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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Tuesday • June 25, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 267
IMMIGRATION
NATION PAGE 7
CHICAGO IS
CUP CHAMP
SPORTS PAGE 12
BROAD SELL-OFF
ON WALL STREET
BUSINESS PAGE 10
U.S. SENATE PASSES LEGISLATION
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The chance of a public marina
remaining at Pete’s Harbor after
its conversion into 411 waterfront
high-rises — a demand by oppo-
nents and a concession by the
developer — is now lost because
the state forced owner Paula
Uccelli to terminate leases of the
outer waterway, according to her
spokesman.
As of June
21, Uccelli
gave notice to
end her 28-year
lease with the
State Lands
Co mmi s s i o n
for the outer
harbor, an area
developer Paul
Powers had
agreed to keep as public slips if
Redwood City officials approve
the application. Uccelli said she
had little choice because the com-
mission issued a breach of con-
tract, ordered her to make millions
of dollars in capital improvements
within 60 days and claimed she
had not provided timely notice of
her husband’s 2005 death.
“At this junction, the State
Lands Commission has made it lit-
erally impossible to maintain the
outer harbor and has in all likeli-
hood needlessly ruined any
prospect of a future public marina
at Pete’s Harbor,” Uccelli said in a
prepared statement.
Pete Uccelli opened the 21-acre
harbor in 1958 and the quirky
boat-dwelling community became
a Peninsula landmark. Uccelli
planned to sell her land and trans-
fer the outer harbor lease to
Powers for his planned develop-
ment. However, as news of the
pending sale broke and Uccelli
evicted tenants, opponents fought
back against the proposal and
questioned the State Lands
Commission about her right to do
so under the existing lease terms
which called for a commercial
marina. Powers attempted to split
the difference by agreeing to pub-
lic slips and even financial com-
pensation to move remaining ten-
ants in return for the opposing
groups to drop their efforts. No
Public marina jeopardized at Pete’s Harbor
Longtime owner terminates leases after State Lands Commission orders quick and costly improvements
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Beekeeping is forbidden in
Foster City.
Most who work for the city,
however, could not tell you why
and some on the City Council were
unaware of the fact until the Daily
Journal asked them about it.
Beekeeping was banned in resi-
dential areas pretty much from the
Foster City’s inception in 1971,
Assistant City Manager Steve
Toler said. City code was then
amended in 1975 to ban beekeep-
ing outright in every part of the
city, he said.
“I can’t tell you why and it has
never been
revisited,” Toler
said.
That could
change, howev-
er, since Vice
Mayor Charlie
Bronitsky and
C o u n c i l ma n
Herb Perez said
they were both
willing to consider beekeeping in
the city if it gets on a council
agenda.
“Many of our rules are antiquat-
ed,” Perez wrote in an email. He
also said he is committed to updat-
ing all ordinances that may “have
outlived their usefulness.”
Bronitsky was not aware that
beekeeping was banned in the
city.
“If a resident wants to raise this
issue, they can always appear at
any City Council meeting and ask
us to put it on the agenda or they
can email any of us to do the same.
We would then have the benefit of
a staff report and the applicant’s
position from which to make a
decision,” Bronitsky wrote the
Daily Journal in an email.
In March, members of the
Beekeepers’ Guild of San Mateo
County attended a San Mateo City
Council study session on sustain-
Beekeepers abuzz over rules
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Summer in Millbrae starts with
a contract agreement between
school officials and teachers for
the year that just ended.
The one-year agreement doesn’t
solve all the contract issues. Both
sides will resume talks in
September to tackle an agreement
for the two upcoming school
years.
Under the agreement, which
members of the Millbrae
Education Association approved
earlier this month, teachers will
have a 2 percent salary increase
effective July
1, 2012 and a
one-time, 1
percent pay-
ment from the
base salary
prior to the 2
p e r c e n t
increase. In
addition to the
salary increase,
the agreement calls for a $75
boost for health benefits, accord-
ing to a staff report.
Linda Luna, superintendent of
the Millbrae Elementary School
Teachers ink
contract deal
with district
Paula Uccelli
Millbrae reaches one-year agreement;
additional talks to pick up again in fall
DAILY JOURNAL FILE PHOTO
Beekeeping in the county faces restrictions depending on where you live.Some cities ban beekeeping outright
as others restrict how many hives can be kept or where the hives may be located.
Foster City forbids it, other cities’ ordinances vary
Nickie Irvine
San Mateo Union to
study bond financing
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Financing options for executing
what’s left of two voter-approved
bond measures — M and O — will
be part of a special study session
held by the San Mateo Union High
School District Board of Trustees
tonight.
How the money is financed could
change the district’s cash flow and
the potential projects to be tackled
by the bond funds.
This isn’t the first time the use of
bond funds, as well as financing
options, has been revisited. The
plans for using money from
Measure M — a 2006 $298 million
See BONDS, Page 20
See DEAL, Page 20
See BEES, Page 20
See HARBOR, Page 20
Linda Luna
House investigators:
Disability judges are too lax
WASHINGTON — Social Security is
approving disability benefits at strik-
ingly high rates for people whose
claims were rejected by field offices or
state agencies, according to House
investigators. Compounding the situ-
ation, the agency often fails to do
required follow-up reviews months or
years later to make sure people are still
disabled.
Claims for benefits have increased
by 25 percent since 2007, pushing the
fund that supports the disability pro-
gram to the brink of insolvency,
which could mean reduced benefits.
Social Security officials say the pri-
mary driver of the increase is demo-
graphic, mainly a surge in baby
boomers who are more prone to dis-
ability as they age but are not quite old
enough to qualify for retirement bene-
fit s.
The disability program has been
swamped by benefit claims since the
recession hit a few years ago. Last
year, 3.2 million people applied for
Social Security Disability or
Supplemental Security Income.
In addition, however, management
problems “lead to misspending” and
add to the financial ills of the program,
investigators from the House
Oversight and Government Reform
Committee say.
“Federal disability claims are often
paid to individuals who are not legally
entitled to receive them,” three senior
Republicans on the House committee
declared in a March 11 letter to the
agency. Among the signers was the
committee’s chairman, Rep. Darrell
Issa of California.
Tightrope walk over Arizona
gorge draws 13M viewers
LITTLE COLORADO RIVER
GORGE, Ariz. — Aerialist Nik
Wallenda’s tightrope walk over a
gorge near the Grand Canyon drew
nearly 13 million
viewers to the live
television broad-
cast.
The Discovery
Channel said
Monday that the
quarter-mile stunt at
the Little Colorado
River Gorge was
among the most
highly viewed shows in the station’s
history.
It also prompted 1.3 million tweets
Sunday, making it one of the top
trending topics.
Wallenda took 22 minutes to cross
the 2-inch-thick steel cable, 1,500
feet above the dry river bed. He did it
without a harness or safety net.
The well-known daredevil contended
with the wind and repeatedly called on
God to calm the swaying cable.
He wore a microphone and two cam-
eras, one that looked down on the river
bed and one that faced straight ahead.
11-year-old California boy
sells gun art in New York City
NEW YORK — A Los Angeles boy
who hopes to get people talking about
gun violence made $2,500 in New
York City selling his art made from
toy guns and tape.
According to the Daily News
(http://nydn.us/17wYcoA ), Charles
Gitnick sold 17 pieces on Prince
Street and West Broadway this week-
end, where many artists sell their
wares to wandering pedestrians.
The 11-year-old says he wraps toy
guns in multicolored tape and then
splatters the canvases with paint.
His parents tell the newspaper they
came to the city in March and Charles
sold 20 pieces and made $2,000.
Charles says he feels that guns are
scary and dangerous. He hopes his art
gets people talking about gun vio-
lence.
He also says he wishes guns were
only in art galleries.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Tuesday • June 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Actor-Comedian
Jimmie Walker is 66.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1973
Fformer White House Counsel John
W. Dean began testifying before the
Senate Watergate Committee, impli-
cating top administration officials,
including President Richard Nixon as
well as himself, in the Watergate
scandal and cover-up.
“Four hostile newspapers are more to be
feared than a thousand bayonets.”
— Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821)
Singer Carly Simon
is 68.
Comedian Ricky
Gervais is 52.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A man juggles a flaming torch in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, which is hosting the Confederations Cup soccer tournament.
Tuesday: Rain. Highs in the lower to mid
60s. South winds 10 to 20 mph with gusts
to around 35 mph.
Wednesday: Cloudy in the morning
then becoming partly cloudy. Highs in
the mid to upper 60s. Southeast winds
around 5 mph... Becoming west in the
afternoon.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
(Answers tomorrow)
BOTCH YOUTH KETTLE SEPTIC
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: When he asked, “Should we harvest the straw-
berries or the blueberries?”, she said — YOUPICK
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
KANEL
OCTIX
LAVRUG
SHIRTT
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
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4 3 6
13 19 23 33 57 28
Powerball
June 22 Powerball
9 23 25 27 34
June 22 Super Lotto Plus
Daily Four
22 20 31 37
Fantasy Five
7 3 0
Daily three midday
In 1788, Virginia ratified the U.S. Constitution.
In 1876, Lt. Col. Colonel George A. Custer and his 7th
Cavalry were wiped out by Sioux and Cheyenne Indians in
the Battle of the Little Bighorn in Montana.
In 1888, the Republican National Convention, meeting in
Chicago, nominated Benjamin Harrison for the presidency.
(Harrison went on to win the election, defeating President
Grover Cleveland.)
In 1910, President William Howard Taft signed the White-
Slave Traffic Act, more popularly known as the Mann Act,
which made it illegal to transport women across state lines
for “immoral” purposes.
In 1938, the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 was enacted.
In 1943, Congress passed, over President Franklin D.
Roosevelt’s veto, the Smith-Connally Anti-Strike Act,
which allowed the federal government to seize and operate
privately owned war plants facing labor strikes.
In 1950, war broke out in Korea as forces from the commu-
nist North invaded the South.
In 1962, the U.S. Supreme Court, in Engel v. Vitale, ruled 6-
1 that recitation of a state-sponsored prayer in New York
State public schools was unconstitutional.
In 1988, American-born Mildred Gillars, known as “Axis
Sally” for her Nazi propaganda broadcasts during World War
II, died in Columbus, Ohio, at age 87. (Gillars had served 12
years in prison for treason.)
In 1993, Kim Campbell was sworn in as Canada’s 19th
prime minister, the first woman to hold the post.
Actress June Lockhart is 88. Civil rights activist James
Meredith is 80. Rhythm-and-blues singer Eddie Floyd is 76.
Actress Barbara Montgomery is 74. Actress Mary Beth Peil
(peel) (TV: “The Good Wife”) is 73. Basketball Hall-of-Famer
Willis Reed is 71. Writer-producer-director Gary David
Goldberg is 69. Rock musician Allen Lanier (Blue Oyster Cult)
is 67. Rock musician Ian McDonald (Foreigner; King
Crimson) is 67. Actor-director Michael Lembeck is 65. TV
personality Phyllis George is 64. Rock singer Tim Finn is 61.
Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor is 59. Rock musician
David Paich (Toto) is 59. Actor Michael Sabatino is 58.
3 14 17 40 50 3
Mega number
June 21 Mega Millions
8 5 7
Daily three evening
9
4
12
Mega number
In other news ...
The story “Fire service sharing expands: Hybrid Redwood
City-San Carlos department moving toward full service” in
the June 22, 2013 edition of the Daily Journal had incorrect
information. The possible new consolidated fire station
would service the Fire Station 19 area on Edmonds Road.
Correction
Nik Wallenda
The Daily Derby race winners Winning Spirit, No. 09, in first
place; Lucky Charms, No. 12, in second place; and Eureka,
No. 07, in third place. The race time was clocked at 1:46.50
3
Tuesday • June 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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MILLBRAE
Vandal i sm. Avehicle window was smashed
on the 1000 block of El Camino Real before
2:37 p.m. Saturday, June 1.
REDWOOD CITY
Suspicious solicitors. Two residents report-
ed two men tried to sell them cleaning products
on Windsor Way and Birch Street before 9:28
p.m. Monday, June 3.
Suspicious person. Awoman wearing a skirt
was flashing her private parts on El Camino
Real before 7:12 p.m. Friday, May 31.
SAN MATEO
Vandalism. Somone reported finding a sec-
ond hole in their wall on the 300 block of Elm
Street before 1:37 p.m. Monday, June 3.
Police reports
Wasn’t feeling well
A vehicle pulled over and a passenger
leaned out the door and vomited on the
1400 block of Hillside Circle in
Millbrae before 4:19 p.m. Saturday,
June 1.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The Service League of San Mateo County
named longtime employee and interim director
Karen Francone to permanently take up the
reins of the nonprofit which administers pro-
grams preparing and transitioning jail inmates
back into society.
Francone has been involved with the Service
League since 1990 when she helped launch the
organization’s first Hope House which gives
recently released female inmates an intensive
residential substance abuse treatment program
before reuniting with their families and the
community. She has been director of the Hope
House program since 1997, working to expand
to six houses and offer transitional housing
opportunities.
“Karen is already such an
essential component of
this organization and we
are very excited that she’ll
be working in this role,”
said Mike Scanlon, presi-
dent of the board of direc-
tors, in a prepared state-
ment.
The decision came after a
nationwide search to replace former executive
director and county supervisor Mike Nevin who
served six years before his December 2012
death from esophageal cancer. Scanlon cited
Francone’s “instrumental” work with Nevin to
make the Service League successful in the
announcement of her naming.
In 2010, the Service League honored
Francone’s work by dedicating the Karen Marie
Wellness Center which provides Hope House’s
clients with a fully-equipped health and fitness
facility.
Francone said she is “incredibly honored” by
the new opportunity and chance to continue the
organization’s work.
“Twenty years ago, I joined the Service
League because I wanted to work hands-on to
improve the lives of some of our community’
most vulnerable people. Today, I’m celebrating
the success that we’ve had and embracing the
chance to promote the Service League’s contin-
ued growth so that more and more people can
benefit from our programs,” Francone said.
Service League names new executive director
Karen Francone
Oktoberfest moving
back to San Carlos
Peninsula Oktoberfest, the annual one-day
community excuse for music, food and good
beer, is heading north this fall to San Carlos.
After a four-year run in Redwood City,
Peninsula Oktoberfest organizers want a small,
more intimate event and believe the Hiller
Aviation Museum in San Carlos provides the
perfect mix of large outdoor space, centralized
location and — on the off chance of rain as in
the celebration’s first year — indoor space.
Organizers are touting the free parking,
indoor rest rooms and limited ticket sales to
help keep lines short. Oh, and the addition of
cool airplanes to check out is a bonus for visi-
tors, too.
The smaller location also frees volunteers
from the extra burden that comes with bigger
events and popularity, according to an
announcement of the move.
More details will be released closer to the
actual event at www.hiller.org.
Local brief
4
Tuesday • June 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Missing woman found dead
A San Mateo woman who went missing
from Montara State Beach in unincorporated
San Mateo County June 13 was found dead,
according to the San
Mateo County Sheriff’s
Office.
The body of Ara
Ghorgyi Ward, 48, of San
Mateo, was found
Wednesday, June 19 at
approximately 7:16 p.m.
washed up along the
beach in the area of
Pomponio State Beach.
Cause of death is unknown, according to
the Sheriff’s Office.
She went to the beach with her boyfriend
on the evening of Wednesday, June 12. They
fell asleep and, the next morning when the
boyfriend awoke, she was gone, according
to the Sheriff’s Office.
It was reported that she may have been
depressed and suicidal, according to the
Sheriff’s Office.
The San Mateo County Sheriff’s Office
investigation is ongoing at this time in
conjunction with the San Mateo County
Coroner’s Office.
Man carrying gun detained
A man walking down the street on the
3200 block of Middlefield Road in North
Fair Oaks was arrested early Sunday morn-
ing for holding a fully visible handgun in
his hand and possession of a controlled sub-
stance, according to the San Mateo County
Sheriff’s Office.
Arrested was Redwood City resident
Daniel Conception, 25.
He was booked into county jail without
incident, according to the Sheriff’s Office.
San Mateo County Board of
Education seeks members for
advisory committee
The San Mateo County Board of Education
recently formed an advisory committee to
review real property information and help
determine the status of “surplus” property.
Now it needs members for the group.
California law requires such a committee
have no fewer than seven. The proceedings
of the County Board Advisory Committee
will be open to the public and is subject to
the Brown Act. The estimated time commit-
ment for committee members is approxi-
mately eight hours per month for the next
three months. The membership of the com-
mittee is to be representative of each of the
following:
• The ethnic, age group, and socioeco-
nomic composition of the district;
• The business community, such as store
owners, managers, or supervisors;
• Land owners and renters;
• Teachers;
• Administrators;
• Parents of students; and
• Anyone with expertise in environmen-
tal impact, legal contracts, buildings codes,
and land use planning.
Applications are available online at
www.smcoe.k12.ca.us. Completed forms
can be submitted to Nancy Magee at
nmagee@smcoe.k12.ca.us or mailed to San
Mateo County Board of Education: ATTN:
Nancy Magee, 101 Twin Dolphin Drive,
Redwood City, CA 94065. The deadline to
apply is 5 p.m. June 26.
Checkpoints planned
for holiday weekend
The San Mateo County Avoid the 23 will
be conducting a DUI/driver’s license check-
point from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. Friday, July 5 at
El Camino Real and St. Francis in San
Carlos.
Officers will be contacting drivers pass-
ing through the checkpoint for signs of
alcohol and/or drug impairment. Officers
will also check drivers for proper licensing
and will strive to delay motorists only
momentarily, according to a press release
sent out by the Daly City Police
Department. Drivers caught driving
impaired can expect jail time, license sus-
pension and insurance increases, as well as
fines, fees DUI classes and other expenses
that can exceed $10,000.
Prelim set for woman
accused of stabbing boyfriend
An East Palo Alto woman accused of fatal-
ly stabbing her boyfriend at their home last
year is set appeared in court Monday for a
preliminary hearing.
Natisha Anderson, 34, was arrested on
Feb. 7, 2012, when officers went to 1240
Camelia Drive after Anderson called 911 to
say she “cut” her boyfriend, police said.
The boyfriend, 34-year-old Charles Perry,
was found suffering from a stab wound to his
femoral artery and a steak knife was found in
the sink, prosecutors and police said.
Perry was taken to Stanford Hospital,
where he succumbed to his injuries, police
said.
Anderson told officers that she “acciden-
tally stabbed"” Perry, the father of her 4-
year-old son, during an argument, prosecu-
tors said.
She was arrested and charged with murder
with an enhancement for use of a deadly
weapon, according to the San Mateo County
District Attorney’s Office.
Ara Ward
Local briefs
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
SAN FRANCISCO — A federal judge has
given preliminary approval to a $1 million
settlement in a lawsuit filed against the city of
Oakland and Alameda County on behalf of
150 people who were arrested during a 2010
protest related to the fatal shooting of Oscar
Grant III.
U.S. District Judge Thelton Henderson of
San Francisco tentatively approved the set-
tlement in a June 13 order and will hold a final
approval hearing on Sept. 9.
The people were arrested during a march
protesting the sentencing of former BART
officer Johannes Mehserle, who fatally shot
Grant, 22, of Hayward, at the Fruitvale
BART station in Oakland early on New
Year’s Day in 2009.
