes and release information based on the level of
verification met.
Never release an ASQ answer that the person has not confirmed.
Verification pod sheets are specific to each queue and may include
additional levels of verification. Consult Pulsar for the most current
version for your queue.




AOL
®
Confidential Revised April 28, 2011
Page 3
Verification

Verification Procedures

Introduction There are strict verification guidelines in order to help protect the privacy
and security of the account. This section of the training is focused on
how you will verify an account in a variety of situations. It is important to
understand all aspects of verification to ensure that accounts are always
properly verified.
During this section of training you will learn how to use the Verification
Guidelines pod sheet to help you successfully verify an account. In
order to help ensure consistent verification, follow the Verification
Guidelines pod sheet on every call or session.
A few queues have variations of the Level 1 and Level 2 verification for
special circumstances they handle. Pod sheets for specific queues will
address any of these variations.


Verification
Identifiers
and Levels
Working with a partner answer the following questions.
What are the identifiers that you can use for verification?





If the person contacting AOL provides one of the
identifiers, will he be eligible for Level 1 verification?





Does Level 2 verification entitle a person to receive all of
the services available with Level 1 verification?







AOL
®
Confidential Revised April 28, 2011
Page 4
Verification

Verification Procedures, Continued

Change/
Release
Account
Information
Using the Verification Guidelines podsheet, answer the following:
To reset a password or the ASQ, who must you be speaking
with?




If the person contacting AOL wants to know her billing
date, who must she be to answer this request?




Who can make changes to the ASQ or find out screen name
details on an account?




A person wants to change a price plan. What level of
verification does that require?




A person asks about screen name usage. What level of
verification does that require?





NOTES:
• Release the billing account number only if the member specifically
asks for it, and provide only the last four digits.
• If an SBC or Account Holder updates the method of payment, that
person becomes the BC. Place the previous BC in the SBC or
Account Holder field.

Continued on next page
AOL
®
Confidential Revised April 28, 2011
Page 5
Verification

Verification Procedures, Continued, Continued

Members on
the Free AOL
Service (No
ASQ or
Billing Info)
Members who registered for the free AOL service online may not have
established an ASQ or entered billing information.
To verify members on the free AOL service that do not have an ASQ or
billing information, do the following:
„ Obtain the full name of the BC/SBC/Account Holder. Note: As with
any other account type, you must speak with this person, not simply
ask for the full name.
„ Obtain the full address.
„ For phone queues, confirm the ANI with the telephone number in
Gandalf.
If the member is unable to verify the account you should advise the
member to call the Fraud Department for assistance. Be sure to check
their hours of operation in Pulsar prior to assisting the member.
Continued on next page
AOL
®
Confidential Revised April 28, 2011
Page 6
Verification

Verification Procedures, Continued

Verification
Issues
Listed below are the basic issues that make up the majority of
verification mistakes. In the space provided describe how you can
overcome those mistakes.
Not getting full address including zip code.











Releasing information.











AOL
®
Confidential Revised April 28, 2011
Page 7
Verification

Unable to Verify – Deceased BC or Power of Attorney

Introduction You are faced with all kinds of situations, including those dealing with a
deceased member or where the person contacting AOL has a Power of
Attorney for an existing member. Since these scenarios will fall outside of
your normal verification guidelines it is important that you understand
how to be of assistance. During this section of training you will learn how
to handle these scenarios.

Deceased BC
or Power of
Attorney
If a person is contacting AOL about an account where the Billing Contact
is deceased or that a Power of Attorney is in effect, there are two
options:
„ If the person has access to the master screen name on the account
they can go online to myaccount.aol.com to make the appropriate
changes.
„ You can fill out the Deceased BC / POA form in Pulsar.

Communica-
ting the
Solution
Remember that the person may be facing an extremely difficult situation
and be very emotional. Apologize for the loss and assure the person that
you will assist him.

If… Then…
Person states he wants to
cancel the account:
The same form will need to be completed if the account
cannot be verified. Explain to the person that he will
receive a letter that will explain what documentation is
needed to cancel the account.
If a person states that he would like to cancel the
account and can properly verify the account, you should
not make any attempt to retain the member. Go ahead
and cancel the account.
Person states she would like to
keep the account:
Ask the person if she has access to the master screen
name and password. If she does, explain in detail the
process of changing the billing information online at
myaccount.aol.com and that this will automatically
transfer the account.
Person is not able to go online
and make these changes, you
will need to complete the
Deceased Billing Contact/POA
form in Pulsar.
Inform the person that he will receive a letter explaining
the process necessary to transfer ownership of the
account.
The letter will arrive within three to five business days.
Also, advise the person that if he has access to a fax
machine we can fax our letter to him.

AOL
®
Confidential Revised April 28, 2011
Page 8
Verification

Unable to Verify – Company Name as BC

Introduction When a business owner sets up an AOL account, the business name may
have been entered in the Billing Contact field. In this circumstance you
will be unable to verify the account. During this section of training you
will learn how to handle this scenario.

Resolution When you cannot verify the account for this reason, inform the member
that if he has access to the master screen name on the account, he may
go to myaccount.aol.com and update the billing information to reflect
their name rather than the business’s name.
For example, say, I’m sorry I am unable to verify the account
information because this account was set up using your company name
as the Billing Contact. Please go to myaccount.aol.com and update the
billing information to reflect your name rather than the business name.
If the person is unable to make the change in myaccount.aol.com, or if
the account is in a terminated or canceled status and the person would
like to access the account, complete and submit the Company Name
Listed as BC form in Pulsar. Inform the person that she will receive a
fax in 72 hours explaining how to resolve the issue.

AOL
®
Confidential Revised April 28, 2011
Page 9
Verification

Non-Disclosure Policy

Introduction There will be times when you will not be able to verify an account. In
those situations, it is important never to disclose any of the information
related to the verification elements prior to verifying the account. This
includes the answer to the ASQ, the day or evening phone number,
name of the BC, SBC, or Account Holder, the Billing Validator, the type of
payment method, or any parts of the address. This section reviews
material from the elearning module, and adds situations for
consideration.

Call/Session
Resolution
Even if the member has not successfully verified all of the necessary
items, there are still ways to assist the person contacting AOL. You can
provide general information concerning AOL policies, or by offering online
support areas the member can use to obtain information or make
changes to his account.

Non-
Disclosure
Policy
Activity
Complete the chart below with statements to obtain the correct
verification items.

Item Suggested Statements
Person provides a telephone
number that is not listed on the
account.

Person provides incorrect payment
number information.




Person provides an old or incorrect
address

Person provides a different answer
to the ASQ than what is provided
in Gandalf.



AOL
®
Confidential Revised April 28, 2011
Page 10
Verification

Other Verification Situations

Activity Write your answers to the following questions in the space provided.


1. If a person can verify information, but has a distinctive
male voice and claims a female name, or vice versa. How
do you respond?

2. Someone contacts AOL on behalf of the Billing Contact,
because the BC does not speak fluent English. The BC is
there with the person translating for them.




3. A person is listed as the SBC and is requesting account
information. However, the person sounds under 18 years
old.




4. The BC did not want someone to contact AOL and make
changes or cancel the account.

5. The Account Holder no longer has access to the billing
validator.





AOL
®
Confidential Revised April 28, 2011
Page 11
Verification

Summary

Summary Verifying accounts is important to maintaining the privacy and security
for AOL members. You must verify an account before you can make any
changes to it or release any account information.
The key items you will use for verification once you confirm the BC, SBC,
or Account Holder’s name are the answer to the ASQ, the billing
validator, or the account number with the complete address.


Learning
Objectives
Now that you have completed this training you should be able to:
„ Differentiate Level 1 and 2 verification requirements, and associated
account changes and information to release.
„ Demonstrate how to verify a call or chat session, using the
Verification Guidelines pod sheet.
„ Describe how to handle a call/session in situations where the person
is unable to verify, and what information you can disclose
„ Demonstrate how to apply the verification guidelines to a range of
situations.

AOL
®
Confidential Revised April 28, 2011
Page 12
Tech Buddy
Participant Guide
















Revised: October 18, 2011
Tech Buddy
AOL Confidential Revised October 18, 2011
Page 1

Overview

Introduction In this section, you will learn to perform the basic uses of the Tech Buddy
tool. You will become familiar with the layout and information within Tech
Buddy through screen shots. Later you will have the opportunity to listen
to and view some recorded call examples where you can observe tool
usage in action.

Learning
Objectives
After completing this section, you will be able to:

 Log in to Tech Buddy.
 Confirm the member’s technology setup.


Tech Buddy
AOL Confidential Revised October 18, 2011
Page 2


Tech Buddy Basics

Tech Buddy
Overview
Tech Buddy is a Web-based tool that provides information on each
member’s technology setup. It makes the troubleshooting process more
efficient by providing critical information for support.
The trinity questions provide the following information:
 What operating system?
 Which AOL Client Version?
 What connection method?

Accessing
Tech Buddy
As you get ready to take calls, you should launch Tech Buddy only after
you have logged into Gandalf.
Access Tech Buddy by going to KW: Tech Buddy or
http://tb2.ms.aol.com and click “Launch Tech Buddy.”

Logging in to
TechBuddy
Your AOL screen name and password are used to log in to Tech Buddy
using Screen Name Service.

It is essential that you login with your correct screen name as the
compliance report is based on the screen name. A wrong screen name
(even a letter) would mean that your compliance is zero, even though
the tool was being used.

Tech Buddy
AOL Confidential Revised October 18, 2011
Page 3


Tech Buddy Information

Tech Buddy
Information
Record a description of each numbered item in the table below.


Section Description
1 Search






2 Member
Experience
Alerts






3 Client
Activity







Continued on next page
Tech Buddy
AOL Confidential Revised October 18, 2011
Page 4


Tech Buddy Information, Continued

Using Tech
Buddy
Information
You will use this information to confirm the Operating System, Client
version and connectivity method used by the member by asking
presumptive questions such as:

 "I'm showing you're using Windows XP, with AOL 9.5 and a dial-up
connection, right?"
 "I'm showing you're using Windows XP, correct? I also show you're
using AOL 9.5, correct? You're using a broadband connection,
correct?"

Tech Buddy
AOL Confidential Revised October 18, 2011
Page 5

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
Now that you have completed this module, you should be able to:

 Log in to Tech Buddy.
 Confirm the member’s technology setup.


Help.aol.com
Participant Guide
















Revised: June 22, 2011
Help.aol.com
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised June 22, 2011

Page 2

Overview

Introduction This module introduces you to help.aol.com. Help.aol.com is a member-
facing database of troubleshooting articles for AOL products and services.
Members can access the site for step-by-step instructions on resolving
AOL related issues. You will also use help.aol.com to locate information to
answer member questions and troubleshoot issues related to email.

Learning
Objectives
After completing this section, you will be able to:

„ Describe the help.aol.com interface and the information it
provides.
„ Use the search feature to effectively locate help articles.
„ File TKAT tickets for knowledgebase updates.

Help.aol.com
Overview


Help Main
Page

The main page of Help.aol.com provides keyword search capabilities, as
well as links to product information and product-specific technical support.
The content one is able to view on help.aol.com varies, based on the
screen name used to log in. The sign-in link on the top is required for
Consultant usage, in order to view Consultant only information.


Members start
chat session
Product-specific
help
Account setting
changes
Keyword search
across all help
topics
Sign In for
Consultant-only
Information
Menu to navigate
between pages
Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised June 22, 2011

Page 3

Help.aol.com
Overview, Continued

Logging in to
Help.aol.com
Members can, but don’t need to log in to access the articles and
community support in aol.help.com. They do need to log in to:

„ Change account settings
„ Contact AOL in a chat session
„ View phone numbers to call for assistance

Consultants must log in to view the additional help information that the
members will not see.

Follow the steps below to log in to help.aol.com.

Step Action
1 Type help.aol.com in your browser address.

2 Click the Sign In link on the upper right.


3 Type your AOL screen name into the Screen Name field.

4 Type your AOL Screen Name Service password into the
Password field.
5 Click the Sign In button.
Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised June 22, 2011

Page 4

Help.aol.com
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised June 22, 2011

Page 5

Overview, Continued

Defining
Search
Terms
For each member interaction you will need to determine the best terms to
search for on help.aol.com. Using very general search terms can yield
hundreds of articles which may or may not be relevant. You will want to
use terms that help to narrow down the number of articles to just those
that are the most likely to be relevant to the issue.

When you review an email to determine the issue, you should uncover
what the members are trying to do, the ACTION, and what, if anything, is
preventing them from doing so, the OBSTACLE. An obstacle can be
something the member wants to change on the account, or a service the
member does not know about.

For many issues, the most effective search terms are those that describe
the OBSTACLE causing the issue.

For general information questions, the most effective search terms are
often the ACTION that the member wants to perform or the topic.

Below are examples of what you may determine as the action/obstacle.
Specific Actions Obstacles Preventing Action
Member is trying to read his email Emails are missing
Member wants to block spam mail. Doesn’t know about AOL Mail and
Spam Controls.
Member wants to view images in
her email
Images appear as a red X
Continued on next page
Help.aol.com
Overview, Continued

Searching
help.aol.com
To search for content on help.aol.com, you will use the search box near
the top center of the page. Type your search term(s) and click the Search
Help button.


Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised June 22, 2011

Page 6

Help.aol.com
Overview, Continued

Search
Results
Articles
The results of your search will be returned to you as a list of related
Articles. Each article is titled with a bold link, and has a summary of that
topic so you can assess what is the most relevant. Click on the title link
that appears to be most relevant.

NOTE: Community Support links to information from members will also
appear with many Search Results. As a Consultant, you will not use this
as a help source.





Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised June 22, 2011

Page 7

Help.aol.com
Overview, Continued

Viewing the
Article
Solution
Articles on help.aol.com are laid out or structured similarly. Each article
contains:
„ Title in black, large font, and bold at the top, and in “breadcrumb”
path above the Search box
„ Information related to the issue in black/gray.
„ Orange links jump to content below or additional related articles.
„ Solutions section for potential resolution articles.
„ Breadcrumb path at the top.
„ Print link to print article, may be used by members.
„ Some articles also contain consultant-specific instructions:
„ Contained within a box at the top
„ In red text

Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised June 22, 2011

Page 8

Help.aol.com
Overview, Continued

Product-
Specific Help
If you are unable to find the right article by performing a typical search,
you can also look within the product-specific help. Click on the icon
besides the Browse Get Help for heading, or the product link under the
Popular Services heading to open the product-specific page.



There are a few options for viewing help articles on the product-specific
page:

„ Click a Topics links on the left, which returns a list of articles
„ Click a link under the Popular Articles in the middle, which opens
that article
„ Type your search text and click Search Help, keeping the option to
Search only within [product name], which returns a list of articles
focused on that product
In this section, you need to click on the icon for the product or service
related to the member’s issue. You can also click the drop down arrow
next to See All Products & Services to see a complete list.
Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised June 22, 2011

Page 9

Help.aol.com
Overview, Continued

Alphabetical
Topic Listing
There is one more way to access help, through an alphabetical listing of
links to products and frequently used services, such as password reset.
This is more likely to be used by members, but consultants may find it
useful to direct members here that may have trouble typing search terms.

To access this listing, click Help A-Z on the top menu, or View Help A-Z
on the bottom of the main page.




Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised June 22, 2011

Page 10

Help.aol.com
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised June 22, 2011

Page 11

Overview, Continued

Help.aol.com
Exploration
Your Facilitator will provide instructions for the help.aol.com exploration
activity. Record your notes for each of these typical contact drivers.

„ Receives large quantity of unwanted spam






„ Wants to change the credit card used for AOL billing






„ Forgot password and is locked out






„ Does not remember the answer to the ASQ








Help.aol.com
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised June 22, 2011

Page 12

TKAT

TKAT Situations may arise where you find:

„ Missing or incorrect screen shots in an instruction guide.
„ Missing symptom or contact reason that should be added to
the knowledgebase.
„ A solution that has no probability of resolving the contact
reason.
„ A new solution for an existing or new issue.

In these cases, you must submit a ticket to the Technical Knowledge
Access Team (TKAT) so that they can research the issue and update the
knowledgebase if necessary. Record the steps for submitting a TKAT
ticket below.

Step Action
1 Copy the symptom/contact reason and solution for the issue from help.aol.com.

2 Open an email message and address it to your coach.

3 Type the following as the subject:
„ TKAT (Missing solution/Symptom/Screen Shot or Incorrect
Solution/Screen Shot): Contact Reason
„ EXAMPLE: TKAT (Missing Symptom):Error Message “04-2368Q”
4 Paste the contact reason & solution from help.aol.com in the body of the email.
Include a screen shot, if possible.

5 Write a description of the problem.
EXAMPLE:
„ Insufficient – Cannot view pictures article does not have enough
information.
„ Sufficient - Used “Cannot view pictures on AOL Webmail” article.
Steps & screen shots for clearing cache in Internet Explorer 9 are
needed.
6 Send the email to your coach. Your coach will review your submission and
forward it on to the appropriate TKAT contact.


Continued on next page
Help.aol.com
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised June 22, 2011

Page 13

TKAT, Continued

TKAT
(continued)
Scenario – A member receives the error message: Address Book entries
exceed the maximum allowed. Cannot add more. You are unable to find
a help.aol.com article about this.

Write a sample TKAT ticket email that you would send to their coach for
the scenario above.







































Help.aol.com
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised June 22, 2011

Page 14

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:

„ Describe the help.aol.com interface and the information it
provides.
„ Use the search feature to effectively locate help articles.
„ File TKAT tickets for knowledgebase updates.


Call Driver Tracking – Tech/TLV/ULV
Participant Guide
















Revised: February 16, 2012
Call Driver Tracking – Tech/TLV/ULV
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 16, 2012
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction In order to continually improve our ability to address issues affecting our
members, we must collect important information regarding their contacts
with AOL technical support.
You will use a tool, CDT (Call Driver Tracker), to improve AOL’s ability to
track the following related to Tech contacts:
 Contact drivers/symptoms
 Products impacted
 Solutions/ending actions
 Potential root causes involved in each member interaction
The Call Driver Tracker tool (CDT) is a web-based form that you will
complete for every member interaction.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
 Access the Call Driver Tracking tool.
 Use CDT to record and submit information about every member
interaction.
 Provide accurate responses for each field of the CDT form.
 Submit TKAT to request updates for CDT form.

Call Driver Tracking – Tech/TLV/ULV
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 16, 2012
Page 2

Call Driver Tracking

CDT Access There are 2 ways to access the CDT tool from within Gandalf while
working with members.
1. Click the CDT link in the main window of Gandalf Window Left. You
will see this new icon next to the screen name in Window Left.
Clicking this link will launch the CDT tool with the member's screen
name already populated in the form.

2. You can also launch the CDT tool from the Search screen for ghost
calls or when you are unable to focus on an account.

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Page 3

Call Driver Tracking, Continued

ULV ONLY–
Additional
Info
This section applies to ULV agents only!
When you first log in to the tool, you must select the correct version
of the form to use. You will use the SMS version for Billing related
interactions and the Tech version for tech related interactions. You will
see a button (1) at the top of the form that allows you to toggle
between the two. You will also see a Text entry field where you will
record the NetAgent Session ID number 92).

Although you see a tab in the SMS version of the form for technical
issues, it is not used in the ULV queue. Instead, please use the toggle
button at the top of the form to switch to the Tech version, which has
more detailed options.

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Page 4

Call Driver Tracking, Continued

CDT Window Below is a screen shot of the CDT tool for Tech interactions. Each
numbered area is described in the table below the screen shot. To
complete the form, you must fill in a response for each area. More
detailed information is provided for many of these areas later in this
document.


# Description
1 Member ScreenName – enter member screen name
2 High Level Support Area – select tab for the category/domain most relevant to the
member’s issue type. Then indicate the symptom/call driver and related product.
3 Ending Solution or Last Action Provided – record the last solution used or ending
action for call
4 Solution Outcome – Check this box if the member must test the solution and you
were unable to confirm while on the phone or online with the member
5 Remote Session – indicate Yes or No to show if remote session was used in the
interaction
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Call Driver Tracking, Continued

CDT Window (continued)

# Description
6 DRV – Check if callback for Dial Up Resolution Validation was successful
7 Repeat Contact – Check if the member has contacted AOL before for the same
issue.
8 Known Outage – Check if the member’s issue is related to a known outage.
9 Root Cause – enter what you believe to be the root cause of the issue, if available
10 Save/Reset – use buttons to save or reset the form (Form will be automatically
reset after it has been saved/submitted.)
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Call Driver Tracking, Continued

High Level
Support Area
In the High Level Support Area select tab for the category/domain most
relevant to the member’s primary issue. The form will then expand and
provide options related to the contact driver and the product where the
member is experiencing the issue.
The Call Drivers section on the left is further broken down into sub-
categories. Clicking on the drop down arrow next to the sub-categories
provides a list of symptoms that describe what the member is
experiencing. Click the radio button next to the most relevant
symptom/contact driver for the member interaction.
Similar to the Call Drivers section, the products section also includes
categories/sub-categories for products relevant to the Call Driver. Again,
use the drop down arrows to view options and then click the radio button
for the most appropriate one.
The contact products/contact drivers are continually updated to reflect
current call drivers and/or other trends that the business needs to track.

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Call Driver Tracking, Continued

Tips for High
Level
Support
Areas
Below are tips for when to use and when not to use specific High Level
Support Areas.
 Non-AOL – Use ONLY when tech issue is not related to AOL and no
troubleshooting is performed. For example, when the member needs
help installing an operating system. DO NOT USE this in the case of an
AC error where a referral is required due to hardware issues. Use a
“Connectivity” Issue Category in that situation and complete rest of
form.
 Other AOL Queue – Use ONLY when no troubleshooting is performed
and customer requests immediate transfer. Submit appropriate queue in
the Endling Solution field.
 Disconnect Call – Use ONLY when no troubleshooting is performed due
to audio issues or disconnection prior to troubleshooting. Indicate the
reason for the disconnect.


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AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 16, 2012
Page 8

Call Driver Tracking, Continued

Ending
Solution/
Last Action
Provided
The Ending Solution / Last Action Provided field allows free typing. Here
you will record the last solution that resolved the issue or the last action
you took during the interaction. You should always provide this
information based on the PRIMARY issue, if there are multiple issues. This
must be completed for all submissions EXCEPT “Disconnect Call.”
IMPORTANT: This SHOULD NOT be copied and pasted from your notes
in Gandalf (phone queues) or NetAgent (chat queues) notes or even from
Help articles. Instead you must manually type the solution. As you start
to type, the tool will auto-suggest solutions from the list based on your
entry, so it is effective to start typing a keyword.
For example, if the last solution attempted was “Reset Password,” you
could begin typing “pass” and the tool would suggest the following.


If you ordered a CD for the member, then you could type CD and see the
following suggestion(s).

In order to provide accurate reporting and tracking, it is CRITICAL that
you click an option from the list and DO NOT type your own solution.

Continued on next page
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Call Driver Tracking, Continued

Ending
Solutions
List
It is helpful if you familiarize yourself with the terminology used in the
tool to ensure that you find the appropriate result in the list. A list of all
solutions has been provided below.
You may find instances where the solution you need is not included in the
list. In these cases you do need to manually free-type the entire solution
in the tool. If this situation arises, or you find other information is needed
in any part of the form, please submit a TKAT.
When updates are made to the list of solutions within the CDT tool, they
will be reviewed in Pulsar. Your leadership will also be made aware of any
changes during their weekly queue calls with AOL.

Enable essential startup
programs
Check the modem using the
Windows dialer
Clear print spool Compact PFC
Open Data folder Determine the version of
Internet Explorer I have
Delete AOL Address Book
files
Create New Screen Name
Change the Windows screen
resolution
Scan my computer for viruses
using McAfee Internet
Security Suite - Special edition
from AOL
Disable third-party browser
extensions
Defragment Hard Drive
Enable cookies on your
browser
Reset web settings Run the Windows Update
utility
Delete Active X Files
Lower hardware acceleration Configure the security and
cookie settings on your
browser
Disable proxy server Delete TOD folder
Deactivate graphic
compression
Manually delete AOL folders Restore browser security
settings to the default level
Downgrade AOL
How do I run the Windows
Disk Cleanup utility?
Run WinsockFix.exe Delete Style.lst and Style.ind
files in AOL
Uninstall and Reinstall J ava
Run Quick Restore Activate tunneling using AOL
Keyword: Browser Fix
Disable QuickTime task from
loading at startup
Install AOL from the internet
Rebuild AOL Adapter Reconfigure the location to 7
or 10 digit dialing
Disable the pop-up blocking
software
Install AOL using a CD
Uninstall the AOL software How do I close waol.exe
process in task manager using
windows?
Enable AOL Sounds Install McAfee
Disable SystemGuard in
McAfee Internet Security Suite
- Special edition from AOL
Verify whether the computer
meets the system
requirements of the AOL
software
Verify Windows sound
controls
KW Increase Screen Size
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Page 10

Call Driver Tracking, Continued

Ending Solutions List (continued)

Enable essential startup
programs
Check the modem using the
Windows dialer
Clear print spool Compact PFC
Restart the computer Download and install the latest
J ava Virtual Machine
Install the QuickTime software Member Education
Clear AOL Artwork Database Power cycle the computer,
modem, and any home
networking equipment
Determine whether you can
hear other sounds
Ordered CD
Refer the member to the
appropriate third party to
resolve the issue (Overhead
content)
Clear J ava cache in Windows Clear the AOL TopSpeed
cache
Refer to Support.Com
Delete all connection locations
and redetect the modem
Replace the main.idx file and
delete the compver.bin file
Delete Address Book Files Referred to Webmaster
Uninstall and reinstall ACS Manually stop and restart the
update session (MIS)
Enable J ava applet scripting
and cookies
Remove AOL Screen Name
Manually set up the dial-up
modem
Configure McAfee Internet
Security Suite - Special edition
from AOL
Restore Internet browsing
capabilities
Reset Mailbox State
Enable/disable firewall using
McAfee Internet Security Suite
- Special edition from AOL
Trash software preferences
(Mac)
Customize Windows 7 System
Tray
Reset Password or ASQ
Temporarily disable a firewall
or configure McAfee
Trash the Data folders (Mac) Uninstall and reinstall McAfee
Internet Security Suite -
Special edition from AOL
Run a Virus Scan
File a Host Problem Report Adjust screen saver settings Clear the Internet Explorer
history list
Run aol process shutdown
utility
Run WebUtil Drag the AOL icon off and
onto the dock several times
Copy the snmaster.idx file to
the idb folder
Run McAfee Stinger
Clear cookies, cache, history,
and footprints
Check physical connections Contact your Internet Service
Provider (ISP)
Run MCPR
Repair the network stack list
using NetShell
Remove all third-party
telephone devices to test for
the presence of line noise
Contact your Computer
manufacturer
Run the Check Disk utility
Power cycle the networking
devices(Mac)
Verify whether the Web page
can be
Add AOL Icon to Desktop Sign Off and Sign Back On
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Page 11

Call Driver Tracking, Continued

Ending Solutions List (continued)

Enable essential startup
programs
Check the modem using the
Windows dialer
Clear print spool Compact PFC
Run ScanDisk and Disk
Defragmenter
Disconnect the router and
connect the modem directly to
the computer
Bump Screen Name, Change
Password and ASQ
Sign on as a Guest
Configure remote access
settings
Reconfigure network system
preferences
Bump Screen Name Sign on as existing Member
Set modem to v.34 connection
speed
Uninstall Viewpoint Media
Player
Change Password Swich to AOL Experience
Use an alternate access
phone number
Check Spam Controls Change ASQ Transferred to another AOL
Queue
Configure Microsoft Internet
Explorer to never dial a
connection
Trash the mailprefs.plist file Call Disconnected Turn off Content Advisor in
Internet Explorer
Run AOL Process Shut Down Delete the location files and
set up AOL for Mac OS X
manually (Mac)
Change Designated Master Turn off Tabbed Browsing
Delete browser cache and
rebuild AOL Adapter
Verify the Mail Controls Do
Not Block Attachments
(Windows)
Change Home Page Uninstall and Reinstall AOL
Software
Manually add access phone
numbers
Back up the personal files,
and then uninstall and reinstall
the AOL software
Change UserName Protection
Level
Update Graphic Card Settings
Install the AOL software Repair Internet Explorer Check Capslock Upgrade Browser
Referred to Modem
Manufacturer
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Page 12

Call Driver Tracking, Continued

Solution
Outcome
In the DRV section, you should click to place a checkmark in the box next
to “DRV Callback Successful” if you performed a DRV callback and were
able to confirm that the issue was resolved. If you are NOT able to
confirm resolution, DO NOT check this box.


Repeat Call In the Repeat Call section, you should click to place a checkmark in the
box if the member has previously contacted AOL about the same issue.


Remote
Session
In the Remote Session section, you must always indicate whether you
used a remote session to support the member. Click to mark the
appropriate radio button.


Known
Outage
In the Known Outage section, you should click to place a checkmark in
the box if the member’s issue is related to a known outage.

Continued on next page
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Page 13

Call Driver Tracking, Continued

Root Cause The last text entry box in the CDT tool is the area where you indicate
what you believe is the root cause of the member’s issue. The root cause
is situation that led to the member’s primary issue. Using effective
probing questions should help you determine both the issue and the
situation that may have led to or caused the issue.
NOTE: There may be instances where you are unable to determine the
root cause. However, you should always use effective probing questions
and attempt to identify the cause.
Take a look at the examples of symptoms and the related probing
questions and possible root causes in the chart below.

Symptom Probing Questions Possible Root
Cause(s)
Unable to
connect to the
AOL Service
 When was the last time you could connect
to the AOL Service successfully?
 Have you made recent changes?
 Where there any thunderstorms in your
area recently?
 New privacy wall
software installed,
blocked AOL
 Modem failed due to
thunderstorm
Unable to
access a
specific website
 When was the last time you could connect
to the website successfully?
 Have you made recent changes?
 Does the website require Java?

