For immediate release: Friday, June 28, 2013

For more information: Bill Mahoney (518) 817-3738

2013 SESSION ANALYSIS

Subject Total bills passed in 2013 compared to other years Floor votes lost by year Governor Cuomo's use of Messages of Necessity and Program Bills Governor Cuomo's vetoes Constitutional amendments Rankings of the members who introduced and passed the most and fewest number of bills and resolutions Opposition to legislation: how many bills passed unanimously, which members voted against the most bills Absences by legislators Conference loyalty in the Senate: how often members voted with their leaders Conference loyalty in the Assembly: how often members voted with their leaders Participation in Senate Floor Debates Appendix A: Senate Bill Introduction/ Passage Totals Appendix B: Assembly Bill Introduction/ Passage Totals Appendix C: Senate Voting Totals Appendix D: Assembly Voting Totals

Page 2 5 6 8 10 12 20 21 23 26 31 37 39 43 45

1

As part of NYPIRG’s ongoing review of legislative activity, the following analysis examines the 2013 New York legislative session to date. This analysis does not draw conclusions on the substance of bills or a particular legislator’s impact, or the overall legislative output, since legislative “productivity” is more complicated and subjective than simple numbers. It is up to New Yorkers to assess their legislators’ effectiveness and impact. In order to be informed New Yorkers deserve information on the functioning of their Legislature and we hope that the following information will stimulate dialogue between lawmakers and their constituents. Unless otherwise noted, the following numbers are based on data compiled by the Legislative Bill Drafting Commission. This was obtained over the past three weeks, and subsequent revisions made to publicly-released voting results might not be reflected. Numbers are subject to change in the event of a special or extraordinary session. Bill Passage Totals by Year Passed Passed Passed Passed Passed Passed Both, Assembly, JanSenate, JanAssembly, Senate, Both, Full Jan-Jul July July Full Year Full Year Year 2013 1,071 1,408 650 1,071 1,408 650 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1,056 999 1,196 1,242 1,641 1,531 1,961 1,628 1,702 1,403 1,654 1,283 1,537 1,470 1,547 1,132 1,580 1,362 1,256 1,289 1,124 640 1,794 1,770 1,842 1,603 1,522 1,366 1,294 1,050 1,424 1,317 1,369 1,234 1,543 1,401 571 677 700 554 811 847 958 882 777 761 745 549 711 607 674 475 813 776 1,056 1,001 1,210 1,256 1,645 1,538 1,965 1,630 1,793 1,408 1,654 1,394 1,537 1,586 1,563 1,469 1,585 1,362 1,256 1,291 1,143 694 1,822 1,828 1,848 1,619 1,607 1,374 1,314 1,149 1,424 1,412 1,391 1,408 1,558 1,407 571 679 716 588 830 861 963 890 879 768 755 662 711 732 694 758 830 782

Year

2

Total Bills Passing Both Houses
1350

1150

950

750

550 1920

1930

1940

1950

1960

1970

1980

1990

2000

2010

Governor Miller Smith 19231928 FDR Lehman Dewey Harriman Rockefeller Wilson Carey Cuomo I Pataki Spitzer Paterson Cuomo II

Average Two House Bills per Year 908.00 936.17 1,047.25 1,214.10 1,189.00 1,289.25 1,356.20 1,348.00 1,041.38 941.75 785.33 861.00 711.33 633.33

While the total number of bills that passed both houses increased from 2012 to 2013 (and may increase further if a special session convenes), the total of 649 bills is remarkably low by historical standards. This is part of a broader trend: Since 1915, the three years that saw the fewest bills pass both houses are 2009, 2012, and 2013.1 It seems that a smaller quantity of two-house bills is a new reality in New York State. There are several reasons this might be the case, and they seem to be rooted in both structural changes in the legislative process and in changes in the productivity and total output of legislation (for better or worse) of the state Legislature. Some of this decrease may be due to the increasing importance of the state budget. In 1969, one of the years with the highest number of bills passed, the budget was 577 pages. In 2012, it was 2,890. While much of this increase is due to the dramatic growth in government spending, there appears to be a trend toward including a greater number of

1

Historic totals from 1920 through 1994 were obtained from the New York State Red Book. Earlier years were obtained from archives held by the New York State Library.