Mehserle was convicted of involuntary
manslaughter and was sentenced in
November 2010 to two years in prison. He
was given credit for time served and was
released in June 2011.
The civil rights lawsuit was filed in 2011 by
four protesters as a class action on behalf of
the approximately 150 marchers arrested dur-
ing a demonstration on Nov. 5, 2010.
Under the agreement, the four named plain-
tiffs will each receive $9,000; other class
members who file approved claims will be
given an estimated $4,500 to $5,000 each;
and attorneys working with the National
Lawyers Guild will be awarded $350,000 for
fees and costs.
In a court filing, both sides told the judge,
“It is undisputed that the 150 class members
were not given an order or opportunity to dis-
perse before being penned in by police lines
in the residential Oakland East Lake neigh-
borhood, and arrested.”
The protesters were placed in sheriff’s
office custody for 14 to 24 hours, and were
held on buses and then in a county jail hold-
ing area before being released, according to
the filing.
Tentative settlement reached
in Oscar Grant protest case
5
Tuesday • June 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Thomas Michael Gill
Thomas Michael Gill, 87, died
June 18, 2013 at Moore Regional
Hospital in Pinehurst, N.C.
He was the husband of Joan Ann
Gill, brother of Corita Ann Gill,
father of Susan Gill Casey,
Catherine Holton Gill, Nancy Gill
Tattersall and Thomas Michael
Gill Jr. and grandfather of Thomas
Micah Gill and Ally Chu Gill.
Mr. Gill was born in New York
City Feb. 15, 1926 to Howard and
Margaret Gill. He was a graduate
from the U.S. Naval Academy.
After retiring from the Navy as a
lieutenant, Tom had a 33-year
career with IBM. He held manage-
ment and executive sales posi-
tions with IBM all over the world:
New York, Palo Alto, Brussels
and Paris. Tom was a lifelong
member of the New York Athletic
Club, an avid chess player, and a
champion squash player.
“Tom loved his family, friends
and country. ”
A funeral mass will be held 10
a.m. Saturday, June 29 at The
Church of the Nativity, Menlo
Park, CA. In lieu of flowers, the
family requests that donations be
made to: Richard J Casey
Foundation, 3077 Britt, Chapel
Hill, NC 27517, for the benefit of
the Thomas M Gill Fund.
John Johnston
John Johnston, born Dec. 21,
1936, died June 21 2013.
Born in Glasgow, Scotland to
John and Grace Johnston, John is
survived by his wife of nine years,
Patricia Johnston; John was
blessed with three daughters;
Heather Pierce DeLong, Linda H.S.
Johnston, Laurie Dunne and their
spouses; his stepchildren Matt
Barnes, Clara Abalos, and Lilly
Simmons; his 12 grandchildren;
his sister Anne of England and
brother David of Australia.
Memorial Services will be 1
p.m. June 29 at Chapel of the
Highlands, 194 Millwood Drive
in Millbrae.
Memorials may be made to The
National Kidney Foundation, 131
Steuart St., San Francisco, CA
94105.
Obituaries
Lindamood-Bell Learning
Proc e s s e s will be providing
instruction this summer at a
Seasonal Learning Clinic i n
San Mateo. Summer instruction for
children and adults will be available
in both morning and afternoon ses-
sions beginning July 1 through
Aug. 23.
Lindamood-Bell i nst r uct i on
develops the cognitive processes
that underlie reading, comprehen-
sion and math skills and can also
provide solutions for individuals
with learning difficulties such as
dyslexia, hyperlexia, ADHD and
autism spectrum disorders. The one-
to-one instruction develops an indi-
vidual’s sensory connection to lan-
guage, focusing on process-based,
intensive instruction, rather than
content-based (subject-specific)
tutoring. The methods used change
the way that one learns to read words
and process information and can
make a significant difference in a
relatively short time period.
To reserve instruction space for
summer, parents are encouraged to
schedule their students for a learning
ability evaluation. Appointments
for testing will be available weekly
now through July.
Individuals interested in summer
instruction can call Sruti
Raghavan at (800) 670-6056 or
by emailing sanmateo.info@lin-
damoodbell.com
***
Menl o School junior Kate
Park placed first at the California
State Championship for the 76th
Annual Oratorical Contest
sponsored by The American Legion.
Her prepared oration at state finals
revolved around the First
Amendment and the obligation to
speak up. Park will represent
California at the National Finals in
Indianapolis in April, where the top
three winners will receive over
$14,000 in scholarships.
***
In keeping with the Mercy mis-
sion, American Sign Language
instructor, Al i son Bel l wanted the
students to be involved in a service
learning project. The girls have cre-
ated sign books for the 3-year-old
programs at the Honolulu School
for the Deaf and Blind and St. Mary’s
School for the Deaf in Buffalo, N.Y.
Unfortunately, about 45 percent
of children who are deaf, never reach
above a fourth grade reading level;
and there are not many books out
there that provide basic signing sto-
ries for kids.
The ASL 3 classes have created
ABC books from scratch. These
books include kid friendly words
and pictures along with the girls’
pictures of the correct sign to use.
Mercy’s ASL 4 class created their
own story books.
Class notes is a column dedicated to
school news. It is compiled by education
reporter Heather Murtagh. You can con-
tact her at (650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at
heather@smdailyjournal.com.
6
Tuesday • June 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
BAY AREA
By Michelle Locke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BERKELEY— Posing for a pho-
tograph in front of the refurbished
front porch of her Chez Panisse
restaurant, chef Alice Waters
smiles as a passer-by calls out,
“Looking good!”
It’s true. They do look good —
both the chef with the sparkling
blue eyes who helped ignite
America’s interest in fresh, local
food and the restaurant, all spruced
up after damage from a fire this
March.
This was the second fire to hit
Chez Panisse in its 42-year histo-
ry, coming almost exactly 31
years after a serious fire in 1982.
Luckily, the toll this time was
much less severe with sprinklers
keeping the flames from spreading
and damage mainly confined to the
two-story front porch seating
areas.
And if you’re looking for self-
pity over this latest setback, you
won’t find it at Alice’s restaurant.
“Whenever there is fire, new
things happen. New things sprout
up like in the forest. It’s just a
moment to really reflect on what
to do,” says Waters. “Everything
seems to happen for a reason, it
just sort of woke us all up.”
That was true literally as well as
figuratively. Waters got a call in
the predawn hours of March 8 to
tell her that her business was on
fire, and not in the good way. At
the time she hoped to reopen with-
in weeks since the damage was
limited.
Instead, the job turned out to
take a little longer. Anew, gabled,
porch was built, interiors were
cleaned and repainted and wiring
and plumbing was replaced. The
process gave the mostly young
staff a chance to really get to know
the restaurant from the inside out,
Waters says. “When you’re work-
ing to rebuild it you learn a lot.
It’s kind of helping people take
ownership.”
The first event at the restaurant
was a private dinner Friday night
to raise funds for the Edible
Schoolyard Project, a kitchen and
garden program integrated into the
academic curriculum of an urban
middle school.
Opening night for the public
was to be Monday with mostly
long-time customers expected,
according to restaurant general
manager Jennifer Sherman. The
menu was to be the usual offering
of local, seasonal food, though
Sherman notes it’s a bonus that
the reopening comes at “probably
the most glorious food moment of
the year. ”
At 69, though she doesn’t look
it, you might wonder if Waters is
ready to slow down. She says she
will if she ever loses interest in
the restaurant. But after nearly 42
years of countless meals and
unforgettable guests such as Bill
Clinton and the Dalai Lama as well
as a coterie of neighborhood faith-
ful, that hasn’t happened yet.
“It’s always been a challenge
and always been a pleasure for
me,” she says. “I’ve never felt like
it was work. I mean “work” work.
I’ve tried to make it feel creative
for everybody who works here.”
Landmark Berkeley restaurant reopens
NATION 7
Tuesday • June 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE – Our
country’s economic
roller-coaster ride
has been interesting
and historic for
sure, but also very
troubling for many
families who’ve not
been as financially stable as others.
Recently though I’ve been observing a
phenomenon with those we serve at the
CHAPEL OF THE HIGHLANDS. It may
be too early to confirm, but it appears that
there is a general state of confidence with
many families, along with the decisions and
choices they make during funeral
arrangements. Yes, I know you are thinking
that “confidence” is not a term you would
use to coincide with “funeral arrangements”,
but it appears to me that people I see are
tending to be more financially assured than
during the deepest years of “The Great
Recession”.
They say that the two things you can’t
avoid are “death and taxes”. With that in
mind, during the economic downturn I saw a
very noticeable sense of “thrift” and
“prudence” with a lot of families who
experienced a death during that period.
Still, those who tended to “cost shop” at
various funeral homes selected CHAPEL
OF THE HIGHLANDS to handle funeral or
cremation arrangements. These families
found comfort with our service, and notably
with our more economic cost structure.
Now, lately the trend with families and
their funeral choices reminds me of the days
way before the recession hit. It’s not that
people are utilizing their funds differently,
spending more or spending less, but that
they are more assertive and confident when
using their wallet. Seeing this over and over
gives me a good indication that something in
the economic climate is changing compared
to not that long ago.
Even though many of our honorable
elected officials in Sacramento and
Washington D.C. appear to be as inflexible
with economic issues as always, the air of
confidence with the families I’ve been
dealing with means to me that these people
are feeling less pressured financially.
It is well known that when businesses do
well they hire more employees, and when
those employees are confident they will
spend their money on goods and services.
In turn, the companies that provide goods
and services will need competent employees
to create more goods, give more services,
and so on…making a positive circle for a
healthy economy. In relation to that, after a
long period of U.S. manufacturing jobs
being sent over-seas there is news of a
growing number of companies bringing this
work back to the United States. Real Estate
values on the Peninsula remained in a good
state during the recession, but houses here
are now in demand more than ever.
“Encouraging” “Hopeful” and “Positive”
are words to describe the optimistic
vibrations that people are giving off. If the
community is becoming more comfortable
with spending, that indicates good health for
business and the enrichment of our
economic atmosphere. I hope I’m right, so
let’s all keep our fingers crossed.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Funeral Trends Indicate
Upswing in the Economy
Advertisement
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Historic immigration
legislation cleared a key Senate hurdle with
votes to spare on Monday, pointing the way to
near-certain passage within days for $30 bil-
lion worth of new security measures along the
border with Mexico and an unprecedented
chance at citizenship for millions living in the
country illegally.
The vote was 67-27, seven more than the 60
needed, with 15 Republicans agreeing to
advance legislation at the top of President
Barack Obama’s second-term domestic agenda.
The vote came as Obama campaigned from
the White House for the bill, saying, “now is
the time” to overhaul an immigration system
that even critics of the legislation agree needs
reform.
Last-minute frustration was evident among
opponents. In an unusual slap at members of
his own party as well as Democrats,
Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas said it
appeared that lawmakers on both sides of the
political aisle “very much want a fig leaf” on
border security to justify a vote for immigra-
tion.
Senate passage on Thursday or Friday would
send the issue to the House, where conserva-
tive Republicans in the majority oppose citi-
zenship for anyone living in the country ille-
gally.
Some GOP lawmakers have appealed to
Speaker John Boehner not to permit any
immigration legislation to come to a vote for
fear that whatever its contents, it would open
the door to an unpalatable compromise with
the Senate. At the same time, the House
Judiciary Committee is in the midst of approv-
ing a handful of measures related to immigra-
tion, action that ordinarily is a prelude to
votes in the full House.
“Now is the time to do it,” Obama said at the
White House before meeting with nine busi-
ness executives who support a change in
immigration laws. He added, “I hope that we
can get the strongest possible vote out of the
Senate so that we can then move to the House
and get this done before the summer break”
beginning in early August.
He said the measure would be good for the
economy, for business and for workers who are
“oftentimes exploited at low wages.”
As for the overall economy, he said, “I think
every business leader here feels confident that
they’ll be in a stronger position to continue to
innovate, to continue to invest, to continue to
create jobs and ensure that this continues to be
the land of opportunity for generations to
come.”
Opponents saw it otherwise. “It will encour-
age more illegal immigration and must be
stopped,” Cruz exhorted supporters via email,
urging them to contact their own senators with
a plea to defeat the measure.
Leaving little to chance, the U.S. Chamber
of Commerce announced it was launching a
new seven-figure ad buy Monday in support of
the bill. “Call Congress. End de facto amnesty.
Create jobs and economic growth by support-
ing conservative immigration reforms,” the ad
said.
Senate officials said some changes were still
possible to the bill before it leaves the Senate
- alterations that would swell the vote total.
At the same time, Sen. Roger Wicker, R-
Miss., who voted to advance the measure dur-
ing the day, said he may yet end up opposing it
unless he wins a pair of changes he is seeking.
Senate Democrats were unified on the vote.
Immigration bill clears Senate test
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Affirmative action in col-
lege admissions survived Supreme Court
review Monday in a consensus decision that
avoided the difficult constitutional issues sur-
rounding a challenge to the University of
Texas admission plan.
Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote the court’s
7-1 ruling that said a court should approve the
use of race as a factor in admissions only after
it concludes “that no workable race-neutral
alternatives would produce the educational
benefits of diversity.”
But the decision did not question the under-
pinnings of affirmative action, which the
high court last reaffirmed in 2003.
The justices said the federal appeals court in
New Orleans did not apply the highest level of
judicial scrutiny when it upheld the Texas
plan, which uses race as one among many fac-
tors in admitting about a quarter of the univer-
sity’s incoming freshmen. The school gives
the bulk of the slots to Texans who are admit-
ted based on their high school class rank,
without regard to race.
The high court ordered the appeals court to
take another look at the case of Abigail
Fisher, a white Texan who was not offered a
spot at the university’s flagship Austin cam-
pus in 2008. Fisher has since received her
undergraduate degree from Louisiana State
University.
High court sends back
Texas race-based plan
By Cristina Silva
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHOENIX — The Supreme Court on
Monday waded into a complicated dispute
over a law aimed at keeping immigrant fam-
ilies together in a case that underscores the
occasionally tense relationship between
immigration proponents and the Obama
administration as Congress debates immi-
gration reform.
The justices said Monday they will hear
an appeal from the Obama administration
arguing that children who have become
adults during their parents’ years-long wait
to become legal permanent residents of the
United States should go to the back of the
line in their own wait for visas. Under U.S.
immigration law, children 21 and older can-
not immigrate under their parents’ applica-
tions for green cards, even if the parents’
application took decades to process.
An immigration spokesman declined to
comment on the case Monday. The Obama
administration has argued in the past that
the thousands of green card applicants who
lost their place in line for U.S. residency
when they turned 21 do not merit priority
status when they file their own visa applica-
tions.
Immigration advocates said it is hypocrit-
ical of the Obama administration to tell
Congress that the nation’s immigration
laws are too tough and need to be rewritten,
while at the same time insisting on conser-
vative interpretations of those laws when
processing family visa applications.
President Barack Obama has vowed to help
immigrants obtain legal status while also
deporting record numbers of immigrants.
“Our lawsuit is only people who are doing
it the legal way, so why do they have to be
tough on separating families?” said Carl
Shusterman, one of the lawyers represent-
ing the immigrants in the case. “These peo-
ple have stood in line with their parents.
These are people who followed all the legal
protocols.”
In 2002, Congress attempted to help
these families by passing the Child Status
Protection Act, which directed immigration
officials to preserve the original date of
application of a minor who turned 21 while
the parents’ application was pending. But
immigration officials argue the law is
ambiguous and giving these families prior-
ity status will likely delay other visa appli-
cations.
Immigration proponents hope Congress
will once again step in to help these fami-
lies. A provision in the immigration bill
crafted by a bipartisan group of lawmakers
and being mulled by the Senate would favor
children who turn 21 during their parents’
wait to win approval to live in the United
States.
The Obama administration is appealing a
2012 ruling from the 9th U.S. Circuit Court
of Appeals, which determined the United
States Citizen and Immigration Services
was wrongly forcing many adult children to
file new applications for residency, putting
their application at the bottom of the pile.
The court said immigration must instead
consider the original application date while
processing the application for residency.
Immigration advocates said it will be dev-
astating for their cause if the Supreme Court
does not uphold the lower court’s ruling. In
some cases, children living illegally in the
United States can wait decades for a parents’
visa application to be processed and then
are thrust into deportation proceedings if
they turn 21 during that time.
High court to review
immigration dispute
NATION 8
Tuesday • June 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Alan Fram
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Internal
Revenue Service’s screening of
groups seeking tax-exempt status
was broader and lasted longer than
has been previously disclosed, the
new head of the agency acknowl-
edged Monday. Terms including
“Israel,” ‘’Progressive” and
“Occupy” were used by agency
workers to help pick groups for
closer examination, according to
an internal IRS document obtained
by The Associated Press.
The IRS has been under fire since
last month after admitting it tar-
geted tea party and other conserva-
tive groups that wanted the tax-
exempt designation for tough
examinations. While investiga-
tors have said that agency screen-
ing for those groups had stopped
in May 2012, Monday’s revela-
tions made it clear that screening
for other kinds of organizations
continued until earlier this month,
when the agency’s new chief,
Danny Werfel, says he discovered
it and ordered it halted.
The IRS document said an inves-
tigation into why specific terms
were included was still underway. It
blamed the continued use of inap-
propriate criteria by screeners on
“a lapse in judgment” by the
agency’s former top officials. The
document did not name the offi-
cials, but many top leaders have
been replaced.
Neither the IRS document
obtained by the AP or a separate
IRS list of terms that workers
searched for, released by House
Democrats, addressed how many
progressive groups received close
scrutiny or how the agency treated
their requests. Dozens of conser-
vative groups saw their applica-
tions experience lengthy delays,
and they received unusually intru-
sive questions about their donors
and other details that agency offi-
cials have conceded were inappro-
priate.
In a conference call with
reporters, Werfel said that after
becoming acting IRS chief last
month, he discovered varied and
improper terms on the lists and
said screeners were still using
them. He did not specify what
terms were on the lists, but said he
suspended the use of all such lists
immediately.
“There was a wide-ranging set of
categories and cases that spanned a
broad spectrum” on the lists,
Werfel said. He added that his aides
found those lists contained “inap-
propriate criteria that was in use.”
Documents show IRS also
screened liberal groups
Smithfield drops
Paula Deen as spokeswoman
NEW YORK — Paula Deen lost
another part of her empire on
Monday: Smithfield Foods said it is
dropping her as
a spokeswoman.
The announce-
ment came days
after the Food
Network said it
would not renew
the celebrity
cook’s contract
in the wake of
revelations that
she used racial
slurs in the past.
QVC also said it was reviewing its
deal with Paula Deen Enterprises to
sell the star’s cookbooks and cook-
ware.
Zimmerman portrayed as
vigilante in Florida shooting
SANFORD, Fla. — George
Zimmerman was fed up with “punks”
getting away with crime and shot
17-year-old Trayvon Martin
“because he wanted to,” not because
he had to, prosecutors argued
Monday, while the neighborhood
watch volunteer’s attorney said the
killing was self-defense against a
young man who was slamming
Zimmerman’s head against the
pavement.