 New version of Java
causing
incompatibilities with
the website

Mailer
Daemons
 When did this issue start happening?
 Did you attempt to run a virus scan?
 Do you have emails in the sent folder
which you did not send?
 Possible compromised
account

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Page 14

Call Driver Tracking, Continued

Submit the
Form
To submit the data you have entered into the form, click the Save button.
Once you click Save, the form will refresh and all data will be removed.
The form is then ready for you to enter information on your next member
interaction.

TKAT To request changes to the CDT (Call Driver Tracking) tool, please submit
a TKAT Request to your coach. Your coach will select the "CDT Request"
option in the "Type" section of the TKAT Request form to specify that your
request is related to the CDT tool.


Call Driver Tracking – Tech/TLV/ULV
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 16, 2012
Page 15

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
 Access the Call Driver Tracking tool.
 Use CDT to record and submit information about every member
interaction.
 Provide accurate responses for each field of the CDT form.
 Submit TKAT to request updates for CDT form.





Tech Call Flow Process
Participant Guide
















Revised: September 20, 2011
Tech Call Flow Process
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised September 20, 2011
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction Participant introduction to the module.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
 Define the stages of the call flow.
 Use the call flow pod sheet to follow the steps during a member
interaction.
 Recognize when tools should be used during the call flow.
 Effectively use tools during each stage of the call flow.

Tech Call Flow Process
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised September 20, 2011
Page 2


, Continued

Introduction In this section you will learn the process, called the Tech Call Flow, which
is used to support every member on every call. You will review the stages
of the call flow process and the steps associated with each stage. You will
use simulations to see how the tech support tools are used during the
tech call flow. You will also have the opportunity to practice using the tech
call flow in role play scenarios.

Pod Sheet
Layout
The AOL Tech Call Flow Pod Sheet defines the steps and stages of the
tech call flow. Each stage is shown with a large rectangle on the pod
sheet. Within each stage, you see a flow chart of the steps that need to
be performed, as well as the actions you need to take in each tool.


, Continued
Tech Call Flow Process
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised September 20, 2011
Page 3

, Continued

Open &
Discover
The Open & Discover stage of the contact flow is where you greet the
member, locate the account in all of your tools, review previous tech
history, identify the issue and locate the support article for the issue.
Review the tool actions you should take for each step with in this stage.
Use your handout of the pod sheet to view a larger version of the text.


Solve The Solve stage of the contact flow is where you perform your
troubleshooting with the member, take notes on the actions you take
during the call, and send an email to the member re: the interaction.
Review the tool actions you should take for each step with in this stage.
Use your handout of the pod sheet to view a larger version of the text.


Close In the Close stage you pitch and register Paid Services/Lifestore products,
if applicable, finalize your notes and end the call.
Review the tool actions you should take for each step with in this stage.
Use your handout of the pod sheet to view a larger version of the.

Continued on next page
Tech Call Flow Process
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised September 20, 2011
Page 4


Call Flow Stages, Steps & Tools

Call
Examples –
Call Flow
Stages,
Steps &
Tools
You will now observe 3 recorded technical support calls. Focus on the call
flow & use of tools for each stage/step during these calls.
Using the Call Flow Stages, Steps and Tools chart on the following page,
mark off when you see/hear each action taken/performed in the call
example.
Continued on next page
Tech Call Flow Process
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised September 20, 2011
Page 5


Call Flow Stages, Steps & Tools, Continued


Call Flow Stages, Steps & Tools Call Examples
Steps Tool/Action 1 2 3
O
p
e
n

&

D
i
s
c
o
v
e
r

Greet & Locate
Account
 Auto-pop or Search in Gandalf
 Select Unverified in Gandalf

Review History  View Account Activity (TECH) in Gandalf
 Locate & Review Account in TechBuddy

Begin Support
Notes
 Write History in Gandalf
 Select “TECH Actioned”
 Record issue in Problem Section
 Begin CDT Record

Probe & Locate
Support Article
 Locate help.aol.com article

S
o
l
v
e

Perform Trouble-
shooting
 Follow help article path
 Attempt at least 2 solutions (1 for DRV)
 Perform actions in Gandalf, as needed

Combine Support
Notes
 Use Write History workflow in Gandalf
 Add article title, solution & steps to Problem
section

Send Email  Use Member Education workflow in Gandalf to
select/send relevant email based on outcome

C
l
o
s
e

Follow Paid Services
Process
 Use AOL Paid Services Sales workflow in Gandalf
 Review current/past subscriptions
 Pitch appropriate product
 Verify account, if needed

Finalize Notes  Use Write History Workflow in Gandalf
 Add additional information, if necessary
 Add final step (in detail) in Resolution section
 Select Reason Code based on outcome
 Submit
 Complete CDT record

Brand & End Call  End Contact in Gandalf for all open windows

Tech Call Flow Process
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised September 20, 2011
Page 6

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
 Define the stages of the call flow.
 Use the call flow pod sheet to follow the steps during a member
interaction.
 Recognize when tools should be used during the call flow.
 Effectively use tools during each stage of the call flow.



Dial-Up Resolution Validation
Participant Guide
















Revised: October 18, 2011
Dial-Up Resolution Validation
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction Participant introduction to the module.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
 Determine when it is appropriate to use the Dial-Up Resolution
Validation (DRV) process.
 Use Avaya Softphone to handle calls during the Dial-Up Resolution
Validation process.

Dial-Up Resolution Validation
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 2


Dial-Up Resolution Validation

Primary Use
of the DRV
The main purpose of the Dial-up Resolution Validation process is to help
members calling in on the same phone line they use to connect to the
internet who, as a result, are unable to perform troubleshooting steps
and/or validate that the issue has been resolved.
In these cases you must remain on the original line for the incoming call
until you reach the point where you are unable to complete any further
steps without connecting to AOL via dial-up.

Average
Handle Time
The AHT (Average Handle Time) for the original incoming call and the
secondary outbound call you initiate are measured separately. Although
you may begin to position the possibility of a callback earlier in the call,
these calls will be monitored to ensure that no actual callbacks are made
until using the alternate line is necessary.

Additional
Use of the
DRV
The DRV process can also be used in instances where you are speaking
with a member and experience an unexpected disconnect, where the
member has not indicated intent of ending the call.
In these cases you are able to initiate a call back to the member, provided
you are able to access the account information and phone number.
You will place an outgoing call following the steps included later in the
study session. When the member answers the phone, you will need to
identify yourself and AOL, let the member know that it seems you were
just disconnected and ask if they would like to continue.
Continued on next page
Dial-Up Resolution Validation
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 3


Dial-Up Resolution Validation, Continued

Preparation
Instructions
When you take a call from a member using a dial up connection and reach
a point where the member must utilize their phone line to troubleshoot or
test a solution, you will need to:
1. Explain that the member needs to connect to the Internet in order to
perform additional troubleshooting steps and/or validate the
resolution.
2. Explain that the member cannot speak with you and make a dial-up
connection to the internet on the same phone line.
3. Offer the possibility of calling the member on alternate phone line, if
the member has one, to continue troubleshooting.
4. Record the alternate phone number, if available, in Gandalf notes.
5. Explain that you will place the member on hold on the current line and
dial their alternate connection, and ask the member to stay on the line
to ensure that you get connected.
6. Confirm connection on the alternate number and then disconnect the
original line. If you are unable to connect to the alternate number, you
can return to the member on the original line.
There is no required scripting for preparing the member for the DRV
process. Each situation will vary and your interaction with the member
should be conversational in nature.

Gandalf
Notes
You must write a note in Gandalf for any instance where you use the DRV
process to call a member back. Your notes should include details of steps
completed during the callback and status of those steps.
Continued on next page
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AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 4


Dial-Up Resolution Validation, Continued

Initiating the
Callback
Follow the steps in the chart below to initiate the callback process.

Step Action
1
Place the call on Hold by selecting Call on the top menu bar and then selecting
Hold.

2
Enter the AOL Members alternate number in the Box labeled “Number.”
(Be sure to add the number 9 and 1, followed by the area code and 7-digit
number.)
Then push the Yellow Phone Icon which will dial the number.

3
You will now see two active calls. The blue arrow indicates the active call, which
will be the alternate number you just dialed.

Continued on next page
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AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 5


Dial-Up Resolution Validation, Continued

Confirmation
of
Connection
Follow the steps below to confirm that you have connected on the
alternate line and return to the original line.

1
2
3

Step Action
1 Confirm you are connected to the Member via their alternate number.
2 Place Call on Hold by selecting Call from the menu bar at the top, and then
selecting Hold.
3
Select the Answer Button to return to the Original AOL Member call.
NOTE: The IP Agent Software will swap the order of the calls so be sure to pay
special attention to which call you are actioning.
Continued on next page
Dial-Up Resolution Validation
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 6


Dial-Up Resolution Validation, Continued

Releasing
Original Call
Follow the instructions below to release the original line and return to the
alternate phone number.

Step Action
1
Ensure that you are back on the original call by confirming that the green arrow
indicator is on the same line as original phone number.
Select the Release button. Then you will notice that this phone number is no
longer listed.

2
Return to the Alternate number by selecting Answer next to the alternate phone
number.

3 You can now ask the AOL Member to attempt to connect to AOL using their Dial Up
internet service over their home telephone line.
Continued on next page
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AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 7


Dial-Up Resolution Validation, Continued

Completing
the Call
While using the alternate line, you will be in an AVAYA state called
AUX/OUT and will not receive additional calls until the current outbound
call is terminated. Once you have completed troubleshooting with the
Member, you can end the Call by selecting Release. Once the call is
released, you will go back into the available state and be ready for the
next inbound call.

Continued on next page
Dial-Up Resolution Validation
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 8


Dial-Up Resolution Validation, Continued

Usage
Scenarios
The following scenarios describe situations when the DRV process should
be utilized. Take notice of the point in the troubleshooting process at
which it is appropriate for the consultant to place the outbound call.

Scenario 1 1. Member calls and states she is receiving an AC-3000 error
message while trying to connect.
2. Consultant locates account in all tools, confirms responses to
interview questions, and searches for AC 3000 in the
knowledgebase.
3. Consultant walks member through the steps to check the
connection and finds that it is set to Broadband. He helps the
member change the location to Home for dial-up.
4. Consultant confirms that the member is using the same phone line
for the call as she needs to use to connect to the Internet.
Therefore, the member is unable to test the resolution to see if it
works or try any of the additional solutions presented within the
article.
5. Consultant explains that they need to connect to the internet in
order to validate the resolution and cannot do so while they are on
the same phone line. He asks if the member has an alternate
phone line available, so he can call her on that number and test
the resolution.
6. Consultant explains the DRV process to the member and initiates
a callback to validate the resolution with the member.
7. Consultant confirms the resolution and leaves notes in Gandalf.
Continued on next page
Dial-Up Resolution Validation
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 9

Dial-Up Resolution Validation, Continued

Scenario 2 REVIEW this section.
Continued on next page
Dial-Up Resolution Validation
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 10

Dial-Up Resolution Validation, Continued

Scenario 2 1. Member complains that he is unable to access his son’s school
website, even though other parents can. He also says he is able to
access all the other websites he’s tried, just not that one.
2. Consultant asks member to verify that the URL is correct and
attempts access the website. Consultant finds that the address is
valid and the website is working.
3. Consultant then walks the member through the steps to Rebuild
the AOL Adapter and asks if the member is using the same phone
line for this call that he needs to use to connect to the Internet.
4. Member confirms that he is on the same line.
5. Consultant explains that the member needs to connect to the
Internet in order to validate the resolution and cannot do so while
they are on the same phone line. She asks if the member has an
alternate phone line available, so she can call him on that number
and test the resolution.
6. Consultant explains the DRV process to the member and initiates
a callback to validate the resolution with the member.
7. Consultant discovers that the problem has not been resolved and
continues with other troubleshooting steps.
8. Consultant leaves notes in Gandalf that a callback was made and
notes the additional troubleshooting steps performed and the
results of those steps.
Continued on next page
Dial-Up Resolution Validation
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 11

Dial-Up Resolution Validation, Continued

Knowledge
Check
EXPLAIN that the participants will now practice what they have learned
about DRV.

Activity EXPLAIN that participants will fill in the answers to the questions in their
participant guide.
After they have answered the questions, REVIEW the answers together.
DISCUSS the different scenarios participants have suggested as
appropriate for DRV, and confirm whether they are correct.
Continued on next page
Dial-Up Resolution Validation
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 12

Dial-Up Resolution Validation, Continued

Knowledge
Check
Answer a few questions to confirm your understanding of the DRV
process.

Activity 1. Identify at what point in the troubleshooting process you
would typically introduce the DRV and initiate a call:
towards the beginning, middle, or end? Explain why.






2. How will you quickly distinguish the original call that came
in from Gandalf from the alternative callback number?






3. Describe two scenarios where you might use the DRV
process. Write them down and be prepared to share with
the class. Bonus points for scenarios not yet discussed.

Dial-Up Resolution Validation
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 13

Summary

Learning
Objectives
Now that you have completed this module you should be able to:
 Determine when it is appropriate to use the Dial-Up Resolution
Validation (DRV) process.
 Use Avaya Softphone to handle calls during the Dial-Up Resolution
Validation process.


Probing
Participant Guide
















Revised: October 18, 2011
Probing
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction Participant introduction to the module.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
 Ask effective probing questions to diagnose an issue.

Probing
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 2

Probing

Introduction Effective probing sets the stage for the rest of a technical support call. In
order to follow the call flow, use tools effectively and resolve the
member’s issue, consultants must first probe to identify and confirm the
contact reason, or reason the member is calling.
During the Discover stage of the Tech Call Flow, consultants determine
the contact reason for the call, or symptom, which they then use to
search the knowledgebase. This determination is made as a result of
asking probing & clarifying questions and actively listening to the
member’s responses.
In this section, participants will learn how to effectively probe and, as a
result, choose the proper symptom in Voyager.

What is
Effective
Probing?
You have effectively probed when you are able to describe the:






An obstacle can be a/an:












Continued on next page
Probing
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 3

Probing, Continued

What is
Effective
Probing?
Label the diagram below.


Probing
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 4

Probing, Continued

Probing Best
Practice
There are the four main questions consultants need to answer in order to
effectively probe and locate the correct symptom in Help.aol.com.
 What
 Where
 When
 How Often
Continued on next page
Determine… By asking…
What?

Where?

When?

How Often?

Probing
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 5

Probing, Continued

Probing By
Domain
Many of the issues that members experience fall into common categories
or domains. Identifying these domains can help you while probing.
Record a description of the domain in the chart below.

Domain Includes errors or issues encountered…
Installation

Application

Connectivity

Online

Email

Web

Security

AOL.com

Continued on next page
Probing
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 6

Probing, Continued

Probing
Quick
Reference
Guide
Your facilitator will provide you with a copy of the Probing Quick
Reference Guide which provides examples of questions to ask within each
domain. Use this section to take notes as you review this guide.

Continued on next page
Probing
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 7

Probing, Continued

Probing
Questions to
isolate Non-
AOL Issues
You must also probe to determine if an issue is related to AOL. Your goal
is to identify a non-AOL issue as efficiently as possible. Keep in mind that
members will be the most satisfied when they feel that their time is not
wasted or unproductive. Therefore, the more efficient you are at helping
members get to the appropriate third party for support, the better the
member experience.
Below are some examples of non-AOL categories and related probing
questions.
Continued on next page
Category Upfront Probing
Questions
Questions to help
determine where to refer
Member
Computer Infected/ Malware
 Did you receive a
notification that your
computer was infected?
 What brand of anti-virus
software do you use?
 Are you using the
McAfee software
provided by AOL?
 Which anti-virus
software are you using?
 Where did you purchase
the software?
Hardware
 Have you tried restarting
your computer?
 Can you get into
Windows?
 Who is the manufacturer
of the device you are
trying to use?
 What brand of computer
do you own?
Printing
 Are you able to print
from another program,
such as Microsoft Word?
 Who is the manufacturer
of your printer?
Broadband Connectivity
 Who is your high speed
provider?
 Do you get your high
speed service through
AOL or do you pay
another provider for
your broadband
connection?
 Who is your high speed
provider?
Probing
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 8

Probing, Continued

Probing Questions to isolate Non-AOL Issues (continued)

Third Party websites
 Are you able to sign on to
AOL?
 Can you access the website
from inside the AOL software?
 Can you access the website
using another browser?
 Can you access other
websites, such as AOL.com?
 What is the URL or web
address you are trying to
access?
 Does the website ask
you for a user name or
password?
Entertainment
 Are you able to sign on to
AOL?
 Can you access other
websites, such as AOL.com?
 Is this a website that you are
trying to play games on?
 Are you trying to play a java
game, such as a card game?
 Are you trying to download
music that you’ve purchased,
such as from iTunes?
 What is the website you
were trying to use?
Third Party
Software/
Applications
 Are you able to sign on to
AOL?
 Was the program provided by
AOL?
 If so, can you tell me how you
access the program?
 Can you access other
websites, such as AOL.com?
 Are you trying to run a
program which uses your AOL
internet connections?
 Are you using banking, office,
or file sharing software?
 Where did you purchase
this software?
 What company produces
or sells the software?
Continued on next page
Probing
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 9

Probing, Continued

Error
Messages –
Method 1
If a member receives an error message for an issue, it is important to
probe to find out what the error message said. This will provide search
terms to use in Help.aol.com that will bring you to the most appropriate
and effective solution path.
If a member recalls that he/she received an error message, but cannot
remember what it said, you can have the member look in 2 areas to see a
list of recent errors related to AOL. These error logs may provide the
information you need.
The steps for one method of accessing the error message log below.

Checking the Error Message Log – Method 1
Step Action
1

Right click on the AOL icon in the System Tray (near the
clock) and select System Information.
2

Click on the Errors tab on the left side of the System
Information window.
Continued on next page
Probing
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 10

Probing, Continued

Error
Messages –
Method 2
The steps for the second method of accessing the error message log are
provided below.

Step Action
1 Open the AOL software.
2

Click on Help and select About AOL.
3 Use Control + E on the keyboard to open the error message
log.
4

Look in the list for an AOL related error.
Continued on next page
Probing
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 11

Probing, Continued

Getting
Enough
Information
The purpose of probing is to make sure you have enough information to
understand the problem and can use effective search terms in
Help.aol.com to find a relevant article. Sometimes you may define the
action and obstacle, but will need more information in order to conduct an
effective search in Help.aol.com. The chart on the following page includes
examples of what you may determine as the action/obstacle. Determine if
you have enough information to effectively search in Help.aol.com. If you
do not have enough information, what additional probing questions could
you ask?

Specific Action Obstacle Enough
Info?
Help.aol.com Article or
Additional Probing
Questions
Member is trying to
access his bank
account from AOL’s
internal Web browser.
Page cannot be
displayed.

Member is trying to
sign on to AOL
Unable to get online

Member is trying to
sign on and connect
to AOL.
Receives an error
message: AC-3000.

Member is trying to
open their mailbox.
Hangs/freezes
immediately after clicking
on the "Read" button.

Member is unable to
print his email
Nothing prints

Member is trying to
play games
Experiencing a problem

Probing
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 12

Continued on next page
Probing
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 13

Probing, Continued

Getting Enough Information (continued)

Specific Action Obstacle Enough
Info?
Help.aol.com Article or
Additional Probing
Questions
Member is having
trouble sending email
to their grandchild
Receives a returned mail
(mailer daemon – user
unknown) when emailing
to one specific address,
but able to send email to
all other addresses

Member is trying to
get to their buddy list.
Buddy List does will
not display.

Member is trying to
install AOL using a
CD.
Hangs during installation.

Member is unable to
use TurboTax on the
web.
Sees Page Cannot be
Displayed error message

Continued on next page
Probing
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 14

Probing, Continued

Active
Listening
Record notes about Active Listening in the space below.




Your facilitator will conduct an activity related to Active Listening. Record
information in the T-chart below.


Continued on next page
Probing
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 15

Probing, Continued

Probing
Questions
Practice
You will practice the Call Opening stage of the call flow in a role play
activity. You will practice asking probing questions and using the Probing
Quick Reference Guide to determine the member’s issue. Use the space
below to take notes for each scenario.

Scenario 1
Continued on next page
Probing
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 16

Probing, Continued

Scenario 2 Use this space to take notes during the Probing Questions Practice
activity.

Continued on next page
Probing
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 17

Probing, Continued

Summarize
and Confirm
the Issue
Record notes about summarizing and confirming the issue below.







Your facilitator will conduct an activity for summarizing and confirming the
issues revealed in the last activity. Record the following in the space
below and on the following page for each example.
 Determine what information is relevant/irrelevant.
 Write a summary of the relevant information which shows what they
would say to the member.
 Write any additional probing questions you feel are needed to identify
the issue.
 Write down the search terms you would use in Help.aol.com and if
possible, the appropriate article.

Continued on next page
Probing
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 18

Probing, Continued

Summarize
and Confirm
the Issue
(continued)
Record information from the activity below. (continued from previous
page.)





























Probing
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 19

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
 Ask effective probing questions to diagnose an issue.



Host Problem Reports
Participant Guide
















Revised: October 18, 2011
Host Problem Reports
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction As a consultant, you may encounter situations where you are have
exhausted all of the troubleshooting solutions included in your
knowledgebase, but are still unable to resolve the member’s issue. In
cases where the problem is an AOL host-based issue, you will file a Host
Problem Report (HPR) to alert AOL. This module will reinforce why, when,
how and what is needed to properly submit a Host Problem Report.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this training you will be able to:
 Explain the HPR process & importance of submitting HPRs.
 Describe when an HPR needs to be submitted.
 Explain how to submit a Host Problem Report (HPR).
 Determine if a new Host Problem Report is related to an existing
ticket.
 Provide appropriate messaging to member for ticket-related and non-
ticket-related HPR situations.
 Notate the account in Gandalf and the HPR with required information.

Host Problem Reports
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 2

Host Problem Reports

HPR End to
End Process
When you submit an HPR, you are setting the wheels in motion to get
more help for the member’s issue. Unless you submit a problem report,
the member’s issue will not be looked into any further.
Once you submit an HPR, it is reviewed by AOL’s Tactical Operations
Team (TacOps). This team conducts real-time monitoring of AOL’s
systems and works to find solutions for issues that arise.
Once they receive an HPR, they review it and determine if the issue is
valid and they have enough information.
If the issue is valid and has the required information, TacOps compares
the HPR to other incoming HPRs and ongoing issues to see if they are
related.
When the issue in HPRs is frequent or has a large impact on members or
the business, TacOps creates a ticket and begins to research and action
the tickets until the issue is resolved or closed.
If the HPR addresses a lower severity issue or issue with lesser impact,
those are filtered to Level 2 Technical Support consultants. Level 2 then
opens a ticket and is then responsible for reaching out to the impacted
member to attempt to resolve their issue.
The work of both the Tactical Operations team and the Level 2 Tech
consultants ensure that all of our member’s needs are addressed.
Keep in mind that this process begins with you. You must file tickets in
the appropriate situations in order to begin the process with TacOps and
Level 2.

Continued on next page
Host Problem Reports
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 3

Host Problem Reports, Continued

When to
Submit HPR
In Help.aol.com, you may notice that some articles have CCC Only
information in red above the member-facing content. In some cases,
these instructions inform you to submit a Host Problem Report and
provide more additional information about the issue. Always follow these
instructions when they are included in a help article.
You will also file an HPR if you are unable to resolve an AOL issue after
exhausting all of the troubleshooting solutions within an article. Host
Problem Reports should be filed for issues that deal with AOL member-
facing content or the AOL service. Examples include:
 Welcome Screen not refreshing.
 Buddy List not displaying.
 Mailbox not found.
NOTE: Priority for action is based on the number of instances of an
occurrence. Therefore, unless you are otherwise instructed by your coach,
you should file an HPR each time an issue occurs, even if you have
previously filed an HPR for the same issue.
Continued on next page
Host Problem Reports
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 4

Host Problem Reports, Continued

How to
Submit HPR
Follow the procedure below to create a Host Problem Report (HPR).

Step Action
1 Access the Host Problem Report form in the QuickForms section of Pulsar.

2 Complete the form with detailed information.

The description that you provide is used to determine a course of action. Be sure
to include sufficient information to define the problem and related variables
including:
 When it occurred
 Processor
 Dial Up/High Speed
 Operating System
 Recent System Changes
NOTE: Some of these variables may be addressed using the drop down menus
on the HPR. However, if you find that the information in the drop down menus
does not match your need, include the information in the problem description.
3 Click the Send button.
Continued on next page
Host Problem Reports
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 5

Host Problem Reports, Continued

Writing an
effective
Problem
Description
The description you add to a problem report should include detailed
information. Some information is captured by what you input in the drop
down menus, but be sure to include any relevant information outside of
these in the description area.
The chart below shows examples of problem descriptions that might be
provided by a consultant in a problem report. The first column provides
information that is insufficient for use in resolving the issue. In contrast,
the second column shows a more detailed description that provides
sufficient information for use in resolving the problem. These examples
are not a template, but rather demonstrate the importance of providing
detailed information.

Insufficient Sufficient
Problems with
buddy list.
Member is experiencing no buddies showing on buddy
list. Only occurs on the above described machine. All
screen names on account are affected.
Missing Emails
All screen names on members account do not have
any emails present. This issue occurs on both the AOL
Software as well as on AOL Webmail. Emails that are
saved on the PFC are being listed. New Emails, and
Email stored on the AOL Server are missing. Issue
started about 3 hours back.
AOL Radio not
working
Member is unable to access AOL Radio on either
Internet Explorer or via AOL Software. Member see’s
a blank screen when attempting to load the AOL
Radio Player. All troubleshooting steps have been
exhausted. Ongoing issue, for the last 4 hours.
Unable to
connect
Member is on an high speed connection with Verizon
and from [Region] is unable to connect to the internet
via AOL. Member is able to pull up websites using IE.
Issue started about an hour back.
Continued on next page
Host Problem Reports
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 6

Host Problem Reports, Continued

Ticket or
Non-Ticket
Related?
You need to consult the Host Issues section at the bottom of the HPR
form to determine if the member’s issue is related to any open TacOps
tickets. The information you give to the member will differ if their issue
is/is not related to a ticket.
To view open tickets, look at the Host Issues section at the bottom of the
HPR form. This will list all current tickets and will provide a description of
the issue.

If filing a Host Problem Report is necessary during an interaction with a
member, you will first determine if the HPR is related to an existing
TacOps ticket.
If the HPR is related to a ticket, you will continue the current HPR
process. If the HPR is NOT RELATED to a ticket, you will file the HPR and
let the member know that while researching their issue, AOL may need to
call them for more information. You will then collect and notate their
contact information and best times for contact. Our Level 2 consultants
will be assigned to specified non-ticket-related HPRs and will then take
end-to-end ownership to work with the member to resolve the issue.

Ticket-
Related
Issues
If you determine that an issue IS related to an existing TacOps ticket,
you will continue to file the Host Problem Report by completing the
required fields.
Continued on next page
Host Problem Reports
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 7

Host Problem Reports, Continued

Non-Ticket
Related
Issues
If the member’s issue is NOT related to an existing ticket, you will still file
the Host Problem Report, with some additional information. In these
cases, it is possible that the member will receive a call back from a Level
2 Technical Support consultant. You will collect the member’s contact
information in case additional information is needed, including:
 Full name
 Preferred phone number
 Best time to contact them (at least 1 business day after HPR
submitted)

Add contact information in the Additional Comments section of the HPR
and also in the Gandalf notes. Please also advise the member that while
we will generally call during the preferred time if we need to contact
them, there will be cases where we attempt to call the member back
within a few hours of the HPR being filed.

Continued on next page
Host Problem Reports
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 8

Host Problem Reports, Continued

Scripting Below is sample scripting that you can use to explain the process to
members.

If… Then…
Ready to file HPR
& searching for a
related ticket

"Please give me a moment to check and see if the issue you
are experiencing is related to any current AOL system issues."
Issue IS related to
existing ticket

"I see that our operations team is already working on other
accounts with a similar issue. I am creating a problem report to
inform them that your account is experiencing the same issue.
Just a moment while I complete the report."

Issue is NOT
related to existing
ticket

"I did not find other reports of issues similar to your case, so I
am creating a problem report for further investigation. It may
be necessary to collect additional information from you, so an
AOL representative will contact you if required. If it is OK, I will
write down the best phone number and time to call you. Just a
moment while I complete the report."
AFTER COMPLETING REPORT & RECORDING CONTACT
INFO:
"I have submitted the problem report and your ticket will be
looked at by our operations team in the next few hours for
appropriate action. An AOL representative will get in touch with
you ONLY if additional information is necessary. If so, they may
attempt to call up to three times and then communicate
through email. If there is no response they will need to close
the ticket.”
Caller asks for a
call back

"I understand that you are requesting a call back, but
unfortunately I cannot guarantee it. I have provided your
contact details to our operations team in case they need to
contact you for additional information to resolve the case. I am
able to give you a case number that you can provide if you call
back to check on the status of the case." (agent provides SR
number).
Continued on next page
Host Problem Reports
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 9

Host Problem Reports, Continued

Gandalf
Notes
In Gandalf, you always notate when a Host Problem Report is filed on
behalf of a member for both ticket-related and non-ticket related issues.
For those that are ticket-related, please copy the ticket number from the
HPR form and include that in your Gandalf notes.
For those at are non-ticket related, please include the member’s preferred
contact information in your Gandalf notes.



Host Problem Reports
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 10

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
 Explain the HPR process & importance of submitting HPRs.
 Describe when an HPR needs to be submitted.
 Explain how to submit a Host Problem Report (HPR).
 Determine if a new Host Problem Report is related to an existing
ticket.
 Provide appropriate messaging to member for ticket-related and non-
ticket-related HPR situations.
 Notate the account in Gandalf and the HPR with required information.