3

issues in the annual budget’s appropriation and Article VII bills, thus increasing the length of the budget bills and reducing the number of policy changes that may have passed as separate bills. An additional factor in this trend might be the relatively small majorities in the state senate. While the total number of bills passing this chamber has barely changed, it is possible that the need for nearunanimity within the Majority Coalition has made it more difficult to pass significant legislation. This may be true because one or two dissenters can be enough to keep a bill from seeing a vote. It seems feasible that this dissent is more likely to surface in a Republican-controlled chamber over bills that are supported by Assembly Democrats than over one-house bills sponsored by their copartisans, which could lead to relatively constant numbers of one-house bills, but fewer agreements between both chambers. The most significant reason for the gradual decline in recent decades is likely due to a relative stasis in the societal areas that are deemed governable. The years in which these numbers peaked were those which coincided with the most fervent periods of expansionism, specifically the Little New Deal, the post-war boom years, and Governor Rockefeller’s unprecedented increases in state spending. Some of the new areas in which the state began to legislate were due directly to opportunities for federal grants, such as increases in welfare and housing. Others, such as environmental protection and funding for higher education, were not directly tied to federal requirements, but grew out of similar philosophies about the role of the state government in society. New legislation became necessary to establish these programs, and additional bills were often passed in subsequent years to fix problems in these nascent state programs. As the programs matured, they entered into a more settled status, which required less frequent adjustment. In recent decades, the state has entered fewer new fields of governance, driven most recently by a lack of funds due to the recent economic downturn. Average Two-House Bills per Year 955 1,159 1,213 1,230 1,363 1,192 1,019 818 791 654

Decade 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s (so far)

4

Bills Passed by Time of Year Both houses passed most of their bills toward the end of session. The Assembly in fact, passed nearly half of their bills (49.63%) in the last week of regular session; the Senate more than one third (36.44%). This reliance on passing hundreds of bills during the closing weeks of session is a long-time practice, though it was more pronounced this year than last. In 2013, the Assembly passed 68.76% of their bills in June, compared to 57.56% in 2013; in 2013 the Senate passed 66.13% of their bills in June, compared to 55.37% for 2012. Bills Passed by % of All Assembly Bills Passed % of All 2 Assembly Bills by Senate Senate Bills 26 2.40% 5 0.35% 25 2.31% 22 1.53% 61 5.64% 101 7.02% 78 7.21% 96 6.68% 148 13.68% 263 18.29% 744 68.76% 951 66.13% 537 49.63% 524 36.44%

Time Period January February March April May June Last Week of Session (6/17 through 6/22)

Floor Votes on Bills Lost by Calendar Year

12,579 different bills have passed the Assembly since the last day a vote sponsored by an Assembly
Democrat lost. This was an attempted veto override in 2004; it has been even longer since a vote requiring a simple majority has lost in the Assembly. This chart does not include totals for votes on hostile amendments or rules. Year 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Senate 0 1 1 2 9 0 1 0 0 Assembly 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2

If bills passed multiple times, credit for one bill was given for each month in which they passed. A number of bills in each house were passed, amended, then repassed.

5

Messages of Necessity After significant public criticism over the use of a message of necessity to pass the SAFE Act in January, only two bills passed either house with a message in the remainder of the 2013 session. In his tenure of three legislative sessions Governor Cuomo has used messages far less than his predecessors: an average of 12.3 bills per year have passed either house with a message in his tenure, compared to 41 under the Spitzer/ Paterson dyad and 89.2 under Pataki.

Year 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995

Bills Passing Either House With Message of Necessity 3 5 29 57 43 41 23 39 34 84 58 102 80 83 118 100 109 144 119

6

Program Bills In 2013 Governor Cuomo continued to introduce fewer program bills than his predecessors, but has passed a significantly higher percentage of them through both houses. It should be noted that most program bills are introduced once in each house, so in most years, a passage rate of 50% would usually indicate that the governor has passed each of his proposals. Program Bills Total Active Passing Both Governor(s) Program Bills Houses 2013 Cuomo 40 2012 Cuomo 58 2011 Cuomo 45 2010 Paterson 237 2009 Paterson 464 Spitzer/ 2008 101 Paterson 2007 Spitzer 69 2006 Pataki 93 2005 Pataki 115 2004 Pataki 88 2003 Pataki 71 2002 Pataki 117

Year

13 21 16 52 29 26 16 9 26 8 15 15

Percentage Passing 32.50% 36.21% 35.56% 21.94% 6.25% 25.74% 23.19% 9.68% 22.61% 9.09% 21.13% 12.82%

7

Gubernatorial Vetoes Note that the combined total of bills that have been chaptered and vetoed does not exactly match the total number of bills passing each house. Due to the governor’s line-item power, many appropriation bills count in both categories. Constitutional amendments are included in the tally of bills passing both houses, but ultimately are subject to voter approval or rejection, not gubernatorial action to be chaptered or vetoed.