The prosecution began opening
statements in the long-awaited mur-
der trial with shocking language,
repeating obscenities Zimmerman
uttered while talking to a police dis-
patcher moments before the deadly
confrontation.
Zimmerman, 29, could get life in
prison if convicted of second-degree
murder for gunning down Martin on
Feb. 26, 2012, as the unarmed black
teenager, wearing a hoodie on a
dark, rainy night, walked from a
convenience store through the gated
townhouse community where he was
staying.
Send him back: US urges
nations to return Snowden
WASHINGTON — The U.S.
grasped for help Monday from both
adversaries and uneasy allies in an
effort to catch fugitive National
Security Agency leaker Edward
Snowden. The White House demand-
ed that he be denied asylum, blasted
China for letting him go and urged
Russia to “do the right thing” and
send him back to America to face
espionage charges.
Snowden had flown from Hong
Kong to Russia, and was expected to
fly early Monday to Havana, from
where he would continue on to
Ecuador, where he has applied for
asylum. But he didn’t get on that
plane and his exact whereabouts
were unclear.
Missing red panda from
National Zoo found in DC
WASHINGTON — A Twitter
photo and phone tip from a resi-
dent helped animal keepers track
down a red panda in a Washington
neighborhood Monday after it
went missing from the
Smithsonian’s National Zoo.
The male named Rusty was cap-
tured in a tree near a home in the
Adams Morgan neighborhood
Monday afternoon, said National
Zoo spokeswoman Pamela Baker-
Masson. It had traveled across the
leafy Rock Creek Park, perhaps
crossing a road or under a creek
bridge to reach a residential area
nearly 3/4 of a mile from the zoo.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — President
Barack Obama is preparing to
announce new steps to combat cli-
mate change, including increased
production of renewable energy on
public lands and federally assisted
housing.
Environmental groups briefed
on Obama’s plan Monday say he’ll
direct his administration to allow
enough renewables on public
lands to power 6
million homes
by 2020.
The groups
say Obama
plans to signifi-
cantly expand
production from
sources like
solar and wind
at low-income
housing projects. They say Obama
will also announce more aggres-
sive steps to increase efficiency
for appliances.
Environmental groups say
Obama’s most important step will
be to launch a process to regulate
carbon emissions from existing
power plants.
The groups were not authorized
to discuss Obama’s plan publicly
and demanded anonymity.
Obama will unveil his national
climate plan Tuesday at
Georgetown University.
Obama to expand renewable energy
Paula Deen
Barack Obama
Nation briefs
OPINION 9
Tuesday • June 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
New college pool is costly
to users and taxpayers
Editor,
I was delighted when my swim coach
told me that the College of San Mateo
has a new Olympic-sized swimming
pool until he said it costs $20 per drop
in visit!
The college website says to call the
private, for-profit company that man-
ages the pool to learn the drop-in cost.
I did, however, find that the College
staff get free use of the pool, which
may explain why it was built at the dis-
trict headquarters instead of the other
colleges (Skyline, Cañada) which don’t
have swimming pools.
When the voters approved the prior
college bond, the money was supposed
to go for “constructing and moderniz-
ing classrooms ... and the replacement
of aging ventilation systems, removal
of hazardous materials such as as-
bestos, and installation of
alternative-energy programs.”
The voters weren’t told the college
district was going to build a multi-mil-
lion dollar swimming pool and charge
taxpayers the highest per visit charge
in the state for any community college
swimming pool.
The next time our San Mateo County
Community College District asks us to
raise taxes for academics, its argument
will be undermined by how it mishan-
dled the new swimming pool, paid for
by taxpayers with borrowed money
over the years, but run by and like a
private club for the moneyed and dis-
trict staff.
Bill Collins
Pacifica
Housing solution
Editor,
The state-mandated requirement to
pack an additional 2,000 housing
units in my already saturated city —
with similar additional housing around
the Bay Area — is simply unrealistic.
But here’s a solution: We can make
room for additional housing by using
the property that churches occupy (em-
inent domain). I counted 41 churches
recently. That seemed to be a high num-
ber for a population of only 62,000
souls. Taking over church (synagogue,
mosque, etc.) property and using it for
more state-mandated housing would be
an ideal way to meet our requirement
(An Internet search reveals that less
than 20 percent of our population at-
tend religious services, so no big deal).
Further, by adopting time-share
arrangements, eliminating 36 religious
houses would not cause any significant
disruptions of the activities of those
amongst us who wish to continue their
other-world practices. This is because
in the remaining houses of worship,
services could be stacked. That is, first
service of the day could be reserved for
Baptists, followed by Methodists,
Catholics, etc. Every six months, the
congregations could move up a notch,
and last of the day during the first half
year would become first during the fol-
lowing period. The beauty of this
arrangement would be that soon, the
various groups will realize that we’re
all the same, and we’ll naturally choose
to become friends, and even intermarry.
Talk about a happy, diversified Bay
Area. And Palo Alto can be the start of
something big. Surely this same plan
will be used throughout the Bay Area.
Ruben Contreras
Palo Alto
Letters to the editor
By Adrienne Tissier
A
s the U.S. Drug Enforcement
Administration steps up
efforts to provide options for
safe disposal of
unused pharmaceu-
ticals, I am
pleased to see a
renewed commit-
ment to dealing
with the danger of
idle unused med-
ications.
There is no
question that government drug dis-
posal programs have been an over-
whelming success. Since San Mateo
County established the nation’s first-
ever Pharmaceutical Disposal
Program in 2006, more than 50 tons
of materials have been diverted from
our sewers and waterways.
It was not long ago when residents
were encouraged to flush unused med-
ications down the toilet. Recent news
reports underscored what many envi-
ronmental watchdogs have long sus-
pected, that myriad pills flushed down
myriad drains were slowly contami-
nating rivers and streams, and linked
to mutations in certain species of fish
and amphibians.
In addition to the environmental
stewardship created by this program,
50 tons of pills are no longer sitting
idle in medicine cabinets and on
shelves — creating the opportunity
for misuse or abuse by the drug’s
owner or others in the household.
I am proud to say that San Mateo
County has received numerous awards
for its program including the
Governor’s Environmental and
Economic Leadership award,
California’s highest environmental
honor. My office still receives calls
from municipalities across the coun-
try looking to use the San Mateo
County drug disposal model to start
new programs.
San Mateo County has been work-
ing hard to “Make Green Easy” for
residents and properly disposing of
old medication is just one way to do
this. For a listing of the 14 confiden-
tial drop-off container locations in
San Mateo County, please visit
www.smchealth.org/RxDisposal or
call my office at (650) 363-4572.
Adrienne Tissier is a member of the
San Mateo County Board of Supervisors.
Drug disposal program making green easy
Twitter @? #!
T
he other Michelle Durands of the world are a lot
more interesting to follow. If my new foray into
the Twitter-verse has taught me anything, it is
that following in near-real time the trials and tribula-
tions of a young woman — maybe a teen even — as she
quits her job McDonald’s, enjoys her day drinking,
muses poetic about the perfection of country music
hunks and contemplates the world beats the heck out of
my occasional drivel about politics and pets.
Actually, I don’t even have drivel on my Twitter
account @michellemdurand. I have my columns. So I’m
late to the Twitter party — sue
me. Besides while the other
Michelle Durand has mid-day
Wednesday cocktails, I have
this coveted space twice a week
to rant and rave and contem-
plate the minutiae of life.
There’s a reason she has more
followers.
Used to be one inevitably
Googled his or her name out of
some perverse curiosity to see
what like-named — if not any-
where near like-minded — peo-
ple out there in the big, wide
world are all about. There is also the hope others aren’t
inadvertently confused by the similar monikers. For
instance, a quick search of my name turns up French
physicians and a Michigan woman who documents her
Beanie Baby collection online when not blogging
about reality television shows. So not me.
But now there are so many other places to find a
doppleganger or bizzaro version of oneself. Eight peo-
ple bear my name on Facebook although only the one
whose page image is a donkey might come anywhere
close. Anyone perusing LinkedIn might mistakenly take
me for a massage therapist, an optometrist, an “aesthet-
ics and laser specialist, ” a Peruvian teacher or — with
one drop of an “l” — a women’s basketball coach. Pile
on Tumblr, Instagram, Pinterest and the chance to stand
out or at least be recognized as yourself is even more of
a challenge.
All of which brings me back to me and the other
Michelle Durands of Twitter.
“I tried to find you on Twitter,” a colleague told me
recently, adding that instead he stumbled upon the afore-
mentioned fast food career girl who freely documents
every up and down in life. “I think I’ll follow her
instead.”
Heck, I’d probably follow her, too.
At the moment I have fewer followers than the apple-
sauce-loving Heaven’s Gate leader of cultists awaiting
the Hale-Bopp comet. Yep, it’s that dismal. So the ques-
tion is what does a lowly Twitter newbie have to do to
gain a little cyber momentum without resorting to actu-
ally thinking, being funny, retweeting actual news or
posting images that were once only accompanied by a
fold-out biography touting a love of long walks on the
beach and puppies?
The answer is obviously Amanda Bynes. Nobody is
anybody anymore until the troubled actress starts a
Twitter fight and calls you ugly. Then you’ve made it.
C’mon Amanda, bring it!
Another possibility is jumping on the bandwagon for
Rusty, the missing red panda that went AWOL from the
National Zoo in Washington, D.C. Accounts both track-
ing and joking about the missing critter lit up cyber-
space yesterday, with only daredevil tightrope walker
Nik Wallenda’s Sunday night travels across an Arizona
gorge creating any popularity contest.
In 2009, the year when I caved into the desire to
maintain squatters rights and actually established an
account (albeit untouched), there was less competition
in the Michelle Durand world. Most handle combina-
tions from michelledurand to Mdurand had little to
say, few to follow and even fewer vying for their
attention.
Now, there are handfuls more of Michelles offering
gems like “I’m really regretting piercing my third
holes,” “I seriously question why I’m not a 500 pound
whale” and “Big butts do notttt work with high waisted
shorts.” Those extra “t”s really give that tweet a little
extra something.
So alas, I think it’s time to resign myself to being
just one of the millions of voices out there instead of
one in a million voices that stand out. I’m actually per-
fectly fine with that. Besides, I don’t have time to do
any real tweeting. I’m too busy following what happens
when the other Michelle sobers up, passes her exams
and finds a life after French fries.
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs every
Tuesday and Thursday. She can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone (650) 344-
5200 ext. 102. What do you think of this column? Send a
letter to the editor: letters@smdailyjournal.com
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
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Onlineeditionat scribd.com/smdailyjournal
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It is the mission of the Daily Journal to be the most
accurate, fair and relevant local news source for
those who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
By combining local news and sports coverage,
analysis and insight with the latest business,
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BUSINESS 10
Tuesday • June 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 14,659.56 -139.84 10-Yr Bond 2.548 +0.034
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Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Monday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Tenet Healthcare Corp., up $1.88 at $43.73
The hospital operator plans to buy rival Vanguard Health Systems Inc.for
about $1.8 billion.The deal will expand Tenet’s reach.
Bed Bath & Beyond Inc., down $1.59 at $68.40
A Jefferies analyst kept his “Hold” rating on the home goods retailer,
saying that falling profit margins may hurt its stock.
Abercrombie & Fitch Co., down $2.49 at $43.46
A Wedbush analyst said in a note to clients that despite deep discounts
on the teen retailer’s clothing, it isn’t selling well.
Nasdaq
Apple Inc., down $10.96 at $402.54
A Jefferies analyst cut his price target for the iPhone maker’s stock by
$15 to $405, saying it may have cut iPhone production.
Keynote Systems Inc., up $6.31 at $19.82
Keynote, which monitors company websites, said it will sell itself to a
private equity firm for about $369 million in cash.
Hercules Offshore Inc., up 38 cents at $6.83
The offshore drilling company bought a majority stake in Discovery
Offshore and will sell its Domestic Liftboat assets for about $54 million.
Breitburn Energy Partners LP, down 55 cents at $17.36
The energy company said that it will acquire interests in a pair of oil fields
for about $860 million from Whiting Petroleum Corp.
Stec Inc., up $3.12 at $6.71
Western Digital Corp. said that one of its subsidiaries has agreed to buy
Stec, the data storage device maker, for about $320.7 million.
Big movers
By Joshua Freed
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
More signs of distress in China’s
economy and rising bond yields led to a
broad sell-off in stocks Monday, leaving
key market indexes down more than 5
percent from their record highs last
month.
It was the first 5 percent decline -
referred to on Wall Street as a “pullback”
- since November.
Pullbacks that occur during bull mar-
kets tend to be “nasty and brutish” — but
short, said John Manley, chief equity
strategist at Wells Fargo Funds
Management. He said it’s common to get
declines of 3 percent to 7 percent “as the
market restores a reverence to risk to the
investing public.”
U.S. trading started with a slump
Monday. The market recovered much of
its loss, then fell back again. By the
close of trading the big stock indexes
were clinging to modest gains for the
second quarter, which ends Friday.
Before Wall Street opened for trading
on Monday, Asian markets were already
sharply lower, led by a 5 percent plunge
in China’s Shanghai Composite Index.
That was the index’s biggest loss in four
years. The decline was prompted by a
government crackdown on off-balance
sheet lending, which made investors
worry about China’s economic growth.
The selling spread to Europe, where
France’s benchmark stock index fell 1.7
percent, Germany’s 1.2 percent.
U.S. traders took one look at that and
started dumping stocks. The Dow Jones
industrial average fell as much as 248
points in the first hour of trading. The
yield on the 10-year Treasury note spiked
to its highest in almost two years as the
sell-off brought down prices of U.S. gov-
ernment debt. Gold and other metals also
fell.
Stocks got closer to break-even around
midday before falling again in the last
hour. The Dow finished down 139.84
points, or 0.9 percent, at 14,659.56.
The S&P 500 index fell 19.34 points, or
1.2 percent, to 1,573.09. The Nasdaq
dropped 36.49 points, or 1.1 percent, to
3,320.76.
All 10 industry groups in the S&P 500
fell. The biggest drop was 1.8 percent for
bank and financial stocks. Bank of
America fell the most among major bank
stocks, giving up 39 cents, or 3.1 per-
cent, to $12.30.
The S&P500 is down 5.7 percent from
its all-time of 1,669 on May 21. The
Nasdaq has fallen 5.2 from its own recent
high on that day.
Markets remain vulnerable to any
comments from the Federal Reserve
about its $85 billion in monthly bond
purchases, which have kept interest rates
at historic lows and helped drive the
stock market’s rally the last four years.
On Wednesday and Thursday, the S&P
plunged 3.9 percent after the central
bank said its bond-buying program could
wrap up by the middle of next year as
long as economic conditions continue to
improve. Stocks edged up Friday, but
still had their worst week in two months.
“I think investors are overreacting to
the prospects of a change in Fed policy,”
said Gary Thayer, chief macro strategist
for Wells Fargo Advisors. He noted that
unemployment is down, inflation is low.
“These are good economic conditions.”
Gold fell $14.90, or 1.2 percent, to
$1,277.10. Other metals were down,
too. Crude oil rose $1.49, or 1.6 percent,
to $95.18 per barrel.
Broad sell-off on Wall Street
By Peter Svensson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Samsung is
expanding its lineup of tablet com-
puters and making them look more
like its Galaxy smartphones, as it
hopes to translate its success in
phones to the tablet market, where
Apple is dominant.
Samsung Electronics Co., the sec-
ond-largest maker of tablets after
Apple, on Monday said it is putting
three new tablets in the Galaxy Tab
3 series on sale in the U.S. on July
7. The cheapest, a $199 device, will
have a screen that measures 7 inches
diagonally. An 8-inch model will go
for $299 and a 10-inch one for
$399.
“Our goal is to attract Galaxy
smartphone users, and to make it the
ultimate smartphone accessory, ”
said Shoneel Kolhatkar, director of
product planning at Samsung
Mobile.
The “Tab” line is Samsung’s value
brand, undercutting the price of sim-
ilar Apple models. Samsung’s pre-
mium tablets are in the “Note” line,
which include styluses. The 7-inch
and 10-inch tablets had “Tab 2”
equivalents, but the 8-inch model is
new, and coincides closely in size
with Apple’s iPad Mini, which came
out late last year.
The new tablets have the same
three buttons on the front as the
Galaxy smartphones. Last year’s
Tab 2 had no physical buttons on
the front, as encouraged by Google,
which supplies the Android soft-
ware.
The 7-inch Galaxy Tab 3 has 8
gigabytes of storage memory, while
the larger models have 16 giga-
bytes. All of them have card slots
for memory expansion.
New Samsung tablets
mimic Galaxy phones
By Jesse J. Holland
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — A sharply
divided Supreme Court on Monday
decided to make it harder for
Americans to sue businesses for
retaliation and discrimination,
leading a justice to call for
Congress to overturn the court’s
actions.
The court’s conservatives, in two
5-4 decisions, ruled that a person
must be able to hire and fire some-
one to be considered a supervisor
in discrimination lawsuits, making
it harder to blame a business for a
co-worker’s racism or sexism. The
court then decided to limit how
juries can decide retaliation law-
suits, saying victims must prove
employers would not have taken
action against them but for their
intention to retaliate.
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg
wrote both dissents for the court’s
liberal wing, and in a rare move,
read them aloud in the courtroom.
She said the high court had “cor-
ralled Title VII,” a law designed to
stop discrimination in the nation’s
workplaces.
“Both decisions dilute the
strength of Title VII in ways
Congress could not have intend-
ed,” said Ginsburg, who then called
on Congress to change the law to
overturn the court.
In the first case, the University
of Texas Southwestern Medical
Center wanted a discrimination
lawsuit won by Dr. Naiel Nassar
thrown out. Nassar, after complain-
ing of harassment, left in 2006 for
another job at Parkland Hospital,
but the hospital withdrew its job
offer after one of his former med-
ical center supervisors opposed it.
Nassar sued, saying the medical
center retaliated against him for his
discrimination complaints by
encouraging Parkland to take away
his job offer. A jury awarded him
more than $3 million in damages.
The medical center appealed,
saying the judge told the jury it
only had to find that retaliation was
a motivating factor in the supervi-
sor’s actions, called mixed-
motive. Instead, it said, the judge
should have told the jury it had to
find that discriminatory action
wouldn’t have happened “but-for”
the supervisor’s desire to retaliate
for liability to attach.
Justice Anthony Kennedy, who
wrote the opinion, agreed with the
lower court and the university, say-
ing people “must establish that his
or her protected activity was a but-
for cause of the alleged adverse
action by the employer.” But he
didn’t rule completely for the med-
ical center, sending the case back
to the lower courts after saying a
decision on the resolution of the
case “is better suited by courts
closer to the facts of this case.”
Court makes it harder to sue businesses
<< Pac-12, Big Ten back together in bowl game , page 12
• Investigation into Pat’s Hernandez continues, page 13
Tuesday, June 25, 2013
LET THE HYPE BEGIN: MAYWEATHER, ALVAREZ START 11-CITY TOUR TO BUILD UP FIGHT >> PAGE 13
Giants start L.A. series with a loss
By Joe Resnick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Rookie sensation
Yasiel Puig hit his seventh home run in 20
major league games and added a tiebreaking
single in the eighth inning against
Madison Bumgarner, leading the Los
Angeles Dodgers to a 3-1 victory over the
San Francisco Giants on Monday night.