Lifestore Products
Participant Guide
















Revised: February 27, 2012
Lifestore Products

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 27, 2012
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction As AOL looks to expand its subscription business you will begin to offer a
variety of Lifestore products to both paid and free AOL members. AOL has
partnered with several companies to provide special offers to AOL
members. These products will be available for members to purchase
online, or by calling consultants who can assist with the registration
process.
With the launch of these exciting new products and services it is
important that the member experience associated with this process is
world class. In order to uphold these standards, several processes have
been put into place including:
 30 day free trial (when applicable)
 Clear information on pricing
 Fair refund policy
 Prevention of duplicate purchases
 Confirmation of intent to purchase
 Immediate purchase confirmation e-mail with option to cancel
 E-mail notification three days and one day prior to billing
 Display of active services at Lifestore
 Online cancellation option
 Phone and online support
During this section of training you will learn the details of the new
products and services.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
 Explain the details of each product.

Lifestore Products

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 27, 2012
Page 2

Activity

Lifestore
Products
All Lifestore products will be supported through the Lifestore site. This
area will house product information and allow members to manage their
subscriptions. You will need to understand the type of information
available at this site.
Working with your group, go to Lifestore and read the details of the
product you were assigned. Be prepared to present this information to the
rest of the class. Use the section below to take notes from each
presentation.

Product Details





Lifestore Products

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 27, 2012
Page 3

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
 Explain the details of each product.



AOL TechGuru (Tech / TLV)
Participant Guide
















Revised:February24,201

Published by Articulate® Presenter
www.articulate.com

Slide 1
Slide 1
Duration:
00:00:05
Advance
mode: Auto

Notes:

Slide 2
Slide 2
Duration:
00:00:05
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mode: Auto

Notes:
Take a look at this conversation between a
father and his daughter. Does it sound
familiar?

Slide 3
Slide 3
Duration:
00:00:05
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mode: Auto

Notes:

Published by Articulate® Presenter
www.articulate.com
Slide 4
Slide 4
Duration:
00:00:05
Advance
mode: Auto

Notes:

Slide 5
Slide 5
Duration:
00:00:05
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mode: Auto

Notes:
Frustrating, isn’t it??!!

Slide 6
Slide 6
Duration:
00:00:05
Advance
mode: Auto

Notes:
Imagine how it feels to be on the other side,
where you really just don’t know how to fix a
technical problem! What’s a guy supposed to
do? How can someone get the help they
need when they need help?

Slide 7
Slide 7
Duration:
00:00:05
Advance
mode: Auto

Notes:
AOL has an answer….You’ve got Tech
Support! Introducing AOL TechGuru, AOL’s
solution to virtually any technical problem
you may encounter.

Published by Articulate® Presenter
www.articulate.com
Slide 8
Slide 8
Duration:
00:00:05
Advance
mode: Auto

Notes:
After completing this training module, you
will be able to:
• Describe AOL’s Premium Tech
Support Service,
AOL TechGuru.
• Explain how customers obtain the
service.
• Describe what products to pitch to
customers.
• Explain when and how to pitch AOL
TechGuru
products in the call center.
• Correctly route customers for billing,
credit,
cancellation and technical support.
NOTE: The screen shots included in this
training are mock-ups of the final product
and are subject to changes in content.

Slide 9
Slide 9
Duration:
00:00:05
Advance
mode: Auto

Notes:
What is AOL TechGuru?
AOL TechGuru is AOL’s solution to virtually
any PC problem you may encounter. AOL
TechGuru is an AOL service that identifies
trouble spots, improves and enhances
system performance, updates operating
systems and software, removes viruses and
fixes system crashes. All you’ll need is a
phone and your computer with an internet
connection. AOL’s technical experts will
remotely access your computer via your
internet connection and fix your computer as
you sit back and watch the magic happen.

Slide 10
Slide 10
Duration:
00:00:05
Advance
mode: Auto

Notes:
Take a look at the details…
Remote Tech Support – Fix your computer
without bringing it in.
Our team of tech gurus will make a house
call via the Internet. All you need to do is sit
back and relax.

Published by Articulate® Presenter
www.articulate.com
Slide 11
Slide 11
Duration:
00:00:05
Advance
mode: Auto

Notes:
Any PC, Any Issue - New or Old. We Just
Fix It.
It doesn't matter where you bought your PC
or whether it is a MAC or a PC. Our tech
experts can get it back up and running fast,
secure and hassle-free.

Slide 12
Slide 12
Duration:
00:00:05
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mode: Auto

Notes:
Available 24 / 7 /365 - On your schedule, not
ours.
Computers issues pop up when you least
expect them. That’s why we’re on-call all
hours of the day—even holidays.

Slide 13
Slide 13
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00:00:05
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mode: Auto

Notes:
Agents in North America – US & Canada
Based Tech Gurus
We hire only the best experts with the skills
and experience to resolve virtually any PC
issue, so you get the best support every time
you call.

Slide 14
Slide 14
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00:00:05
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mode: Auto

Notes:
Our Commitment- You are priority one.
Our commitment is to be there when you
need us, save you time and effort and help
you be more productive, all at an affordable
price.


Published by Articulate® Presenter
www.articulate.com
Slide 15
Slide 15
Duration:
00:00:05
Advance
mode: Auto

Notes:
Here is how AOL TechGuru works:
1. Call. Phone one of our U.S.- and
Canada-based technical experts and
describe the computer problem or
assistance you need.
2. Connect. Our expert will guide you
through a quick process to install
software that enables our experts to
remotely work on your computer
over the internet.
3. Fix. Sit back, relax and watch while
we take care of your computer
needs.
4. Disconnect. You control the
connection between you and our
tech expert. Once our experts are
finished, simply disconnect the
remote connection. For added
security, our remote technology
software automatically uninstalls
from your computer.
AOL TechGuru is available 24 hours a day,
seven days a week, plus holidays. No matter
the computer problem, AOL TechGuru will
resolve almost every computer issue, every
time. Check out AOL TechGuru’s service
and subscription packages and sign up
today!

Slide 16
Slide 16
Duration:
00:00:05
Advance
mode: Auto

Notes:
AOL TechGuru is an on-call personal
technical support expert for a customer,
family or small business. It is a part of AOL –
the company that is known and trusted by
millions for over 25 years. Customers can
trust that we’ll be there as their on-call
personal tech support expert whenever they
need us.

Published by Articulate® Presenter
www.articulate.com
Slide 17
Slide 17
Duration:
00:00:05
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mode: Auto

Notes:
Services are offered as either one-time
service plans or subscription plans. Here you
see a list of the products offered for each.
Take a look at the AOL TechGuru website at
techguru.aol.com. Here you will find detailed
information about all of these products and
pricing.

Slide 18
Slide 18
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00:00:05
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mode: Auto

Notes:
Our customers are able to purchase a wide
variety of these services online as well as
some of the products through our contact
centers.

Slide 19
Slide 19
Duration:
00:00:05
Advance
mode: Auto

Notes:
In addition to the AOL TechGuru website,
our customers can go to LIFESTORE, at
www.lifestore.aol.com or lifestore.aol.co.uk,
where AOL offers the “Best Solutions for
your everyday life needs.” Lifestore is a
website that lets you browse, research and
purchase AOL products. It also allows you to
open and maintain an online account that
helps you manage, add or cancel
subscriptions to products. One of the options
in the LIFESTORE will be AOL TechGuru,
which will then be broken down into the
categories you see here.

Slide 20
Slide 20
Duration:
00:00:05
Advance
mode: Auto

Notes:
When we work with customers in the contact
centers, by phone or by chat, we will not
pitch any specific AOL TechGuru products.
Instead we will provide the member with
general information about AOL TechGuru
and if they’re interested, we’ll transfer them
to an AOL TechGuru sales agent who can
help them determine which product is right
for them. Some of the features you can
promote are:
• On call live tech
support
• Experts work

Published by Articulate® Presenter
www.articulate.com
remotely
• PC Tune Up
• Virus, spyware &
malware removal
• Repair driver
conflicts
• Help set up new
devices

Slide 21
Slide 21
Duration:
00:00:05
Advance
mode: Auto

Notes:
You will pitch AOL TechGuru to members
with specific types of NON-AOL Issues, if
they are eligible for a pitch.

Slide 22
Slide 22
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00:00:05
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mode: Auto

Notes:
You must first determine which category the
NON-AOL Issue falls into. Is it a Windows or
Mac issue related to PC performance or
optimization, virus issues or an issue related
to setting up devices? Or is it related to 3
rd

party software? Or hardware failure? Only
the 1
st
category qualifies for a pitch on AOL
TechGuru.
Review the Pulsar article, Supporting
Members with AOL and Non AOL Technical
Issues, for more detailed information.

Slide 23
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Duration:
00:00:05
Advance
mode: Auto

Notes:
If the customer’s NON-AOL issue is related
to WIN/MAC OS Issues, PC performance or
optimization, virus issues or device setup,
you must then determine if the customer has
internet connectivity, either dial up or
broadband. Connectivity is required for AOL
TechGurus to remote into the customer’s
computer. If the customer DOES NOT have
internet connectivity, you should refer them
to the 3
rd
party manufacturer for their
computer or device.

Published by Articulate® Presenter
www.articulate.com
Slide 24
Slide 24
Duration:
00:00:05
Advance
mode: Auto

Notes:
The Lifestore Pitch Eligibility & Offers pod
sheet in Pulsar also provides reminders for
when to pitch this offer.
Review the most current version of this pod
sheet in Pulsar.

Slide 25
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00:00:05
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mode: Auto

Notes:
Remember to keep the overall eligibility
reasons in mind as well. This is discussed in
more detail in the Lifestore Offers module of
the New Hire curriculum.

Slide 26
Slide 26
Duration:
00:00:05
Advance
mode: Auto

Notes:
Here is an example of the offer script that is
included in Gandalf. As this script may be
changed from time to time, please make
sure to always check Gandalf for the most
up to date version.
It is important that you explain that there is
an additional cost associated with AOL
TechGuru services. Members should not be
transferred to TechGuru with the impression
that the services are included as a part of
their AOL price plan.

Slide 27
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00:00:05
Advance
mode: Auto

Notes:
If the pitch is accepted, you will either
transfer the member to an AOL TechGuru
sales agent (phone agents) or provide the
phone number for the AOL TechGuru sales
agent (Chat queues) The AOL TechGuru
sales agent will provide more details and
register them for the appropriate product.

Published by Articulate® Presenter
www.articulate.com
Slide 28
Slide 28
Duration:
00:00:05
Advance
mode: Auto

Notes:
Once a customer has purchased a AOL
TechGuru service, how they receive support
varies depending on whether they need
support related to:
• Billing
• Credit
• Cancellations
• Technical Support / Service

Slide 29
Slide 29
Duration:
00:00:05
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mode: Auto

Notes:
Any member concerns related to Billing,
Credit Requests, Cancellations for AOL
TechGuru services should be transferred to
SMS, just like any other Paid Service.

Slide 30
Slide 30
Duration:
00:00:05
Advance
mode: Auto

Notes:
Any questions related to existing service
should be transferred to a AOL TechGuru
service agent. The transfer phone number
will be available in Pulsar.

Slide 31
Slide 31
Duration:
00:00:05
Advance
mode: Auto

Notes:
Any product information related questions,
such as to what services are available, what
are the price plans, details on how the
service works, prior to purchase should be
transferred to a AOL TechGuru Sales agent.
The transfer phone number will be available
in Pulsar.

Published by Articulate® Presenter
www.articulate.com
Slide 32
Slide 32
Duration:
00:00:05
Advance
mode: Auto

Notes:
Now that you have completed this training
you should be able to:
• Describe AOL’s Premium Tech
Support Service,
AOL TechGuru.
• Explain how customers obtain the
service.
• Describe what products to pitch to
customers.
• Explain when and how to pitch AOL
TechGuru
products in the call center.
• Correctly route customers for billing,
credit,
cancellation and technical support.
Questions?

Lifestore Offers & Registration
Participant Guide
















Revised: February 27, 2012
Lifestore Offers

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 27, 2012
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction Now that you understand the details of each product, the next step is
learning how to offer these products during your contacts. During this
portion of training you will learn how to use Gandalf to:
 Determine if the customer is eligible for an offer.
 Determine which offer to pitch.
 Pitch the offer.
 Register for the offer.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:

 Locate the appropriate Lifestore Products Eligibility & Offer Sequence
Pod Sheet in Pulsar.
 Determine if a customer is eligible/ineligible for a Lifestore offer.
 Demonstrate how to use Gandalf to pitch the appropriate offer.
 Use Gandalf to register a Lifestore subscription.

Lifestore Offers

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 27, 2012
Page 2

Determining Eligibility

Introduction Prior to pitching, you need to determine if the contact is eligible for a
Lifestore offer. To help you determine if a pitch is required, you will need
to review:
 Eligibility Guidelines
 Verification Guidelines
During this section of training you will learn how to determine if an
account is eligible for a Lifestore offer.

Eligibility
Guidelines
In order to be eligible for the Lifestore offer the customer must meet
certain eligibility guidelines. You will find the most current eligibility
guidelines in Pulsar. Follow the instructions from your facilitator to
navigate to Pulsar to review the eligibility guidelines for your queue.
Use the space below to record notes.
Continued on next page
Lifestore Offers

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 27, 2012
Page 3

Making an Offer

Introduction After you verify that the customer is eligible for a Lifestore offer, the next
step is to determine what offer you should pitch. You will use the Lifestore
Products Eligibility & Offer Sequence Pod Sheet and the Gandalf tool to
help determine the most appropriate offer. It is critical to the success of
this program that you follow this offer sequence on every contact. During
this section of training you will review your offer sequence.

Offer
Sequence
Your offer sequence is determined by:
 Your queue and/or site
 Contact type
 Current product availability
 Active and cancelled Lifestore products on the account
Use the information in the Lifestore Products Eligibility & Offer Sequence
Pod Sheet for your queue to determine the appropriate offer sequence.
This information is available in Pulsar.
Keep the following in mind:
 Only pitch one offer per contact.
 Only use the fallback offer if the customer already has a subscription to
the primary pitch or a product within the same category for your queue.
 Do not pitch an offer if the customer has a subscription to all offers in
your offer sequence.
 Pitch Digital Landing instead of a Lifestore product if the customer is
interested in high speed service.
Continued on next page
Lifestore Offers

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 27, 2012
Page 4

Determining Eligibility, Continued

Launch
Lifestore
Sales
Workflow
Click on the Lifestore Sales link in the Subscription Information
workgroup to access the Lifestore Sales workflow.

Continued on next page
Lifestore Offers

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 27, 2012
Page 5

Determining Eligibility, Continued

AOL
Lifestore
Sales
Window
When the Lifestore Sales window opens in Gandalf, you will see the
information described below.


# Description
1 Current/Previous Subs – List of current and previous subscriptions on the account.
Active subscriptions are indicated in green and cancelled subscriptions are indicated in
red. In both cases you will be able to see the date that they registered/cancelled
which will help you determine which offer to pitch.
2 Available Offers – The primary offer for your site/queue will be listed at the top in bold
print. Additional offers will be listed below that in alphabetical order.

Click on the offer that you would like to pitch to populate this window with the
information related to that product.
Continued on next page
Lifestore Offers

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 27, 2012
Page 6

Determining Eligibility, Continued



# Description
3 Description - Key features/marketing points of the selected product
3 Offer Scripts
CHAT AGENTS: Scripting for the all Lifestore pitches will be included as
Frequently Used Sayings in the Lifestore folder of NetAgent.
4 Accept button – click if customer accepts pitch
5 Go Back – click to go back to previous window
6 Decline –Click the button to go back to Account Overview screen.


Lifestore Offers

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 27, 2012
Page 7

Determining Eligibility, Continued

Determining
Offer to Pitch
Refer to the Lifestore Sales Flow in Gandalf to help you determine which
products are currently active and which pitches have been previously
declined.


# Determine if customer…
1 GREEN - Has an ACTIVE subscription to the offer or similar products in the same
product category
For example: If pitching Computer Check Up, look for active subscriptions to any
of the following:
 Computer Check Up
 System Mechanic
 Perfect Speed
2 RED - Has a CANCELLED subscription to the offer
3 PURPLE - DECLINED the offer. You must check the date to determine if the offer
was declined in the last 30 days.
Continued on next page
Lifestore Offers

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 27, 2012
Page 8

Determining Eligibility, Continued

Pitching
Products
After launching the Paid Service window in Gandalf, follow the process
below to pitch a Lifestore product.

Step Action
1 Select the product that you will pitch.
2 Read the offer script and provide product details.
3
If the customer… Then…
Declines the offer
(or is ineligible)
Click the Decline button. This will bring you back to the
Account Overview window.


Accepts the offer Click the Accept button and go on to Step 4.
4
If the offer… Then…
Requires a transfer to a partner Click the Accept button and go to Step 5.
DOES NOT require a transfer to a
partner
Click the Accept button. Skip step 5 and
go on to Step 6.
5
Offers requiring a transfer will automatically take you to the Transfer Referral
screen in Gandalf. You will need to manually transfer the customer; however the
transfer number is provided in this window. Click Done once the customer has
been successfully transferred.

Continued on next page
Lifestore Offers

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 27, 2012
Page 9

Determining Eligibility, Continued

Pitching Products (continued)

Step Action
6 Enter the Method of Payment. Gandalf is able to store multiple methods of
payment for every customer. If the customer has any payment methods on file,
you will see them listed here. They are now able to use a different method of
payment for each subscription and AOL account. They no longer need to use the
same method of payment for all Lifestore subscriptions.


If the customer wants to use an existing method of payment on their account, click
the radio button next to that MOP.

To enter a new method of payment, click the radio button next to “Enter a new
payment method below.” The window will expand and you can enter the billing
information in the fields.

Continued on next page
Lifestore Offers

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 27, 2012
Page 10

Determining Eligibility, Continued

Pitching Products (continued)

Step Action
7 If the customer is using a debit card, Gandalf will provide you with a script for the
Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT) agreement. You must read this script verbatim,
including the appropriate Yes/No response script.



If customer… Then…
Verbally agrees to EFT Click to place a checkmark in the box below the script
and move on to Step 8.
Does not agree to EFT Select another method of payment for the subscription.

Continued on next page
Lifestore Offers

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 27, 2012
Page 11

Determining Eligibility, Continued

Pitching Products (continued)

Step Action
8 Click Place order button.
9 Read Full Disclosure and click the button to indicate if customer does/does not
agree.



Clicking on No, Don’t Agree returns you to the Account Overview window.
Clicking Yes, Agree also takes you back to the Account Overview window,
however, you will see confirmation text in green.




Billing Date The billing date for the Lifestore subscription will be based on the
registration date, not the AOL billing date. The customer will be charged
immediately following their free trial (if applicable).

Lifestore Offers

AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 27, 2012
Page 12

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:

 Launch Gandalf for Lifestore products.
 Locate the Lifestore Products Eligibility & Offer Sequence Pod Sheet for
the correct queue in Pulsar.
 Determine if a customer is eligible/ineligible for a Lifestore offer.
 Demonstrate how to use Gandalf to pitch the appropriate offer.
 Use Gandalf to register a Lifestore subscription.




All Queues
Handout
Revised Date:
6/6/2011



Customer Relations Ethics Standards (CRES)
Violations and Consequences

Introduction The Customer Relations Ethics Standards (CRES) identifies specific
violations and associated consequences. There are four types of
consequences, with penalties ranging from a verbal warning up to
immediate removal from the AOL account. This document reviews the
four consequences, and identifies the consequence associated with each
potential violation.

Types of
Conse-
quences

The consequences associated with a Customer Relations Ethics Standards
(CRES) violation depend on the severity of the violation:
 Account Removal: Consultants are removed from the AOL account the
first time they conduct the behavior.
 Final Written Warning: Consultants cannot commit the same violation
within a twelve-month period from the date corrective action is
discussed. Another occurrence of the same behavior during that time
period escalates to Account Removal.
 Written Warning: After a written warning, another occurrence of the
violation in a 6-month period escalates to a Final Written Warning.
 Verbal Warning: A repeat occurrence of the violation within a 3-month
period escalates to a Written Warning.

Violations:
Compliance
impacting
AOL
Allow an unauthorized user access to AOL internal records

Access an account without business justification

Perform an unauthorized price plan change Final
Fail to leave a history note after accessing an account Written



AOL ® Confidential Page 1


Violations:
Compliance
impacting
Members
Sales 
Mislead member while attempting to make a sale/avoid cancellation 

Perform unauthorized and uninformed sales/changes to an account   
Misrepresent full disclosure by not providing mandatory elements  Final
Continued attempts to retain member/sell AOL products & services   Final
Enter Visa/MasterCard info without asking if debit or credit card
1
  Written
Enter card info as credit card when member specified debit card
1
  Final
Unauthorized Contact 
Solicit communication with a member   Final
Respond to unsolicited communication with a member Final
Process 
Record member's personal info outside approved processes & tools   
Fail to follow through with a commitment   Final
Improperly verify an account   Final
Release additional verification elements after account verification  Written
Invalid Saves
2
 
Fail to transfer an eligible member to Third Party Verification
3
 

Fail to honor cancellation or migration‐to‐free request
4
 

Provide inaccurate info on cancellation procedure to retain a member  Final
Migrate account to free when member requests complete cancellation
4
  Final
Invalid Registrations/Reactivations
2
 
Create/reactivate account or billing relationship for a minor  

Create account when one already exists  

Create account without full verification of member phone #/address  Final
Create account/billing relationship for unqualified/ineligible member  Final
Create account (free or paid) when it is not the member’s intent  Final

Violations:
Behavioral
impacting
AOL
Document an inaccurate account history notation  Final
Perform unauthorized action on secured CAT/Fraud accounts   Final
Abuse credit or company knowledge of a queue‐specific promotion  Final
Inappropriate use of cancel/termination codes
2
  Written
Unauthorized use of cancel intent code
2
  Verbal
Access and add cancel intent code to multiple accounts
2
  Final

Violations:
Behavioral
impacting
Members
Solicit member for non‐business/personal reason  Final
Inappropriate online conduct 

Unauthorized/fictitious billing information on member account 

1  Debit card‐related violations do not apply to the AOLCA queue 
2  Invalid saves/registrations/reactivations and cancellations do not currently apply to technical queue 
situations  
3  Third party verification does not currently apply to the AOLCA or BLV queues  
4  Migrate‐to‐free situations do not currently apply to the LCA queue

AOL ® Confidential Page 2


Version 3.5 Effective May 2011

AOL Ethics Agreement



The Customer Promise

As the voice of AOL, I promise to conduct myself with integrity at all times, provide excellence in service, and ensure
a world-class customer experience on every call or interaction. In addition, I must abide by the rules of conduct
specific to customer interactions.

By signing below I agree to the following terms and conditions:

1. I will comply with directives regarding the Customer Relations Ethics Standards initiatives.
2. I understand that I am to access an account only when there is a valid business reason. I will uphold AOL’s
standards of quality and compliance by documenting access with a history code and recording the event with
detailed history notes.
3. I have received Customer Relations Ethics Standards training and fully understand the guidelines and will
comply with its expectations.
4. I also understand that proper customer interaction behavior(s) are periodically updated or otherwise revised,
with the prevailing version(s) posted in Pulsar. It is my responsibility to abide by Customer Relations Ethics
Standards requirements.
5. If I do not share AOL’s commitment to ethical behavior, or if at any time find I am having difficulty complying
or cannot, or do not wish to comply with the terms of this Agreement, I will consult with my Manager or
another Site Leadership representative prior to taking any action which might violate the terms of this
Agreement.
6. Partners’ employees may be subject to removal from the AOL account if a violation of this agreement occurs.

Hereby agreed to by:

Employee Name: (print) Employee Signature Employee ID Date



Leadership Accountability Agreement

I understand that I am responsible for the above mentioned agent and must adhere to the policy, processes, and
Consequence Management Guidelines in the CRES document. In addition, I will take the appropriate actions on
customer accounts to ensure resolution of an identified violation and notify AOL in a timely manner. I acknowledge
that any violation of these processes will result in disciplinary action up to and including removal from the AOL
account.


I agree: _____________(Initials) DATE ____/____/________



Note:

The AOL Ethics Agreement is to be signed immediately following the Customer Relations Ethics Standards training
as acknowledgement and retained in the Agent file.




Customer Service Techniques
Participant Guide
















Revised: January 12, 2011
PARTICIPANT Customer Service Techniques
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 12, 2011
Module Overview

Introduction One of AOL’s most important goals is to provide world class customer
service during every interaction with our members. Providing the best
member experience possible will impact how members feel about AOL and
whether or not they choose to continue using AOL as their Internet
provider. During this section of training you will review the customer
service skills you will need to provide world class customer service on
every call / session.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
 Explain how your customer service skills can impact your MSI
performance.
 Demonstrate how to use an appropriate tone on all calls / sessions.
 Deliver a difficult message to a member.
 Actively listen to members.
 Practice effective call / session control to provide more efficient
customer service.

PARTICIPANT Customer Service Techniques
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 12, 2011
Customer Service Skills

Introduction One of your goals should be to provide world class customer service on
every call / session. AOL shows that we value our customers by serving
them well and putting their needs and interests at the center of
everything we do. Therefore, it is critical that you provide outstanding
customer service on every call / session. During this section of training
you will look at an overview of some important customer services skills
and how they can impact your Member Satisfaction Index (MSI).

Customer
Service Skills
This module reviews the following customer service skills:
 Conversation tone
 Delivering a difficult message
 Active listening
 Call/Session control

Linking
Customer
Service and
MSI
Your customer services skills will have a direct impact on the satisfaction
of our members and your MSI scores. Listed below are some of the
specific MSI performance areas that are impacted by your customer
service skills.
Customer Service
Skill
MSI Performance Area
Voice Tone impacts  Consultant Interaction Skills – Courtesy and
Communication Skills
 Initial Offer Index – Believable Offer
Delivering a difficult
message impacts
 Consultant Capabilities – Ability to meet needs
 Consultant Interaction Skills – Professionalism and
Courtesy
Active listening impacts  Resolution – Time to resolve the issue
 Consultant Capabilities – Understanding Needs
 Consultant Interaction Skills – Professionalism and
Communication Skills
 Initial Offer Index – Offer Meets Needs
 Ease of Registration Index - Ease of purchase
Call / session Control
impacts
 Resolution - Time to resolve the issue.
 Consultant Interaction Skills – Professionalism and total
length of time spent with member
 Contact Accessibility

PARTICIPANT Customer Service Techniques
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 12, 2011
Tone

Introduction Many communications experts agree that eighty percent of
communication is body language, gestures, facial expressions, and
posture. The remaining twenty percent is verbal. Some of the verbal is
what you say, and some is how your voice sounds. On a call / session,
members cannot see your body language and hear how your voice
sounds. The message they hear depends entirely on your written
communication skills. Because of this, it is important to think about the
impact of what you are saying during every call / session. During this
section of training you will review important skills related to your
communication.

Enthusiasm The enthusiasm you project will influence the member’s perspective of
you and AOL
®
. If you use a negative or unenthusiastic conversation tone,
the member may walk away from the interaction with a negative
impression of AOL. This impression will be reflected in the survey they
complete and your MSI score.

Use Positive
Words
Using positive words or phrases such as please, thank you and may I
leave a positive impression on the member. Using negative words can
cause a negative emotional response like frustration or anger from the
member. In the table below, list some positive and negative words:

Positive Words/Phrases Negative Words/Phrases





Continued on next page
PARTICIPANT Customer Service Techniques
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 12, 2011
Tone, Continued

Uphold a
Positive
Image
AOL has many partners as well as competitors. In every member
interaction, you want to ensure that you uphold a positive image of AOL,
our partners and even our competitors..
When explaining the cause of an issue always use blame neutral language
and a positive voice tone. For example, never place blame on another
consultant or another company. Explain the issue and provide the
member with the solution instead of dwelling on the cause of the issue.
Regardless of what the problem or issue is or where the fault lies, your
goal is to fix the problem, provide solutions to avoid similar problems in
the future and uphold a positive image for everyone.


PARTICIPANT Customer Service Techniques
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 12, 2011
Delivering Difficult Messages

Introduction You will not always be able to provide the resolution that the member is
asking for. For example, you may have to inform a member that you
cannot issue the amount of credit they want. This can be a difficult
message to deliver.
As an eSupport consultant, you have the responsibility of providing the
member with accurate information positively and honestly, at all times.
During this section of the training you will learn how you can deliver a
difficult message professionally and confidently.

Strategies There are four general strategies that should be implemented throughout
the call / session when delivering a difficult message.
 Be direct and honest
 Identify and explain the next step
 Avoid interpretation
 Empathize

Be Direct
and Honest
No matter what solution you provide, it is important to provide the
member with honest and accurate information. Use the guidelines listed
below to help you accomplish this goal.
 Be direct and simply state the information you need to provide to the
member.
 Do not omit any information, even if you think it makes the message
sound better. Omitting facts for the purpose of making it sound better
will often be interpreted as lying.
Bad member experience will impact future interactions with other
consultants and your MSI.

Identify and
Explain the
Next Steps
In order to provide the correct expectation, it is important for you to
clearly identify and explain the next steps for the member. Use the
guidelines listed below to help you accomplish this goal.
 Clearly identify and explain the next steps.
− If you do not tell the member what the next steps are, he will not be
any closer to a resolution, and may feel that AOL is unwilling or
disinterested in helping him.
− Providing the next steps sets accurate expectations and communicates
the acceptance of responsibility to resolve the issue, thus ensuring a
good member experience.
Continued on next page
PARTICIPANT Customer Service Techniques
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 12, 2011
Delivering Difficult Messages, Continued

Avoid
Interpretations
It is important that you clearly understand what the member’s concern
is in order for you to provide the best possible solution. Use the
guidelines below to help ensure that you understand the member’s
concern.
 Establish verbal contracts (agreement between you and the
member on the exact issue that needs to be resolved) and take
actions toward resolution, using only the facts discussed during the
conversation. Remain blame neutral.
 Do not make assumptions based on the information shared with
you. You should not cross the line from determining the cause to
laying blame.
 Assigning blame does not aid the troubleshooting process. It
destroys the trust necessary for you to resolve the problem at
hand.

Empathize Empathy is an important part of showing a member you understand their
situation and want to help them find a solution. Use the guidelines shown
below to help you understand how to show empathy.
 Provide a statement that shows the member you understand how he
feels as a result of the information he is sharing with you.
 When the member feels you are truly concerned, he will more readily
accept what you have to say.
 If the member believes you are unconcerned about the problem, he
may think you are just trying to get him off the call / session, which
can cause him to become apprehensive or demanding.