Nick Punto, who
replaced third baseman
Juan Uribe in a double
switch, led off the eighth
with an opposite-field
double down the right-
field line. Mark Ellis sac-
rificed Punto to third and
reached safely when
Bumgarner threw high to
first for an error.
Puig greeted George Kontos with a line-
drive single to left that scored Punto.
Hanley Ramirez drove in the final run on a
liner toward the middle that shortstop
Brandon Crawford knocked down with a
lunging attempt before getting the out at
first.
Kontos was recalled from Triple-AFresno
before the game, while Jean Machi was sent
back to the Giants’ Pacific Coast League
club. Kontos was optioned to the minors on
June 11, the day he received a three-game
suspension for throwing at Pittsburgh’s
Andrew McCutchen. But since he is appeal-
ing the penalty, Kontos is eligible to play
until his case is heard by Major League
Baseball.
All San Mateo final set
Both National and American win in complete little league slugfests
JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL
Joey Sinclair, top, complete a force play at
second while Ryan Ivers singles home the
go-ahead run in San Mateo National’s win over
Hillsborough.
Upset alert:
Nadal ousted
at Wimbledon
Healthy Curry
looks to take
the next step
See NADAL, Page 13
See CURRY, Page 14
By Howard Fendrich
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON — Just like that, in a span of 15
days, Rafael Nadal went from French Open
champion for a record eighth time to first-
round Grand Slam loser for the only time in
his career.
Limping occasionally and slower than
usual, but unwilling afterward to blame an
old left knee injury, the two-time
Wimbledon winner exited 7-6 (4), 7-6 (8), 6-
4 Monday against 135th-ranked Steve
Darcis of Belgium — one of the most stun-
ning results ever at the All England Club.
“Nobody remembers the losses. People
remember the victories,” Nadal said, shak-
ing his head as he leaned back in a black
leather chair. “And I don’t want to remember
that loss.”
Everyone else definitely will.
It certainly belongs in the same category
as his loss a year ago at Wimbledon, in the
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Right smack in between the two baseball
fields at Trinta Park in San Mateo there is a
flag pole. And if you happen to be a fan of
San Mateo Litttle League, that is exactly
where you wanted to be Monday afternoon.
On the South end, San Mateo National
was battling Hillsborough.
On the North end, San Mateo American
was doing the same against Belmont-
Redwood Shores.
And from the flag pole position,
you could catch every bit of the
action.
But, if the flag pole at Trinta was
your spot of choice, there is a good
chance you ended up with major
vertigo trying to follow the two
semifinal games of the District 52
Minors Superbowl tournament. In
all, the four teams combined for 54 runs and
even more clutch hits. And at the end of
almost two and half hours of baseball, the
city of San Mateo gets what it wanted before
the first pitch of the semifinal games was
thrown: an all local final.
By virtue of 16-14 and 16-8 wins, San
Mateo American (who actually won in extra
innings) and San Mateo National will lock
heads for the 2013 Minors championship
Tuesday afternoon at Trinta Park with the
first pitch scheduled for 5:30 p.m.
As evident by the two scores, Monday
afternoon provided baseball fans with plen-
ty of offensive highlights. But the games
were won in very distinct fashions.
“It was complete determination,” said
National head coach Angelo Formosa. “I
told the boys, as your coach, I have faith in
you — the assistant coaches have faith in
you, your parents have faith in you. If you
have faith in yourself and you really want
this game, go out and win it.”
National’s win against Hillsborough was
tight for the majority of the game.
San Mateo actually lead 2-1 before
Hillsborough tied the game with a
groundout and seized the lead with
Kyle Sieben’s triple to centerfield
serving as the big hit in what ended
up being a 5-2 advantage.
But National roared right back.
They cut the lead 5-3 and then
loaded the bases for Jackson Wood
who delivered a double that cleared the bags
and made it 6-5.
“It was our third game in three days, but
we never gave us,” Formosa said. “Every
single game, we played lights out, hard as
we could. We were down in two of those
three games, we came right back. I always
told them, we will not give up. San Mateo
National does not give up.”
Hillsborough came back and tied things
By Steve Reed
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHARLOTTE — Ahealthy Stephen Curry
is looking forward to spending this offsea-
son improving his game instead of than
rehabbing from another ankle surgery.
The Golden State
Warriors point guard said
Monday that he feels
great, unlike the last two
seasons when he spent
months recovering from
surgery on his trouble-
some right ankle.
Curry was bothered by
a sore left ankle during
the NBA postseason but
said he started working out this week and
has “no limits.”
“It’s huge,” Curry said Monday during a
break from hosting a youth basketball camp
at Charlotte Christian, his high school
alma mater. “Mentally, that’s the biggest
part. You don’t have to worry about the
rehab. It wears on you every day knowing
you have to wake up and do these mundane
exercises to get your range of motion
back.”
Curry is coming off a breakout season in
Stephen Curry
See MINORS, Page 14
San Mateo
American vs.
National
Trinta Park,
5:30 p.m.
SUPERBOWL
See GIANTS, Page 14
Madison
Bumgarner
Malibu fight involving
Scottie Pippen investigated
MALIBU — Former Chicago Bulls
star Scottie Pippen was questioned
Monday about a fight that occurred
over the weekend between him and an
autograph seeker outside a Malibu
restaurant, authorities said.
Pippen came in voluntarily to a sub-
station after he was named as a suspect
in an investigation of an assault with
intent to commit great bodily injury,
Los Angeles County sheriff’s officials
said.
Pippen, 47, was cooperating with
the investigation, sheriff’s
spokesman Steve Whitmore said.
The victim was taking pictures
inside Nobu restaurant late Sunday
while Pippen dined with his family,
said sheriff’s Capt. Patrick Davoren.
When Pippen went outside to the
parking lot, the man continued to take
pictures and sought the Hall-of-
Famer’s autograph, Davoren said.
An argument ensued that led to the
altercation, investigators said.
The man was taken to a hospital
with a head injury and was treated and
released.
Investigators were interviewing
several witnesses who apparently saw
what transpired.
SPORTS 12
Tuesday • June 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
S.A.M S A M
1940 Lesl i e St. , San Mateo, CA 94403
Sam
Tsang
Grand Opening!
92
101
Hillsdale
Shopping
Center
Hillsdale
Caltrain
Station
We are Here!
S El Camino Real
West
East
South North
Sports brief
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — With an emphasis on destination
diversity and expanding West Coast markets, the Big Ten
and Pac-12 are strengthening their traditional ties with a
pair of matchups in California bowl games.
The Holiday Bowl in San Diego and the Kraft Fight
Hunger Bowl in the San Francisco Bay Area announced six-
year agreements Monday for teams from each conference to
play each other starting in 2014.
Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott and Big Ten
Commissioner Jim Delany said the new configuration will
also help avoid repeat matchups and teams returning to the
same region frequently.
While the Pac-12 has a slotted selection order, Scott said
the conference has “mechanisms” in place to allow for flex-
ibility. Delany said the Big Ten is not locking in a selec-
tion order with its bowl partners but will have three tiers of
bowl games where teams can be placed depending on their
regular-season records.
“We’re working with the bowls to create what I would
describe as a process for selection and approval by each
bowl subject to a series of parameters,” Delany said. “We’re
going to really want different teams in different bowls.”
The agreements shuffle the postseason landscape for both
conferences.
The Big Ten replaces the Big 12 in the Holiday Bowl,
where the Pac-12 already had an affiliation. The Fight
Hunger Bowl will have the Pac-12’s fourth selection after
the College Football Playoff, which the Rose Bowl is a part
of, the Alamo Bowl in San Antonio, Texas, and the Holiday
Bowl.
The Fight Hunger Bowl, which is moving from the San
Francisco Giants’ home at AT&T Park to the 49ers’ future
stadium in Santa Clara in 2014, had been sixth in the Pac-
12’s rotation. The Sun Bowl in El Paso, Texas, was previ-
ously fourth and will be moving down.
Delany and other Big Ten officials had talked openly
about playing more postseason games in California, a
major recruiting ground and television market. The Big 12
also plans to give its bowl lineup a more southern flavor by
adding games in Florida and Tennessee in the coming
weeks.
Scott said his focus in negotiations with bowls was about
building markets that appeal to Pac-12 fans, many of whom
live in San Diego and the San Francisco Bay Area. He also
wanted to build upon established relationships with bowls
and conferences.
“We felt that we had great bowl arrangements, great part-
nerships in the right markets for our teams, for our fans,”
Scott said. “So we looked at this process as one of optimiz-
ing our bowl arrangements going forward. In each the
Holiday Bowl and Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl, we feel like
we’ve done that.”
The Fight Hunger Bowl has had tie-ins with the Atlantic
Coast Conference, the service academies and BYU over the
years. If BYU is eligible this season, the Cougars will play
a Pac-12 team in the final Fight Hunger Bowl played at
AT&T Park, one of baseball’s best venues but also one that
has odd sightlines and atmospheres for football. If BYU is
not eligible, an ACC team is next in line.
The conference commissioners said the bowl’s pending
relocation some 40 miles south to Levi’s Stadium, the
68,500-seat future home of the 49ers that already has been
awarded the 2016 Super Bowl, was a major factor in elevat-
ing the game’s status — something bowl officials had in
mind when they decided to make the move.
“Moving up was critical to us,” Fight Hunger Bowl exec-
utive director Gary Cavalli said.
Big Ten, Pac-12
announce new
bowl agreements
By Jimmy Golen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON — An NHL-record unbeaten
streak to start the lockout-shortened
season.
Three straight victories to clinch the
title.
From beginning to end, the Chicago
Blackhawks skated away from the rest
of the league.
Bryan Bickell and Dave Bolland
scored 17 seconds apart in the final
minutes and the Blackhawks rallied to
win Game 6 of the Stanley Cup Final 3-
2 on Monday night to clinch their sec-
ond NHL championship in four sea-
sons.
Jonathan Toews returned from injury
to add a goal, and Corey Crawford made
23 saves for Chicago. But Crawford
was off for an extra skater for the most
important goal of the season, when
Jonathan Toews fed it in front and
Bickell scored from the edge of the
crease to tie it 2-2.
Perhaps the Bruins expected it to go
to overtime, as three of the first four
games in the series did, because they
seemed to be caught off-guard on the
ensuing faceoff.
A shot deflected by Michael Frolik
went off the post right to Bolland, who
put it in the net and started the Chicago
celebration with 59 seconds left in the
game.
“It’s huge,” Bolland said. “Just see-
ing that puck bounce around there, I
knew I just had to tap it in. So it was a
huge goal.”
The Blackhawks on the ice gathered
in the corner, while the Blackhawks
bench began jumping up and down. It
was only a minute later, when Boston’s
Tuukka Rask was off for an extra man,
that the Hawks withstood Boston’s
final push and surged over the boards,
throwing their sticks and gloves across
the ice.
“I still can’t believe that finish,”
Crawford said. “Oh my God, we never
quit.”
The Bruins got 28 saves from Rask,
who was hoping to contribute to an
NHL title after serving as Tim Thomas’
backup when Boston won it all two
years ago.
The sold-out TD Garden began chant-
ing “We want the Cup!” after Milan
Lucic’s goal put the Bruins up 2-1 with
eight minutes left, but it fell silent after
their team coughed up the lead.
The arena was almost empty —
except for a few hundred fans in red
Blackhawks sweaters who filtered down
to the front rows — when the Chicago
players passed the 35-pound Cup
around the ice.
Patrick Kane, whose overtime goal
in Game 6 beat Philadelphia to win
the 2010 championship, was voted
the Conn Smythe Trophy winner as
playoffs MVP.
“It was the best year of my life, just
playing with these guys,” Kane said.
Toews scored his third goal of the
playoffs to tie it for the Blackawks at
4:24 of the second of Game 6 — exact-
ly two minutes after teammate Andrew
Shaw was penalized for roughing.
“In 2010, we didn’t really know what
we were doing,” Toews said. “We just,
we played great hockey and we were
kind of oblivious to how good we were
playing.
“ This time around, we know definite-
ly how much work it takes and how
much sacrifice it takes to get back here
and this is an unbelievable group.
We’ve been through a lot together this
year and this is a sweet way to finish it
off.”
Boston, needing a win to extend the
series to a deciding Game 7, came out
aggressively and led 1-0 after one peri-
od on Chris Kelly’s second goal of the
playoffs.
Chicago wins Stanley Cup
REUTERS
The Chicago Blackhawks pose with the Stanley Cup trophy after a Game 6 win.
SPORTS 13
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second round to Lukas Rosol, a
player ranked 100th at the time.
After that setback, Nadal missed
about seven months because of his
bad left knee. Since returning, he
had gone 43-2 and reached the
finals at all nine tournaments he
entered, winning seven.
Most recently, in Paris, he col-
lected his 12th Grand Slam tro-
phy, tied for third-most in history,
while extending his winning
streak to 22 matches.
“Two weeks ago, I was in a fan-
tastic situation, winning a fantas-
tic tournament,” Nadal said. “Two
weeks later, I lost here in the first
round. That’s the positive and the
negative thing about this sport.”
His early defeat rendered moot
all the debate in the preceding
days about whether Nadal’s No. 5
seeding was appropriate or
whether Wimbledon officials
should have bumped him higher
because of past success at the
grass-court tournament.
In five appearances at
Wimbledon from 2006-11 (he
missed the 2009 edition because
of knee trouble), Nadal reached the
final five times. He won the 2008
and 2010 championships, and was
the runner-up to Roger Federer in
2006-07, then to Novak Djokovic
in 2011.
Because of Nadal’s low-for-him
seeding this time — his ranking
slid during his time off — he
wound up in the same half of the
draw as seven-time champion
Federer and second-seeded Andy
Murray. A possible Nadal-Federer
quarterfinal loomed, as did a poten-
tial Nadal-Murray semifinal.
So much for that.
“Pretty irrelevant right now, ”
said Murray, who won in three sets
Monday, as did Federer. “It’s obvi-
ously surprising. But, you know,
the consistency that Rafa, Roger,
Novak have shown in the Slams
over the last five, six years, it’s
going to be almost impossible to
keep that up forever.”
Two days before Wimbledon
started, Nadal spoke about having
more trouble on grass than other
surfaces lately because its low
skids force him to bend his knees
so much to reach shots. Nadal
decided to skip a grass-court tune-
up tournament between the French
Open and Wimbledon, opting to
rest instead, and arrived in
England on Tuesday to begin
preparing in earnest.
On Monday, he said, “I didn’t
move the way I need to if I’m
going to win on this surface.”
Nadal avoids discussing health
issues in the immediate aftermath
of a defeat — he didn’t reveal the
left knee injury last year until
weeks after the Rosol match —
and Monday was no different.
Still, anyone who watched Nadal
play Darcis could tell something
wasn’t right.
Nadal deflected three questions
in English about his left knee,
saying it’s “not the day to talk
about these kind of things” and
that it would sound like “an
excuse.” When a reporter asked in
Spanish about the knee, Nadal
replied: “You’re assuming I’m
injured.” He later did repeat what
he mentioned at Roland Garros,
which is that the knee is painful at
times.
“Maybe he was not in the best
shape ever. Maybe he didn’t play
his best match,” Darcis said, not-
ing that he wants to get his hands
on of a DVD of the most signifi-
cant victory of his career. “But I
have to be proud.”
That’s for sure.
Darcis came in 7-18 in Grand
Slam matches, a .280 winning
percentage, including 12 first-
round losses. So when asked his
reaction upon hearing last week
that he would be facing Nadal,
Darcis smiled broadly and gave a
one-word answer unfit for publica-
tion.
Then he added: “When you see
the draw, of course you say, ‘Ah,
it’s bad luck.”’
While Nadal was struggling,
Federer and Murray looked the way
title contenders are supposed to in
the first round. Federer, the defend-
ing champion, needed all of 68
minutes to beat 48th-ranked
Victor Hanescu of Romania 6-3, 6-
2, 6-0 on Centre Court, as former
U.S. Secretary of State Condoleeza
Rice looked on from the Royal
Box.
“I’m happy to get out of there
early and quickly,” Federer said.
“Perfect day. ”
Continued from page 11
NADAL
REUTERS
Steve Darcis of Belgium, ranked 135th in the world, celebrates after
upsetting Rafael Nadal at the Championships at WImbledon.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Floyd
Mayweather and Saul “Canelo”
Alvarez kicked off an 11-city tour
Monday with a Times Square news
conference packed with fans eager
for their title fight in Las Vegas.
The undefeat-
ed fighters
announced on
Twitter last
month that
they would face
each other at
the MGM Grand
on Sept. 14,
exciting box-
ing fans around
the world. The
news confer-
ence on a steamy day in the heart
of Manhattan, the first on a pro-
motional tour that includes stops
in cities such as Washington D.C.,
Chicago, Miami and Mexico City,
was aimed at jumpstarting the
hype ahead of one of boxing’s
most anticipated bouts in recent
memory.
“Canelo, I appreciate you for
taking the fight,” Mayweather said
in front of a few thousand fans
watching the competitors official-
ly announce the fight. “Now, let’s
give the fans what they want to
see.”
It’s also perhaps the sport’s
most ambitious tour since
Mayweather and Oscar de la Hoya
also stopped in 11 cities before
their 2007 bout — won by
Mayweather.
Mayweather, 36, is unbeaten in
44 fights, the last a unanimous 12-
round decision over Robert
Guerrero on May 4 in defense of
his 147-pound title. Alvarez, a 22-
year-old star from Mexico, is 42-
0-1 and unified the 154-pound
titles with a unanimous victory
over Austin Trout on April 20.
“In the sport of boxing, it’s
everybody’s time, and this is my
time,” Alvarez said through a
translator as fans chanted “Mex-i-
co!”
“I’m going to win.”
The 12-round fight will be con-
tested at 152 pounds with both
men’s super welterweight/junior
middleweight titles on the line,
and just might satisfy many of
those fans who had been wishing
during the last several years for
Mayweather to take on Manny
Pacquiao.
“The Earth is my turf,”
Mayweather said. “You can put me
in any ring and I will always come
out victorious.”
Each fighter took a stroll down a
makeshift red carpet leading to the
dais, with pops of confetti mark-
ing their entrances. Mayweather
received a noticeable amount of
boos; the crowd appeared to
slightly favor Alvarez.
One fan, though, got
Mayweather to crack up when he
held up a Chucky doll from the
“Child’s Play” movie franchise,
taking a clear shot at the redheaded
Alvarez.
Mayweather, Alvarez kick
off 11-city tour in New York
Floyd
Mayweather Jr.
By Michael Casey
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ISTANBUL — The United States
improved its chances of reaching
the knockout stage of the Under-
20 World Cup, tying France 1-1
Monday on an 85th-minute goal
by substitute Daniel Cuevas.
“I feel like they were confused,”
he said. “They couldn’t get the
ball out and luckily it took a
bounce my way and I got to push it
in.”
With France and Spain having
won their openers, the U.S. needs
a victory in its final match against
Ghana to advance outright. But it
could still advance as one of the
four best third-place teams.
“Our team is very united and we
are always together and pushing
forward,” Cuevas said. “If things
don’t go our way, we keep trying
and keep trying until they do.
Luckily we got the tie.”
Spain beat Ghana 1-0 in a lack-
luster match on Monday. In the
other early game in Group B,
Nigeria defeated Cuba 3-0, with
Aminu Umar scoring twice in four
minutes.
France appeared set to beat the
Americans win and advance after
Yaya Sanogo scored his second
goal of the tournament. His penal-
ty in the 48th minute came after
Dimitri Foulquier was sideswiped
by America’s Javan Torre in the
penalty area.
“I don’t think we had a great
control of the game tonight,”
France coach Pierre Mankowski
said. “It feels a bit strange because
the U.S. team was hardly danger-
ous. But they had situations they
should have never had. We conced-
ed a penalty and a free-kick, which
led to their goal.”
The U.S., which lost its open-
ing match to Spain, had few
chances and missed those it did
have — the worst when Luis Gil’s
penalty was easily saved in the
65th. But the Americans grew
more confident toward the end and
it paid off when Cuevas pounced
on a loose ball in the penalty area.
“Our team is very united and we
are always together and pushing
forward,” Cuevas said. “If things
don’t go our way, we keep trying
and keep trying until they do.
Luckily we got the tie.”
U.S. coach Tab Ramos was a
“little disappointed” with the
lackluster play early on but happy
to come away with a draw.
U.S. ties France 1-1 in U-20 Cup
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NORTH ATTLEBOROUGH,
Mass. — Police again searched the
area near the home of New England
Patriots tight end Aaron
Hernandez, a week after his
friend’s body was found about a
mile away.
Some police officers wore wet-
suits Monday while searching
woods near Hernandez’s home, not
far from the industrial park where
Odin Lloyd’s body was found.
Lloyd, a 27-year-old semi-pro
football player for the Boston
Bandits, was found slain June 17.
His relatives said he was dating
the sister of Hernandez’s fiancee,
that the two men were friends and
that both men were out together
on the last night of Lloyd’s life.
An Attleboro District Court offi-
cial said no new documents were
available in connection with the
case Monday morning. The
Bristol County district attorney’s
office also didn’t release any new
information about the case, which
their spokeswoman called “an
active, ongoing investigation.”
A court official said last week
that three search warrants had been
issued, but none of them had been
returned, meaning they weren’t yet
public.
Hernandez hasn’t commented on
the homicide investigation, but
has been seen with his lawyer.
The Patriots drafted Hernandez,
who is originally from Bristol,
Conn., out of the University of
Florida in 2010. Last summer, the
team gave him a five-year contract
worth $40 million.
Police search again near home of Pats’ Hernandez
Paco Rodriguez (2-2) got two
outs and Kenley Jansen worked the
ninth for his fifth save.
Bumgarner (7-5) was charged
with three runs — two earned —
and five hits in seven-plus innings
with five strikeouts in his 100th
big league start. The 23-year-old
left-hander engaged in another
tense duel with Hyun-Jin Ryu in a
rematch of their April 2 meeting,
when Bumgarner spoiled the
Korean-born lefty’s major league
debut with eight innings of two-
hit ball and retired 18 consecutive
batters during a 3-0 win at Dodger
Stadium.
Ryu allowed a run, eight hits and
four walks in 6 2-3 innings. He
was lifted by manager Don
Mattingly after Buster Posey
reached second on a fly to right
field that Puig was just about to
catch when his backside made con-
tact with the auxiliary scoreboard
and the ball fell behind him. The
play was originally ruled an error,
then changed to a double by offi-
cial scorer Don Hartack.
Ronald Belisario came on and
struck out Hunter Pence.
The Giants began a 10-game
road trip with a familiar face back
in the lineup: Pablo Sandoval was
reinstated from the disabled list
Monday after missing 14 games
because of a left foot strain. He
was 2 for 4.
Puig drove a 1-1 pitch into the
lower seats in the right-field cor-
ner with one out in the first. It
ended Bumgarner’s 16-inning
scoreless streak against the
Dodgers, and was their only hit
until Puig’s two-out single in the
sixth.
The Giants tied it in the second
inning with an RBI double inside
third base by Andres Torres that
scored Joaquin Arias from first
base — but Arias strained his left
hamstring on the play and came
out of the game.
Crawford, who replaced Arias at
shortstop, flied out with the bases
loaded to end the third after Ryu
got a visit from pitching coach
Rick Honeycutt.
The Giants had the bases loaded
again in the fifth, but only because
Posey slipped and fell rounding
third base on a one-out single by
Sandoval before scampering back
to the bag. Crawford followed with
a comebacker to Ryu, who calmly
threw to catcher A.J. Ellis to begin
an inning-ending double play.
NL WEST BRIEF
Padres score 3 in 9th,
beat Phillies 4-3 in 10
SAN DIEGO — Kyle Blanks sin-
gled home the winning run in the
10th inning for his fourth hit of
the game, and the San Diego
Padres rallied from a three-run
deficit in the ninth to beat the
Philadelphia Phillies 4-3 Monday
night.
Blanks also had a two-run single
and scored the tying run on a
passed ball in the ninth as the
Padres fought back against Cliff
Lee and struggling closer
Jonathan Papelbon.
Looking for his 10th win of the
season, Lee took a six-hit shutout
into the ninth but lasted only
three more pitches. Carlos
Quentin led off with a single and
went to third when Chase Headley
followed with a double that ended
Lee’s night.
On came Papelbon, who gave up
a two-run single to Blanks on his
first pitch.
up at 6 on a Finn Gilmartin two-
out single.
But National exploded for 10
runs in its half of the sixth inning
that blew the game wide open.
Ryan Ivers’ single scored the go-
ahead run with Oliver Crank, Chris
Kelly and Edgar Sanchez getting
the knocks to add major insurance
for San Mateo.
Ryan Tuthill hit a bomb to cen-
terfield for Hillsborough that made
it 16-8.
While National’s win was excit-
ing, it did not match American’s
win in dramatics.
A true roller coaster ride of a
game, American went up 4-0 in the
first but then trailed 5-4 before
Belmont-Redwood Shores made
three outs in its half of the inning.
It was true sign of things to come
because if it seemed like each team
gained a big lead only to see it fade
away, it’s because that’s exactly
what happened.
With the game tied at 7-7 after 3
1/2 frames, Belmont went up 9-7,
only to have American come back
and somehow lead 12-10 just 1 1/2
innings later.
“Belmont was stiff competi-
tion,” said American head coach
Brian Haverty. “Two really strong
teams, a lot of hitting power all
the way around. Two just very
strong teams. Today, it was a little
bit of luck, pitching depth and
strategy. We played a pretty strate-
gic game.”
The real craziness began to start
the bottom of the sixth with
Belmont down 13-10. Redwood
Shores scored a run with one out to
make it 13-11 and after a walk and
a pop out, Myles Allison delivered
a huge double to left centerfield to
tie the score up at 13-13 and force
extra innings.
American responded to start the
seventh with an Ethan Ienni sin-
gle. Two batters later, Alexander
Haas stroked the hit of the game,
doubling deep to right centerfield
to bring in Ienni and Peter Martin
who had reached base right after. A
wild pitch allowed Haas to score a
handful of pitches later for the
16th run.
Belmont got the potential tying
run to first in its half of the sev-
enth. But a nice play at the plate
by American was the final out of
the game and sent San Mateo to
the championship final.
“He has a great team,” Haverty
said of Formosa and the National
squad. “It should be fun (Tuesday).
Gosh, I don’t what to say other
than this is exciting. We’re
thrilled to be here.”
SPORTS 14
Tuesday • June 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
his fourth year, averaging 22.9
points and 6.9 assists while help-
ing the Warriors reach the playoffs
for the first time in six years.
When the postseason arrived, he
stepped it up, averaging 23.4
points and 8.1 assists before the
Warriors succumbed to the eventu-
al Western Conference champion
San Antonio Spurs in the second
round.
Curry said knowing he has three
to four months to prepare for
training camp is a great feeling —
and he plans to take advantage of
the extra time.
He plans to use the extra time
this offseason to find more ways
to get to the free throw line.
“That’s the biggest thing,” said
Curry, a 90-percent free throw
shooter. “In the playoffs I’ve
found your shot can take you a
long way but to be able to not let
defenders play so tight on you and
be able to get those easy points at
the free throw line definitely
opens the game up for you more,
especially in those games where
you aren’t shooting the ball so
well. You still have a way to get
easy points if you can get to the
line.”
Curry also wants to get stronger
in the coming months and plans
to do more self-evaluation through
film study to determine ways to
work on his drives.
The former Davidson product,
who signed a four-year contract
extension last November with the
Warriors, believes the future is
bright in Golden State under coach
Mark Jackson.
Curry said a solid core exists and
the team is only going to get bet-
ter with more playoff experience
and the fact they were competitive
with the Spurs shows they’re on
the right track.
“Hopefully keep our team
together,” Curry said. “We have a
lot of chemistry this year. Going
through that experience in the
playoffs that is big to build the
foundation going forward, espe-
cially with a fairly new coach who
has got his taste of being in a suit.
Once you have those pieces
together, you want to keep them
together so when we go through
those ups and downs of the season
and get our taste of the playoffs
again we will know how to
advance further. ”
Curry will be paying close
attention to the NBA draft
Thursday night, even though the
Warriors don’t have a pick.
His younger brother, Seth, who
plays at Duke, has a chance to get
drafted.
“Whether he gets drafted or not,
a team will be making a great deci-
sion by bringing him into camp,”
Curry said. “The same questions
that were brought up about my
game and how it transitions to the
NBA, he’s going through that
same criticism. But I think the
way he shoots the ball and the way
he can score will be a high value
for a team.”
Continued from page 11
CURRY
Continued from page 11
MINORS
Continued from page 11
GIANTS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — San Francisco
Giants center fielder Angel Pagan
is scheduled for left hamstring sur-
gery on Tuesday and could miss the
rest of the season.
The announcement was made by
manager Bruce
Bochy before
the defending
World Series
c h a m p i o n s
opened a three-
game series
with the last-
place Dodgers
on Monday.
The procedure
to repair a tendon will be per-
formed by Dodgers team physician
Neal ElAttrache at the Kerlan-Jobe
Clinic in Los Angeles, and Pagan
is expected be out at least another
12 weeks.
Pagan, who turns 32 on July 2,
signed a four-year, $40 million
contract in December after helping
the Giants win their second World
Series title in three years. He is
batting .262 with three home runs
and 24 RBIs.
Gregor Blanco and Juan Perez,
who was promoted from the
minors on June 7, have shared
time in center with Pagan out.
Blanco started the series opener in
Los Angeles.
Also Monday, the Giants
recalled reliever George Kontos
from Triple-AFresno and optioned
right-hander Jean Machi to their
Pacific Coast League club. Right-
hander Chad Gaudin was placed on
the 15-day DL because of a bruised
elbow and lefty Mike Kickham
was recalled from Fresno.
Pagan hasn’t
played since his
inside-the-park
homer lifted
San Francisco
to a 6-5 victory
over the
C o l o r a d o
Rockies on
May 25.
He sustained a small tear when
he aggravated the leg injury during
a rehab game with Class A San
Jose on Thursday night. He then
met with team orthopedist Dr. Ken
Akizuki and opted to get a second
opinion.
“After getting the second opin-
ion, the consensus was that
surgery’s the best option right
now,” Bochy said.
It was the latest dose of bad news
for the Giants, who entered
Monday trailing NL West-leading
Arizona by three games. It came
on the same day they reinstated
slugging third baseman Pablo
Sandoval from the disabled list
after he missed 14 games because
of an injured left foot.
Kontos was optioned to the
minors on June 11, the day he
received a three-game suspension
for throwing a pitch at
Pittsburgh’s Andrew McCutchen.
He is appealing the penalty and is
eligible to play until his case is
heard by Major League Baseball.
Gaudin was struck by a line drive
on Thursday, and Kickham will
make his second major league start
on Tuesday night in his place. He
made his major league debut May
28 in Oakland, giving up four
runs, four hits and four walks in 2
1-3 innings.
Giants’ Pagan to have
surgery on hamstring
Angel Pagan
Gaudin put on DL, Kickham brought up
Chad Gaudin
SPORTS 15
Tuesday • June 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
We Buy Gold, Jewelry,
Diamonds, Silver & Coins
Serving The Peninsula
for over 25years
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 44 33 .571 —
Washington 37 38 .493 6
Philadelphia 36 41 .468 8
New York 30 42 .417 11 1/2
Miami 25 50 .333 18
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 47 29 .618 —
Pittsburgh 46 30 .605 1
Cincinnati 45 32 .584 2 1/2
Chicago 31 43 .419 15
Milwaukee 31 43 .419 15
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 41 34 .547 —
Colorado 39 38 .506 3
San Diego 39 38 .506 3
San Francisco 38 38 .500 3 1/2
Los Angeles 33 42 .440 8
Monday’s Games
San Diego 4, Philadelphia 3, 10 innings
L.A. Dodgers 3, San Francisco 1
Tuesday’s Games
Arizona (Cahill 3-8) at Washington (G.Gonzalez
3-3), 4:05 p.m.
Colorado (Nicasio 4-3) at Boston (Dempster 4-8),
4:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Correia 6-4) at Miami (Fernandez 4-
4), 4:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Medlen 4-7) at Kansas City (E.Santana 5-
5), 5:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson 3-9) at Milwaukee
(Lohse 2-6), 5:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Z.Wheeler 1-0) at Chicago White Sox
(Sale 5-6), 5:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Westbrook 3-2) at Houston (Harrell 5-
7), 5:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Arroyo 6-5) at Oakland (Milone 6-7),
7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 6-4) at San Diego
(Marquis 9-2), 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Locke 6-1) at Seattle (J.Saunders 5-7),
7:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Kickham 0-1) at L.A. Dodgers (Fife
1-2), 7:10 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Minnesota at Miami, 9:40 a.m.
Cincinnati at Oakland 12:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Seattle, 12:40 p.m.
Colorado at Boston, 1:05 p.m.
Arizona at Washington, 4:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Kansas City, 5:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 5:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Chicago White Sox, 5:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Houston, 5:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at San Diego, 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers, 7:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 45 33 .577 —
New York 41 34 .547 2 1/2
Baltimore 42 35 .545 2 1/2
Tampa Bay 40 37 .519 4 1/2
Toronto 38 37 .507 5 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 42 32 .568 —
Cleveland 39 36 .520 3 1/2
Kansas City 35 38 .479 6 1/2
Minnesota 34 38 .472 7
Chicago 31 42 .425 10 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 44 32 .579 —
Oakland 44 34 .564 1
Seattle 34 43 .442 10 1/2
Los Angeles 33 43 .434 11
Houston 29 48 .377 15 1/2
Monday’sGames
Cleveland 5, Baltimore 2
Tampa Bay 4,Toronto 1
Tuesday’sGames
Cleveland (Masterson 9-5) at Baltimore (Tillman 8-
2), 4:05 p.m.
Texas (Darvish 7-3) at N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 7-5),
4:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 6-5) at Detroit (Porcello 4-4),
4:08 p.m.
Colorado (Nicasio 4-3) at Boston (Dempster 4-8),
4:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Correia 6-4) at Miami (Fernandez 4-4),
4:10 p.m.
Toronto (Buehrle 4-4) at Tampa Bay (M.Moore 9-
3), 4:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Medlen 4-7) at Kansas City (E.Santana 5-5),
5:10 p.m.
N.Y.Mets(Z.Wheeler 1-0) at ChicagoWhiteSox(Sale
5-6), 5:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Westbrook 3-2) at Houston (Harrell 5-7),
5:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Arroyo 6-5) at Oakland (Milone 6-7),
7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Locke 6-1) at Seattle (J.Saunders 5-7),
7:10 p.m.
Wednesday’sGames
Toronto at Tampa Bay, 9:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Miami, 9:40 a.m.
Cincinnati at Oakland, 12:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Seattle, 12:40 p.m.
Colorado at Boston, 1:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Baltimore, 44:05 p.m.
Texas at N.Y.Yankees, 4:05 p.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
vs.Galaxy
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/29
@Chicago
5:30p.m.
CSN-PLUS
7/3
@NERev
4:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/6
vs.Seattle
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/13
@Dodgers
7:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/25
@Dodgers
7:10p.m.
NBC
6/26
vs. Reds
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/25
@Colorado
5:40p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/28
@Colorado
1:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/29
@Colorado
1:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/30
vs. Reds
12:35p.m.
6/26
vs. Cardinals
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/28
vs. Cardinals
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/29
vs. Cardinals
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/30
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Optioned RHP Freddy
Garcia to Norfolk (IL).Recalled RHP Kevin Gausman
from Norfolk.
CLEVELANDINDIANS—Sent RHPs Brett Myers and
Blake Wood to Mahoning Valley (NYP) for rehab
assignments. Optioned RHP Carlos Carrasco to
Columbus(IL).RecalledLHPT.J.HousefromColum-
bus.
HOUSTONASTROS—OptionedINFMarwinGon-
zalez to Oklahoma City (PCL). Released LHP Wade
LeBlanc.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Agreed to terms with
LHP Hunter Green on a minor league contract.
MINNESOTATWINS—Optioned LHP Pedro Her-
nandez to Rochester (IL).
OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Optioned RHP Dan
Straily to Sacramento (PCL).
SEATTLE MARINERS—Agreed to terms with SS
Tyler Smith on a minor league contract.
National League
ARIZONADIAMONDBACKS—Optioned LHP Joe
Paterson to Reno (PCL).
SAN DIEGO PADRES—Recalled LHP Tommy
Layne from Tucson (PCL). Optioned RHP Miles
Mikolas to Tucson.
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS—Optioned INF Nick
Noonan and RHP Jean Machi to Fresno (PCL). Re-
instated 3B Pablo Sandoval from the 15-day DL.
Recalled RHP George Kontos from Fresno.
NFL
NFL—Suspended Indianapolis WR LaVon Brazill
and New York Giants WR Brandon Collins for four
games each for violating the league’s substance-
abuse policy.
CLEVELANDBROWNS—Named Zak Gilbert di-
rector of communications.
DETROITLIONS—Signed S Chris Hope.Released
WR Brian Robiskie.
OAKLANDRAIDERS—Waived LB Mario Kurn.
NHL
ANAHEIMDUCKS—Acquired D Alex Grant from
the Pittsburgh for LW Harry Zolnierczyk.
DALLAS STARS—Signed F Matt Fraser and D
Cameron Gaunce to one year contracts.
FLORIDA PANTHERS—Agreed to terms with F
Bobby Butler on a two-year contract and F Eric Sel-
leck on a one-year contract.
MINNESOTA WILD—Agreed to terms with G
Niklas Backstrom on a three-year contract.
WINNIPEGJETS—Signed coach Claude Noel to
a one-year contract extension.
COLLEGE
ATLANTIC 10 CONFERENCE—Signed commis-
sioner Bernadette V. McGlade to a contract
extension through 2018.
ALABAMA—Announced sophomore men’s bas-
ketball F Devonta Pollard has withdrawn from
school.
CARROLL (WIS.)—Named Stein Rear baseball
coach.