Activity Working with a partner practice delivering the following difficult
messages:
 Member requests credit and the credit guidelines do not enable you to
give credit.
 Member asks to speak with an American (or a different consultant).
 Member is upset because he did not understand that the free AOL
services did not come with phone tech support.
 Member is upset because you cannot find his account.

PARTICIPANT Customer Service Techniques
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 12, 2011
Active Listening

Introduction Active listening is an essential component of effective communication. If
you are not actively listening to the member’s concern and other
information that they provide, you will not be able to provide an
appropriate solution. During this section of training you will review some
techniques you can use to help ensure you are actively listening.

Active
Listening
Active listening over a telephone is conveyed with the verbal or written
(for chat) cues you give members to acknowledge that you are listening
to their concern(s) thoroughly and with total attention focused on what is
being said.
Active listening is the foundation of effective communication; it
establishes an understanding between you and the member. Being a
great listener takes a lot of practice and experience.

Behaviors to
Avoid
There are some specific behaviors to avoid to help ensure you are actively
listening. These include but are not limited to:
 Half-listening
 Assuming you already know the member’s issue before he completes
his explanation.
 Thinking of your response before the member completes his thought.
 Concentrating on subjects or issues unrelated to the call / session.
 Assuming the member sees the situation the same way you do.
 Sending/reading email, sending instant messages or surfing the web.

Activity Working with you table group, discuss the following question:
What words or phrases can you use to demonstrate you are
listening to the member?


Yes Right
Okay Sure
I understand Exactly
I’m following you Certainly
Alright
PARTICIPANT Customer Service Techniques
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 12, 2011
Call / Session Control

Introduction It is important that you remain focused on the member’s reason for
contacting AOL. If any irrelevant conversation comes up during the call /
session, you need to control it immediately. Politely keeping the call /
session on track leads to a better member experience, and helps resolve
the issue in a timely manner. Members will appreciate your help as well
as the time you have saved them. During this section of training you will
learn some techniques for controlling every call / session.

Interrupt
Politely
You can politely interrupt the member to regain control of the call /
session, but interrupting a member while they are expressing something
is a very sensitive process. It is essential that you follow specific practices
when attempting to regain control of a call / session. You should:
 Apologize for the interruption, and quickly recap the member’s issue.
 Make sure the member knows you want to help.
 Maintain a friendly tone and demonstrate the level of courtesy the
member expects from AOL.

Venting When a member is venting, it is important to remain silent. Letting the
member vent allows them to feel as if they have gotten their message
across, and now it’s up to you to resolve it.
Remember your active listening skills; listen while the member fully
explains their issue, and take brief notes in your tools. You’ll want to
focus on anything that is said that provides you with the information you
need to successfully resolve the problem. Your notes and mental
preparation will help you sound confident and professional as you enter
the verbal contract and clarify your understanding of the call / session.

Place
yourself in
the
Member’s
Shoes
Placing yourself in the shoes of the member helps you respond
appropriately to their frustration. This is also where your sincere apology
for the inconvenience is a perfect fit for the situation.
Often a simple, I'm sorry this has happened, let’s see how we can get this
resolved or you certainly sound frustrated and that’s understandable.
Let’s see what we can do to resolve this issue is enough to calm or at
least lower the member's emotional state.
Continued on next page
PARTICIPANT Customer Service Techniques
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 12, 2011
Call / Call / Session Control, Continued

Proper Use
of Hold Time
Call / session control includes properly using hold time. Before placing a
member on hold you need to ask for their permission. Say something like:
May I please place you on hold for just a minute while I check your
account information?
When you take the member off hold and are ready to continue, thank the
member for holding. Never take the member of hold and say Are you still
there?
If you need to keep the member on hold for more than a minute, you
should revisit with the member, apologize, and explain the reason for the
extended hold time. For example:
Thank you for holding, I apologize but I need place you on hold a little
longer while I research your account.
People appreciate knowing something is getting done while they are
waiting on hold.

Proper Use
of Dead Air
There will be times when you have silence or dead air during a call /
session. This may happen while you are waiting for Gandalf or accessing
other account information. Use this time to give the member some tips
and tricks about AOL or discover some opportunities to add value for the
member.

What other suggestions do you have for managing dead air time?

Continued on next page
PARTICIPANT Customer Service Techniques
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 12, 2011
Call / Call / Session Control, Continued

Activity Working with a partner, review each scenario listed below and determine
how best to control the call / session and ensure a world class member
experience.
 Member reached the wrong department and is very frustrated.



 Member is rambling on and repeating himself.



 Member is irate.



 Member has multiple issues that he wants resolved immediately.



 Member keeps talking about unrelated topics.


PARTICIPANT Customer Service Techniques
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 12, 2011
Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
 Explain how your customer service skills can impact your MSI
performance.
 Demonstrate how to use an appropriate voice tone on all calls /
sessions.
 Deliver a difficult message to a member.
 Actively listen to members.
 Practice effective call / session control to provide more efficient
customer service.


Accessibility
Participant Guide
















Revised: November 9, 2011
Accessibility
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised November 9, 2011
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction The content for this module includes elearning. Your facilitator will provide
instructions on how to access the content online. Within your participant
guide you will see screen shots of each elearning screen as well as the
text for any narration. Please use the additional space on each page to
take notes as you work through the elearning. Elearning modules are
accessible on MSU.

User
Interface
This module is designed to prevent “clicking through” the content. It is important
that you ensure your class understands that everyone should take the time to
read through each element of the eLearning module.
NOTE: There may be a delay of five seconds after all of the content has been
displayed on a slide. Users will be unable to move forward until the five seconds
has elapsed.
The following items are frequently a part of the navigation tools for the eLearning
content:


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Page 2


Module Overview, Continued

User
Interface
(Continued)
If you attempt to advance a slide before it has completely displayed all of
its content, you will receive the error message below. You must view all
content prior to moving on within the presentation.


Accessibility
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised November 9, 2011
Page 3


eLearning Content

AOL® Confidential. Content modifications
must be approved by AOL.
Accessibility
New Hire Training
for Contact Center Agents


Welcome to the Accessibility training for AOL Call Center Agents. AOL has an ongoing commitment to
accessibility. Our software products accommodate customers with disabilities, and we provide customer
assistance and support in many ways to accommodate all customers – with or without disabilities.


Notes








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eLearning Content, Continued

Learning objectives
Define the AOL accessibility policy
List the AOL products with accessibility features
Explain the customer support techniques applicable to
customers with disabilities
Demonstrate how to respond to relay calls

At the end of this module, you will be able to:
• Define the AOL accessibility policy
• List the AOL products with accessibility features
• Explain the customer support techniques applicable to customers with disabilities
• Demonstrate how to respond to relay calls.

Notes






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eLearning Content, Continued

Defining Accessibility and
AOL’s Policy

We will start out by defining accessibility and what AOL has to say about it.


Notes








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eLearning Content, Continued

When you hear the word
“accessibility,” what comes to mind?
On a piece of paper, jot down your
thoughts about how you would
define accessibility.
When you’re finished, click the arrow
to move to the next slide.
What does “accessibility” mean?

What does accessibility mean? When you hear the word ―accessibility,‖ what comes to mind?

On a piece of paper, jot down your thoughts about how you would define accessibility.

When you’re finished, click the arrow to move to the next slide.

Notes







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eLearning Content, Continued

What does “accessibility” mean?

Accessibility is a general term used to describe the degree to which a product, device, service, or
environment is available to as many people as possible.
As you can see by the definition, making something accessible means making it easy to approach,
reach, enter, speak with or use.
The term accessibility often focuses on people with disabilities and their right of access to buildings,
facilities, and technology.

Notes







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Page 8


eLearning Content, Continued

Accessibility at AOL considers several disabilities
Blind/low vision
Deaf/hard-of-hearing
Speech difficulty
Physically unable to use
mouse or keyboard

Knowing the types of challenges that our customers with disabilities face is the first step in providing the
best service possible. Once these challenges are understood, solutions for minimizing these challenges
can be incorporated into the research and design of the software applications and information
technologies.
We are essentially talking about three types of disabilities that relate to our customers using AOL:
•Customers who are blind or have low vision
•Customers who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, and
•Customers with physical limitations that prevent them from using a mouse or keyboard; for example,
people who have hand injuries or tremors.

Notes




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eLearning Content, Continued

Accessibility at AOL is about…
Extending the power of the Internet to all users
Addressing product compatibility with assistive
technologies
• screen reader software
• alternative keyboard devices
• voice recognition products
Introducing features to enhance the value of
the Internet to people with disabilities

Let’s look at how AOL views accessibility.

Accessibility at AOL is about extending the power of the Internet to all users. In addition to addressing
product compatibility with assistive technologies such as screen reader software, alternative keyboard
devices and voice recognition products, AOL strives to introduce features to enhance the value of the
Internet to people with disabilities.

Notes






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eLearning Content, Continued

AOL’s accessibility policy
1. Locate the help.aol.com article
about our accessibility policy.
What is the article title?
2. What are the policy’s three
fundamentals?
3. Describe two ways AOL
collaborates with the disability
community.
4. Share your thoughts about what
the fundamentals of Awareness
and Responsibility mean to AOL
agents.
STOP and discuss with your class.

Take some time to explore help.aol.com to learn about the company’s accessibility policy. Work
independently to locate and record answers to the questions on this slide. You will use this information
for a Knowledge Check quiz later in this module. When you finish, stop here and your facilitator will lead
a discussion with your class.
1. Locate help.aol.com article about our accessibility policy. What is the article title?
2. What are the three fundamentals of the policy?
3. Describe two ways AOL collaborates with the disability community.
4. Share your thoughts about what the fundamentals of Awareness and Responsibility mean to
AOL agents.

Notes





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eLearning Content, Continued

Identifying Accessible
Products & Services

Now we will take a look at some products and services that help people with disabilities, and specifically
how AOL products and services can be used by customers with vision, hearing, or speech disabilities.

Notes













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Page 12


eLearning Content, Continued

Assistive technologies for blind or low vision
Braille output
device
Screen reader
software

We’ll start with some background about common assistive technologies for people who are blind or have
low vision.
A screen reader is the primary tool used by people who are blind, to interact with computers. It is a
software application that identifies and interprets what is being displayed on the computer screen. The
screen reader presents the information in one of two ways. One method is by reading aloud what’s on
screen using a text-to-speech program which plays on the computer’s speakers. Another method is to
output this to a Braille device that attaches to the computer through a USB port so the person can read it
tactilely (with fingers). The screen reader also replaces the need for a mouse.

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eLearning Content, Continued

Screen magnifiers also help for low vision
Area to
magnify
Magnified
view

For the low-vision person, a screen reader is often combined with a screen magnifier. What happens is
that a specific area of the screen is magnified, or blown up to a much larger size that the low vision
person may then be able to recognize. Some low vision people use this alone; others use it together
with the screen reader.

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eLearning Content, Continued

AOL products work with JAWS screen reader
AOL Desktop
AIM (version 7+)
AOL Webmail
JAWS

AOL products support JAWS, a leading Windows screen reader program. We recommend the use of
JAWS with the AOL client and AIM, version 7 and above.
AOL Webmail is actually accessible to all screen readers. Mac operating system users do not need a
separate program like JAWS. Voiceover, the built-in screen reader functions the same way.

Notes












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Page 15


eLearning Content, Continued

Screen Reader questions?

For screen reader questions, advise the customer to contact the screen reader vendor and share our
accessibility email address, AOLAccessibility@aol.com

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Page 16


eLearning Content, Continued

JAWS live!
Click the JAWS icon to
watch a video of using AOL
software with the JAWS
screen reader.

Click the JAWS icon to watch a video of using AOL software with the JAWS screen reader.
http://centralservices.ops.aol.com/MSU/AOL/crossqueue/accessibility/AOL_Client_with_Jaws.mp4

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eLearning Content, Continued

Keyboard accessibility removes reliance on mouse

Another accessibility feature that AOL incorporates in its products is the ability to use keyboard
shortcuts. This is great for people with visual and physical disabilities who cannot use the mouse. For
example, AOL Webmail has an accessible version that is keyboard friendly. To write a new email, the
Control, Alt, ―N‖ key combination does the trick. No need to look at the screen and find the Compose
button.

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Page 18


eLearning Content, Continued

Click the
image to
view the
article.
Keyboard accessibility removes reliance on mouse

The help article, Keyboard shortcuts in Classic AOL Mail-- Accessible Version, provides a more
comprehensive list of keyboard shortcuts. Click on the image of the article to view the full text at
help.aol.com.

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eLearning Content, Continued

Physically disabled can use voice
recognition software
Control, Alt, N

A common approach for someone with a physical disability who cannot use the keyboard is use of voice
recognition software. Windows 7 and the Mac have built in speech recognition functionality. Other
software programs can also be purchased for this purpose. The leading commercial one is Dragon
Naturally Speaking. Using voice recognition software, a person speaks the keyboard shortcuts or
names of commands to perform tasks. As in the prior example, saying Control, Alt, N would open a new
email in the AOL Webmail.

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Page 20


eLearning Content, Continued

Your turn to try keyboard access!
1. Go to AOL Webmail. On the window bottom, click
Accessible Version and click OK.
2. Open help.aol.com in another window. Find the article
with keyboard shortcuts. Locate keyboard shortcut to turn
on a shortcut table.
3. Return to AOL Webmail and try 10-15 keyboard shortcuts.
Note that the Standard link on the page bottom switches to
the previous view.

Now it’s your turn to try keyboard access.
• Go to your AOL Webmail. On the window bottom, click Accessible Version and click OK.
• Open help.aol.com in another window. Find the article with keyboard shortcuts. Locate
keyboard shortcut to turn on a shortcut table.
• Return to AOL Webmail and try 10-15 keyboard shortcuts.

Note that the Standard link on the page bottom switches to the previous view.

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eLearning Content, Continued

AIM adds value for sensory disabled

The AIM chat product is real asset to many who are sensory disabled. When it was invented in 1997—
about 15 years ago—AIM instant messaging revolutionized independent communication between deaf
and hearing people. When two people are on AIM, it doesn’t matter whether or not they can hear or
speak.
Since that time, AIM has added features to make it even better for the sensory disabled. People can
now use AIM to chat with Facebook friends, as well as regular buddies—something that extends
communication possibilities for the blind community. AIM is a gateway to any number of Relay Services
used by the deaf, which we’ll review next.

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Page 22


eLearning Content, Continued

telephone
AIM instant messaging
from computer or
wireless device
AIM Relay Service extends AIM for
the hearing/speech disabled
Hearing/Speech
Disabled
Relay Service
Communication
Assistant
Non-Disabled

AIM Relay Service allows people who are deaf, hard-of-hearing, or who have a speech disability to place
and receive conventional telephone calls in the US via AIM instant messaging.

AIM Relay Service customers can connect to telecommunication relay service providers by adding the
providers’ screen name to their AOL or AIM Buddy List feature. AIM Relay Service is available from any
computer or wireless device running the AOL service or AIM client.

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eLearning Content, Continued

AIM Relay Service
Instant
Message
Communications
Assistant
Customer
Communications
Assistant
Hearing Person
Phone
Call

Here’s how it works: You can think of it in terms of a relay race, where one racer hands off the baton to
another who then takes it and runs with it before handing it off to someone else.
• AIM relay starts with the customer, who is hard of hearing. The customer sends an Instant Message
to the Communications Assistant for the Relay Service. NOTE: They must contact their relay service
provider to obtain their AIM Relay Screen Name.
• The Relay Service Communication Assistant receives the IM and then places a call to the non-
disabled hearing person (such as a non-disabled friend or the pizza delivery shop), introduces the
call, and reads the words to the hearing person.

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eLearning Content, Continued

AIM Relay Service
Instant
Message
Communications
Assistant
Customer
Communications
Assistant
Hearing Person
Phone
Call

Then the relay works in reverse with:
• The Hearing person responding on the phone call to the Communications Assistant.
• The Communication Assistant types the response into an Instant Message and sends it to the
Customer.
• The Customer reads the IM.
• That’s a complete cycle, that repeats until all the communication is complete.

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eLearning Content, Continued

Assisting Customers with
Disabilities

We will move on to discussing some general approaches that work well when you are assisting
customers with disabilities.

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eLearning Content, Continued

Tailor your customer service approach
Do not ask about disabilities
• If relevant to the conversation, customer will volunteer that
Ask how you can best assist the customer
• Disabled persons know best what their special needs are and
what assistance they require
Provide phone numbers in numerals, not words, to
visually impaired customers
• Use 800-225-5265 instead of 800-CALL-AOL

When assisting customers with disabilities you must tailor your customer service approach to meet their
needs. There are a few things to keep in mind to help overcome any challenges in communication.
•Do not ask what disability the customer has
•If relevant to the conversation, customer will volunteer that information
•Instead, ask how you can best assist the customer
•Disabled persons know best what their special needs are and what assistance they require
•Provide phone numbers in numerals, not words, to visually impaired customers
•Use 800-225-5265 instead of 800-CALL-AOL

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eLearning Content, Continued

Tailor your customer service approach
Adapt your communication style to meet the
customer’s needs
• Use probing questions to assess customer’s
knowledge/skills
Exceed expectations by providing support that is
specific to the needs of the customer’s disability
Communicate with patience and courtesy
• Take your time on the call

•Adapt your communication style to meet the customer’s needs
•Use probing questions to assess customer’s knowledge/skills
•Exceed expectations by providing support that is specific to the needs of the customer’s disability
•Communicate with patience and courtesy
•Take your time on the call to avoid sounding like you are trying to rush the customer

Notes












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eLearning Content, Continued

Managing relay calls

In this last section, you will learn how to manage relay calls from customers who have a hearing or
speech disability.

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eLearning Content, Continued

Customers can reach AOL through a Relay Service
telephone
text
video
TTY
Hearing/Speech
Disabled
Customer
Relay Service
Communication
Assistant (CA)
AOL Call Center
Agent

The AOL phone queues welcome Relay Service calls. Relay calls are somewhat similar to AIM Relay,
which we reviewed earlier, only this time the hearing person with whom the customer is interacting is an
AOL phone agent. The customer who is deaf or speech-impaired contacts the relay service through any
of these means: text, like instant messaging; video, where the customer and Communication Assistant
can communicate with sign language; or TTY. TTY is an older technology using a TeleTypewriter that is
a text-based phone.

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eLearning Content, Continued

Relay Calls
Text,
video, TTY
Communications
Assistant
Customer
Communications
Assistant
AOL Agent
Phone
Call

Let’s take a look at how relay calls work, using the analogy of a relay race. Here’s how it works:

An AOL customer has a question. She contacts a Relay Service by text, video, or TTY, and gives the
Relay Service Communication Assistant the AOL number to call. The Communication Assistant calls an
AOL agent, and, over the phone, relays the customer’s question.

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eLearning Content, Continued

Relay Calls
Communications
Assistant
Customer
Communications
Assistant
AOL Agent
Phone
Call
Text,
video, TTY

The agent speaks over the phone to the communications assistant, as if they were addressing the
customer. The communications assistant then relays the message via text, video or TTY, to the
customer .
The Communications assistant is the ―go between‖ in the conversation, voicing to the Agent what the
customer says, and letting the customer know what the agent says. Even account verification is handled
through the Communication Assistant.

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eLearning Content, Continued

Some do’s and don’ts
DO transfer customer to another voice queue if the
customer needs that support
DO NOT refuse a customer service, transferring or forcing a
customer to contact the TTY queue or another agent
DO speak directly to the customer
DO NOT speak directly to the relay communications
assistant
DO recommend other AOL support options
DO NOT force customers to use AOL support options

We have a few guidelines for you to follow – some DO’s and DON’Ts:
DO transfer to another voice queue if the member needs support from that queue. For example if you
are in SMS and the member needs technical assistance, you would transfer to that queue.
DO NOT refuse a member service--ever. If the member is using a relay service you may not force the
member to contact the TTY queue. Once a call is received, you are required to assist the member.
Provide assistance and offer the phone number to the TTY queue at the end of the call, if the member is
unable to connect to AOL. Anytime an agent transfers a contact to another queue or agent to avoid
handling it, it is a violation of the Customer Relations Ethical Standards (CRES) policy.
DO speak directly to the customer. Even though there is a communications assistant who will relay your
message, you should speak as if you are talking directly to the member. For example, ask ―What
happened when YOU tried to access your mail?‖ and not ―What happened last time the member tried to
access his mail?‖
DO NOT speak directly to the relay communications assistant. The communications assistant’s job is to
be the voice of the deaf or hard-of-hearing person, so technically that person doesn’t exist on the call.
Speaking directly to the member, not to the operator, may be a bit challenging at first, but it will become
more natural with practice.
This last DO is more of a suggestion. Recommend the other AOL support options such as TTY,
help.aol.com, live chat and email support, and keyboard accessible webmail as part of AOL’s value, but
DO NOT force customers to use these features.

Notes

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Accessibility
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised November 9, 2011
Page 33


eLearning Content, Continued

The Go Ahead command facilitates relay calls
Say “Go Ahead” to let the Communications Assistant know that
you are finished speaking and he/she can start repeating your
words to the customer.
“My name is Robert,
Go Ahead.”
“Hi Robert, I have a question about
my AOL account. Go Ahead.”

When you are talking on a relay call, it’s best to say ―Go Ahead‖ when you are ready for a response. It
tells the communications assistant that he or she can start repeating your statement or question to the
customer. The Communications Assistant will typically say ―Go Ahead‖ when they are finished relaying
part of a conversation as well.

Notes












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Accessibility
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eLearning Content, Continued

Relay calls may take longer
Speak a complete thought
Wait for the Communications Assistant to repeat
to customer
Allow time for the customer to respond
Listen while Communications Assistant relays
customer’s message to you

When handling a relay call, you should speak in complete thoughts and then wait for the
Communications Assistant to repeat it to the customer. Then you must allow time for the customer to
respond and the Communications Assistant to relay that message to you.
Relay calls may take longer than your average call. There’s just more time needed for each back and
forth communication. It takes longer to read, respond, and communicate via a relay communications
assistant than it does on a normal call. Handle this by being patient.

Notes











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Accessibility
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eLearning Content, Continued

Observe a relay call
Click the image of the agent to
Observe an example of an AOL
relay call.
Take note of how the AOL agent
converses with the
Communications Assistant.

Click the image of the agent to observe an example of an AOL relay call.

Take note of how the AOL agent converses with the Communications Assistant. Notice that in this
particular example, the agent and Relay Communications Assistant do not actually use the phrase ―go
ahead,‖ but instead provide adequate pauses between thoughts to allow for the message to be relayed.

http://centralservices.ops.aol.com/MSU/AOL/crossqueue/accessibility/Relay_Service_Master.mov

Notes









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eLearning Content, Continued

Review & Practice relay call procedure
Click the image below to review the Pulsar article about
handling relay calls, How to handle Relay / TTY Calls - All.
Work with 2 classmates to conduct a role play of a Relay
Call. (Customer, Communication Asst., AOL Agent)
• Customer and CA can IM or handwrite notes to each
other. Switch roles, repeat twice.


Click the image below to review the Pulsar article about handling relay calls, How to handle Relay /
TTY Calls - All.

Work with 2 classmates to conduct a role play of a Relay Call. (Customer, Communication Asst., AOL
Agent)

To make the role play more realistic, the Customer and CA can IM or handwrite notes to each other.
Switch roles, repeat twice.

Notes








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Accessibility
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised November 9, 2011
Page 37

eLearning Content, Continued

Knowledge Check

Take the quiz to test your knowledge about accessibility at AOL.


Notes














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Accessibility
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Page 38

eLearning Content, Continued

Review of learning objectives
Define the AOL accessibility policy
List the AOL products with accessibility features
Explain the customer support techniques applicable to
customers with disabilities
Demonstrate how to respond to relay calls

Congratulations! Now that you have completed this course you should be able to:

•Define the AOL accessibility policy
•List the AOL products with accessibility features
•Explain the customer support techniques applicable to customers with disabilities
•Demonstrate how to respond to relay calls

Notes












Member Advocacy & You
Participant Guide
















Revised: October 18, 2010
Member Advocacy & You
Module Overview

Introduction The content for this module is primarily elearning. Your facilitator will
provide instructions on how to access the content online. Within your
participant guide you will see screen shots of each elearning screen as
well as the text for any narration. Please use the additional space on each
page to take notes as you work through the elearning.

User
Interface
This module is designed to prevent “clicking through” the content. It is important
that you ensure your class understands that everyone should take the time to
read through each element of the eLearning module.
NOTE: There may be a delay of five seconds after all of the content has been
displayed on a slide. Users will be unable to move forward until the five seconds
has elapsed.
The following items are a part of the navigation tools for the eLearning content:


Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2010
Page 1

Member Advocacy & You
Module Overview, Continued

User
Interface
(Continued)
If you attempt to advance a slide before it has completely displayed all of
its content, you will receive the error message below. You must view all
content prior to moving on within the presentation.


AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2010
Page 2

Member Advocacy & You
eLearning Content

Member Advocacy and You

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Member Advocacy & You
eLearning Content, Continued

Module Overview
•After completing this module you will be able to:
–Describe what AOL member advocacy means
–Describe why AOL has taken a member advocacy position
–Describe what it means to be a member advocate

This module explores the basic elements of AOL member advocacy and your role in implementing it
during each interaction. You will discuss the importance and impact member advocacy has at AOL. After
completing this module you will be able to describe what AOL member advocacy means, why AOL has
taken a member advocacy position, what it means to be a member advocate and lastly, you will be able
to list and describe the 6 Bs.

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Member Advocacy & You
eLearning Content, Continued

Introduction
•YOU are the voice of AOL!
AOL has a unique way of approaching interactions with members. Member advocacy means to stand up
for something or someone. We want our members to feel that AOL stands up for them. Member
advocacy is the foundation on which AOL was built. You are the voice of AOL. How you interact with
each and every member will determine how member’s feel about AOL. Today we are going to explore
the fundamentals of member advocacy. As the voice of AOL, your understanding of the importance and
impact of member advocacy is critical to our success.
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Member Advocacy & You
eLearning Content, Continued

Customer Service
Customer Service Experience
Was the experience positive or negative? Was the customer service rep cheerful? Did they 
listen to your question(s)?
What made it positive or negative? Did the customer service rep go beyond your 
expectations?
How did that interaction make you feel? Did you feel satisfied? Happy? Angry? Anxious?
Did you tell your friends and family? Did you suggest to your  family and friends that 
they do business with that company or did you 
tell them to avoid that company?
Did you complete a survey or  file a complaint 
about the service you received? 
Was a manager readily available to speak to you 
about your experience? 
If the service was exceptional, did you 
complement the person who assisted you?
How did the manager react? Were  they helpful?
Will you use that company again or go back to 
that store?
Did you feel overall that you  had a good 
experience that will attract you back to that 
business?
In order to understand the member’s experience, you must picture yourself in a similar situation. Think
about the last time you needed customer service support from a company or store. Use the questions
listed on the chart to evaluate your experience. Now that you are an AOL consultant how will these
experiences change the way you deal with members during your interactions?

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Member Advocacy & You
eLearning Content, Continued

What does AOL Member Advocacy Mean?
•Provide a safe, secure, hassle‐free, and enjoyable online experience
•Create innovative new ways and new technology to keep people 
connected to their family and friends
•Provide a world class member experience during every interaction
Member advocacy is the foundation on which AOL conducts business. It is what AOL stands for as a
company. The policies and procedures associated with member advocacy ensure we are providing a
world class member experience during every interaction. Here are some of the key goals associated
with member advocacy.

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Member Advocacy & You
eLearning Content, Continued

The AOL Commitment
Member Advocacy
–Providing you with the tools and information necessary to assist 
members
–Constantly reviewing policies and procedures to help improve 
your ability to help our members
–Empower you to provide a world class member experience
At AOL, part of member advocacy is our commitment to you as an AOL consultant. Your ability to
effectively do your job has a direct impact on the member experience and we are committed to providing
you with the tools and information necessary to effectively do your job. We are constantly reviewing
policies and procedures to help improve you ability to help our members. Our goal is to empower you to
provide a world class member experience.

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Member Advocacy & You
eLearning Content, Continued

Performance Expectations
•Balance handle time 
–How long does it take to resolve a member’s concern?
–How much does each interaction cost AOL?
•Member Satisfaction Index (MSI)
–Ensure the correct behaviors are being measured
–Adjust targets as needed 
–Use scores to measure success
All businesses must balance performance expectations and member satisfaction. The needs of the
member have to be balanced with the needs of the business. AOL uses targets related to specific areas
such as handle time and Member Satisfaction Index, or MSI to help measure our success.

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Member Advocacy & You
eLearning Content, Continued

Think Strategically
Family 
Friends 
Co‐workers 
A member who has a negative experience with AOL will tell their family, friends and co-workers. This
one experience will impact the buying decisions of each of those people. One negative experience can
result in multiple cancelations or losses of new member registrations.

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Page 10

Member Advocacy & You
eLearning Content, Continued

Think Strategically
That negative member experience may also result in fewer page views on AOL’s sites, resulting in a loss
of advertising revenue. As you can see, each negative member experience has a snowball effect on the
impact to AOL.

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Page 11

Member Advocacy & You
eLearning Content, Continued

Why does AOL Promote Member Advocacy?
AOL has been an advocate for the online community for many years. From legal battles to reduce spam
to making the Internet easy to use for everyone, AOL has lead the way in making the Internet an exciting
and hassle-free form of communication. If we fail to serve the member, we experience poor ratings in
customer satisfaction reports, high profile negative news stories and negative feedback from our call
centers. AOL maintains these policies throughout the company to ensure we continue to improve our
image, practices and policies.