CENTRAL CONNECTICUT STATE—Agreed to
terms with women’s volleyball coach Linda Sag-
nelli on a three-year contract extension through
the 2015 season.
DETROIT—Named Sean Williamson strength and
conditioning coach.
TRANSACTIONS
@Reds
4:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/1
@Reds
4:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/2
vs. Cubs
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/2
vs. Cubs
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/3
vs.Norwich
City
7:30p.m.
7/20
vs.Portland
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/27
vs. Chivas
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/4
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DENVER — At long last, Brian
Shaw is getting his first chance to
coach an NBAteam.
The former guard for the Los
Angeles Lakers and Phil Jackson
pupil has agreed to succeed George
Karl as coach of the Denver
Nuggets, a person familiar with the
negotiations told The Associated
Press.
The person spoke to the AP on
condition of anonymity Monday
night because the deal hadn’t been
officially announced.
Still, it was the buzz of the bas-
ketball world.
“I think the Nuggets are going to
benefit from his tenure,” Jackson
tweeted.
“So great to see Brian Shaw
rewarded with this long overdue
opportunity,” Pacers coach Frank
Vogel told The AP in a text.
“Congrats to Brian and the Nuggets.
Denver just got one of the best head
coaches this league will see for
years to come.”
The Denver Post first announced
the agreement with Shaw, the
Indiana Pacers assistant who told
the newspaper he’s been “prepared
by the best of the best” for his first
NBA head coaching job, adding “I
feel like I’ve waited and paid my
dues.”
Shaw is a longtime assistant who
has interviewed about a dozen times
for head coaching positions but
kept coming up short until Monday.
He beat out Lionel Hollins, the
former Memphis Grizzlies coach.
The Nuggets called a news confer-
ence for Tuesday afternoon, where
team president Josh Kroenke and
newly hired general manager Tim
Connelly will introduce their new
coach.
Shaw replaces Karl, who was oust-
ed June 6 just weeks after winning
the league’s Coach of the Year award.
Shaw inherits a young team
loaded with talent that won a fran-
chise-record 57 games but lost
Danilo Gallinari to a knee injury
down the stretch and bowed out in
the first round of the playoffs for the
ninth time in 10 years.
Gallinari recently underwent sur-
gery and is expected back in
December.
Nuggets hire Shaw
16
Tuesday • June 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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What Is visco-
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Visco-supplementation, also known
as joint therapy, supplements the
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t Weight
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t 8JMM*NJTTUJNFGSPNwork?
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Do you wake up with knee
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HEALTH 17
Tuesday • June 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Huge list prices
charged by hospitals are drawing increased
attention, but a federal law meant to limit
what the most financially vulnerable
patients can be billed doesn’t seem to be
making much difference.
Aprovision in President Barack Obama’s
health care overhaul says most hospitals
must charge uninsured patients no more
than what people with health insurance are
billed.
The goal is to protect patients from med-
ical bankruptcy, a problem that will not go
away next year when Obama’s law expands
coverage for millions.
Because the Affordable Care Act doesn’t
cover everyone, many people will remain
uninsured. Also, some who could sign up are
expected to procrastinate even though the
law requires virtually everyone to have
health insurance.
Consumer groups that lobbied for a “fair
pricing” provision are disappointed. Auni-
versity researcher who’s studied the issue
says the government doesn’t seem to be
doing much enforcement, and at least one
state, Colorado, enacted a stricter rule since
the federal statute passed.
Critics say the law has several problems:
• It applies only to nonprofit institutions,
which means about 40 percent of all com-
munity hospitals are exempted. By compar-
ison, the Colorado law also covers for-prof-
it hospitals.
• It lacks a clear formula for hospitals to
determine which uninsured patients qualify
for financial aid, and how deep a discount is
reasonable. ACalifornia law spells out such
a formula for that state’s hospitals.
• More than three years after Obama
signed his law, the Internal Revenue Service
has not issued final rules explaining how
hospitals should comply with the federal
billing limits. Delay doesn’t signal a high
priority.
“We still hear the same stories about
patients who are being sent to (debt) collec-
tion,” said Jessica Curtis, director of the
hospital accountability project at
Community Catalyst, a Boston-based advo-
cacy group that led the push for billing lim-
itations. “It’s the same behavior that we
were seeing before the passage of the
Affordable Care Act.”
The Obama administration responds that
fair pricing is the law of the land, and that
hospitals are expected to comply even if the
IRS has not finalized the rules. The agency
has begun compliance reviews, a spokes-
woman said.
The health law “helps to protect patients
from hidden and high prices and unreason-
able collection actions,” said Treasury
Department spokeswoman Sabrina Siddiqui.
The American Hospital Association says
it urges members to limit charges to the
uninsured in line with the federal law. But
neither the administration nor the industry
has statistics on how many hospitals are
doing so.
Health and Human Services Secretary
Kathleen Sebelius recently took on hospi-
tal pricing policies when she released feder-
al data that document wide disparities in
what different hospitals charge for the same
procedures.
Most patients never face those list prices
because private insurers negotiate lower
rates and government programs such as
Medicare get to set what they will pay. The
burden of paying list price falls on the unin-
sured and people with skimpy policies. It’s
unclear that the federal requirements are
helping at all.
Justin Farman, a nursing student from
Watertown, in upstate New York, was diag-
nosed with a blood cancer last fall, when he
was uninsured.
Going without health insurance is a calcu-
lated risk taken by many young people
starting out their careers. Farman, 26, said
the $120 his employer charged monthly for
premiums was too much for his budget.
Besides, he was in good shape and an avid
weightlifter. But months of deep tiredness
and unexplained weight loss led him to con-
sult doctors, and he was eventually diag-
nosed with lymphoma.
Treatment at Upstate University Hospital
in Syracuse was successful, but Farman faced
more than $54,000 in medical bills,
between the hospital and doctors.
“After I went into remission, the bills
started to roll in,” said Farman. The hospi-
tal did not tell him that financial assistance
might be available, Farman said.
He had to fend off collection agencies.
“That’s not too fun,” he added.
Aspokesman for Upstate said the federal
fair pricing law does not appear to apply to
the hospital because it is publicly owned
and not incorporated as a nonprofit under
federal law. Spokesman Darryl Geddes said
he could not discuss individual cases, but
the hospital does not decline care to anyone
based on the individual’s ability to pay.
Upstate maintains a financial assistance
program that complies with state law, he
added.
Part way through his treatment, Farman
was able to get on Medicaid. With the help
of a community agency, he also applied for
assistance under New York law to help pay
for his medical care during the period he was
uninsured. On Friday, he received a letter
saying his application had been approved
and his debts would be greatly reduced.
Such discounts should be taken up front,
advocates say.
Congress needs to take a second look at
the federal law, says University of Southern
California health policy professor Glenn
Melnick.
As written, the law leaves it up to hospi-
tals to determine which uninsured people
qualify for discounted bills, and that could
create a whole new set of disparities.
“One hospital could say it applies to peo-
ple at 100 percent of the poverty line, and
another could say 200 percent,” Melnick
explained. He called the enforcement provi-
sions were “very weak.”
A California law could serve as a model,
he said. It defines the patients who qualify
for assistance as those who are uninsured or
making at or below 350 percent of the fed-
eral poverty line - $40,215 for an individual
and $82,425 for a family of four. Those
patients cannot be charged more than the
hospital would receive from Medicare.
“This issue will not go away,” said
Melnick. “Even when the (Affordable Care
Act) is fully implemented, there will be mil-
lions and millions of people without insur-
ance.”
Promise of price cut on
hospital bills in limbo
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON — More than a third of patients
infected with a new strain of bird flu died
after being admitted to the hospital earlier
this year, Chinese researchers report in a
new study.
Since the new H7N9 bird flu first broke out
in China in late March, the strain has sick-
ened more than 130 people and killed 37.
The World Health Organization has previ-
ously described H7N9 as “one of the most
lethal influenza viruses” it has ever seen and
said it appeared to spread faster than the last
bird flu strain, H5N1, that threatened to
unleash a pandemic.
After making some adjustments for miss-
ing data, the Chinese scientists estimated
the overall death rate to be 36 percent. The
outbreak was stopped after China closed
many of its live animal markets - scientists
had assumed the virus was infecting people
through exposure to live birds.
That makes the new strain less deadly
than H5N1, which kills about 70 percent of
the people it infects. Still, H7N9 is more
lethal than the swine flu that caused a 2009
global epidemic. That had a death rate of
less than one percent.
The results were released in two papers on
the H7N9 strain, published online Monday
in the journal Lancet.
“The good news is that numbers of
(H7N9) cases have stalled,” Cecile Viboud
and Lone Simonsen of the U.S. National
Institutes of Health wrote in a commentary
accompanying the article.
Latest bird flu strain
‘kills more than a third’
By Marilynn Marchione
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Doctors are reporting a major step toward
an “artificial pancreas,” a device that would
constantly monitor blood sugar in people
with diabetes and automatically supply
insulin as needed.
Akey component of such a system — an
insulin pump programmed to shut down if
blood-sugar dips too low while people are
sleeping — worked as intended in a three-
month study of 247 patients.
This “smart pump,” made by
Minneapolis-based Medtronic Inc., is
already sold in Europe, and the U.S. Food
and Drug Administration is reviewing it
now. Whether it also can be programmed to
mimic a real pancreas and constantly adjust
insulin based on continuous readings from a
blood-sugar monitor requires more testing,
but doctors say the new study suggests
that’s a realistic goal.
“This is the first step in the development
of the artificial pancreas,” said Dr. Richard
Bergenstal, diabetes chief at Park Nicollet,
a large clinic in St. Louis Park, Minn.
“Before we said it’s a dream. We have the
first part of it now and I really think it will
be developed.”
He led the company-sponsored study and
gave results Saturday at an American
Diabetes Association conference in
Chicago. They also were published online
by the New England Journal of Medicine.
The study involved people with Type 1
diabetes, the kind usually diagnosed during
childhood. About 5 percent of the 26 mil-
lion Americans with diabetes have this
type. Their bodies don’t make insulin, a
hormone needed to turn food into energy.
That causes high blood-sugar levels and
Doctors make progress
toward ‘artificial pancreas’
See PANCREAS, Page 19
18
Tuesday • June 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Ann Sanner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
COLUMBUS, Ohio — Getting face time
with the family doctor could soon become
even harder.
A shortage of primary care physicians in
some parts of the country is expected to wors-
en as millions of newly insured Americans
gain coverage under the federal health care law
next year. Doctors could face a backlog, and
patients could find it difficult to get quick
appointments.
Attempts to address the provider gap have
taken on increased urgency ahead of the law's
full implementation Jan. 1, but many of the
potential solutions face a backlash from influ-
ential groups or will take years to bear fruit.
Lobbying groups representing doctors
have questioned the safety of some of the pro-
posed changes, argued they would encourage
less collaboration among health profession-
als and suggested they could create a two-
tiered health system offering unequal treat-
ment.
Bills seeking to expand the scope of prac-
tice of dentists, dental therapists,
optometrists, psychologists, nurse practi-
tioners and others have been killed or watered
down in numerous states. Other states have
proposed expanding student loan reimburse-
ments, but money for doing so is tight.
As fixes remain elusive, the shortfall of pri-
mary care physicians is expected to grow.
Nearly one in five Americans already lives
in a region designated as having a shortage of
primary care physicians, and the number of
doctors entering the field isn’t expected keep
pace with demand. About a quarter million pri-
mary care doctors work in America now, and
the Association of American Medical
Colleges projects the shortage will reach
almost 30,000 in two years and will grow to
about 66,000 in little more than a decade. In
some cases, nurses and physician assistants
help fill in the gap.
The national shortfall can be attributed to a
number of factors: The population has both
aged and become more chronically ill, while
doctors and clinicians have migrated to spe-
cialty fields such as dermatology or cardiolo-
gy for higher pay and better hours.
The shortage is especially acute in impov-
erished inner cities and rural areas, where it
already takes many months, years in some
cases, to hire doctors, health professionals
say.
“I’m thinking about putting our human
resources manager on the street in one of
those costumes with a `We will hire you’
sign,” said Doni Miller, chief executive of the
Neighborhood Health Association in Toledo,
Ohio. One of her clinics has had a physician
opening for two years.
In southern Illinois, the 5,500 residents of
Gallatin County have no hospital, dentist or
full-time doctor. Some pay $50 a year for an
air ambulance service that can fly them to a
hospital in emergencies. Women deliver
babies at hospitals an hour away.
The lack of primary care is both a fact of life
and a detriment to health, said retired teacher
and community volunteer Kappy Scates of
Shawneetown, whose doctor is 20 miles away
in a neighboring county.
“People without insurance or a medical card
put off going to the doctor,” she said. “They
try to take care of their kids first.”
In some areas of rural Nevada, patients typ-
ically wait seven to 10 days to see a doctor.
“Many, many people are not taking new
patients,” said Kerry Ann Aguirre, director of
business development at Northeastern Nevada
Regional Hospital, a 45-bed facility in Elko,
a town of about 18,500 that is a four-hour
drive from Reno, the nearest sizable city.
Newly insured to deepen
primary care doctor gap
HEALTH/WORLD 19
Tuesday • June 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
raises the risk for heart disease and many other health
problems.
Some people with the more common Type 2 diabetes,
the kind linked to obesity, also need insulin and might
also benefit from a device like an artificial pancreas. For
now, though, it’s aimed at people with Type 1 diabetes
who must inject insulin several times a day or get it
through a pump with a narrow tube that goes under the
skin. The pump is about the size of a cellphone and can
be worn on a belt or kept in a pocket.
The pumps give a steady amount of insulin, and
patients must monitor their sugar levels and give them-
selves more insulin at meals or whenever needed to keep
blood sugar from getting too high.
A big danger is having too much insulin in the body
overnight, when blood-sugar levels naturally fall.
People can go into comas, suffer seizures and even die.
Parents of children with diabetes often worry so much
about this that they sneak into their bedrooms at night to
check their child’s blood-sugar monitor.
In the study, all patients had sensors that continuously
monitored their blood sugar. Half of them had ordinary
insulin pumps and the others had pumps programmed to
stop supplying insulin for two hours when blood-sugar
fell to a certain threshold.
Over three months, low-sugar episodes were reduced by
about one-third in people using the pump with the shut-
off feature. Importantly, these people had no cases of
severely low blood sugar - the most dangerous kind that
require medical aid or help from another person. There
were four cases in the group using the standard pump.
“As a first step, I think we should all be very excited
that it works,” an independent expert, Dr. Irl Hirsch of
the University of Washington in Seattle, said of the pro-
grammable pump.
The next step is to test having it turn off sooner, before
sugar falls so much, and to have it automatically supply
insulin to prevent high blood sugar, too.
Continued from page 17
PANCREAS
By Christopher Torchia
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JOHANNESBURG — South Africa’s
president on Monday said a critically
ill Nelson Mandela was “asleep” when
he visited the 94-year-old at the hospi-
tal, and he urged the country to pray for
Mandela, describing him as the “father
of democracy” who made extraordinary
sacrifices on behalf of his people.
President Jacob Zuma told dozens of
foreign and South African journalists
that doctors are doing everything pos-
sible to help the former president feel
comfortable on his 17th day in a
Pretoria hospital, but refused to give
details of Mandela’s condition, say-
ing: “I’m not a doctor.” The briefing
came a day after the government said
Mandela’s condition had deteriorated
and was now critical.
Monday’s press gathering high-
lighted the tension between the gov-
ernment’s reluctance to share more
information about Mandela on the
basis of doctor-patient confidentiality,
and media appeals for thorough
updates on a figure of global interest.
The government’s belated acknowl-
edgement that an ambulance carrying
Mandela to the hospital on June 8
broke down has fueled the debate about
transparency versus
the right to privacy.
Zuma’s briefing
was also an indica-
tor of the extent to
which reports on
Mandela’s health
sometimes over-
shadow the business
of the state. Under
questioning, Zuma
said President
Barack Obama would go ahead with a
visit to South Africa, despite concerns
about Mandela’s health.
“President Obama is visiting South
Africa,” Zuma said. “I don’t think you
stop a visit because somebody’s sick.”
Obama, who arrives in Africa this
week, is due to visit Senegal, South
Africa and Tanzania.
White House spokesman Jay Carney
wouldn’t speculate about how
Mandela’s health would impact
Obama’s upcoming visit to South
Africa, saying only that the U.S. pres-
ident “continues to look forward to his
trip.”
“The president obviously has long
seen Nelson Mandela as one of his per-
sonal heroes, and I think he’s not
alone in that in this country and around
the world,” Carney said.
Zuma, who in the past has given an
overly sunny view of Mandela’s
health, briefly spoke of his visit
Sunday night to Mandela in the hospi-
tal in the capital. That visit was men-
tioned in a presidential statement on
the same night that said Mandela, pre-
viously described as being in serious
but stable condition, had lapsed into
critical condition within the previous
24 hours.
“It was late, he was already asleep,”
Zuma said. “And we then had a bit of a
discussion with the doctors as well as
his wife, Graca Machel, and we left.”
The president said South Africans
should accept that Mandela is old, and
he urged people to pray for their former
leader.
“Madiba is critical in the hospital,
and this is the father of democracy.
This is the man who fought and sacri-
ficed his life to stay in prison, the
longest-serving prisoner in South
Africa,” Zuma said, using Mandela’s
clan name.
Mandela, who became South Africa’s
first black president after the end of
apartheid in 1994, was hospitalized
for what the government said was a
recurring lung infection. This is his
fourth hospitalization since
December.
Mandela ‘asleep’ during visit
from South African president
Nelson
Mandela
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MILAN — Silvio Berlusconi, Italy’s
flamboyant former premier, was sen-
tenced to seven years in prison and
banned from politics for life Monday for
paying an underage prostitute for sex dur-
ing infamous “bunga bunga” parties and
forcing public officials to cover it up.
It was the most damaging setback yet
for the 76-year-old Berlusconi, who has
been tried numerous times for his busi-
ness dealings but never before for his
personal conduct.
Still, he vowed
that his days as a
political force are
not over. He has two
levels of appeal —
and his supporters
quickly rallied around
him.
The charges
against the billion-
aire media mogul
resulted from what became widely known
in Italy as “bunga bunga” parties hosted
in 2010 by Berlusconi, then the sitting
premier, at his villa near Milan, where he
wined and dined beautiful young women.
Berlusconi’s defense described the din-
ner parties as elegant soirees; prosecu-
tors said they were sex-fueled gatherings
that women were paid to attend. The
woman at the center of the scandal,
Karima el-Mahroug, better known as
Ruby, has described aspiring showgirls
stripping provocatively for the then-
Italian leader.
Italy’s former PM convicted in sex-for-hire trial
Silvio
Berlusconi
LOCAL 20
Tuesday • June 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
agreement was reached on that matter.
The irony now, said Uccelli spokesman
Adam Alberti, is that by their efforts to
stave off the proposal they actually killed
the possibility of protecting the public
marina they really wanted.
“They are essentially complicit with the
state and ultimately that results in no mari-
na,” Alberti said.
With a public marina near certainly off the
table, Adam Alberti said Uccelli is still pur-
suing sale of the property.
The unknown is how the loss will affect
the pending development proposal. The
City Council sent the original plan back to
the Planning Commission in May because
the inclusion of the public marina and added
amenities like parking constituted a signif-
icant enough amendment to warrant recon-
sideration of the approved permit.
The office of developer Paul Powers of the
Pauls Corporation declined comment on
anything concerning Pete’s Harbor.
A spokeswoman for opposition group
Save Pete’s Harbor did not return an inquiry
for comment on the lease termination.
However, Alison Madden who represents a
different faction and filed the lawsuit
attempting to halt the evictions, said there
is no certainty the state would not lease the
land to another bidder, especially when the
new development will provide public
access.
If the lease is legally terminated, the com-
mission could theoretically consider a new
application, said Sheri Pemberton, chief of
external affairs for the State Lands
Commission.
Pemberton said the commission had just
received the termination notice Monday and
legal staff is currently reviewing it. She
could not speculate on whether there is still
flexibility to reach a different resolution to
continue the lease with Uccelli.
“What I know is that the commission did
issue a letter two months ago of default and
that letter followed a lot of efforts and items
outlined as a default of the lease that have
not been cured,” she said.
The release of the leases is the culmina-
tion of three acrimonious decades between
the Uccellis and the state over Pete’s
Harbor, according to her attorney Ted
Hannig. In 1981, the state tried seizing the
property, including that owned by the
Uccellis, but a countersuit and grassroots
effort prevailed. The land, short of the outer
waterway, was deeded to Uccelli and the
outer harbor was placed on a 49-year renew-
able lease.
Uccelli said the couple never received
invoices but deposited 28 years of rent in a
bank account until last September when she
went to Sacramento to personally settle the
rent dispute. Months later, she was threat-
ened with termination of the lease unless
she paid $406,253.24 in rent and interest.
Uccelli paid, despite disputing the amount,
to protect the lease but more complications
with the state arose in March when it
learned of her plan to transfer it to Powers,
according to Alberti.
Continued from page 1
HARBOR
District, said the long process showcased
that the district has been transparent with
the budget.
“We’ve had five years of cuts. We want to
bring things [that have been cut] back, ...
but it can’t happen overnight,” said Luna,
who was excited that an agreement had been
reached.
When the two sides resume contract nego-
tiations in September, they will start from
where they left off rather than from scratch,
said Luna. Also, the school district should
have more information about its budget for
the upcoming years under the new state
Local Control Funding Formula.
Reaching an agreement took some time
for the two sides in Millbrae.
Negotiations between the district and the
Millbrae Education Association reached
impasse in February. Then, the two sides
worked with a mediator without success. In
late March, the sides entered the final medi-
ation process called fact finding.
Teachers were in their sixth year without a
pay raise. In addition, over the past two
years, teachers had lost about 4 percent in
income due to furloughs, teacher representa-
tives had said during the negotiations.
Prior to entering fact finding, the district
had offered a 2 percent pay raise. On the
other hand, teachers requested a 3 percent
ongoing salary increase and an increase in
health and welfare benefits to include cover-
ing a single employee completely for
Kaiser and Delta Dental.
The average annual salary for teachers
within the Millbrae district during the
2011-12 school year was $64,168, accord-
ing to the California Department of
Education. The lowest salary offered is
$40,971 and the highest is $79,907.
Increasing the teacher’s compensation
resulted in retroactive boosts to other labor
groups within the district to match the 1
percent bonus and a $10 addition boost to
benefits, bringing the contribution to $75.
Continued from page 1
DEAL
bond measure — were revisited in 2011. The
2009 plan, structured based on historical
assessed values of properties, had to be
looked at again when property values went
down for the first time in 30 years. Measure O,
a $186 million bond measure passed in
November 2010, was written with lots of lee-
way. Alarge reason for the 2010 measure was
to pay off previous debt created by bridge
loans.
Now the challenge is about how bonds are
issued.
Legislation is currently moving through
the state that could restrict the issuance of
bonds to 25-year terms. Currently, school dis-
tricts can use a mixture of 25-year and 40-year
bond terms. The legislation was introduced
after a Southern California district misused the
40-year option creating mountains of debt for
voters with few improvements to facilities.
Locally, many districts couple the longer term
option with the 25-year bonds as a way to cap-
italize on lower rates or possibly refinance
down the road but have cash while construc-
tion prices are low.
Restrictions could impact bonds issued next
year. Tonight’s study session will look at the
financing options as well as prioritizing the
remaining projects.
The board meets 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 25
at the Burlingame High School Alumni
Room, 1 Mangini Way, Burlingame.
Continued from page 1
BONDS
ability that was organized by Nickie Irvine.
Irvine and other beekeepers came to the
city to seek clarity on its municipal code
related to bees. In San Mateo, bees face
restrictions based on where you live, Irvine
said.
The county does not restrict beekeeping
on its land and 14 out of 21 cities in the
county allow it, Irvine said.
Seven cities restrict beekeeping and some
such as Pacifica restrict the practice so much
it makes it virtually impossible to raise
bees there, Irvine said.
The guild hopes to have each city in the
county adopt an ordinance such as the one
Napa County did late last year. The Napa
County Board of Supervisors eased restric-
tions on bees because they pollinate the
county’s valuable agricultural crops.
Currently, some cities limit the number of
hives a beekeeper can have or the distance a
hive can be from any structure.
Restrictions against bees, Irvine said,
have nothing to do with how they behave.
“Beekeeping codes come out of fear, ”
Irvine said.
Bees only sting when they feel threatened
and only once and drones do not sting at all,
she said. It is the yellowjackets that do the
stinging and biting, she said.
Redwood City, San Carlos and Pacifica
have the most “massive distance restric-
tions,” she said.
One Pacifica resident asked the city for a
variance and may be the only legal beekeep-
er in the coastal city.
Although banned in Foster City, they still
live there, she said.
“Bees are wild creatures,” Irvine said.
The guild wants to understand the con-
cerns of each city and help them accept
bees, she said. A typical hive can have
30,000 bees or more.
The guild also had a booth at the San
Mateo County Fair this year where it was
asking attendees to sign a petition to pro-
mote beekeeping.
Foster City Councilman Art Kiesel’s
curiosity about bees was heightened when
he saw the booth at the fair this year, he told
the Daily Journal.
He has not had a chance to discuss the
issue yet with city staff, however.
The guild’s mission going forward is to
educate the public, educate beekeepers and
change restrictive ordinances.
The guild’s membership has also swelled
in the past decade from about 40 to about
300 because many have taken an interest in
protecting honeybees, which have fallen
victim to colony collapse disorder, a phe-
nomenon where worker bees abruptly disap-
pear.
Irvine took to beekeeping because bees
are in crisis, she said.
But do not forget, she said, they also pro-
duce all that delicious honey you can buy at
any farmers’ market.
To learn more about the Beekeepers’ Guild
of San Mateo County go to: www.sanma-
teobeeguild.org
Continued from page 1
BEES
TUESDAY, JUNE25
Filoli Art Exhibit - Hidden Beauty. 86
Cañada Road, Woodside. This
photography exhibit features the
photography of various northern
California photographers and will run
throughAugust 18.For moreinformation
call 364-8300, ext. 508.
WellnessLecture: DiabetesandSugar.
6p.m.to7:30p.m.Half MoonBayLibrary,
620 Correas St., Half Moon Bay. Free. For
more information and to register go to
www.newleaf.com.
FantasyonStringsPuppetShow.6:30
p.m.SanMateoPublicLibrary,OakRoom,
55 W.Third Ave.,San Mateo.Free.Pick up
an activities calendar at the library to
searchfor more“ReadingisSoDelicious!”
events. For more information call 522-
7838.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE26
San Mateo Professional Alliance
WeeklyNetworkingLunch. Noon to 1
p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 233 E. 4th Ave.,
San Mateo. Free, lunch is $17. For more
information call 430-6500 or go to
www.sanmateoprofessionalalliance.com.
Needles and Hooks Club: AKnitting
and Crocheting Group. 6:30 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Join instructor Olivia
Cortez-Figueroa who both crochets and
knits. Cortez-Figueroa is a member of
several online knitting forums and plans
to invite guest visitors such as the editor
of Crochet Magazine. For more
information call 591-8286.
MillbraeLibraryFamilyOpenHouse.
6 p.m.-8 p.m. Millbrae Library, 1 Library
Ave. Free. Open house to feature Mike
GalisatusJazzTrioandVocalist,children’s
art activities,refreshmentsfor adultsand
children and family fun for all. For more
information go to 697-7607.
Music inthePark- Lost DogFound.6
p.m.to8p.m.StaffordPark,corner of King
Street and Hopkins Avenue, Redwood
City. Free.
Meet the Author: TimJ. Myers. 7 p.m.
1044 Middlefield Road, Redwood City.
Free.For moreinformationcall 780-7018
or go to www.redwoodcity.org/library.
Let’s Get Down to Camping Basics
with REI Outdoor School. 7 p.m.
Burlingame Public Library,480 Primrose
Road, Burlingame. Free. For more
information call 558-7411.
AmyLouandtheJukeJunkies.7 p.m.
ClubFox,2209Broadway,RedwoodCity.
$5. For more information go to
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
THURSDAY, JUNE27
NCHRAPeninsulaRegionNetworking
Social.5:30p.m.to7:30p.m.Alana’sCafe,
1020MainSt.,RedwoodCity.$25NCHRA
members, $35 non-members. For more
information call 415-291-1992.
Mustache Harbor. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Central Park, 50 E 5th Ave., San Mateo. is
a group of dedicated and talented
musicians brought together by their
astrological signs and a love for vintage
soft rock and sweet stashes. For more
information visit ci.sanmateo.ca.us.
Movies on the Square: “Back to the
Future.”8:45 p.m. Courthouse Square,
2200 Broadway, Redwood City. Free. For
more information call 780-7311 or go to
www.redwoodcity.org/events/movies.ht
ml.
FRIDAY, JUNE28
ReleasingtheInnerEntrepreneurwith
Tim Russell. 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m.
Wedgewood Banquet Center, Crystal
Springs Golf Course, 6650 Golf Course
Drive,Burlingame.$15includesbreakfast
- paid at the door. For more information
call 515-5891.
Real EstateTrendsandTransactionswith
Chris Eckert, Clarke Funkhouser, and
Michael Berube. 7:45 a.m. is registration
and coffee. Program is from 8 a.m. to 9
a.m.Poplar CreekGrill,1700CoyotePoint
Drive, San Mateo. $30 for a continental
breakfast and the program. For more
information call 401-2441.
Home Safety and Fraud Prevention.
10 a.m. to Noon. Twin Pines Senior and
Community Center, 20 Twin Pines Lane,
Belmont. The Belmont Police
Department and Fire Department
present ‘Don’t Get Burned: A workshop
on Home Safety and Fraud Prevention.
This workshop is for ages 18+. Free. For
more information call 595-7441 or go to
www.belmont.gov.
Calendar
COMICS/GAMES
6-25-13
monday’s PUZZLE soLVEd
PrEVioUs
sUdokU
answErs
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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aCross
1 Greek X
4 Ayla’s creator
8 Chinese dynasty
11 Romance novelist Victoria
13 Boast
14 Osaka sash
15 Blunted blade
16 Wood hyacinth
18 Obsess
20 Palm reader’s\
opener (2 wds.)
21 Purchase
22 Get hitched
24 Make folds
27 Sniff out
30 Take down — —
31 Unadorned
32 Pasture sound
34 Anderson Cooper’s
channel
35 She, in Paris
36 Honeycomb unit
37 2000 Olympics site
39 Breeding horses
40 Big Ten sch.
41 Okla. neighbor
42 Book ID
45 Robust
49 Eggplant dish
53 Lima’s land
54 Univ. degree
55 Stratford’s river
56 Unceasingly
57 Distress signal
58 Hangouts
59 Calibrate
down
1 Emeril, e.g.
2 Arizona tribe
3 Holly shrub
4 Monk’s home
5 Link letters
6 Paris water
7 Opposite of sm.
8 Garden tools
9 Competent
10 Cairo’s river
12 Brewer’s need (2 wds.)
17 Wait
19 Egyptian boy king
22 Existed
23 Bastille Day season
24 Felt boot
25 Hosp. workers
26 Counting-rhyme start
27 “The Voice” host
28 Trucker, often
29 Chaucer offering
31 Roquefort hue
33 Gore and Capone
35 Coast Guard off.
36 Appetizer
38 Oxford tutors
39 Actress West
41 Mongol rulers
42 Rascals
43 Carnaby Street loc.
44 Future fowers
46 Steps on the gas
47 It has rings
48 Domed tent
50 Low
51 Blvd.
52 “— -Tiki”
diLBErT® Crossword PUZZLE
fUTUrE sHoCk®
PEarLs BEforE swinE®
GET fUZZy®
TUEsday, JUnE 25, 2013
CanCEr (June 21-July 22) -- Be alert for some
material opportunities since you could gain from a
situation initiated by another. Be prepared for more
than one surprise.
LEo (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Upon frst hearing, some of your
mate’s ideas might sound outlandish, but after careful
evaluation, you might judge them to be much more clever
than you thought. Don’t make any hasty judgments.
VirGo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- This is a good day
to try out a new method or system you’ve been
contemplating for some time. Just don’t put any
limitations your thinking.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Strive to fulfll your
social obligations, especially if they could lead you
to some new people. There are indications that you
could meet someone very interesting.
sCorPio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- A situation of some
importance that hasn’t been going your way recently
could take a turn for the better. The results you
envisioned could be forthcoming.
saGiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- There could be
good reason why someone has been lingering in
your thoughts. Get in touch with him or her because
some pleasant developments could occur.
CaPriCorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- You could be in a
fortunate cycle where your fnances and material
interests are concerned. A number of opportunities
are likely to present themselves in rapid fashion.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- You’re a quick
thinker, and your spontaneous notions are likely to
be very good. Be prepared to act promptly on your
inspirations.
PisCEs (Feb. 20-March 20) -- There’s a good
chance that you could reap some rewards from a
past good deed. This remuneration may come about
from someone other than the person you helped.
ariEs (March 21-April 19) -- One of your greatest
successes is likely to come from a venture that
you only recently became interested in. In your
case, new will be better.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) -- Initially, you could
be unsure when you find yourself challenged by a
unique development. However, you’ll thrive under
the difficult circumstances.
GEmini (May 21-June 20) -- Things in general
should go much more smoothly for you than of
late, owing to a constructive change of attitude.
You’ll now be able to see positive possibilities
where you before saw only negative outcomes.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Tuesday • June 25, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Tuesday • June 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
EXPERIENCED COOKS, Avanti Pizza. .
3536 Alameda, MENLO PARK, CA
(650)854-1222.
MAINTENANCE
General Maintenance Assistant
private school, full time,
Tuesdays through Saturdays.
Grounds maintenance, cleaning, re-
pairs, painting, etc. Must be profes-
sional, reliable, lift 50+ lbs. Must
read, speak and write English fluent-
ly. Full criminal background check
and physical will be required.
To apply, email
jreams@mmboa.org
110 Employment
AUTMOTIVE -
NOW HIRING
SERVICE TECHNICIANS
OILSTOP DRIVE-THRU
OIL CHANGE
• Excellent benefits
• No experience necessary
• Complete training program
• Retirement program
• Advancement opportunities
• Competitive pay
APPLY IN PERSON AT
2009 El Camino Real, San Mateo
Monday-Saturday 8-6
For more info: www.oilstopinc.com
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
HOTEL -
Experienced front desk agent position,
and maintenance person position.
Fax resume: (650)589-7076.
Email: ac@citigardenhotel.com
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
182 Biz Opportunities
SUSHI RESTAURANT FOR SALE - Ex-
cellent location in San Francisco. Good
cash flow, Asking $350K, Call Peter
(707)815-3640
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255802
The following person is doing business
as: Hash Cloud Studio, 200 Industrial
Rd., Ste. 155, BURLINGAME, CA 94010
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Frank Flores, 1501 Hillside Dr.,
Burlingame, CA 94010. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 05/01/2013.
/s/ Kristiann Garrett /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/04/13, 06/11/13, 06/18/13, 06/25/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256029
The following person is doing business
as: 1) J & J Hawaiian Barbecue, 2) J & J
Hawaiian BBQ, 1180 Alma St. MENLO
PARK, CA 94025 is hereby registered by
the following owner: J & J Hawaiian Bar-
becue, Inc., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 01/01/2004.
/s/ Jason Quan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/24/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/04/13, 06/11/13, 06/18/13, 06/25/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256117
The following person is doing business
as: Five Star Property Management, 920
Terminal Way, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Five Star Property Management
Po Box 15657, San Francisco, CA
94115. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
06/01/2013.
/s/ Roger D. Eagleton /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/04/13, 06/11/13, 06/18/13, 06/25/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256144
The following person is doing business
as: Dancing Dolphins Healing Arts, 3552
Altamont Way, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94062 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Margo Keeley, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Margo Keeley/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/11/13, 06/18/13, 06/25/13, 07/02/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256146
The following person is doing business
as: Inkraged, 2512 Carmelita Ave, BEL-
MONT, CA 94002 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Marit Hsich,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on May 2013.
/s/ Marit Hsich /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/11/13, 06/18/13, 06/25/13, 07/02/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256248
The following person is doing business
as: European Wax Center, 249 Primrose,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
CDIT, INC, CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Diana Chan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/11/13, 06/18/13, 06/25/13, 07/02/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255996
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: VEGA Skin Care, 134 Hazel-
wood Dr., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owners: Angela Vega and Lubin
C. Masibay, Jr., 1001 National Ave.,
#233, San Bruno, CA 94066. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Married Couple.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Angela Vega /
/s/ Lubin Masibay /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/11/13, 06/18/13, 06/25/13, 07/02/13.)
23 Tuesday • June 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256172
The following person is doing business
as: Harbor Books & Art Gallery 643 Main
St., HALF MOON BAY, CA 94019 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Carole Brehm, 771 The Alameda, El
Granada, CA 94018. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Carole Brehm /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/4/2013. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/11/13, 06/18/13, 06/25/13, 07/02/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256043
The following person is doing business
as: L’Vian, 317 Primrose Rd., BURLIN-
GAME, CA 94010 is hereby registered
by the following owners: Suzan Devle-
tian, 317 Primrose Rd., BURLINGAME,
CA 94010. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Suzan Devletian/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/24/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/11/13, 06/18/13, 06/25/13, 07/02/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256324
The following person is doing business
as: Time to Live Life Coaching, 181 Mor-
ton Dr., DALY CITY, CA 94015 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Zaree-
na Garrison, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Zareena Garrison /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/18/13, 06/25/13, 07/02/13, 07/09/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256325
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Happy Campers Infant Toddler
Center, 300 El Camino Real, SAN CAR-
LOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered by
the following owners: Angela Grech and
John Grech, 408 Biscayne Ave., Foster
City, CA 94404. The business is con-
ducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ John Grech /
/s/ Angela Grech /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/18/13, 06/25/13, 07/02/13, 07/09/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256099
The following person is doing business
as: Nernst Engineering, 64 Eddy Stone
Ct., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94065 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Hooman Hafezi, same adress. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 05/01/2013.