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Member Advocacy & You
eLearning Content, Continued

The Six B’s
•Be Straightforward
•Be Helpful
•Be Inspiring
•Be Respectful
•Be Positive
•Be Friendly

If you approach every interaction with the six B’s in mind, you will always be appropriately representing
AOL as well as providing a world class member experience. First, you should be straightforward. Always
act in a reliable and trustworthy manner. Set realistic expectations and make sure the member clearly
understands what to expect. Next, be helpful. Empower consumers with information, listen to what they
say and do your best to provide a resolution on their first call. The next goal is to be inspiring by giving
members a reason to believe in AOL. Being respectful is a critical part of every call. Respect each
member’s time and concern, show appreciation by saying please and thank you and treat each member
as you would want to be treated. Be positive. Make sure your voice shows enthusiasm and energy.
Show the member that you believe in AOL. Lastly, be friendly. Show the member that you genuinely
care and want to help. Keeping these six things in mind will be a valuable resource when interacting with
members.

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Member Advocacy & You
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2010
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eLearning Content, Continued



KNOWLEDGE CHECK


Quiz questions are included in elearning module
Continued on next page
Member Advocacy & You
eLearning Content, Continued

Module Summary
You should now be able to:
•Describe what AOL member advocacy means.
•Describe why AOL has taken a member advocacy position.
•Describe what it means to be a member advocate.
•List and describe the six Bs. 
Now that you have completed this training you should be able to: Describe what AOL member advocacy
means, describe why AOL has taken a member advocacy position, describe what it means to be a
member advocate and list and describe the six Bs.

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Member Advocacy & You
eLearning Content, Continued

The Member Promise
“As the voice of AOL, I promise to conduct 
myself with integrity at all times, provide 
excellence in service, and ensure a world‐
class member experience on every call or 
interaction.”

As you interact with members, think about the Member Promise. As the voice of AOL, I promise to
conduct myself with integrity at all times, provide excellence in service, and ensure a world-class
member experience on every call or interaction.




AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2010
Page 16

Delivering Personalized Service
Participant Guide
















Revised: October 18, 2010
Module Title
Module Overview

Introduction The content for this module is primarily elearning. Your facilitator will
provide instructions on how to access the content online. Within your
participant guide you will see screen shots of each elearning screen as
well as the text for any narration. Please use the additional space on each
page to take notes as you work through the elearning.

User
Interface
This module is designed to prevent “clicking through” the content. It is important
that you ensure your class understands that everyone should take the time to
read through each element of the eLearning module.
NOTE: There may be a delay of five seconds after all of the content has been
displayed on a slide. Users will be unable to move forward until the five seconds
has elapsed.
The following items are a part of the navigation tools for the eLearning content:


Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2010
Page 1

Module Title
Module Overview, Continued

User
Interface
(Continued)
If you attempt to advance a slide before it has completely displayed all of
its content, you will receive the error message below. You must view all
content prior to moving on within the presentation.


AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2010
Page 2

Module Title
eLearning Content

Delivering Personalized Service
Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2010
Page 3

Module Title
eLearning Content, Continued

Module Overview
Delivering Personalized Service
After completing this module, you will be able to:
–List and describe four states of mind that members may 
demonstrate during calls.
–Identify a member’s state of mind based on the behaviors 
exhibited. 
–Use appropriate techniques to respond to members based on 
their state of mind.
Delivering personalized service is a critical part of providing a world class member experience. After
completing this module you will be able to list and describe four states of mind that members may
demonstrate during calls, identify a member’s state of mind based on the behaviors exhibited, and use
appropriate techniques to respond to members based on their state of mind.

Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2010
Page 4

Module Title
eLearning Content, Continued

Emotional States
The emotional state of each caller is different. Some members could be upset about an issue, or
apprehensive about a problem they have. It is important that you take note of their emotional state and
personalize your response to fit the member’s specific situation. Doing this helps ensure you are
providing world class customer service on each and every call.

At the same time, it is important not to label a member as a specific profile type. There are circumstance
you are not aware of which are impacting the member’s situation and you need to handle each
interaction by simply using your tools to address the member’s concern and provide the best member
experience possible.
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Module Title
eLearning Content, Continued

Types of Callers ‐ Apprehensive
•Anxious, nervous or self‐conscious about their abilities. Examples of 
apprehensive behaviors include:
–Displaying uncertainty when answering questions.
–Giving confusing or contradictory explanations
–Mumbling
Review the characteristics of an apprehensive caller and then click on the button to listen to a call
example.

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Page 6

Module Title
eLearning Content, Continued

Types of Callers ‐ Neutral
•Express no specific emotional state. Examples of neutral behaviors 
are:
–Willing to follow your instructions
–Speaking in a calm tone of voice
–Responding to questions quickly
Review the characteristics of a neutral caller and then click on the button to listen to a call example.

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Page 7

Module Title
eLearning Content, Continued

Types of Callers ‐ Demanding
•Characterized by a desire to insist something happens, or request a 
specific course of action. Examples of demanding behaviors are:
–Speaking rapidly
–Being insistent
–Arguing or debating an outcome

Review the characteristics of a demanding caller and then click on the button to listen to a call example.

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Page 8

Module Title
eLearning Content, Continued

Types of Callers ‐ Irate
•Characterized by anger and a desire to know someone is listening 
and truly hearing their issue. Examples of irate behaviors are:
–Yelling
–Insulting
–Speaking rapidly
Review the characteristics of an irate caller and then click on the button to listen to a call example.

Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2010
Page 9

Module Title
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2010
Page 10

eLearning Content, Continued



KNOWLEDGE CHECK


Quiz questions can be found within the eLearning module.
Continued on next page
Module Title
eLearning Content, Continued

•Calm tone of voice
•Condescending
•Tells you they are right
•Interrupts frequently
•Speaks slowly
•Threatens
•Loud voice
•Speaks rapidly
Identify Member State of Mind
•Relaxed
•Confronting
•Condescending
•Short, clipped statements
•Tells you they are right
•Mumbles
•Sounds nervous
•Insulting

The first step in identifying a member’s state of mind is to use your active listening skills to distinguish a
member’s behavior. On your screen are a number of identifiable behaviors you may encounter during a
phone call with a member. Keep in mind that some behaviors may be applicable for more than one state
of mind. Although we have listed characteristics of different emotional states, they are not always
indicators. For example, a truly apprehensive member may mask their nervousness by yelling or rapidly
speaking. You should use these characteristics as hints or possible indicators of what a member’s
emotional state may be.

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AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2010
Page 11

Module Title
eLearning Content, Continued

Apply Strategies
In order to provide individualized service to members you need to develop a strategy on how to
personalize each call depending on the members’ state of mind. During the next section of training you
will review strategies on how to deal with each type of member.

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AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2010
Page 12

Module Title
eLearning Content, Continued

Neutral Members
•Show appreciation
•Respect
•Assisted in a timely and efficient manner
To provide a tailored member experience to neutral members you should engage in active listening and
work in an efficient manner to assist the member. Neutral members are typically looking for appreciation,
respect, and timely assistance

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AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2010
Page 13

Module Title
eLearning Content, Continued

Apprehensive Members 
•Reassurance
•Respect
•Patience
An apprehensive member wants to be reassured that you will be able to help and they want to be
treated with respect and patience. To help an apprehensive member you should proceed at the
member's pace, provide positive feedback as the member explains the situation and engage in active
listening. Taking extra care with this type of member will result in a world class member experience.

Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2010
Page 14

Module Title
eLearning Content, Continued

Demanding Members 
•Immediate action
•Quick solution
•Understanding
•Respect
A demanding member is looking for an immediate solution to their problem. These member typically tell
you the resolution they are looking for and will settle for nothing less. To assist these types of members
you need to actively listen to what the member is asking for and determine if you can assist with that
request. You should avoid putting this type of member on hold unless absolutely necessary. Provide
these members with quick accurate solutions.

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AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2010
Page 15

Module Title
eLearning Content, Continued

Irate Members 
•Apology
•Empathy
•Understanding
•Respect
An irate member is looking for empathy and an acknowledgement of the problem. You should accept
responsibility for helping to resolve the member's concern and show the member respect throughout the
call. Allow the member time to vent their frustrations, actively listen to their problem and then reassure
the member that you will do everything you can to resolve their issue. You should avoid using phrases
like “I don't know” or “I can't do that”. Staying positive and focusing on what you can do to assist the
member will help guide this call to a positive resolution.

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AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2010
Page 16

Module Title
eLearning Content, Continued

Initial Responses
Apprehensive
•I apologize for the problem. I know 
computers can be a bit intimidating at 
times.
•I’m sure we can get this fixed in no 
time.
•I will walk you through the proper steps 
and you will be back online shortly. 
Neutral 
•Thank you for calling today.
•I’m sorry you had to call for that, but it’s 
really easy to fix.
•We appreciate your valued 
membership.
Irate
•I am very sorry to hear that you have a 
problem with that.
•I understand how you could feel that 
way.
•Let’s work together on getting your 
problem solved.
Demanding
•I can understand how that would be 
frustrating.
•I can help you solve that problem right 
away. 
•I apologize for the inconvenience. 
Thank you for letting me help you 
resolve this. 

The table on your screen lists some initial responses you can use with each member type. Please take a
moment to review these responses.


AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2010
Page 17

Module Title
eLearning Content, Continued

Initial Responses
Apprehensive
•I understand completely. Don’t worry, 
we can get this resolved. 
Neutral 
•I can help you take care of that right 
away. 
Irate
•I hear where you are coming from and I 
can certainly understand why you are 
frustrated. 
Demanding
•I can see how that would be frustrating. 
Let’s get this fixed right away!
Here are some examples of cushioning statements that you can use to address the different emotional
states that members may demonstrate during your calls.


AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2010
Page 18

Module Title
eLearning Content, Continued

Summary
•Use active listening to identify the type of member
•Customize the call based on the member’s state of mind
•Provide world class customer service on every call
Use your active listening skills to identify the type of member you are talking to and their state of mind.
Discovering this information will help you customize the call to fit that member's needs. This process will
help you reach the goal of providing world class customer service on every call.







AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2010
Page 19

Escalations Procedures
Participant Guide
















Revised: February 27, 2012
Escalations Procedures
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 27, 2012
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction As a consultant, you may find yourself situations where a member
requests to speak with a supervisor. These requests from members can
be a result of many different reasons or situations including:
 Frustration with service.
 Unsatisfactory previous service.
 Disconnection from a previous call/ session.
 Frustration with credit guidelines.
 Unwillingness to accept or disputing resolution provided
During this training you will learn the policies and guidelines for what you
should do in these situations.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
 Explain the Supervisor Escalation Policy and when it is appropriate to
escalate a call/ session to a supervisor.
 Explain ways in which you can attempt to de-escalate a call/ session
and decrease number of supervisor requests.
 Provide examples of scripting you could use or things you might say to
satisfy the member and de-escalate the call/ session.
 Identify who can take calls/ sessions escalated to a supervisor.
 Explain how to escalate a call / session to a supervisor.

PARTICIPANT Escalations Procedures
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised May 4, 2011
Page 2


Supervisor Escalations Policy

Introduction Before you review how to handle a supervisor request from a member,
you need to understand AOL’s policy around supervisor requests. During
this section of training you will review this policy information.


Types of
Escalations
You will escalate calls/ sessions for the following reasons:
 Resolving the member’s concern requires someone with rights or
permissions above that of a consultant.
 The member has requested to speak to a supervisor.


Before
Escalating
a Call/
session
Before escalating a call/ session, ensure that you have made all attempts
to resolve the member’s concerns to the best of your ability.
NOTE: If you do not escalate the call/ session after you attempt to de-
escalate and disregard the customer’s verbal tone/cue, it is considered a
CRES violation. (This is discussed in a separate module.)

Retort Policy When a member asks to speak to a supervisor, make one attempt to
assure the member that you will be able to handle the member’s concern.
If the member insists on speaking to a supervisor after your retorts, then
escalate the call/ session following the process outlined in this document.
NOTE: You should never refuse to allow a member to speak with a
supervisor.

Escalations Procedures
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 27, 2012
Page 3

Handling Escalations

Introduction Members will be the most satisfied when they experience thorough
service and/or a timely resolution by competent and confident
consultants. Keeping members satisfied helps to decrease the need to
escalate calls/ sessions to a supervisor. When a member is dissatisfied for
any reason, it is important that you try to de-escalate or diffuse the
problem

De-escalate
The Problem
Follow the steps outlined below to attempt to de-escalate the call/ session
prior to engaging a supervisor.
 Remaining calm and maintaining their composure. This can be
challenging when a member is frustrated or angry, however a
consultant’s demeanor can greatly influence the member’s satisfaction
and attitude.
 Showing Empathy. Consultants who demonstrate empathy show the
member that they understand their frustration. Showing empathy
does not necessarily mean that the consultant agrees with the
member, but rather is sincerely apologetic for the situation and is
willing to help.
 Offering alternative solutions. Consultants must ensure that they
have made all attempts to resolve a member’s concern to the best of
their ability. They should explain that they are equipped to handle and
resolve the member’s issue or concern.
NOTE: Keep in mind that your goal is always to help the member and not
to make them more frustrated. If a member is becoming more frustrated
and makes a second request to speak with a supervisor, you should stop
your attempt to de-escalate the problem and hand the call/ session off to
your supervisor.
Continued on next page
PARTICIPANT Escalations Procedures
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Page 4


Handling Escalations, Continued

Before
Escalating to
a Supervisor
Follow the process outlined below before escalating a call/ session to a
supervisor.


Step Action
1 If a member immediately asks to speak with a supervisor, advise the member
that you need to gather basic information about the issue and ask probing
questions.
By doing so, you will likely discover that this is an issue that you can support
without involving your supervisor.
If you have been working with a member prior to their request to speak with a
supervisor, you will most likely have the information that you need to pass on to
your supervisor.
2 If you have been able to assist the member, validate that you have
successfully de-escalated the call/ session by asking the member if there is
anything else that you can assist them with today that would require a
supervisor.

If ... Then ...
Yes Advise supervisor of all background information &
hand the call/ session off to the supervisor.
No End the call/ session as you normally would,
following the call/ session flow.

Continued on next page
Escalations Procedures
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 27, 2012
Page 5

Handling Escalations, Continued

Scripting
Examples
Below are some examples of what you might say to members in an
attempt to de-escalate a call/ session.

If ... Then ...
Member immediately demands a
supervisor
“Not a problem, I can get you a supervisor. Will you
please tell me your name and a brief description of
the problem so I can pass that along to my
supervisor in order to better expedite your concern?”
Member requests supervisor, but has
a concern that you can address.
“The issue you described is something I’m familiar
with, and I am very happy to assist you with that. If
you still need a supervisor after that, I can still bring
one on the line.”
Member request due to
unprofessional behavior from a
previous contact
“I apologize for the previous experience, but I am
happy to help you resolve the issue. If we find that I
am unable to help, I can quickly bring a supervisor
on the line for you.”
Member request is due to previous
poor customer service
“I apologize for the previous interaction and can
definitely get you a supervisor. However, I will be
more than happy to assist you today.”
Member refuses any information or
attempts to help
“Ok, understood. One moment as I bring a
supervisor on the line.”
Call/ session is handed back after
Supervisor escalation
“I am glad that (Supervisor’s Name) was able to
help. Is there any way that I can be of further
assistance?”

Who Is Able
To Take a
Supervisor
Call/
session?
A call/ session that is escalated to a supervisor must be handled by a
coach CSS (Consultant Support Specialist) or the current lead on the
floor. You are NOT permitted to have another consultant handle the call/
session.
Continued on next page
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AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised May 4, 2011
Page 6


Handling Escalations, Continued

How To
Escalate a
Call/ session
To a
Supervisor
If you are unable to resolve a member’s issue without escalating, follow
this process to hand the call/ session off to your supervisor.


Step Action
1 Leave a note in Gandalf that the call/ session was escalated to the
supervisor.
NOTE: Never put any derogatory information or personal opinions about the
member as comments in the notes. Simply note that the “Member requested to
speak with a supervisor.”
2 Ask supervisor for assistance with the call/ session.
3 Provide as much applicable information about the call/ session as possible
to the supervisor.
4 Hand off the call/ session to your supervisor at your desk. Calls/ sessions
should NOT be transferred to the supervisor’s computer for several reasons
including:
 Less risk of dropping the call / session, and
 Supervisor can hand call / session back over to the consultant if member
needs additional support.
5 Once the call / session is complete, notate the result of the escalation in
Gandalf using a NOT400.
NOTE: You may need to confer with the supervisor who handled the call /
session to ensure proper documentation.


Escalations Procedures
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 27, 2012
Page 7

Call / session Examples

Introduction Now that you understand supervisor escalations, let’s review some call /
session examples.

Call /
session
Example 1
Scenario
George has been an AOL member for 8 years and his payment has always been
automatically debited from his bank account. The payment did not go through for
the past month, so his account was blocked by R&R for an updated payment
method.
George does not understand what has changed that would make the payment get
declined. He and his wife have researched the account and have determined that
the amount is always deducted on or after the 25
th
of each month. They are
convinced that this payment was declined because AOL attempted to deduct it on
the 23
rd
. Nancy, the consultant, tries to explain that the 23
rd
is the bill date and
that the date they see on their statement is the date the bank posts the charge,
so nothing has changed.
She also very patiently tries to explain that George and his wife need to update
their method of payment because they may have received a new debit card in the
mail. George asks his wife to provide that information on the call / session.
George’s wife is very upset and agitated and refuses to give her debit card
information. The consultant tries again to explain, however George’s wife is not
able to understand her and says that she needs to speak with someone who
speaks better English. Nancy brings her supervisor on the line.

1. What does the member want?

To resolve the billing issue so they can get online
2. How is the member feeling?

Confused as to why this has happened; frustrated because they can’t understand
why or how to fix it; nervous about providing debit card information

3. Why has the issue been escalated to the supervisor?

Consultant has not been able to provide an explanation that they are able to
understand and therefore, hasn’t been able to resolve the issue.
4. What does the supervisor do well on the call / session?
Asks how he can help; uses concerned tone of voice; very patient; sounds
interested in the member; allows member to explain issue; provides very good
explanations; tells member that she is correct about when $ comes out;
apologizes for inconvenience; reassures member, “What I can do…,” “I will help
you so you can get online immediately.”; gives a reminder and good description of
next steps; laughs when the member j okes at end of call / session.
5. What could the supervisor do differently in order to de-escalate the
issue?
Call / session went very well. Could have given some indications of active
listening while member was describing issue at start of call / session.
Continued on next page
PARTICIPANT Escalations Procedures
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised May 4, 2011
Page 8


Call / session Examples, Continued

Call /
session
Example 2
Scenario
Melissa signed up for an AOL account two days ago with a 90 day Risk-
Free CD. She was just billed $25.90 and said she wants a refund because
she thought she was getting a free-trial and would not be billed for 90
days. Melissa had already spoken with another consultant who explained
the difference between risk-free and free-trial, which Melissa understands.
She, however, does not think it is fair that she is punished because she
didn’t understand the Terms of Service agreement that she signed. She
says she was misled and that AOL doesn’t care. Eric, the second
consultant with whom she speaks, continues to try to explain why he
cannot issue a refund. She feels like AOL is taking advantage of her and
wants to speak with a supervisor.

1. What does the member want?

Money to be refunded and to be given 90 days free, like she thought she
was getting.
2. How is the member feeling?

Frustrated, taken advantage of, mislead, aggravated
3. Why has the issue been escalated to the supervisor?

Consultants are unable to issue credit in this situation and Melissa does not feel
that is acceptable
4. What does the supervisor do well on the call / session?

Allowed member to fully express concern at start of call / session; provided
consistent message
5. What could the supervisor do differently in order to de-escalate the
issue?

Needs to express empathy and acknowledge her emotions at start and
throughout call / session, rather than simply apologizing at end that he
can’t do what she wants; Should have provided explanations without
arguing, being condescending or using terms that make it sound like he
is blaming the member ( “I f you understand that, then that means you
know…” “You knew you were going to be charge, m’am, because it
said…”) ; needs to use a tone that shows he is interested and concerned
rather than sounding bored, uninterested and uncaring; Needs to speak
in terms of what can be done, rather than what cannot be done ( for
example, could have canceled the acct in order to provide refund)

Escalations Procedures
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised February 27, 2012
Page 9

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Knowledge
Check
Check your understanding of the information in this training by answering the
following questions.

1.
When can you refuse a member’s request to speak to a supervisor?

You should never refuse to allow a member to speak with a supervisor.
2.
Who can take a supervisor call/ session?

A call/ session that is escalated to a supervisor must be handled by a coach, CSS
or the person who is currently the lead.
3.
Is it ok to attempt to help a member even if they ask for a supervisor at the beginning of
a call/ session?

You should attempt to help the member and de- escalate the call/ session unless
a member becomes frustrated or makes a second request to speak to a
supervisor.
4.
What type of notes should you leave on an account when a consultant engages the
supervisor?

You should leave a NOT400 indicating that the call/ session was escalated to the
supervisor.
5.
If you successfully assist the member after he/she requested a supervisor, do you still
need to escalate to a supervisor?

No. You should validate that the member no longer needs to speak with a
supervisor and then end the call/ session following your standard call/ session
flow.
6.
TRUE / FALSE: Refusing a Member’s request to speak with a supervisor is a Keep It Real
violation.

True
7.
TRUE / FALSE: The supervisor should take the call/ session at your desk.

True
8.
What does it mean to show empathy on a call/ session?

You should demonstrate empathy to show the member that you understand their
frustration. Showing empathy does not necessarily mean that you agree with the
member, but rather it is sincerely apologetic and shows a willingness to help.
Continued on next page
PARTICIPANT Escalations Procedures
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised May 4, 2011
Page 10


Summary, Continued

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
 Explain the Supervisor Escalation Policy and when it is appropriate to
escalate a call/ session to a supervisor.
 Explain ways in which you can attempt to de-escalate a call/ session
and decrease number of supervisor requests.
 Provide examples of scripting you could use or things you might say to
satisfy the member and de-escalate the call/ session.
 Identify who can take calls/ sessions escalated to a supervisor.
 Explain how to escalate a call/ session to a supervisor.



Metrics & MyPortal
Participant Guide
















Revised: October 21, 2011
Metrics & MyPortal
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 21, 2011
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction The level of performance and quality of service in the Technical Support
queue are measured in several different ways. Three of the primary
metrics assessed by the AOL business are:
 AHT – Average Handle Time
 MSI – Member Satisfaction Index
 CQI – Contact Quality Index
In this module you will learn about how these metrics are calculated and
how you can influence them to improve your scores.
In addition you will learn how to access the MyPortal tool to view and
keep track of your scores on these metrics.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
 Define the primary metrics used in the Technical Support queue.
 Explain the components of each metric and how you are able to
influence them.
 Describe how the Observation Feedback Form is used to evaluate
consultant performance.
 Access and utilize myPortal to view statistics.

Metrics & MyPortal
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 21, 2011
Page 2

Average Handle Time

Overview Average Handle Time is a measurement of the amount of time utilized for
one member interaction. Your facilitator and/or coach will provide you
with a target time for your calls. You should always strive to meet this
target time while ensuring that you are delighting our members and
providing world-class service.

Components AHT includes:
 Talk Time - total number of minutes spent talking to member
 Hold Time - total number of minutes you put the member on hold
Time spent wrapping up after a call (After Call Work) is not included in
your AHT, but does negatively impact your productivity. Therefore, you
should strive to complete all actions within your tools while on the phone.

How is AHT
Calculated?
Your productive time is broken down based on the Auxiliary codes (AUX
codes) entered into the softphone. These codes are then used on the
backend to calculate your Average Handle Time. Review the Pulsar article
that outlines the AUX codes and when to use them.

AHT Targets The target time for AHT may change from time to time as the business
evolves and changes. Your facilitator or coach will provide you with the
current target, depending on call type.

How Can
AHT be
Improved?
You can improve the AHT on your calls by keeping a few things in mind.
 Limit your focus to the member’s needs and avoid outside influences.
 Actively listen to the member to avoid repetition of information.
 Actively use AOL products, such as different version of the AOL client
software, webmail and AIM, when possible to enhance your product
knowledge and expertise.
 Practice multi-tasking with your tools while providing explanations to
members so you can effortlessly move between and utilize tools while
talking to a member during a call.
 Add commonly used Pulsar articles and URLs to Favorites.

Metrics & MyPortal
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 21, 2011
Page 3

Member Satisfaction Index

Overview Member Satisfaction Index (MSI) is the one of the metrics used to
evaluate the performance of the AOL business, your site, your queue,
your team and your individual performance.
Complete the chart below with information from your facilitator about
MSI.

Member Satisfaction Index (MSI)
What?




Why?




How?




Who?




When?




Continued on next page
Metrics & MyPortal
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 21, 2011
Page 4

Member Satisfaction Index, Continued

Survey Email The survey will appear in the member’s email inbox.

Below is an example of the survey email that members receive. Notice
that members can identify this as an official AOL mail by the gray bar at
the top of the email.

Continued on next page
Metrics & MyPortal
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 21, 2011
Page 5

Member Satisfaction Index, Continued

The MSI
Survey
You will view a demo version of the MSI survey to become more familiar
with the questions that are asked of the member. A demo survey is also
available at http://surveys.aol.com/demo/66.


Affected by Consultant: Affected by Both: Affected by Business:

Continued on next page
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AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 21, 2011
Page 6

Member Satisfaction Index, Continued

MSI Goals/
Target
MSI is closely tracked by the individual consultant, as well as by the AOL
business as a whole, each queue and each site. Consultant MSI is
calculated based on the behaviors that a consultant can impact by their
performance, while Enterprise MSI is the overall business number that
includes some elements that are out of the consultants’ control. Each
queue has MSI targets, which change from time to time as the business
evolves and changes.
Use the space below to take notes about MSI Goals for your queue.
























Metrics & MyPortal
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 21, 2011
Page 7

Member Satisfaction Index, Continued

Overview The Performance Enhancement Team (PET) conducted a study to
determine the behaviors that correlate with or have the most impact on
member satisfaction. This study led to the development and improvement
of the Contact Quality Index (CQI) metric, which is a measurement of the
quality of your interaction with members.
CQI focuses on two main components of your calls:
 Tool Compliance – proper and effective use of your tools
 Soft Skills – interpersonal skills that allow you to effectively engage
and interact with members

Tool
Compliance
Tool compliance means using your tools properly and effectively. For
Technical Support calls, you will be monitored to ensure that you do the
following on every call:
 Effectively probe to determine issue.
 Choose the proper article.
 Follow the appropriate approved solution path.
 Record resolution.
 Pitch a Paid Service.
 Send Email to member.
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Page 8

Member Satisfaction Index, Continued

Scoring Your performance in each of the compliance areas combine to provide a
total compliance score. Each area is weighted, meaning those with a
higher percentage count more towards your score. Below is the
percentage of points applied to each category.
30%
30%
20%
10%
10%
Probe Choose Proper Article
Follow Approved Solution Path Record Resolution
Send Email


Effectively
Probe to
Determine
Issue
The chart below describes the parameters that PET uses when this
component of compliance is assessed.

Question Key Components/ Parameters Scoring Options
Did the
consultant
effectively
probe?
 Understands the Issue
 Acquires an historical overview
of the issue
 Ensures that information
presented in TechBuddy has
been verified
Yes/No
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Page 9

Member Satisfaction Index, Continued

Effectively
Probe to
Determine
Issue -
Details
To indicate that you understand the issue, you must do the following,
whenever applicable:
 Isolate the issue with either the error message or the symptom.
 Determine what the member was trying to do.
 Attempt to recreate the issue.
 Determine at which stage of the member’s lifecycle the issue occurs.
Example: During Installation, Product Launch, Sign in or While online?
 Determine if the issue is occurring within the AOL software or with an
external program.
 Probe to understand the historical overview of the issue based on the
situation.
Examples include:
 How long have you been experiencing this issue?
 Have you made any changes to the computer either software or
hardware?
 Since when has this issue started occurring?
 Confirm information in TechBuddy for Operating System, Client
version and connection type.

Choose the
Appropriate
Article
The chart below describes the parameters that PET uses when this
component of compliance is assessed.


Question Key Components/
Parameters
Scoring Options
Did the
consultant
choose the most
appropriate
article based on
the member’s
main issue?
 Selects correct article
based on member’s
main issue
Yes/No/Cannot
Confirm
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Page 10

Member Satisfaction Index, Continued

Choose the
Appropriate
Article -
Details
 The article should be selected based on effective probing for:
Error Code / Error Message.
Symptom / Keyword.
 Cannot Confirm is used for scenarios where the call ends before the
agent is able to choose an article or there is no applicable article.

Follow the
Approved
Solution Path
The chart below describes the parameters that PET uses when this
component of compliance is assessed.


Question Key Components/
Parameters
Scoring Options
Did the
consultant follow
the approved
solution path?
 Follows the approved
solution path within the
article
Yes/No

Follow the
Approved
Solution Path
- Details
 If the first solution you attempt does not resolve the issue, you must
choose at least one additional step (solutions) from the article,
regardless of order. You are given credit if the Issue is resolved while
probing / recreating the issue.
 If the Dial-Up Resolution (DRV) process is applicable you must provide
at least one solution prior to offering a call back to the member.
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AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 21, 2011
Page 11

Member Satisfaction Index, Continued

Record
Solution
The chart below describes the parameters that PET uses when this
component of compliance is assessed.


Question Key Components/
Parameters
Scoring Options
Did the
consultant leave
appropriate
notes?

Did the agent
close the case?

Did the agent
send an email?
 Leaves notes describing
EACH attempted
solution.
The note should indicate
the step and whether
the solution failed or
was successful.
TKAT should be filed if
the resolution is
confirmed but is not
available in the selected
article.
 Attaches the selected
article.
 Email is sent.
 Cannot Confirm: Scored
if member gets
disconnected or the
recording ends prior to
the Consultant saving
the case
Yes/No/Cannot
Confirm

Record
Solution -
Details
 Cannot Confirm is used if the member gets disconnected or the
recording ends prior to the consultant saving the case
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AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 21, 2011
Page 12

Member Satisfaction Index, Continued

Pitch The chart below describes the parameters that PET uses when this
component of compliance is assessed.


Question Key Components/
Parameters
Scoring Options
Did the
consultant pitch a
Paid Services
product?
 Consultant should pitch
on all calls eligible for a
Paid Services product.
Yes
No
N/A – Not eligible
N/A – If agent pitches
on ineligible calls
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AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 21, 2011
Page 13

Member Satisfaction Index, Continued

Soft Skills The Soft Skills portion of CQI measures the interpersonal skills that allow
you to effectively engage and interact with members. You will be
monitored to ensure that you do the following on every call:
 Provide reassurance to the member
 Actively listen to the member
 Provide appropriate member education
 Demonstrate professionalism
 Use effective communication skills

Scoring Your performance in each of the soft skills areas combine to provide a
total soft skills score. Each area is weighted, meaning those with a higher
percentage count more towards your score.
20%
30%
20%
20%
10%
Reassurance Active Listening Member Education
Professionalism Communication Skills

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Page 14

Member Satisfaction Index, Continued

Reassurance
(Verbal
Contract)
This parameter is scored based on effectiveness of the statements used
by the consultant to reassure the member and establish a verbal contract.
You are expected to:
 Acknowledge the issue and reassure the Member.
 Use effective empathy statements.
Example: “I apologize for the inconvenience caused by <issue>. I
understand the situation that you are in, however let me assure you
that we will get this issue resolved.”
Example: “I understand the <situation> that you are in. But let me
assure you that we are working towards fixing this issue.”
 Reassure the member before proceeding to the solve stage.

Active
Listening
This parameter is scored based on active listening skills exhibited
throughout the call. You are expected to:
 Stay alert and engaged throughout the call.
 Provide prompt answers to members’ questions.
 Acknowledge Members (via soft verbal nods) without interrupting.
 Avoid dead air (45 seconds limit).
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Member Satisfaction Index, Continued

Member
Education
This parameter is scored based on any relevant information provided
pertaining to the issues or queries that the member has. You are
expected to:
 Provide a transitional statement to the solve stage (mandatory).
 Promote the use of AOL Software / Services, If applicable.
Example: “I see that you are using AOL Webmail. Are you aware that
the AOL software has all the features of AOL Mail, and provides a lot
more benefits?”
 Provide a re-cap of the last solution attempted to resolve the issue.
 Brief the member that an email will be sent and further solutions will
be contained within it.
Example: “The issue that you were experiencing was resolved by
performing a quick restore, which resets your AOL software to its
original state. I’ll be sending an email which consists of the solutions
that we attempted, for your future reference.”
 Provide adequate information when referring the member to a Third
Party vendor, if applicable.

Professionalism This parameter is scored based on the conduct that you exhibit
throughout the call. You are expected to:
 Remain calm and neutral at all times during the call.
 Not inappropriately interrupt the member.
 Be fully engaged in the call, and not engaged in Personal IM’s /
Emails, etc.

Communication
Skills
This parameter is scored based on the communication skills that you
exhibit throughout the call. You are expected to:
 Use proper sentence structure.
 Avoid grammatical errors.
 Sound energetic while on the call with the member OR maintain the
same pace as the member.
 Speak clearly and understandably, avoiding accent-related issues.

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Page 16

Member Satisfaction Index, Continued

Introduction The Observation Feedback Form (OFF) is used by your leadership and the
PET team to evaluate your calls. The form provides a means for gathering
information related to the specific criteria included in the CQI metric.
When coaches record information related to their observations on this
form, it helps to establish and maintain records about your performance
in order to identify patterns in behavior and look for trends. The
information collected using the observation feedback form will be used to
provide feedback for both you and your coach on strengths &
weaknesses, and to help identify areas for improvement, training needs &
coaching opportunities.

How are
Consultants
Evaluated?
During an observation, your coach will indicate whether if you have
demonstrated the behaviors included on the OFF by marking Yes/No/NA.
The form asks questions and provides examples of what behaviors you
are expected to demonstrate in order to provide an excellent member
experience. Coaches will include notes that will be helpful in determining
next steps for your growth, particularly for areas where a “No” response
is recorded. Your facilitator will distribute and review the most current
version of the OFF.

Continued on next page
Metrics & MyPortal
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 21, 2011
Page 17

Member Satisfaction Index, Continued

Action Plans The last section of the OFF is dedicated to your Action Plan. Reviewers will
record notes or key information from your previous action plan in this
section, as well as detailed information for a current action plan based on
the calls reviewed.
A good action plan answers the question of “Who will do What by
When?” This includes actions to be taken by both you and your coach to
support and reinforce the action plan.
Reviewers will develop action plans that:
 Clearly identify expectations for future action.
 Include performance-based goals.
 Define objectives and specific tasks clearly.
 Have realistic completion dates.
 Identify how issues that are not resolved will be handled.
 Track progress and acknowledge/reward completion and/or success.

Call
Examples
You will listen to two recorded calls handled by consultants in the tech
support queue. For each call, you will complete an Observation Feedback
Form (excluding the Action Plan portion). When the call is finished, you
will compare your completed form to those completed by your colleagues.
You will also be review the scoring completed by AOL Headquarters for
the same calls. Be prepared to discuss any discrepancies or differences of
opinion related to the scoring on the form. Use the space below and on
the following page to record any notes.










Continued on next page
Metrics & MyPortal
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 21, 2011
Page 18

Member Satisfaction Index, Continued

Call
Examples
Use the space below to record notes about the call examples in this
activity.





























Metrics & MyPortal
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 21, 2011
Page 19

MyPortal

Introduction In this section you will learn about the myPortal tool which is used to
access current call statistics for consultants. You will learn how to access
the tool and reports that will provide vital information about your
successes and areas of opportunity once you are on the call floor.

Accessing My
Portal &
Logging In
Access the myPortal tool using the shortcut for myPortal on the desktop
or by going to Start>Programs>myPortal. My portal can also be accessed
at http://myportal.ops.aol.com.
You will need to enter your screen name, password and Secure ID to
access the myPortal tool.
Continued on next page
Metrics & MyPortal
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 21, 2011
Page 20

MyPortal, Continued

MyPortal
Summary
Page
Once you log in to MyPortal, you are directed to the Summary page. This
page can be customized to display only the features that you are
interested in viewing regularly. You can also control the placement of
these features on the page.
To add features, click on the Add button near the top left of the page.


In the Select Portlet window that appears, click on the feature you would
like to add. That feature will then appear on your summary page. You
can click on the dark blue title bar at the top of the feature to move it to a
new location on the page. Use the buttons at the top right corner of each
feature to collapse/expand, refresh, close or maximize the window.


NOTE: The MyPortal tool is frequently updated and improved, so new
features and/or changes are typically included in the Announcements
section. In addition, the screen shots in this training may appear
differently than what currently appears on the site.
Continued on next page
Metrics & MyPortal
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 21, 2011
Page 21

MyPortal, Continued

Navigating
myPortal
Below is a screen shot of the MyPortal welcome screen. Describe the
functions of the links that you will use on the welcome screen in the chart
below.


MyPortal Functions
1




2




3




4




5





Continued on next page
Metrics & MyPortal
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 21, 2011
Page 22

MyPortal, Continued

Viewing
Reports
Record a description of each tech related report in the chart below.

myPortal Reports
Report Description
1 CCC MSI



2 Enterprise
MSI



3 Telephony



4 New CQI



Continued on next page
Metrics & MyPortal
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 21, 2011
Page 23

MyPortal, Continued

Report
Options
You will be presented with a variety of options to help generate the
specific information you want. Options vary depending on the report
selected.
Record a description of what you will see for each of the levels in
the chart below.
Level Description
CCC




Coach




Site




Enterprise





Continued on next page
Metrics & MyPortal
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 21, 2011
Page 24

MyPortal, Continued

CCC MSI The CCC MSI report provides statistics related to the MSI scores for a
particular consultant. Although you will only be able to view your own
scores, coaches and leadership have the ability to view the scores for any
individual.
Your facilitator will demonstrate how to access the CCC MSI report and
review the available options. Below are some helpful tips for this report.
Use the space below to record any additional notes.
 Click the Refresh button to populate each of the option boxes.
 If a required section has not been completed, red stars will appear to
indicate the section that needs to be completed.
 You can hold down the CTRL key while clicking to select multiple
options within a section.
 In the Metrics section, you can choose to view overall results or review
detailed information on a specific component of MSI.

Continued on next page
Metrics & MyPortal
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 21, 2011
Page 25

MyPortal, Continued

Enterprise
MSI
The Enterprise MSI report allows you to view MSI scores for a particular
queue across all of AOL. This will allow you to view how your performance
compares with the agents in the rest of the business.
Your facilitator will demonstrate how to access the Enterprise MSI report
and review the available options. Below are some helpful tips for this
report. Use the space below to record any additional notes.
 Click the Refresh button to populate each of the option boxes.
 If a required section has not been completed, red stars will appear to
indicate the section that needs to be completed.
 You can hold down the CTRL key while clicking to select multiple
options within a section.

Continued on next page
Metrics & MyPortal
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 21, 2011
Page 26

MyPortal, Continued

Telephony
Report
The Telephony report allows you to view:
 Average Handle Time.
 Average Talk Time.
 Average Hold Time.
Your facilitator will demonstrate how to access the Telephony report and
review the available options. Below are some helpful tips for this report.
Use the space below to record any additional notes.
 Click the Refresh button to populate each of the option boxes.
 If a required section has not been completed, red stars will appear to
indicate the section that needs to be completed.
 You can hold down the CTRL key while clicking to select multiple
options within a section.

Continued on next page
Metrics & MyPortal
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 21, 2011
Page 27

MyPortal, Continued

New CQI
Report
The New CQI report allows you to view your scores for tool compliance
and soft skills. This allows you to track your performance in specific areas
over time to observe trends and identify areas for improvement.
Your facilitator will demonstrate how to access the New CQI report and
review the available options. Below are some helpful tips for this report.
Use the space below to record any additional notes.
 Click the Refresh button to populate each of the option boxes.
 If a required section has not been completed, red stars will appear to
indicate the section that needs to be completed.
 You can hold down the CTRL key while clicking to select multiple
options within a section.




Metrics & MyPortal
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 21, 2011
Page 28

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
 Define the primary metrics used in the Technical Support queue.
 Explain the components of each metric and how you are able to
influence them.
 Describe how the Observation Feedback Form is used to evaluate
consultant performance.
 Access and utilize myPortal to view statistics.



d
e
CQI Observational Feedback Form - TECH
Consultant Name: Reviewer Name:
Review Date(s):
Call 1 Date/Time/Reason: Call 2 Date/Time/Reason: Call 3 Date/Time/Reason:
Call 1 Call 2 Call 3
PROCESS COMPLIANCE
Probing Description NOTES Yes/No
Did the Consultant effectively probe to reveal
the members Issue?
Scored “YES” if the Consultant fulfills both the
parameters below:-
1) Understands the Issue
2) Acquires an historical overview of the
issue
3) Ensure that information presented in Tech
Buddy / Fusion has been verified
■ To understand the issue, an Consultant must answer the following:
Isolate the issue with either the error message or the symptom
What was the member trying to do? Attempt to recreate the issue.
At which stage of the member’s lifecycle does this occur? I.E:- during
installation, product launch, sign in or while online? It is first important to
isolate if the issue is occurring within the AOL software or with an external
program.
■ Furthermore the Consultant must probe further to understand the
historical overview of the issue based on the situation. An example of
these questions include , but not restricted to:-
How long have you been experiencing this issue?
Have you made any changes to the computer either software or hardware?
Since when has this issue started occurring?
■ Information presented in Tech Buddy / Fusion will need to be confirme
with the member.
Choose Proper Article Description NOTES Yes/No/NA
Chose the most appropriate article based on
the member's main issue
Scored “YES” if the Consultant selects the
correct article based on the member’s main
Issue.
■ Article selected should be based on effective probing, Error Code /
Message Or Keyword / Symptom
■ Cannot Confirm is used for scenarios where the call ends before the
agent could choose an article or there is no applicable article.
■ If Fusion is down, Consultants are expected to use help.aol.com.
Failure to do so will result in this parameter being scored as a “No”.
Solution Path Description NOTES Yes/No
Did the Consultant follow the approved
solution path?
Scored 'Yes' if the Consultant followed the
approved solution path within the selected
article.
■ If the first solution attempted does not resolve the issue, the Consultan
must choose at least one additional step (solutions) from the article,
regardless of order. Agent is given credit if the Issue is resolved while
probing / recreating the issue.
■ If DRV is applicable the Consultant must provide at least one solution
prior to offering a call back to the member.
t
Record Solution Description NOTES Yes/No/NA
Did the consultant properly record the
resolution given to the member?
Scored “Yes” if the Consultant:
■ Leaves notes describing each attempted step and whether the solution
failed or was successful.
■ Attaches the selected article
■ Sends email when necessary
■ Submits status of SR as Pending or Closed-Resolved
■ Sends email when necessary (Email exceptions include the following
scenarios: Misdirect/Wrong Queue, No exact article for the member's
main issue, MAC calls or Disconnected Calls.)
■ Files TKAT if the resolution is confirmed but is not available in the
selected article. ■ Cannot
Confirm should be selected if the Member gets disconnected or the
recording ends prior to the CCC saving the case.
Pitch Description NOTES Yes/No/NA
Did the agent pitch a Paid Services product
appropriately?
■ The agent should pitch on all calls that are eligible for a Paid Services
product, based on guidelines in Pulsar.
■ Scored N/A if the call is ineligible and the agent does not pitch.
■ Scored No in the following scenarios:
1. Agent does not pitch on an eligible call.
2. Agent pitches a product already active on the account.
3. Agent proactively pitches a product previously canceled on the account.
4. Agent pitches on an ineligible call.
SOFT SKILLS
Reassurance Description NOTES Yes/No
Scored based on effectiveness of the
statement used.
■ The CCC is expected to:-
1) Acknowledge the issue and reassure the Member
2) Use effective empathy statements
3) Consultants should reassure the member before proceeding to the solv
stage.
Active Listening Description NOTES Yes/No
Scored based on active listening skills
exhibited throughout the call.
■ The CCC is expected to :-
1) Stay alert and engaged throughout the call
2) Provide prompt answers to members questions
3) Acknowledge Members (via soft verbal nods) without interrupting
4) Avoid dead air (45 seconds limit)
o
Member Education Description NOTES Yes/No
Scored based on any relevant information
provided pertaining to the issues or queries
that the member has.
■ The CCC is expected to :-
1) Provide a transitional statement to the solve stage (mandatory).
2) If applicable promote the use of AOL Software / Services
3) Should provide a re-cap of the last solution attempted to resolve the
issue. Furthermore should brief the member that an email will be sent and
further solutions will be contained within it.
4) If applicable provide adequate information when referring the member t
a Third Party vendor
Professionalism Description NOTES Yes/No
Scored based on the conduct that the CCC
exhibits throughout the call.
■ The CCC is expected to:-
1) Remain calm and neutral at all times during the call
2) Should not inappropriately interrupt
3) Should not be engaged in any personal IM's / Emails
Communication Skills Description NOTES Yes/No
Scored based on effective communication
skills that the CCC exhibits throughout the
call.
■ The CCC is expected to:-
1) Use proper sentence structures
2) Avoid grammatical errors
3) Should sound energetic while on the call with the member OR Should
be at the same pace as the member
4) Possess a neutral accent
MISCELLANEOUS
Dial Up Resolution Validation Description NOTES Yes/No
Was the Dial up Resolution Validation process
followed?
■ The CCC is expected to:-
1) If applicable call the member back AFTER providing at least one trouble
shooting procedure
KIR Description NOTES Yes/No
Were there any KIR violations on this call?
Action Plan (Previous and New)
In the space below, include the date and key information from consultant’s previous action plan.
Current Action Plan:
WHO does WHAT by WHEN? (include specific behaviors and expectations/commitments made by both the Consultant and Coach. Status )
Overall Comments:
Coach Signature: Consultant Signature:
Basic Computer Hardware
Participant Guide
















Revised: May 23, 2011
Basic Computer Hardware
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised May 23, 2011
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction In this section you will learn about basic computer hardware components
and peripheral devices that will prepare you to troubleshoot hardware-
related problems. In addition you will explore the versions of the Windows
Operating System used by AOL members.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
„ Identify and describe the function of basic computer hardware
components and peripherals.
„ Determine when hardware components or peripherals could be the
cause of an issue.

Basic Computer Hardware
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised May 23, 2011
Page 2

Basic Computer Hardware

Introduction In this section you will learn about basic computer hardware components
and peripheral devices to prepare yourself to troubleshoot hardware-
related problems.

Hardware
Components
Computer hardware components can affect the online experience. It is
important to know how to identify and describe the basic hardware
components and peripheral devices, why they are needed, and how they
work and interact.
Write a description of each of the following hardware devices below.
„ Camera –

„ CD-RW –

„ Central Processing Unit –

„ Drivers –

„ DVD-RW –

„ Hard Drive –

„ Headset –

„ Jump or thumb drive –

„ Keyboard –

„ Microphone –
Continued on next page
Basic Computer Hardware
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised May 23, 2011
Page 3

Basic Computer Hardware, Continued

Hardware
Components
(continued)
„ Modem –

„ Modem card –

„ Monitor –

„ Motherboard –

„ Mouse –

„ Network card –

„ Printer –

„ Random Access Memory –

„ Router –

„ Scanner –

„ Speakers -

Continued on next page
Basic Computer Hardware
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised May 23, 2011
Page 4

Basic Computer Hardware, Continued

Hardware
Components
(continued)
„ Sound card –

„ Video/graphics card –

„ Wireless Access Point –

„ Wireless Router -

„ Webcam –
Continued on next page
Basic Computer Hardware
Basic Computer Hardware, Continued

Types of
Hardware
(continued)
There are two types of computer hardware:
„ Internal hardware components (inside the computer).
„ Peripheral devices (outside the computer).
Write each of the hardware devices from the previous pages in the
appropriate area of the T-chart below.

Continued on next page
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised May 23, 2011
Page 5

Basic Computer Hardware
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised May 23, 2011
Page 6

Basic Computer Hardware, Continued

Using This
Information
General knowledge of hardware components can help you distinguish
between computer related issues as opposed to AOL issues that you
support. It is important to determine if an issue involving the hardware
components discussed are related to AOL in order to determine whether
to troubleshoot or refer the member to a third party.

Explain what hardware the issues below could be related to and why.

„ A member calls stating his AOL Sign On window takes up the entire
screen.





„ A member calls stating AOL does not make any sounds (i.e. Welcome,
Good-bye, etc.).






„ A member calls stating AOL does not connect to the internet even
though they have a high speed connection.






Basic Computer Hardware
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised May 23, 2011
Page 7

rdware, Continued Basic Computer Ha

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
„ Identify and describe the function of basic computer hardware
components and peripherals.
„ Determine when hardware components or peripherals could be the
cause of an issue.




Windows XP & Vista
Participant Guide
















Revised: October 18, 2011
Windows XP & Vista
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction In this section you will learn about basic computer hardware components
and peripheral devices that will prepare you to troubleshoot hardware-
related problems. In addition you will explore the versions of the Windows
Operating System used by AOL members.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
 Identify the version of Windows Operating System used by members.
 Identify the AOL software versions compatible with Windows XP, Vista
and 7.
 Navigate through the Windows XP and Vista Operating Systems.

Windows XP & Vista
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 2

Windows Basics

Introduction In this section you will learn about the Windows XP and Vista Operating
System tools that can be used to troubleshoot member issues. You will
explore and practice using common features and tools and co-navigating
with a partner to prepare for live calls. You will compare the similarities
and differences between the two Operating Systems.

Overview You will provide technical support for members using the following
Windows operating systems:
 Windows 98
 Windows Millennium (ME)
 Windows 2000
 Windows XP
 Windows Vista
 Windows 7
This module will focus on Windows XP, Vista and 7 since the majority of
calls involve those operating systems.
Continued on next page
Windows XP & Vista
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 3

Windows Basics, Continued

Windows XP
Exploration
Lab
Use the space below and on the following page to take notes during the
Windows XP Exploration Lab activity.












Continued on next page
Windows XP & Vista
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 4

Windows Basics, Continued

Windows
Vista
Exploration
Your facilitator will conduct an activity using the Microsoft Vista website,
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsvista, to help you answer the
questions below and on the following page.

Click the User Experience Link to answer these questions.
 What are Live Taskbar Thumbnails?


 In Vista, what happens when you Alt+Tab to switch between
programs?


Click the Security link to answer these questions.
 Vista includes a program to hel safeguard the user against malware
and other potentially unwanted software. This program is called:


 With User Account control and the new Parental Controls in Vista, you
can easily create a separate account for each member of the family
and control what?


Click the Sidebar & Gadgets link to answer these questions.
 How could you describe Windows Sidebar to a member?


 How could you help a member choose what they wanted to see in the
sidebar?



Continued on next page
Windows XP & Vista
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 5

Windows Basics, Continued

Windows
Vista
Simulations
Use the space below to take notes while working through the Vista
simulations. Then answer the questions related to each simulation on the
following page.


Continued on next page
Windows XP & Vista
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 6

Windows Basics, Continued

Windows
Vista
Simulations
(continued)
Clearing the Browser Cache – Windows Vista comes with Internet
Explorer 7.0. What is different about deleting the cache and cookies when
compared to earlier MSIE versions?

Browser Security Settings – Windows Vista adds something new to the
Security Tab within the Security level for this zone area. What is this new
item?



Accessing the Command Line – Help.aol.com may have you access the
command prompt to directly type in words to execute. List a few
commands you might have members type in the command line.



Accessing Task Manager – Look at the tabs across the top of Task
Manager. Is there any difference in the number of tabs from that of
Windows XP? Explain.



Hardware Acceleration – Explain some of the differences in the path
you take in getting to the hardware acceleration settings in Windows Vista
as opposed to Windows XP.



Uninstall AOL – The Change/Remove button you are used to seeing in
Windows XP to uninstall a program has been renamed to what in Vista?



Continued on next page
Windows XP & Vista
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 7

Windows Basics, Continued

Category
versus
Classic Views
Windows XP and Windows Vista have two general look-and-feel settings,
called Category and Classic View. Your facilitator will conduct an activity
where you will explore the different views. Take notes in the space below.




























Continued on next page
Windows XP & Vista
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 8

Windows Basics, Continued

XP & Vista
Comparison
& Co-
Navigation
Activity
Your facilitator will conduct an activity using Help.aol.com articles to
compare instructions/screen shots for XP and Vista and to also help you
practice co-navigating with a partner as you would instruct a member.
Take notes in the space provided and then answer the questions for each
activity.


Activity 1 –
Accessing
Control Panel







 How are the instructions different for XP and Vista?




Activity 2 –
Display







 How do the screens differ for XP and Vista?


 What screen resolution is your monitor currently set to?



Continued on next page
Windows XP & Vista
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 9

Windows Basics, Continued

Activity 3 –
Adjusting
Sound



 What does the volume icon on the Windows Taskbar enable you to do?


 List some of the installed AOL sounds.




Activity 4 –
Control
Panel and
Device
Manager



 How does the Device Manager indicate a hardware conflict?


 What information is located on the General Tab of the System Control
Panel?



Activity 5 –
Run Feature



 What happens when you run the command netsh winsock reset all?



Continued on next page
Windows XP & Vista
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 10

Windows Basics, Continued

Activity 6 –
Safe Mode





 How do you show hidden files or folders in Windows Explorer?




Activity 7 –
MSConfig





 How do you access the System Configuration Utility?



 What does it mean when a computer is already in Selective Startup
when you access MSConfig?



Continued on next page
Windows XP & Vista
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 11

Windows Basics, Continued

File
Management
Help.aol.com may have solutions that require you to lead members
through various files and folders on their computer. Windows Explorer is
the most important tool in Windows for file management. Windows
Explorer enables you to navigate, move, copy, and delete the files on a
computer.
Windows Explorer is divided into two panes with a toolbar at the top. The
left pane shows the folder structure and the right pane displays the
contents of the selected folder.
By default, Windows Explorer does not show files marked as hidden. At
times, you may need to have members view all files and folders. When
you need to view hidden files, Help.aol.com guides you through the
necessary steps.
 How can you access Windows Explorer to manage files?


Windows has hot keys or keyboard shortcuts to perform various tasks.
Record the function of each keyboard shortcut in the chart below.
Step Action
CTR + C

CTR + V

CTR + X

ALT + Tab


File
Management
Activity
Use Windows Explorer to determine the following using your computer:
 How many objects are located within this folder? Hint: Look at the
bottom of the Windows Explorer window.

 What is the file size of all files within this folder?

Right-click on your AOL folder and select Properties.
 How many files and folders are contained in this folder?


Windows XP & Vista
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 12

Continued on next page
Windows XP & Vista
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 13

Windows Basics, Continued

Feature
Comparison
Use the chart below to compare and contrast features of Windows XP
and Windows Vista.

Feature Windows XP Windows Vista
GUI







Start
Menu







Control
Panels

















Windows XP & Vista
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 14

Windows Basics, Continued

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
 Identify the version of Windows Operating System used by members.
 Identify the AOL software versions compatible with Windows XP, Vista
and 7.
 Navigate through the Windows XP and Vista Operating Systems.




Windows 7
Participant Guide
















Revised: October 18, 2011
Windows 7
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction In this section you will learn about basic computer hardware components
and peripheral devices that will prepare you to troubleshoot hardware-
related problems. In addition you will explore the versions of the Windows
Operating System used by AOL members.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
 Navigate through the Windows 7 Operating System.

Windows 7
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 2

Windows 7

Introduction Microsoft released a new version of their Windows Operating System on
October 22, 2009. This operating system is expected to have a high
adoption rate, with some predictions of up to 50% conversion as soon as
the product is available.
Windows 7 includes a large number of usability and performance changes.
In addition there are some features of previous Windows versions which
are no longer included in Windows 7. The changes will have an impact on
the way you perform certain troubleshooting steps.

AOL
Software
Compatibility
The chart below shows the recommended AOL software for each
Operating System.
XP VISTA 7
AOL 8.0 and above AOL 9.0 VR
AOL 9.0 VR, 9.1, 9.5
and above


Installing
Windows 7
When a user installs Windows 7, they are only able to upgrade from
Windows Vista and still retain their files. If they are using XP, Windows 7
is a new install which overwrites their previous operating system,
applications and files.
If a member calls prior to installing Windows 7 and is using Windows XP,
you should recommend that the member back up their AOL files on an
alternative source, and not on their local machine.
Continued on next page
Windows 7
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 3

Windows 7, Continued

Start Button
& Taskbar
The appearance of the Start button and Taskbar can help you determine
which version of the Windows Operating System the member is using.
Below are screen shots and a description for Windows XP, Vista and 7.
XP Green Start button with open programs listed with small icons/text on the taskbar.

VISTA Windows icon in place of start button with open programs listed with small icons
and text on the taskbar.

7 Windows icon in place of start button with open programs provided as large icons
with no text on the taskbar.

With Windows 7, the user has complete control over the icons included in the task bar.
Icons are no longer automatically installed on the taskbar when new software is installed.
This means that AOL icons will need to be manually added if a member wishes to have one
in the taskbar. Additional icons can be added and existing icons can be removed by either
dragging onto the taskbar or using the pin and unpin option on the right-click menu for
that application icon.

The quick launch bar from previous versions of Windows has been removed in Windows 7,
but the functionality of the Quick Launch toolbar has been integrated into the main
taskbar.
When a member launches an application using the icon on the taskbar, the icon stays in
place but gets a square overlay to indicate that it is now running. If multiple windows or
instances are opened for the same application, the icon changes from the single
highlighted square overlay to an overlay of a stack of highlighted squares. All of the
windows from the same application are collapsed into a single icon.
Continued on next page
Windows 7
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 4

Windows 7, Continued

Taskbar
Notification
Area
The four system icons and the clock are the only icons that will be visible
the Taskbar Notification Area by default. All other icons that would
normally appear in the taskbar notification area are instead pushed into
the overflow area that appears when clicking the up arrow as shown
below. The Show Desktop option has been moved to the far right of the
taskbar and is shown as the thin vertical bar.



Start Menu
Jump List
The Start menu has changed to serve as a jump list. Jump lists are used
throughout Windows 7 and provide an easy way to access the most
common tasks, features, documents and/or applications that the user is
most likely to use. In addition, there is no longer a web browser and
email client pinned to the top of the Start Menu by default.

Continued on next page
Windows 7
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 5

Windows 7, Continued

Windows
Search
The Windows Search feature, or Search Programs and Files box, has been
added to the Start Menu. This feature allows you to begin typing in the
box and instantly see a list of relevant documents, pictures, music and
email on a PC. Results are grouped by category and contain highlighted
keywords and text snippets which make them easy to scan through. This
feature also takes the place of the Run command.

You will access and utilize many common troubleshooting steps using the
Windows Search feature. These include:
 MSConfig (System Configuration)
 SINF (SysInfo)
 Device Manager
Continued on next page
Windows 7
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 6

Windows 7, Continued

MSConfig
and SysInfo
To begin using MSConfig or SysInfo, you can type “sys” in the Search
Programs and Files box. As you add additional letters to your search, the
results will change. Typing “sys” allows you to see both MSConfig and
SysInfo in the results, as seen in the screen shot below.

Continued on next page
Windows 7
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 7

Windows 7, Continued

Device
Manager
The Device Manager can be accessed by typing “dev” in the Search
Programs and Files box.
Once the Device Manager is open, you will notice some differences in
appearance from earlier versions of operating systems. In the screen shot
below, you see small triangles at the start of each line instead of the
usual + or – sign.

The table below explains the symbols used in the Device Manager and
what the symbols indicate.
If… Then Indicates that…
Black exclamation point
(!) on a yellow field
device is not functioning properly
Red “X” device as been disabled
Blue “i” on a white filed device was manually configured
Green question mark
(?)
a compatible driver is installed but the device
may not have all the functionality available


Windows 7
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 8

Windows 7, Continued

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
 Navigate through the Windows 7 Operating System.