/s/ Hooman Hafezi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/25/13, 07/02/13, 07/09/13, 07/16/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256100
The following person is doing business
as: Meal Boxes Etc., 724 S. Amphlett
Blvd., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Ka-
makshis Kitchen, LLC, CA. The business
is conducted by a Limited Liability Com-
pany. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Narayanan Kallingal /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/25/13, 07/02/13, 07/09/13, 07/16/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256275
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Molly’s Wheat Free Confection
Company, 505 S. B St., SAN MATEO,
CA 94401 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owners: Molly Bullard and Dan
Topoian, 1767 Juniper Ave., San Bruno,
CA 94066. The business is conducted by
a Married Couple. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Molly Bullard /
/s/ Dan Topoian /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/25/13, 07/02/13, 07/09/13, 07/16/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256358
The following person is doing business
as: Inspiring Spaces, 3130 Alpine Rd.,
Ste 288-154, PORTOLA VALLEY, CA
94028 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Amy Friedberg, 130 E. Flores-
ta Way, PORTOLA VALLEY, CA 94028.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
01/01/2013.
/s/ Amy Friedberg /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/25/13, 07/02/13, 07/09/13, 07/16/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256454
The following person is doing business
as: Sequenta Clinical Laboratory, 400 E.
Jamie Ct., Ste. 301, SOUTH SAN FRAN-
CISCO, CA 94080 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Sequenta, Inc,
CA. The business is conducted by an In-
dividual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
03/01/2012.
/s/ Thomas Willis /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/25/13, 07/02/13, 07/09/13, 07/16/13.)
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
CHANGE IN OWNERSHIP OF
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE
Date of Filing Application: June 17, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
Pho Vinh, Inc
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
1065 Holly Street,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070
Type of license applied for:
41-On-Sale Beer And Wine-Eating
Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
June 25, 2013
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Ann Elizabeth Emerson. aka Ann
Emerson and Ann E. Emmerson
Case Number: 123427
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Ann Elizabeth Emmer-
son, aka Ann Emmerson and Ann E.
Emerson. A Petition for Probate has
been filed by Daniel C. Spitzer in the Su-
perior Court of California, County of San
Mateo. The Petition for Probate requests
that Daniel C. Spitzer be appointed as
personal representative to administer the
estate of the decedent.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
203 Public Notices
this court as follows: July 15, 2013 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28,, Room , Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo,
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. If you object to the granting of the
petition, you should appear at the hear-
ing and state your objections or file writ-
ten objections with the court before the
hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within four months from the date of first
issuance of letters as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 9100. The time for fil-
ing claims will not expire before four
months from the hearing date noticed
above. You may examine the file kept by
the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court
a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Seth M. Skootsky (SBN 139202)
Skootsky & Der, LLP
90 New Montgomery St., Ste. 600
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94105
(415)979-9800
Dated: June 6, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on June 11,18, 25, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, $90.,
(650)610-9765
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIER 5200 BTU window air conditioner
- never used, in box, $95. obo, (650)591-
6842
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
296 Appliances
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WEBER BRAND Patio Refrigerator,
round top load, for beer, soda, and wa-
ter. $30 obo (650)591-6842
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $90.,
(650)596-0513
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
298 Collectibles
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
67 USED United States (50) and Europe-
an (17) Postage Stamps. Most issued
before World War II. All different and de-
tached from envelopes. All for $4.00,
(650)787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MENORAH - Antique Jewish tree of life,
10”W x 30”H, $100., (650)348-6428
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
STAINED GLASS WINDOW - 30” x 18”,
diamond pattern, multi-colored, $95.,
SOLD!
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
298 Collectibles
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria
650-873-8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $700 obo
(650)766-3024
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
24
Tuesday • June 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Praline nut
6 Grueling grad
grillings
11 Nebraska
panhandle hrs.
14 Wear down
15 Jousting weapon
16 Irish actor Stephen
17 Proverbially, they
wait for no one
19 Separating space
20 Rocks in a bar
21 It’s often used as
a synonym for
“thesaurus”
22 Desert largely in
Mongolia
23 Ragged
27 Salinger heroine
28 Battery terminal
29 Two foursomes
32 Rock legend
Frank
35 Revolutionary
Franklin
37 “Gotcha!” cries
38 Birth state of two
presidents
39 Bowl over
40 Stout of
whodunits
41 Takes the risk
42 Sale rack abbr.
43 Overzealous
45 Spork point
47 Semi
53 Jekyll’s alter ego
54 2010 Super Bowl
MVP
55 Connecticut
collegian
56 Press initials
57 Simple breakfast
60 “__ Along, Little
Dogies”
61 Duma dissents
62 Singer
Tennessee __
Ford
63 Provençal
possessive
64 Short and snappy
65 Red and rosé
DOWN
1 __ four: small
cake
2 Susan’s “All My
Children” role
3 Celestial streaker
4 Citrus drink
5 Most closely
related
6 Eccentric senior,
affectionately
7 Classified
8 Singer Baker
9 Digital scale
display, for short
10 “Understand?”
11 Hershey’s treat in
a yellow wrapper
12 Shore cooler
13 Putter’s gimme
18 Standard
22 Pontiac muscle car
24 Beach shirts
25 Dozes off
26 Forensic
evidence letters
29 Rower’s need
30 George
Washington’s
favorite fruity
dessert?
31 Stressful reviews
for filers
33 Tool for the Tin
Woodman
34 Like verbs
describing what
happened
36 Reverse pic
38 “Yay, me!”
39 Three, to Angela
Merkel
41 Cartoonist
Browne
42 Rather
worried
44 Dating letters
46 Hopping mad
47 Tough guys
48 Knick or Celt
49 Mild oaths
50 Rimes of
country
51 Borden mascot
52 Religious
ceremonies
57 Big bang cause,
and an informal
hint to 17-, 23-,
47- and 57-
Across
58 Needle-threader’s
target
59 “... __ quit!”
By C.C. Burnikel
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
06/25/13
06/25/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
302 Antiques
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HARMON/KANDON SPEAKERS (2)
mint condition, great, for small
office/room or extra speakers, 4 1/2 in.
high, includes cords $8., SOLD!
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center draw locks all comes with
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame SOLD!
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
304 Furniture
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
2, 5 drawer medal cabinets 5' high 31/2'
wide both $40 SOLD
3 MEDAL base kitchen cabinets with
drawers and wood doors $99
(650)347-8061
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR (2), with arms, Italian 1988 Cha-
teau D'Ax, solid, perfect condition. $50
each or $85 for both. (650)591-0063
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COPENHAGEN TEAK dining table with
dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions. 48/88"
long x 32" wide x 30" high. $95.00
(650)637-0930
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 draw dresser 61" wide,
31" high, & 18" deep $50., (650)592-
2648
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
304 Furniture
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
GLASS DINING Table 41” x 45” Round-
ed rectangle clear glass top and base
$85 (650)888-0129
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
LIGHT WOOD Rocking Chair & Has-
sock, gold cushions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
RECLINER ROCKER - Like new, brown,
vinyl, $99., (650)365-0202
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, SOLD!
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
304 Furniture
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR with wood carving,
armrest, rollers, and it swivels $99.,
(650)592-2648
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TALL OUTSIDE BISTRO TABLE -
glass top with 2 chairs $75 (firm) SOLD!
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEAK TV stand, wheels, rotational, glass
doors, drawer, 5 shelves. 31" wide x 26"
high X 18" deep. $75.00 (650)637-0930
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
WICKER ENTERTAINMENT CABINET -
H 78” x 43” x 16”, almost new, $89.,
(650)347-9920
WOODEN DESK 31/2' by 21/2' by 21/2'
$25 SOLD
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
3 PIECE fireplace set with screen $25
(650)322-2814
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
BREVILLE JUICER - Like new, SOLD!
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, (650)578-9208
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
1/2 HORSE power 8" worm drive skill
saw $40 OBO (650)315-5902
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
BLACK & DECKER CORDLESS 18 volt
combo drill, vacuum, saw, sander, two
batteries & charger, brand new, $95.
obo, SOLD!
BOB VILLA rolling tool box & organizer -
brand new with misc. tools, $40. obo,
(650)591-6842
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTMANS PROFESSIONAL car buf-
fer with case $40 OBO (650)315-5902
CRAFTSMAN 14.4 VOLT DRILL - bat-
tery & charger, never used, $35. obo,
SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 3/8” 16.8 volt drill & vac-
uum combo, brand new, with charger,
$45. obo, SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DEWALT 18 volt battery drill with 2 bat-
tery & charger $45 OBO SOLD!
DREMEL HIGH SPEED ROTARY TOOL
- all attachments, never used, $25. obo
SOLD!
308 Tools
ELECTRIC HEDGE trimmer good condi-
tion (Black Decker) $40 (650)342-6345
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LADDER - 24' aluminum 2 section ladder
$20., SOLD
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 21” Belt Sander with long cord,
$35 (650)315-5902
MILLWAUKEE SAWSALL in case with
blades (like new) $50 OBO SOLD!
NEW DRILL DRIVER - 18V + battery &
charger, $30., (650)595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SANDER, MAKITA finishing sander, 4.5
x 4.5"' used once. Complete with dust
bag and hard shell case. $35.00 SOLD!
SMALL ROTETILLER 115 Volt Works
well $99.00 (650)355-2996
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
TOOL BOX - custom made for long
saws, $75.,SOLD!
TOOLAND INC
Name brands * Huge inventory
Low prices
Personalized service
M-F 7"30 - 6; Sa: 9 - 4:30
1369 Industrial, San Carlos
(650)631-9636
www,tooland.com
TORO ELECTRIC POWER SWEEPER
blower - never used, in box, $35. obo,
(650)591-6842
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $65 (650)341-8342
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
IBM SELECTRIC II typewriter self cor-
recting $25 (650)322-2814
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
3 LARGE old brown mixing bowls $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History,
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
5 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $9. for all
(650)347-5104
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEO 75 with jackets 75 with-
out $100 for all, SOLD!
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99., (650)580-
3316
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASTRONOMY BOOKS (2) Hard Cover
Cambridge Encyclopedia of Astronomy,
World of Discovery, $12., (650)578-9208
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14., (650)578-9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, excellent
condition, $43., (650)347-5104
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
310 Misc. For Sale
BAY BRIDGE Framed 50th anniversary
poster (by Bechtel corp) $50
(650)873-4030
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection SOLD!
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY Jake AB Scissor Exercise Ma-
chine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
C2 MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES -
style wall mount, plug in, bronze finish,
12” L x 5”W , good working condition,
$12. both, (650)347-5104
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
(650)578-9208
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOOD HEALTH FACT BOOK - un-
used, answers to get/stay healthy, hard
cover, 480 pages, $8., (650)578-9208
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HABACHI BBQ Grill heavy iron 22" high
15" wide $25 (650)593-8880
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
KELTY SUPER TIOGA BACKPACK -
$40., (650)552-9436
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model", $250., (650)637-0930
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LAUNDRY SORTER - on wheels, triple
section, laundry sorter - $19., (650)347-
9920
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, (650)341-1861
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW COWBOY BOOTS - 9D, Unworn,
black, fancy, only $85., (650)595-3933
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., (650)578-9208
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
25 Tuesday • June 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
310 Misc. For Sale
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. White Rotary
sewing machine similar age, cabinet
style. $85 both. (650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STAINED GLASS panels multi colors
beautiful work 35" long 111/2" wide $79
OBO (650)349-6059
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TENT - one man packable tent - $20.,
(650)552-9436
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, (650)341-1861
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLKSWAGON NEW Beatle hub cap,
3, $70 for All (650)283-0396
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WEBER GO ANYWHERE GAS BARBE-
QUE - never used, in box, $40., SOLD!
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
MARTIN D-18S 1971 Guitar $1500.
Great sound. Great Condition
(650)522-8322
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
ATTRACTIVE LADIES trench coat red,
weather proof size 6/8 $35
(650)345-3277
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS JACKET - size XXL, Beautiful
cond., med., $35., (650)595-3933
316 Clothes
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW! OLD NAVY Coat: Boy/Gril, fleece-
lined, hooded $15 (415)585-3622
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
brand new, never worn for $25
(650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 AIR rifles, shoots .177 pelets. $50 ea
Obo (650)591-6842
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$25.(650)368-0748.
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
BIKE TRAINER Ascent fluid $85
(650)375-8021
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
FOR SALE medium size wet suit $95
call for info (650)851-0878
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BAG with 15 clubs $35. SOLD.
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels, $85.
obo, (650)223-7187
ROWING MACHINE. $30.00
(650)637-0930
SCHWINN STATIONARY RECUMBENT
BIKE, $45., SOLD!
STATIONARY EXERCISE BICYCLE -
Compact, excellent condition, $40. obo,
(650)834-2583
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL EXERCISE- Pro Form 415
Crosswalk, very good condition $200 call
(650)266-8025
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40.,
(408)764-6142
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
SLEEP APNEA breathing machine com-
plete in box helps you breathe, costs $$$
sacrifice for $75, (650)995-0012
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
381 Homes for Sale
VOLUNTEER WITH
Habitat for Humanity
and help us build homes and
communities in East Palo Alto.
Volunteers welcome
Wed-Sat from 8:30-4pm.
415-625-1022
www.habitatgsf.org
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$59.-69.daily + tax
$350.-$375. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
515 Office Space
SAN MATEO DRIVE beautiful Medical
Office space for rent only $75/day.
Paulsurinder1@yahoo.com
620 Automobiles
2001 MBZ ML320 SVU with third row
seating with 133k miles loaded sharp
looking and roomy mid size luxury
suv.#4430 on sale for $7500.00 plus fees
(650)637-3900
2001 PORSCHE 911 Carrera 4 cabriolet
automatic with 90k miles hard top and
power soft top in excellent conditions
black on black leather loaded navigation
#5033 on sale for $27995.00 plus fees.
(650)637-3900
2001 TOYOTA Tundra access cab 4
door automatic with 220k miles. Must
see this truck up close to see how nice
she is been taken care of .#5038 on sale
for $7995.00 plus fees. (650)637-3900
2002 LEXUS is 300 special edition, with
91k miles she is loaded with all options
including navigation clean car fax #4519
asking price is $11995.00 plus fees
(650)637-3900
2002 VOLVO s80 t6 sedan, 107k miles
in great new conditions. Fully loaded with
options. Looks & drives excellent
#5040.on sale for $5995.00 plus fees.
(650)637-3900
2003 FORD Mustang GT convertible with
102k miles. Ready for summer with auto-
matic and power top,loaded sharp look-
ing with nice ride #5031 sale price
$7995.00 plus fees. (650)637-3900
2004 SATURN Ion 3 sedan with 94 k
miles. Comes with manual 5 speed
transmission. One owner clean car and
free warranty #4521 priced to sell quick
$5850.00 plus fees (650)637-3900
2006 VW gti two door hatchback
with121k miles 6 speed manual in red
sporty color. Runs great and fun to drive
#4426 on sale for only $7995.00 plus
fees. (650)637-3900
620 Automobiles
2005 MAZDA RX8 sport coupe with 112
k miles. come with automatic transmis-
sion. Looks great and very good on gas.
Hard to find black color #4502 reduced
sale price $7500.00 plus fees
(650)637-3900
2012 TOYOTA Camery LE automatic
with 24 k miles. Comes with factory war-
ranty. save thousands instead of buying
new, comes with brand new alloy rims
and tiers #4420 priced $17995.00 plus
fees. (650)637-3900
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
ACCURA 1997 3.0 CL CP Black, Auto-
matic $3300, (650)630-3216
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBIL”79Royal Delta 88, 122k
Miles, in excelleny Condition $1,800
(650)342-8510
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$2,500 Bid (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,400.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo Rob SOLD!
HONDA 1983 ASCOT VT 500 Motorcy-
cle, looks like 2012, must see. $1100,
obo, SOLD!
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $50. obo,
(650)223-7187
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
NEW MOTORCYCLE HELMET - Modu-
lar, dual visor, $69., (650)595-3933
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., SOLD!
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $60 for all
(650)588-7005
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPEAR tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Four steel
13in rims. Factory Hub Caps. $150. San
Bruno. SOLD!
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
670 Auto Parts
JEEP TJ 2004-2006 (1) ALUMINUM
WHEEL & TIRE, brand new condition,
$90., SOLD!
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Bath
TUBZ
Over 400 Tubs on display!
World’s Largest “Hands-On, Feet-In”
Showroom
4840 Davenport Place
Fremont, CA 94538
(510)770-8686
www.tubz.net
Asphalt/Paving
AIM CONSTRUCTION
John Peterson
• Paving • Grading
• Slurry Sealing • Paving Stones
• Concrete • Patching
We AIM to please!
(650)468-6750
(408)422-7695
Lic.# 916680
Cabinetry
Contractors
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Concrete, decks, retaining
walls, fences, bricks, roof,
gutters, & drains.
Call David
(650)270-9586
Lic# 914544 Bonded & Insured
Contractors
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Home repairs &
Foundation work
Retaining wall • Decks • Fences
No job too small
Gary Afu
(650)207-2400
Lic# 904960
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
26
Tuesday • June 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Cleaning
Concrete
CHETNER CONCRETE
Lic #706952
Driveways - Walkways
- Pool Decks - Patios - Stairs
- Exposed Aggregate - Masonry
- Retaining Walls - Drainage
- Foundation/Slabs
Free Estimates
(650)271-1442 Mike
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete • Brickwork • Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers • Landscaping
Tile • Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Construction
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Solas
Electric
Best Rates
On all electrical work
7 days a week
Free Estimates
(650) 302-7906
CA License 950866
Bonded and Insured
Electricians
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
JOSE’S
COMPLETE GARDENING
Complete gardening &
Landscaping
Commercial & Residential
Licensed
Free Estimates
(650)315-4011
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Landscaping
ASP LANDSCAPING
• All kinds of Concrete • Stamp
• Retaining Wall • Tree Service
• Brick • Roofing • Fencing
• New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435
(650)834-4495
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
Painting
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
VICTOR’S FENCES
House Painting
•Interior •Exterior
Power Wash
•Driveways •Sidewalk •Houses
Free Estimates
(650)583-1270
or (650)808-5833
Lic. # 106767
Plumbing
HAMZEH PLUMBING
5 stars on Yelp!
$25 OFF First Time Customers
All plumbing services
24 hour emergency service
(415)690-6540
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
27 Tuesday • June 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Cemetery
CRIPPEN & FLYNN FUNERAL
CHAPELS
Family owned & operated
Established 1949
Personalized cremation &
funeral services
Serving all faiths & traditions
Woodside chapel: (650)369-4103
FD 879
Carlmont chapel: (650)595-4103
FD 1825
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)868-0082
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Home Care
MY ERRAND SERVICES
Help is on the way
• New Mother Assistance
• Senior Assistance • General Errands
• House & Pet Sitting • Event Help
• House Keeping • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
(650)201-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GREAT FULL BODY
MASSAGE
Tranquil Massage
951 Old County Rd. Suite 1,
Belmont
10:00 to 9:30 everyday
(650) 654-2829
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
Massage Therapy
UNION SPA & SALON
Grand Opening
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT
SENIOR LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
Video
ADULT VIDEOS $99 (415)298-0645
28
Tuesday • June 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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