Dial-Up Connectivity
Participant Guide
















Revised: March 23, 2012
Dial-Up Connectivity
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 23, 2012
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction In this module you will learn about the differences between narrowband
and broadband connectivity and the software used by AOL to create these
connections. You will also learn to determine which version of the AOL
Connectivity Service software is being used in order to provide
appropriate troubleshooting steps to members.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
• Explain differences between narrowband/dial-up and broadband/high
speed connectivity.
• Describe what AOL Connectivity Service is and its function.
• Explain how to determine which version of ACS a member is using.
• Explain the process for setting up a dial-up connection.
• Find appropriate access numbers based on member’s location.
• Explain the connection process for a dial-up connection and the related
failure points.
• Effectively probe to determine a dial-up connectivity issue.
• Effectively co-navigate with a member to resolve connectivity issues.


Dial-Up Connectivity
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 23, 2012
Page 2


Connectivity Basics

Narrowband
vs.
Broadband
AOL members use two types of connectivity:
• Narrowband
• Broadband
Your facilitator will conduct an activity where you will research the
definitions and characteristics of the two connection types. Fill in the T-
chart below with the information you find.

Continued on next page
Dial-Up Connectivity
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 23, 2012
Page 3


Connectivity Basics, Continued

What is ACS?

1. Why does a tech support consultant need to know the
version of ACS?






2. How can you find the version of ACS on a computer?









Dial-Up Connectivity
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 23, 2012
Page 4


Dial-Up Connectivity

Setting up a
Dial Up
Connection
You will view a slide show that walks through the process of setting up a
dial up location. Use the space below to take notes. Complete the chart
below with the information you learn about dialing options.
















Dialing Option Description
Reach an
Outside Line





Call Waiting





Ten digit dialing





Continued on next page
Dial-Up Connectivity
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 23, 2012
Page 5


Dial-Up Connectivity, Continued

Access
Numbers
AOL uses access numbers to connect narrowband members. You may
need to search for these numbers.
Follow the steps below to find appropriate access. This is a site that you
will use frequently, therefore it is helpful to add it as a Favorite on your
workstation.

Step Action
1






2






3







Activity Work through the Setting up Dial Up Connection Interactive Simulation on
MSU to practice setting up a connection.
Continued on next page
Dial-Up Connectivity
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 23, 2012
Page 6


Dial-Up Connectivity, Continued

Connection Steps When a dial-up connection to AOL is attempted, the software
begins a seven-step connection process. Being aware of these
steps and what the member will see and hear during each step
will help you troubleshoot connection issues. Record details
about the action being taken for each step in the chart below.

Step Action
Step 1:
Initializing
Modem

Step 2:
Dialing…



Step 3:
Connected
at X bps...

Step 4:
Requesting
Network
Attention...

Step 5:
Talking to
Network...

Step 6:
Connecting
to AOL...

Step 7:
Checking
Password...

Continued on next page
Dial-Up Connectivity
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 23, 2012
Page 7


Dial-Up Connectivity, Continued

Failure
Points
The chart below briefly describes the possible failure points at the various
connection steps. “Line noise” or problematic phone lines can also cause
failures at any of these steps.

Failure Point Failures can be Caused by:
Step 1:
Initializing Modem…
Modem hardware problems or bad cables between
modem and computer
Step 2:
Dialing…
No phone line, no dial tone, incorrect use of dialing 9
first, *70, voice mail interruptions, wrong or missing
area code, 10-digit dialing, or the phone line connected
to the incorrect port on the modem.
Step 3:
Connected at X bps...
Modem performing poorly on the member's or the
provider’s side, or a bad modem on the provider's side.
Step 4:
Requesting Network
Attention...
Incorrect provider network configuration or AOL
network/host complex problems.
Step 5:
Talking to Network...
Firewalls, TCP/IP stack problems, AOL adapter (all
varieties) problems, or AOL network/host complex
problems.
Step 6:
Connecting to AOL...
Firewalls, TCP/IP stack problems, AOL adapter (all
varieties) problems, or AOL network/host complex
problems.
Step 7:
Checking Password...
AOL host complex problems, assuming the member is
using a working client and a correct password. You
should check System Status to see if there are any
network issues. Help.aol.com may also advise you to file
a problem report if the contact reason can be
reproduced.

Dial-Up Connectivity
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 23, 2012
Page 8


Narrowband Connectivity Probing Questions

Introduction This section lists useful examples of probing questions you can use for
each step of the narrowband connection process.

General
Questions
• When was the last time you were able to connect to AOL?
• Does the connection process fail at any particular step?
• Have there been any recent electrical storms or bad weather in your
area?
• What was the exact error message that appeared?

Step One:
Initializing
the Modem
• Do you hear a very faint click?
• Have you installed any new programs on your computer (like a
firewall)?
• Can you see any lights blinking on the modem (if an external modem)?
• Are any other applications using the modem (fax software, etc.)?
• What was the exact error message that appeared?

Step Two:
Dialing
• Can you hear the modem dial the phone number?
• Do you hear any voices after the modem dials?
• Do you hear a busy signal after the modem dials?
• What was the exact error message that appeared?
Continued on next page
Dial-Up Connectivity
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 23, 2012
Page 9


, Continued


Step Three:
Connecting
• Do you hear a screeching or static-like sound after the modem dials the
number?
• Does the sound ever stop, or does it keep attempting to connect?

Step Four:
Requesting
Network
Attention
• How long has this been happening?

Continued on next page
Dial-Up Connectivity
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 23, 2012
Page 10


, Continued

Step Five:
Talking to
Network
• Does AOL seem to hang, or not respond for a long time?


Step Six:
Connecting
to AOL
• How long has this been happening?


Step Seven:
Checking
Password
• Does AOL seem to hang, or not respond for a long time?
• Do you get an invalid screen name/password error message?
• Does this happen on every screen name? Or just one?

Additional
Probing
Questions
Use this space to write any additional probing questions.
Continued on next page
Dial-Up Connectivity
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 23, 2012
Page 11

, Continued

Probing
Questions
Activity
(Narrowband)
Your facilitator will conduct an activity with the class where you practice
using probing questions for dial up connectivity. Use the space below to
take any notes.


Dial-Up Connectivity
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 23, 2012
Page 12

Troubleshooting

Help.aol.com
Exploration
You will have the opportunity to explore the articles in Help.aol.com
related to connectivity. The purpose of this activity is to become more
familiar with the Help.aol.com articles related to this topic, the questions
asked and resolutions provided within the articles. Use the space below to
take notes.



























Continued on next page
Dial-Up Connectivity
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 23, 2012
Page 13

Troubleshooting, Continued

Co-
Navigating
for
Connectivity
Issues
You must be able to walk a member through the steps in Help.aol.com
related to a Connectivity Issue. Your facilitator will lead you through a
role-play activity to provide time for you to practice co-navigating through
the steps. Record any notes below.

Dial-Up Connectivity
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 23, 2012
Page 14

Summary

Learning
Objectives
After completing this training, you should be able to:
• Explain differences between narrowband/dial-up and broadband/high
speed connectivity.
• Describe what AOL Connectivity Service is and its function.
• Explain how to determine which version of ACS a member is using.
• Explain the process for setting up a dial-up connection.
• Find appropriate access numbers based on member’s location.
• Explain the connection process for a dial-up connection and the related
failure points.
• Effectively probe to determine a dial-up connectivity issue.
• Effectively co-navigate with a member to resolve connectivity issues.


Broadband Connectivity
Participant Guide
















Revised: October 18, 2011
Broadband Connectivity
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction In this module you will learn about the differences between narrowband
and broadband connectivity and the software used by AOL to create these
connections. You will also learn to determine which version of the AOL
Connectivity Service software is being used in order to provide
appropriate troubleshooting steps to members.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
 Explain the process for setting up a third party broadband connection.
 Explain the connection process for a third party broadband connection
and the related failure points.
 Effectively probe to determine a third party broadband connectivity
issue.
 Effectively co-navigate with a member to resolve connectivity issues.


Broadband Connectivity
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 2

Module Overview, Continued

Setting up a
Broadband
Connection
Since a third party broadband connection is “always on,” the only set up
that a member needs to do is ensure Broadband has been selected on the
Connection drop down menu. This will enable AOL to use the member’s
existing connection.

Broadband
Connectivity
Process
When a third party broadband connection to AOL is made, the software
goes through three steps. Record the actions taken during each of the
steps in the chart below.
Step Action
Step 1:
Looking for
AOL via
TCP/IP


Step 2:
Connecting
using TCP/IP

Step 3:
Checking
Password


Continued on next page
Broadband Connectivity
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 3

Module Overview, Continued

Failure
Points
If a member has difficulty signing on to AOL over their ISP, identifying the
step in which the problem occurs will help you solve the problem. A
smooth, problem-free high-speed connection is characterized by a fast
progression from one step to the next, until the AOL Welcome Screen
displays. The chart below briefly describes the possible failure points at
the various connection steps.

Failure Point Can be caused by:
Step 1:
Looking for AOL via
TCP/IP
Connection to the Internet not being established, firewall
settings, software issues (ACS file corruption), or very rarely,
the result of spyware.
Step 2:
Connecting using TCP/IP
ISP, spyware, firewall, AOL system, or other software issues
(ACS file corruption).
Step 3:
Checking Password
Password, host, or system resource problem.

Broadband Connectivity
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 4

Broadband Connectivity Probing Questions

Introduction This section lists useful examples of probing questions you can use for
each step of the broadband connection process. Take notes on why these
questions are important and how the responses help you to diagnose the
issue.

General
Questions
Have you been able to connect to AOL using your broadband connection
before?

Have you installed any new hardware or software since this problem
occurred?

What connection step did AOL get to before it failed?

Is it just hanging or stopping at that step or is there an error message?

If it’s just hanging at a certain step the error message will usually be
revealed a short time later; did you notice an error message?

Does system information reveal any error message information? (If the
member does not recall, ask them to attempt to connect to see if they
receive the message again.)

Have you made any changes to your Broadband service with your high-
speed provider?

What happens if you attempt to connect to the Internet with Internet
Explorer?

Continued on next page
Broadband Connectivity
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 5

Module Overview, Continued

Probing
Question
Examples
(Broadband)
Your facilitator will lead you through an activity to practice probing to
determine a specific issue related to broadband connectivity. Use the
space below to take notes.


Broadband Connectivity
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 6

Troubleshooting Connectivity Issues

Connectivity
Exploration
You will have the opportunity to explore the connectivity articles in
Help.aol.com. The purpose of this activity to become more familiar with
the Help.aol.com articles related to connectivity, the questions asked and
resolutions provided within the articles. Use the space below to take
notes.



























Continued on next page
Broadband Connectivity
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 7

Troubleshooting Connectivity Issues, Continued

Co-
Navigating
for
Connectivity
It is important for you to be able to navigate to resolve connectivity
issues, but you must also be able to help the member get there. Your
facilitator will lead you through an activity to practice co-navigating with a
“member” to resolve connectivity issues. Use the space below for any
notes.



























Broadband Connectivity
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 8

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
 Explain the process for setting up a third party broadband connection.
 Explain the connection process for a third party broadband connection
and the related failure points.
 Effectively probe to determine a third party broadband connectivity
issue.
 Effectively co-navigate with a member to resolve connectivity issues.



SysInfo
Participant Guide
















Revised: October 18, 2011
SysInfo
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction Participant introduction to the module.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
 Access and utilize the SysInfo tool to perform tasks when directed by
Help.aol.com.
 Effectively co-navigate to help members perform troubleshooting
steps.

SysInfo
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 2

SysInfo

Introduction In this section you will learn to access and use the SysInfo Tool. SysInfo
detects important information about the member’s installed AOL software
and system configuration. SysInfo is used to answer questions and to
perform maintenance on the client software when directed by
Help.aol.com.

Accessing
SysInfo
There are 4 methods of accessing SysInfo included in your learning log.
Record the steps for each of the methods on the following pages.
NOTE: Some members may have older versions of system information. If
the member launches sys info but the screen doesn’t look like what you
are describing, they may have an older version of SysInfo.

Method 1 The easiest way to access SysInfo is shown below.

Step Action
1 Right-click the AOL icon in the Systray.

2 Select the System Information option.
Continued on next page
SysInfo
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 3

SysInfo, Continued

Method 2 There is another method to access SysInfo, in case the SysTray icon is
unavailable.

Step Action
1 Click the Start button.
2 Select the All Programs menu option.
3 Select the America Online/AOL menu option.
4 Select the AOL System Information menu option.

Continued on next page
SysInfo
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 4

SysInfo, Continued

Method 3 The third way to access SysInfo is recommended only in cases where it is
impossible to launch SysInfo by either of the methods listed above. This is
because launching the tool this way will increase call time, as the member
will need to be walked through typing the path in the Start > Run
command line, and if they mistype something, it could take a long time to
fix the error.
The steps are different for Windows XP and Vista.

Step Action – FOR WINDOWS XP
1 Click the Start button.
2 Select the Run command.
3 Type SINF and click the OK button.


Step Action – FOR WINDOWS VISTA
1 Click the Start button
2 Select All Programs.
3 Select Accessories.
4 Select Command Prompt.
5 Type sinf and hit ENTER.
Continued on next page
SysInfo
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 5

SysInfo, Continued

Method 4 The fourth way requires the use of AOL, offline or online.
Step Action
1 Click the Help Menu and select the About America Online/AOL
option.


2 Type CTRL-H. The About AOL Panel displays.


3 Click the Start SysInfo Tool button.

Continued on next page
SysInfo
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 6

SysInfo, Continued

Co-
Navigating
to SysInfo
It is important for you to be able to navigate to SysInfo, but you must
also be able to help the member get there. Your facilitator will lead you
through an activity to practice co-navigating with a “member” to access
SysInfo.

Exploring
SysInfo
Your facilitator will conduct an activity where you will work with SysInfo to
gain understanding and experience. Answer the questions below and on
the following pages.
1. The SysInfo screen defaults to the System Information tab.
What OS, Anti-Spyware, and Web Browsers does your
computer use?

2. What are the names of the tabs in SysInfo?


3. What function can you use to add or remove programs from
the computer? Where is that function located in SysInfo?

4. Where is Network Control Panel located and what does it do?

5. Help.aol.com may suggest accessing MSCONFIG in order to
resolve a member’s issue with clients other than AOL Desktop.
Where can you access MSCONFIG in SysInfo? What are the
names of the six tabs in MSCONFIG?



Continued on next page
SysInfo
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 7

SysInfo, Continued

Exploring
SysInfo
(Continued)
6. Click the Errors tab. What does this tab show? If you are
looking for an error that occurred as a result of using a
particular program or at a certain time what feature allows you
to do this?

7. Click the Utilities tab, you will find a number of functions
that allow access to familiarize the member with his
computer. Which utility would you use to identify what
hardware the computer has? What device(s) is listed under
the Disk Drives category?

8. Open Task Manager. What tabs display in the window?
What applications show in the task list?

9. Locate One-Click Fixes beneath the AOL Utilities header.
Since Help.aol.com often suggests a One-Click Fix (OCF)
for several issues, run the OCF for Clear IE Cache, and Set
Cache Size. Take note of what you see below, and be
prepared to discuss with the class.


Continued on next page
SysInfo
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 8

SysInfo, Continued

Using
Help.aol.com
& SysInfo –
Part 1
Imagine that a member calls and complains that his PFC is missing. He
uses AOL 9.0 on Windows XP. Practice searching for and accessing the
contact reason and further information in the Voyager knowledgebase.
1. What contact reason would you use in Help.aol.com to
troubleshoot Mr. Johnson’s issue?

2. Why is it important the member is not signed on as a guest?

3. What is the resolution suggested by Help.aol.com?


4. Using System Information tab Utilities, identify 2 Utilities in
the Browser section, 2 Utilities in the Network section, and 1 in
the Operating System section.


Continued on next page
SysInfo
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 9

SysInfo, Continued

Using
Help.aol.com
& SysInfo –
Part 1
Another member calls because he is experiencing a problem with 9.0 VR.
He says it seems to freeze while he is online and ceases to function any
further. In this section, you will practice searching for and accessing the
contact reason and further information in the Voyager knowledgebase.
1. Find the correct contact reason for the member’s issue in
Help.aol.com. What contact reason did you select? Why?

2. Answer no to the question CCC ACTION Does a relevant issue
appear at AOL® Keyword: Status. Why is it important that the
member’s computer meet the system requirements? How does
Help.aol.com instruct you to determine if the computer meets
system requirements?

Use the answers below to locate the Run Quick Restore to refresh the
client solution.
 Did you notice a McAfee VirusScan Online update initialize when the
AOL software froze? No
 Are you able to access any Websites? Yes
 What version of ACS is being used? 4
1. Open the Run Quick Restore instruction guide. What is the
method to run Quick Restore?

2. Follow the instructions in the instruction guide to complete a
Quick Restore on your computer. When it is finished, launch
AOL. What changes do you see?

3. Fail the Run Quick Restore resolution. Review the instruction
guide for the next resolution. How does Help.aol.com instruct
you to use SysInfo?



SysInfo
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 10

SysInfo, Continued

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
 Access and utilize the SysInfo tool to perform tasks when directed by
Help.aol.com.
 Effectively co-navigate to help members perform troubleshooting
steps.



Install / Uninstall AOL
Participant Guide
















Revised: January 17, 2012
Install / Uninstall AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 17, 2012
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction Members can obtain the AOL software in many ways including from a CD
Rom or downloading from download.aol.com. In this section, you will
learn about the process for installing and uninstalling the AOL software
after download. You will also practice co-navigating the process with a
partner and practice using help.aol.com flows which involve
install/uninstall.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
 Explain the steps for installing/uninstalling AOL software and setting
up a connection.

Install / Uninstall AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 17, 2012
Page 2


Install/Uninstall AOL

AOL
Software
Compatibility
The chart below shows the recommended AOL software for each
Operating System.
XP VISTA 7
AOL 8.0 and above AOL 9.0 VR
AOL 9.0 VR, 9.1, 9.5,
9.7 and above


System
Requirements
Different versions of the AOL software have different system
requirements. The system requirements for 9.5 and 9.7 are included in
the chart below.

AOL 9.5 AOL 9.7
Operating
System
Windows XP, Vista or 7
Windows XP, Vista, 7 or Windows
8 Beta

Browser IE 6.0 or higher for XP, 7.0 or
higher for Vista, and 8.0 or higher
for WIN 7
Internet Explorer 7.0 or higher
(including IE10 Beta)

Processor Minimum of 233 Megahertz for XP,
1 GHz for Vista or WIN 7
266 MHz Pentium-class processor
or higher

RAM 128 MB for XP, 512 MB for Vista 1
GB for WIN 7 (32-bit) or 2GB for
WIN 7 (64-bit)
128MB RAM
Free Hard
disk Space
230 MB
250MB free disk space

Connection 28.8 Kbps or faster modem, or
other internet connection
28.8 Kbps or faster modem, or
other Internet connection
Continued on next page
Install / Uninstall AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 17, 2012
Page 3


Install/Uninstall AOL, Continued

AOL 9.x
Installation
Process
AOL 9.7 provides a streamlined installation experience. The table below
outlines the steps that customers will go through to install the software.

Step Action
1 Double click on the AOL Desktop 9.7 Install icon on the desktop.

2 Before starting the installation, the user has the option to shut down all AOL
applications. If the customer needs to go back and shut down running programs,
they will select “Quit Install.” Otherwise they will click “Continue Install.”
Selecting “Quit Install” closes the installer.

Continued on next page
Install / Uninstall AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 17, 2012
Page 4


Install/Uninstall AOL, Continued

AOL 9.x Installation Process (continued)

Step Action
3 Once the customer continues the installation process, they will be prompted to
either upgrade their existing version or to install a new version of the software.
 Upgrade Existing Version – transfers existing data from previous versions of
the AOL software, excluding AOL Desktop 10.x. Using the drop down menu,
customers must select the version of the client from which they would like to
transfer their data.
 Install New Version – installs a “clean” copy of the software with no data
transferred from existing versions of the software.

Continued on next page
Install / Uninstall AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 17, 2012
Page 5


Install/Uninstall AOL, Continued

AOL 9.x Installation Process (continued)

Step Action
4 If a specific version of the AOL software is not visible in the drop down menu,
customers can browse to find the version from which they would like to transfer
data.

Continued on next page
Install / Uninstall AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 17, 2012
Page 6


Install/Uninstall AOL, Continued

AOL 9.x Installation Process (continued)

Step Action
5 In the next window of the installer, users select their preferred software settings.
This includes:
 Setting AOL as the default for:
Email
Web browsing
Search provider
Homepage
 Installing the AOL Toolbars for Internet Explorer and Firefox

Continued on next page
Install / Uninstall AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 17, 2012
Page 7


Install/Uninstall AOL, Continued

AOL 9.x Installation Process (continued)

Step Action
6 The next window confirms the options selected by the user and allows the user to
choose the location for the software to be installed.

Continued on next page
Install / Uninstall AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 17, 2012
Page 8


Install/Uninstall AOL, Continued

AOL 9.x Installation Process (continued)

Step Action
7 User should select the location for installation and then click the “Install Now”
button.

Continued on next page
Install / Uninstall AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 17, 2012
Page 9


Install/Uninstall AOL, Continued

AOL 9.x Installation Process (continued)

Step Action
8 As the installation progresses, users will see a progress bar, as shown below.

Continued on next page
Install / Uninstall AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 17, 2012
Page 10


Install/Uninstall AOL, Continued

AOL 9.x Installation Process (continued)

Step Action
9 After software installs, it will automatically launch and open the AOL software.
The user must then indicate whether they are a:
 New User
 Existing member, or
 Guest

Continued on next page
Install / Uninstall AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 17, 2012
Page 11


Install/Uninstall AOL, Continued

AOL 9.x Installation Process (continued)

Step Action
10 Selecting either New User or Existing Member brings up the window shown
below. Users must choose to either create a new account or use their existing
AOL Screen Name. Selecting “Create a new AOL account” leads the user to the
registration path, which is reviewed in the next section of this module.

Continued on next page
Install / Uninstall AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 17, 2012
Page 12


Install/Uninstall AOL, Continued

AOL 9.x Installation Process (continued)

Step Action
11 Selecting “Use your existing AOL Screen Name” allows the user to enter their
screen Name and password to access their existing account.

12 Selecting Guest allows users to enter their screen name and password to log in
to AOL as a guest.

Continued on next page
Install / Uninstall AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 17, 2012
Page 13


Install/Uninstall AOL, Continued


Registration
Path
If the user chooses to Create a new AOL Account, they will be directed
through the registration path outlined below.
Step Action
1 On the first screen, the customer indicates whether they are a dial up or high
speed user and then the most appropriate price plans are presented on the page
for that type of account. Customers then click the orange “Get It Now” button
for the plan of their choice.

Continued on next page
Install / Uninstall AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 17, 2012
Page 14


Install/Uninstall AOL, Continued

Registration Path (continued)
2 If the customer selects the “View Benefit Details” link below each offer, a
window with additional price plan details will be launched. The customer can
then click the “Get it Now” button or close the window.

3 The customer is next prompted to add their first and last names and to pick a
user name and password. Then they click the Next button to continue.

Continued on next page
Install / Uninstall AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 17, 2012
Page 15


Install/Uninstall AOL, Continued

Registration Path (continued)
4 The customer is then prompted to enter their account information including
address and billing details. If they would like to use a credit card as the method
of payment, then they click the Submit Order button to continue.

5 If the customer clicks the “Choose a different payment method” link, they will
be prompted to select the method of payment they would like to use.

Continued on next page
Install / Uninstall AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 17, 2012
Page 16


Install/Uninstall AOL, Continued

Registration Path (continued)
6 If Checking Account is selected as the method of payment, then the customer is
prompted to enter their account details and must type “I Agree” prior to
submitting the order to indicate their agreement to the terms provided on this
screen.

Continued on next page
Install / Uninstall AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 17, 2012
Page 17


Install/Uninstall AOL, Continued

Registration Path (continued)
7 If Phone Bill is selected as the method of payment, the customer is prompted to
enter their account details and must type “I Agree” prior to submitting the order
to indicate their agreement to the terms provided on this screen.

Continued on next page
Install / Uninstall AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 17, 2012
Page 18


Install/Uninstall AOL, Continued

Registration Path (continued)
8 A confirmation screen then appears with a review of details for the selected
price plan, as well as additional information on conditions and terms. The user
selects Next to continue.

Continued on next page
Install / Uninstall AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 17, 2012
Page 19

Install/Uninstall AOL, Continued

Registration Path (continued)
9 Finally the customer views the final registration window that provides the user
name and password selected by the customer. The customer also has the option
to click the “Go to MyBenefits” link to view more details on the benefits included
with their price plan.


Install / Uninstall AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 17, 2012
Page 20


Identifying AOL Files & Folders

Introduction It is very important to know some of the key files and folders where AOL
installs. This is helpful when troubleshooting installation and other issues
for a member.

Default
Installation
Directory
AOL 9.x clients install into the Program Files folder on the C: drive (root
directory) of a computer. This occurs if you do not change the default
folder options.
All files and subfolders are installed into the AOL 9.x folder. AOL is one of
the few programs that will not overwrite itself if additional copies are
installed. This means that installing AOL again will place a second copy in
a folder named AOL 9.xa. Installing a third copy will place AOL into a
folder named AOL 9.xb, etc.

AOL
Executable
The aol.exe file resides in the AOL 9.x root directory. It is the main
executable file where all AOL program icons point.
A shortcut to Uninstall AOL also exists in this folder. It is labeled
Uninstall, but you should use the Add/Remove Control Panel in Windows
to accomplish this task.

Common AOL
Folder
Certain files are installed to a common directory in the Windows
Operating System. The location of this folder depends on which version of
Windows you are using, for example:

OS Direct Path
Windows 98/98se/ME C:\Windows\All Users\Application Data\AOL...
Windows 2000/XP C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application
Data\AOL...
Vista C:\ProgramData\AOL
Continued on next page
Install / Uninstall AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 17, 2012
Page 21

Identifying AOL Files & Folders, Continued

Showing
Hidden Files
The folders contained in the above locations may be hidden. The folders
and files on some AOL CDs are also hidden. In order to view hidden files
in Windows 2000 or XP, follow the steps below.

Step Action
1 Double-click the My Computer icon from the Windows
desktop.
2 From the menu bar, select Tools > Folder Options > View
tab.
3 From the Advanced Settings, select the Show hidden files
and folders option and click the OK button.

Folder
Contents
Once you have enabled the viewing of hidden files and folders, there is a
subfolder that matches the name of the folder for your AOL software.
For example, if the AOL 9.0 program is installed to C:\Program Files\AOL
9.0, you see a subfolder named C_AOL 9.0.
The Organize, IDB, and Backup folders are located within this subfolder.
Similar files and folders exist in older versions of AOL. Using the path
information from the previous page, and the screen below, find these files
on your computer.

Continued on next page
Install / Uninstall AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 17, 2012
Page 22

Identifying AOL Files & Folders, Continued

Explore
Default
Installation
Directory
Within the software folder, there will be a folder for each installed version
of AOL. Write a description of what the folder contains and what the folder
is used for in the chart below.

Folder Contents Used for:
Organize

Backup

Spool

Download

TOD (Tool
On Demand)

Install / Uninstall AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 17, 2012
Page 23

Knowledge Check

Introduction Work through the activity below with a partner to practice what you have
learned about AOL CDs.

Activity 1. What is the purpose of the Download folder?




2. What is the Organize folder, and why is it important?

3. If a member has trouble printing, what files might you need to
delete? What is the Path to that folder in Windows XP?

4. What are the paths to the two main AOL folders (if the member
has not specified their own locations)?

5. Where is the aol.exe file located? Why is it important to know
the location of this file?


Continued on next page
Install / Uninstall AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 17, 2012
Page 24

Knowledge Check, Continued

Activity,
Continued
Navigate to your IDB folder to answer the following questions
6. What is the size of your Main.idx file?

7. What is the path to the IDB folder?

Navigate to your Organize folder to answer the following questions.
8. How large is your Personal Storage Settings file (the one with
no extension)?

9. On the computer you currently use, what is the path to your
organize folder?

10. What is the path to the backup organize file?



Install / Uninstall AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 17, 2012
Page 25

Help.aol.com Exploration

Uninstall
Process
Use the space below to take notes about the uninstall process.










Install/
Uninstall
Exploration
You will have the opportunity to explore the install and uninstall articles in
help.aol.com. The purpose of this activity to become more familiar with
the help.aol.com articles related to install/uninstall, the questions asked
and resolutions provided within the articles. Use the space below to take
notes as you explore these articles.















Continued on next page
Install / Uninstall AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 17, 2012
Page 26

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
 Explain the steps for installing/uninstalling AOL software and setting
up a connection.


Launching AOL Software
Participant Guide
















Revised: March 22, 2012
Launching AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 22, 2012
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction Participant introduction to the module.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
• Explain features and settings related to launching AOL.
• Locate and utilize Help.aol.com articles to troubleshoot top contact
drivers related to launching the AOL software.
• Effectively co-navigate to help members perform troubleshooting steps.

Launching AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 22, 2012
Page 2


Launching AOL

AOL
Shortcuts
AOL establishes shortcuts in many different places on a computer.
Shortcuts are pointers that are usually represented by a small picture or
object and point directly to the application being launched.
AOL typically installs a shortcut in the following places:
• The Desktop
• The Quick Launch bar (this is the bar containing small icons next to the
Start Menu)
• The top of the Start Menu
• The Programs Group (AOL creates its own group)
• The Systray


Jigsaw
Activity –
Launching
AOL
Your facilitator will conduct an activity that provides time to explore
articles in Help.aol.com related to launching the AOL software. Use the
space below and on the following page to take notes.







Launching AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 22, 2012
Page 3

Launching AOL, Continued

Jigsaw
Activity –
Launching
AOL






















Launching AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 22, 2012
Page 4

Exploring Help.aol.com for Launch Issues

Launching
AOL -
Help.aol.com
Exploration
You will have the opportunity to explore the articles in Help.aol.com
related to launching AOL. The purpose of this activity is to become more
familiar with the Help.aol.com articles related to this topic, the questions
asked and resolutions provided within the articles. Use the space below to
take notes.



























Launching AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 22, 2012
Page 5

Launching AOL, Continued

Co-
Navigating
for Launch
Issues
You must be able to walk a member through the steps in Help.aol.com
related to a Launch Issue. Your facilitator will lead you through a role-play
activity to provide time for you to practice co-navigating through the
steps. Record any notes below.

Launching AOL
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 22, 2012
Page 6

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
• Explain features and settings related to launching AOL.
• Locate and utilize Help.aol.com articles to troubleshoot contact drivers
related to launching the AOL software. Effectively co-navigate to help
members perform troubleshooting steps.



Browser Basics & Troubleshooting
Participant Guide
















Revised: March 20, 2012
Browser Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 20, 2012
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction Participant introduction to the module.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
• Define common vocabulary/terms related to web browsers.
• Use features & functionality of common browsers.
• Perform common troubleshooting functions within common browsers.
• Locate and utilize help articles to resolve common contact drivers
related to web browsers.


Browser Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 20, 2012
Page 2


Intro to Web Browsers

Introduction A web browser is a free software program that is used to access and view
content on web pages. Browsers allow users to interact with web sites
without knowing and inputting complex code or commands. Browsers
translate the code that forms each web page into images, text, videos,
links, etc. for users to view and use.

Common
Browsers
Below is a list of commonly used web browsers and their related
platforms.

Browser Icon Platform
Internet
Explorer

Windows
Mozilla
Firefox

Windows & MAC
Google
Chrome

Windows & MAC
Safari

Most commonly used on MAC, version 5 also
available for Windows

AOL Client
Browser
The AOL Desktop software (sometimes referred to as the internal
browser) uses the Microsoft Internet Explorer installed on the computer
as the default Web browser. You may encounter members using an older
version of AOL, which means they are likely using an older version of
Internet Explorer. Consult help articles for information on troubleshooting
older versions.
When using IE through AOL, you are taking advantage of extra features
and functionality provided by AOL. Those extra features include Parental
Controls, data compression, and TopSpeed. The AOL client browser also
provides AOL's Web Pop-Up Controls and Password Vault functionality.
These are features you won’t see when using IE separately from the AOL
client. The Favorites saved on AOL and those saved on Internet Explorer
are separate.
Continued on next page
Browser Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 20, 2012
Page 3

Intro to Web Browsers, Continued

Common
Features/
Functions
Every browser features a toolbar that allow the user to perform common
functions. Review the list of common features/functions below and note
where these features are located for each web browser.
# Feature Description
1 Title Bar At the top of most windows; includes title of the current web page
2 Forward/Back Navigation buttons to move forward or back to the previous page
3 Address Bar Box where user enters a web site address
4 Refresh button The arrow button refreshes or reloads the current page.
5 Search Bar Box where user enters words or phrases for which they would like to
search the internet
6 Favorites/
Bookmarks
List of websites marked by the user. Bookmark allows user to go
directly to that page
7 Tabbed
Browsing
A tab is opened for each web page that a user has open
simultaneously. (Not available in all browsers)

Internet Explorer

Mozilla Firefox

Google Chrome

Apple Safari

Continued on next page
Browser Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 20, 2012
Page 4

Intro to Web Browsers, Continued

Common
Terms and
Definitions
The chart below includes common terms that are used when talking about
web browsers. It is important for you to understand these terms in order
to troubleshoot issues as well as to provide explanations while working
with members.

Term Definition
Add-ons

Active X

Browsing
History

Bookmarks

Cache

Cookie

HTML

FTP

Continued on next page
Browser Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 20, 2012
Page 5

Intro to Web Browsers, Continued

Common Terms and Definitions (continued)

Term Definition
HTTP

hyperlink

IMAP

IP Address

Java /
Javascript

Megabyte

Plug-in

URL

SSL


Browser Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 20, 2012
Page 6


Troubleshooting for Web Browsers

Introduction When helping members with their questions and concerns re: email, you
will utilize some common troubleshooting steps, regardless of browser.
This section will introduce you to some of those steps and will give you
some insight into how to perform the steps within different browsers.
Keep in mind that the help articles will contain step by step instructions
and screen shots for these.

Common
Actions/
Solutions
Below are some common actions or solutions that you will use with
members when providing email assistance. You will explore the steps for
each of these in the next section of this module.

Action / Solution Purpose
Determine Browser Version

Used to find out what version of a particular browser is
being used by the member. Important because
troubleshooting steps depending on browser AND version.
Clear cookies, cache, history
& footprints

Clears out the files stored in the temporary internet files
folder. Includes list of websites you have visited, cookies,
information you've entered into web forms (for example,
your name and address), website passwords, info in
shopping carts, and other temporarily saved information.
Links and favorites will not be deleted. Would be used if
member is unable to log in, mailbox isn’t rendered properly,
hangs or gets stuck when logging in or opening email, error
message received when loading a webpage
Reset Web Settings

Return browser settings for the web to the default state.
Could be use if member disabled cookies which prevent
them from remaining logged in to aol.com or email when
they re-open browser. Could also be used if member can’t
find the setting to enable cookies or as a general last
solution to troubleshoot problems with rendering the
mailbox
Continued on next page
Browser Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 20, 2012
Page 7

Troubleshooting for Web Browsers, Continued

Common Actions/ Solutions (continued)

Action / Solution Purpose
Change Privacy Settings
(Internet Explorer)

Changes levels of privacy and permissions for website
access. Used to enable cookies to make sure the member
doesn’t have to log in every time they go to AOL Mail. Also
cookies are recommended to be enabled to experience the
entire aol.com and AOL mail site fully.
Disable pop-up blocking

Used to change settings related to whether pop up windows
are permitted to appear. Useful in cases where browser is
inadvertently blocking pop up features that user wants to
view, such as when clicking on the Facebook or Twitter icon
from Project Phoenix.
Enable Java applet scripting
and cookies
Used to enable the browser to use java scripting and
cookies from a given site in order to view/use the site fully.

Browser
Troubleshoot
-ing
Exploration
Your facilitator will lead you through a hands-on activity that gives you
the opportunity to review help articles on the troubleshooting
actions/solutions reviewed above. You will also have the opportunity to
perform these steps within different web browsers.
Use the space below and on the following page to record notes about
similarities and differences between the steps in each browser. Be
prepared to discuss and demonstrate your findings.

Continued on next page
Browser Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 20, 2012
Page 8

Troubleshooting for Web Browsers, Continued

Browser Troubleshooting Exploration (continued)


Browser Basics
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 20, 2012
Page 9

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
• Define common vocabulary/terms related to web browsers.
• Use features & functionality of common browsers.
• Perform common troubleshooting functions within common browsers.
• Locate and utilize help articles to resolve common contact drivers
related to web browsers.


General AOL Troubleshooting
Participant Guide
















Revised: January 13, 2012
General AOL Troubleshooting
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 13, 2012
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction As a ULV agent you will help members with general AOL questions, such
as how to use the parental control features, manage their screen names,
block pop-ups, use the AOL calendar or just modify settings and
preferences. During this module you will review the features of each of
these as well as the help.aol.com articles you will use to help answer
basic questions about these features.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
 Explain the features and settings of the following AOL features:
Parental controls
Popup blockers
Welcome screen
Screen names
AOL settings and preferences
 Demonstrate how to locate and utilize help.aol.com articles assist
members with these general AOL features.
 Identify issues that are within and outside of the scope of support for
a ULV agent.


General AOL Troubleshooting
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 13, 2012
Page 2

Parental Controls

Introduction AOL's Parental Controls allow members to help create a safe online
environment for their children. Parents can control access to the following
online features:
 Web browsing
 IM and email communication
 Time limits
Parents can also receive an activity report that allows them to monitor
their child's online activity. Working with a partner, go to
parentalcontrols.aol.com to learn about these features.

Jigsaw
Activity
Your facilitator will conduct an activity that provides time to explore
articles in Help.aol.com related to the Parental Controls. Use the space
below to take notes.





















General AOL Troubleshooting
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 13, 2012
Page 3

Pop-up Blockers

Introduction Pop-up blocker functionality allows members to control the types of pop-
up messages they receive. This feature can be customized to block pop-
ups from specific sites or to block them all.

Jigsaw
Activity
Your facilitator will conduct an activity that provides time to explore
articles in Help.aol.com related to the pop-up blockers. Use the space
below to take notes.

























General AOL Troubleshooting
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 13, 2012
Page 4

Welcome Screen

Introduction The Welcome Screen is one of the first thing a member sees when they
sign into the AOL Client software or AOL.com. This provides a variety of
valuable information and can be customized to fit the specific needs of the
member. Working with a partner, take a minute to explore the
customizable option of the Welcome Screen.

Jigsaw
Activity
Your facilitator will conduct an activity that provides time to explore
articles in Help.aol.com related to the Welcome Screen. Use the space
below to take notes.

























General AOL Troubleshooting
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 13, 2012
Page 5

AOL Calendar

Introduction The AOL Calendar provides member with a great resource to keep track of
important appointments, birthdays, and other special events. Once an
event is entered members can request a reminder email so that they
don't forget that appointment or special day. Members can also subscribe
to other calendars, such as family members to keep track of their
schedules.

Jigsaw
Activity
Your facilitator will conduct an activity that provides time to explore
articles in Help.aol.com related to the AOL Calendar. Use the space below
to take notes.

























General AOL Troubleshooting
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 13, 2012
Page 6

Screen Names

Introduction Members can create different screen names for different purposes (for
example, one to use with friends one to use for business or they can
create separate screen names for each member of their family). Each
account can have up to 7 screen names with no extra charge.

Jigsaw
Activity
Your facilitator will conduct an activity that provides time to explore
articles in Help.aol.com related to the screen names. Use the space below
to take notes.

























General AOL Troubleshooting
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 13, 2012
Page 7

AOL Settings and Preferences

Introduction AOL provides members with a variety of preferences and settings that
they can use to customize their online experience. Working with a
partner, navigate to discover.aol.com and select the Settings link to
explore the different ways members can customize their AOL experience.

Jigsaw
Activity
Your facilitator will conduct an activity that provides time to explore
articles in Help.aol.com related to the AOL settings and preferences. Use
the space below to take notes.

























General AOL Troubleshooting
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 13, 2012
Page 8

Activity

In Scope vs.
Out of Scope
Working with a partner, review the following scenarios to determine if
they are in scope for you to troubleshoot or if you would need to transfer
to TLV for assistance.
1. How do I subscribe to a calendar?
2. My AOL Toolbars are gone.
3. I would like to add a shortcut to AOL calendar onto my toolbar.
4. Calendar will not load correctly.
5. How do I customize Parental Controls?
6. I can’t delete this screename.
7. My username includes personal information; how do I modify it?
8. Screen name is missing from the Sign On screen
9. Repairing the AOL Parental Controls software
10. When I upgraded I lost all my favorite places. What happened to them
and how do I get them back?
11. My ticker symbol isn’t on the screen anymore.
12. Whenever I download a file it simply opens the same file I had opened
earlier. I can't get to the new one.
In-Scope for ULV Out of Scope for ULV




General AOL Troubleshooting
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 13, 2012
Page 9

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
 Explain the features and settings of the following AOL features:
Parental controls
Popup blockers
Welcome screen
Screen names
AOL settings and preferences
 Demonstrate how to locate and utilize help.aol.com articles assist
members with these general AOL features.
 Identify issues that are within and outside of the scope of support for
a ULV agent.

Personal Filing Cabinet (PFC)
Participant Guide
















Revised: March 23, 2012
Personal Filing Cabinet
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 23, 2012
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction Participant introduction to the module.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
• Explain features and settings for the Personal Filing Cabinet.
• Locate and utilize Help.aol.com articles to troubleshoot top call drivers
in the tech queue.
• Effectively co-navigate to help members perform troubleshooting steps.

Personal Filing Cabinet
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 23, 2012
Page 2


Personal Filing Cabinet

Jigsaw
Activity –
Personal
Filing
Cabinet
Your facilitator will conduct an activity that provides time to explore
articles in Help.aol.com related to the Personal Filing Cabinet. Use the
space below to take notes.





















Continued on next page
Personal Filing Cabinet
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 23, 2012
Page 3

Personal Filing Cabinet, Continued

PFC Top 10
Activity
Create a TOP 10 list of things to know about the PFC, based on the
information learned in the previous activity.

AOL Personal Filing Cabinet: Top 10 Things to Know
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Continued on next page
Personal Filing Cabinet
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 23, 2012
Page 4

Personal Filing Cabinet, Continued

PFC -
Help.aol.com
Exploration
You will have the opportunity to explore additional PFC articles in
Help.aol.com. The purpose of this activity is to become more familiar with
the Help.aol.com articles related to issues with the Personal Filing
Cabinet, the questions asked and resolutions provided within the articles.
Use the space below to take notes.


























Continued on next page
Personal Filing Cabinet
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 23, 2012
Page 5

Personal Filing Cabinet, Continued

Co-
Navigating
for PFC
Issues
You must be able to walk a member through the steps in Help.aol.com
related to a PFC Issue. Your facilitator will lead you through a role-play
activity to provide time for you to practice co-navigating through the
steps. Record any notes below.

Personal Filing Cabinet
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 23, 2012
Page 6

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
• Explain features and settings for the Personal Filing Cabinet.
• Locate and utilize Help.aol.com articles to troubleshoot top call drivers
in the tech queue.
• Effectively co-navigate to help members perform troubleshooting steps.

Email
Participant Guide
















Revised: March 7, 2012
Email
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 7, 2012
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction Participant introduction to the module.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
• Provide general information about AOL email features.
• Explain how to access AOL mail using mobile devices.
• Locate and utilize Help.aol.com articles to troubleshoot top contact
drivers.

Email
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 7, 2012
Page 2


AOL Usernames & Mail

Scavenger
Hunt Activity
Your facilitator will conduct an activity that provides time to explore
articles in Help.aol.com related AOL screen names/usernames, mailbox
styles and mail types. Record the answers to the questions below.

What is a screen name?





What characters can be used to create an AOL username?






How many usernames are allowed per account?






What are AOL’s username categories?






Continued on next page
Email
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 7, 2012
Page 3


AOL Usernames & Mail, Continued

Scavenger
Hunt Activity
- continued
Your facilitator will conduct an activity that provides time to explore
articles in Help.aol.com related AOL screen names/usernames, mailbox
styles and mail types. Record the answers to the questions below.

What are the two types of mailbox styles members can have?



How can a member switch to the other style mailbox?





What are the storage limits for email in the unified inbox and new/old
inbox?







What is AOL Official Mail, Priority Mail & Certified Mail?








Email
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 7, 2012
Page 4


AOL Usernames & Mail, Continued

Accessing
Email on
Mobile
Devices
Earlier in your training you learned about accessing AOL mail using the
AOL Desktop software and with Project Phoenix and AOL Mail on the Web.
Our members can also access their email with mobile devices such as a
smart phone or tablet computer.
POP3 and IMAP are two different protocols used to access email. POP3
and IMAP function very differently and each has its own advantages.
Describe how each works in the chart below.
POP 3 IMAP



Setting Up
Email on
Mobile
Devices
Many devices offer applications that allow the user to access email
without using a web browser. Some use IMAP and some use POP3. Each
one is configured differently but use the same server settings, which are
provided in help.aol.com. Record the server settings that must be used to
set up a device to use IMAP or POP3 below.





The steps for setting up email on different mobile devices can be found in
help.aol.com, typically by searching for the type of device.

Email
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 7, 2012
Page 5


Email Troubleshooting

Help.aol.com
Exploration –
Receiving
Email
You will have the opportunity to explore additional articles in
Help.aol.com. The purpose of this activity is to become more familiar with
the Help.aol.com articles related to email issues, the questions asked and
resolutions provided within the articles. Use the space below to take
notes.























AAGI Coaches have access to an additional tool, called AAGI, which may allow
them to restore missing email or address book contacts. You will see a
reminder in the CCC Only content in relevant help articles that reminds
you to consult your coach for assistance.
Continued on next page
Email
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 7, 2012
Page 6


Email Troubleshooting, Continued

Help.aol.com
Exploration –
Sending
Email
You will have the opportunity to explore additional articles in
Help.aol.com. The purpose of this activity is to become more familiar with
the Help.aol.com articles related to email issues, the questions asked and
resolutions provided within the articles. Use the space below to take
notes.



























Email
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised March 7, 2012
Page 7

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
• Provide general information about AOL email features.
• Explain how to access AOL mail using mobile devices.
• Locate and utilize Help.aol.com articles to troubleshoot top contact
drivers.


General AOL Troubleshooting
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised January 13, 2012
Page 10



Remote Desktop
Participant Guide














Revised: October 18, 2011
Remote Desktop
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 1

Module Overview

Introduction Bomgar provides software that simplifies technical support by letting
consultants remotely control computers over the internet or network.
With Bomgar, you can access a member’s computer virtually, with their
permission and see what they see and/or control their computer to
provide support.
A pilot was conducted to test the results of using remote desktop support
within the AOL Tech Queue. It was determined that seeing the screen
helps you resolve the member’s issue efficiently, which ultimately
decreases Average Handle Time and improves Member Satisfaction in
most cases. The use of Remote Desktop access will help you reach a first-
time fix on more calls, which will decrease the number of repeat calls by
members.

Learning
Objectives
At the end of this module you will be able to:
 Effectively use BOMGAR software to conduct remote access sessions
with members for troubleshooting.
 Provide explanations/answer general questions about remote access
to members.
 Describe the compliance guidelines for using remote desktop access.

Remote Desktop
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 2

Module Overview, Continued

Accessing
BOMGAR
To access BOMGAR, go to Start> All Programs> BOMGAR> BOMGAR
Representative Console.

You will open the BOMGAR software at the start of your shift and leave it
open on your desktop for quick access when needed.
NOTE: If the Bomgar software is not listed under the Start menu or on
the desktop, you can download it at http://remotesupport.aol.com/login.

Logging In You should log in to BOMGAR when you are ready to conduct a remote
session. In the BOMGAR login window, enter your Username (CDID) and
Password. Then click LOGIN.



Logging Out You should log out of BOMGAR when you are not conducting a remote
session to ensure availability of the tool for other agents conducting
sessions. If you are logged in to the BOMGAR tool, but are idle for a
period of 30 minutes, you will automatically be logged out.
Continued on next page
Remote Desktop
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 3

Module Overview, Continued

BOMGAR
Main Window
When the BOMGAR software launches, you will see the window below. The
features that you will utilize are numbered in the screen shot below.
Record a description of each numbered item in the chart.

Part Function
1



2



3



4



5



6




Remote Desktop
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 4

Module Overview, Continued

When to
Start a
Remote
Session
You will recommend conducting a remote support session with a member
on any call where the member has broadband connectivity and the
troubleshooting steps involve actions to be completed on the member’s
computer. You must obtain the member’s verbal permission before
initiating a session.
EXAMPLE: “I would like to access your computer remotely so I can
perform the troubleshooting steps to fix your issue. Is that OK with you?”
Members may have additional questions about remote access, which are
reviewed later in training.
NOTE: You should not initiate a remote support session for actions that do
not require use of/require only minimal use of the member’s computer,
such as a password reset.

Starting a
Session
To begin a session, click on Support on the top menu bar and select
Generate Session Key.

At this point, you should have the member go to
http://remotesupport.aol.com website to prepare for the remote session.
Continued on next page
Remote Desktop
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 5

Module Overview, Continued

Generate
Session Key
A window will open that includes the unique session key. Provide this key
to the member and have them enter it in the Session Key box on the
BOMGAR web site. You will also need to copy the session key and include
it in your Gandalf notes. Confirm that the member now sees the BOMGAR
page and have them enter the session key you provide into the box and
click then click Close.

CONSULTANT


MEMBER

Notice that the session key is only valid if the member enters the session
within 10 minutes. If, for some reason, you are not able to initiate the
session within that timeframe, the member will receive the error message
below and you will need to generate a new key.

Continued on next page
Remote Desktop
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 6

Module Overview, Continued

Member
Access to
Remote
Session
Explain that members will need to complete the following steps to
download the software and access the remote session.
NOTE: The software automatically uninstalls at the end of the session.

Step Action
1 After entering the Session Key, members will see a window that asks if they
would like to start a support session with you. Explain that the member should
click Yes.


2 As the software downloads, members will receive a series of prompts. Explain
to the member that the software is downloading and they should click on the
Run button each time it appears.


Continued on next page
Remote Desktop
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 7

Module Overview, Continued

Member Access to Remote Session (continued)

Step Action
3
After clicking RUN, the member will see a download progress bar. Explain that
the software takes a little time to download and that the member does not
need to do anything yet. On average, with a good broadband connection, this
will take less than 30 seconds.

4
Once the installation is complete, members will see a window with a link to the
Full Terms and Conditions.

Continued on next page
Remote Desktop
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 8

Module Overview, Continued

Start Screen
Sharing
Once the member is able to view the Terms & Conditions, you will see a
session appear in queue in the BOMGAR tool. Double-click the session to
activate the remote access process.

After double-clicking the session, you will see a new tab appear in the
BOMGAR console. Click the Start Screen Sharing button.
At the same time, the member will see a message in the window that
states that the consultant can now view and control their screen.
NOTE: For member on Windows Vista and Windows 7 or MAC, they may
be prompted to elevate their computer privileges to allow BOMGAR
access.
CONSULTANT

MEMBER

At this point you will be able to view the messages that the member sees
in the top right corner of the BOMGAR window. You will also see a list of
all actions taken until this point and the time at which they took place.


Remote Desktop
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 9

Using Remote Desktop Access

Overview You are now connected and able to remotely control the member’s
screen. The member will be able to watch as you move the mouse around
and perform actions on their computer. You can use the desktop icons
and start menu as if they are on your own desktop. This section will
provide information about some additional information provided within the
BOMGAR tool. There may be instances where accessing the information
through the tool can save you time and allow you to be more efficient.
NOTE: When using BOMGAR to remote into a MAC, you will notice that
some of the options differ.

Session
Information
On the right side of the BOMGAR window, you will see Session
Information. This shows you:
 The amount of time that the session has been in the queue/system.
 The IP Address for the member’s computer.
 Customer’s name.
 Platform

Continued on next page
Remote Desktop
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 10

Using Remote Desktop Access, Continued

Screen
Sharing
Toolbar
Below is a screen shot of the Screen Sharing Toolbar. The following chart
includes a description of each button.


Button Description

Start/Stop Sharing – button toggles between the two functions. If member
screen not currently shared, shows Start Sharing. If screen currently shared,
shows Stop Sharing

Toggle button to disable/enable control of mouse and keyboard

Refreshes the screen share window. In instances where the screen freezes or
is garbled, use this button to refresh

Adjusts the consultants view to match the actual size of the members display.
This can be used to identify issues regarding member complaints about display
size or when a member has a small screen resolution that makes it difficult to
view in BOMGAR.

Maximizes the display for consultants. When used, you can no longer see the
other options BOMGAR window as the screen is taken up with the member
view.
Continued on next page
Remote Desktop
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 11

Using Remote Desktop Access, Continued

Screen Sharing Toolbar (continued)

Button Description

Provides options for viewing the member’s screen. You will generally use the
Best Performance option. If the member connection is slow, you can switch to
low bandwidth. This will then remove the color from the screen, but improves
performance.



Virtual pointer - can be used to point out specific things in the screen for the
customer.

Allows you to see the remote mouse cursor full size, instead of as a small dot.
You can use this if they are having issues clicking on buttons, windows, etc….

Provides options for rebooting the computer. Generally you will use the Reboot
option, unless Help.aol.com indicates that you should reboot in Safe Mode.

After selecting an option, you will receive a confirmation message asking if you
are sure you want to restart the member’s computer. Click Yes to restart. The
remote support session will automatically reconnect after start up.


Continued on next page
Remote Desktop
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 12

Using Remote Desktop Access, Continued

Screen Sharing Toolbar (continued)

Button Description

Provides quick links to perform actions/open windows on the member’s
computer. The Control Panel option provides a list of additional options for
accessing specific areas of the control panel, as seen below.

Continued on next page
Remote Desktop
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 13

Using Remote Desktop Access, Continued

System Info
Tab
To view information about the member’s system, click on the System Info
tab in BOMGAR.


Then click the Start button.


You will now see 5 tabs related to System Information.


When you access the member’s system information, the action is
recorded in the right hand window of BOMGAR.

Continued on next page
Remote Desktop
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 14

Using Remote Desktop Access, Continued

Overview
Tab
The Overview tab includes information for the following categories which
can be used to confirm system information without the need to navigate
manually within the member’s system.
 General Information
 Memory
 Drives
 Processes
 Events
 Network

Continued on next page
Remote Desktop
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 15

Using Remote Desktop Access, Continued

Devices Tab The Devices tab includes information about the devices used by the
member without having to manually navigate within their system to find
the information.

Continued on next page
Remote Desktop
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 16

Using Remote Desktop Access, Continued

Processes
Tab
The Processes tab includes information that you would typically see if you
navigated manually to the Task Manager on the member’s computer.

Continued on next page
Remote Desktop
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 17

Using Remote Desktop Access, Continued

Events Tab The Events tab includes additional information about events that have
occurred on the member’s computer. This tab will rarely be used, as most
help.aol.com articles do not require this type of information.

Continued on next page
Remote Desktop
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 18

Using Remote Desktop Access, Continued

Programs
Tab
The Programs tab includes information about:
 Startup Programs
 Installed Programs
 Windows Updates
 Scheduled Tasks

Continued on next page
Remote Desktop
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 19

Using Remote Desktop Access, Continued

Additional
Features
BOMGAR has additional features/functionality that you will not use during
the Level 1 Pilot. This includes built in functionality for:
 Chatting with other technical support consultants. (You should
continue to use your regular AOL chat rooms to seek support while
working with members.)
 Transferring a support session to other technical support consultants.
(You will not transfer sessions to other consultants. Instead seek help
from your coach while continuing to work with member.)
 Send File directly to member. (Any file that you need for
troubleshooting should be available on an AOL website for download.
Please access the file from our website(s).

Remote Desktop
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 20

Using Remote Desktop Access, Continued

Stop Screen
Sharing
Once you have finished troubleshooting the member’s issue, you need to
first stop screen sharing by clicking the Stop Screen Sharing button. Once
you do this, you will no longer be able to view or control the member’s
computer.

NOTE: You are able to restart screen sharing at this point simply by
clicking the Start Screen Sharing button.


End Session To end the session and have the BOMGAR software automatically
removed from the member’s computer, you will need to click the Close
button at the top right corner of the BOMGAR window.

Then click End Session. The Member will receive notification that the
software has been removed and the computer can no longer be accessed.
CONSULTANT

MEMBER


Remote Desktop
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 21

Compliance/Legal Guidelines

Overview When you remote into a member’s computer, you are now performing the
steps that you would previously have requested the member perform.
While you perform these steps, you should still follow your CQI
Compliance guidelines. Also ensure that you provide a step-by-step
description of what you are doing to inform and educate the member. You
must still follow the troubleshooting steps included in Help.aol.com.
Also keep in mind that with remote access to a computer, you are able to
access the member’s personal property. You would not previously have
had access to this information while on the phone with the member. In
order to protect yourself and AOL from any potential legal implications,
you must comply with the guidelines reviewed below.

Permission
to Begin
Remote
Session
Before you initiate a remote desktop support session, you must get
permission from the member allowing you to access their computer.
EXAMPLE: “I would like to access your computer remotely so I can
perform the troubleshooting steps to fix your issue. Is that OK with you?”
Once the member agrees, you may begin the session and generate a
session key. In addition to this, the member will see a disclaimer on their
screen and will need to click “Accept” to continue.

Detailed
Documentation
Every action you take and/or change that you make on the member’s
system while connected remotely MUST be documented. You will
record a note in Gandalf indicating that you conducted a remote
support session and also include additional notes, following your
current process. In Gandalf you must notate:
 The Session Key
 The troubleshooting steps performed and results.
 Any old values that were changed and why they were changed.

EXAMPLES:
 Session Key AFG9762. Disabled startup items in MSConfig -
CONFIRMED. New settings were maintained.
 Session Key XHT1472. Changed homepage from www.cnn.com to
www.aol.com at member’s request.
Continued on next page
Remote Desktop
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 22

Compliance/Legal Guidelines, Continued

Notification
for Changing
Settings/
Values
If troubleshooting requires you to change any values or settings on the
member’s computer you must notify the member and explain what you
need to do prior to performing the steps.

Deleting
Files from
Member’s
Computer
Under no circumstances should you delete a member’s personal files from
their computer. This includes, but is not limited to:
 Photos
 Documents
 Essential Programs
If it is imperative that a member’s personal files must be deleted to
resolve an issue, provide instructions to the member on how to delete the
file(s) themselves.

Restricted
Access to
Personal
Folders/Files
While troubleshooting, you are not permitted to access any of the
member’s personal folders without business justification including, but not
limited to:
 My Documents
 My Music
 My Pictures

Remote Desktop
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 23

Frequently Asked Questions

FAQs Since Remote Desktop Support is new for AOL, some members may have
questions about the process. Using what you have learned about the
process, draft a response to some of the anticipated questions included
below.

Question Response
Why is the connection running
slow when connected to
BOMGAR?


Why is my desktop background
missing?

Do I need to install software on
my computer for you to access it
remotely? Will I need to remove
it after the call?

What is BOMGAR?

Member is worried about their
personal files.

Continued on next page
Remote Desktop
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 24

Frequently Asked Questions, Continued

FAQs (continued)

Question Response
How will I uninstall the BOMGAR
software?


Is the Session ID/Key case
sensitive?


Can I step away from my
computer (for an extended
period) and let you continue the
troubleshooting process?



Remote Desktop
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 25

Frequently Asked Questions, Continued

Overview Your facilitator will lead you through some role-play scenarios where you
can practice using the BOMGAR software as the consultant and also
experience it from the member’s perspective. Use the space below to
record any notes.

Remote Desktop
AOL® CONFIDENTIAL Revised October 18, 2011
Page 26

Summary

Introduction Let’s review what we covered in this module.

Learning
Objectives
During this module, you learned how to:
 Effectively use BOMGAR software to conduct remote access sessions
with members for troubleshooting.
 Provide explanations/answer general questions about remote access
to members.
 Describe the compliance guidelines for using remote desktop access.


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