Vetoes as a % of Bills Year Chaptered Vetoed Passing Both Houses 2013, through 6/21 57 3 TBD 2012 505 61 10.68% 2011 610 68 10.01% 2010 567 150 20.95% 2009 507 79 13.44% 2008 652 177 21.33% 2007 691 164 19.05% 2006 750 219 22.74% 2005 770 119 13.37% 2004 755 132 15.02% 2003 697 73 9.51% 2002 698 55 7.28% 2001 591 70 10.57% 2000 609 101 14.21%

8

A review of 564 bills that passed both houses in 2012 illustrates that legislation Governor Cuomo acts on later in the year is more likely to be vetoed than bills acted on soon after session.3 Of the examined bills, only 0.55% of those acted on in July were voted, while 56.25% of those dealt with in December were.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 0 50 100 150 200 Vetoed Chaptered

3

In 2012, 571 bills passed both houses. Of this total, seven bills were omitted from this chart due to peculiarities that made them difficult to graph, such as budget bills that were both signed and received line-item vetoes.

9

Concurrent Resolutions to Amend the Constitution Passing Both Houses More constitutional amendments have received either first or second passage in both houses in 2013 than in any other year in recent history. Constitutional Amendments Year Passing Both Houses 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995

8 6 2 1 2 1 5 3 3 1 2 2 1 1 1 0 3 2 5

10

Concurrent Resolutions to Amend the Constitution Passing Both Houses in 2013 Sponsor/ Title Silver (MS) -- Creates the independent redistricting commission to establish senate, assembly and congressional districts Thiele (MS) -- Relates to veterans with disabilities Weinstein (MS) -- Authorizes retired supreme court justices to serve as justice of supreme court until age 80 Galef (MS) -- Allows satisfaction of constitutional requirement that bills be on members desks by distribution of bills in electronically written form Pretlow -- Authorizes casino gambling within the state as prescribed by the legislature MARTINS -- Extends until 1/1/2024 the authority of counties, cities, towns & villages to exclude from constitutional debt limits indebtedness related to sewage facilities LITTLE -- Authorizes the state to engage in a land exchange with NYCO Minerals, Inc. relating to certain land in the town of Lewis, county of Essex, within the forest preserve (second passage) LITTLE -- Authorizes the legislature to settle the land dispute between the state and private parties in township 40, Totten and Crossfield Purchase in Long Lake (Second Passage) Passage Year on Ballot

Second Second Second

2014 2013 2013

Second Second

2014 2013

Second

2013

Second

2013

Second

2013

11

BILL INTRODUCTION/ PASSAGE Bill Introductions Members of the IDC introduced the greatest number of bills per member.4 Total Bills Average Per Introduced Member 6739 63.58 1335 31.05 2217 85.27 427 106.75 3113 100.42

Conference Assembly Dems Assembly GOP Senate Dems Senate IDC Senate GOP

25 legislators introduced more than 125 bills: House Senate Assembly Assembly Senate Assembly Senate Assembly Assembly Assembly Senate Assembly Assembly Senate Senate Assembly Senate Assembly Senate Senate Assembly Assembly Assembly
4

Member Bills Introduced Parker 406 Englebright 381 Pretlow 259 LaValle 257 Ortiz 223 Golden 208 Rosenthal 201 Wright 200 Kavanagh 197 Maziarz 196 Gabryszak 195 Thiele 186 Young 180 Lanza 178 Brennan 170 Adams 167 Gunther A 157 Grisanti 156 Ball 155 Cusick 147 Dinowitz 147 Cahill 146

In the conference summaries analysis dealing with bill and resolution introductions, passage, and co-sponsorship, Assemblymember Kearns, Senators Sampson and Smith, and bills introduced by “Budget” and “Rules” are excluded.

12

Senate Senate Senate

Carlucci Espaillat Marcellino

146 141 126

13 legislators introduced fewer than ten bills. Many of these members were freshman. House Assembly Assembly Assembly Assembly Senate Assembly Assembly Assembly Assembly Assembly Assembly Assembly Assembly Member Bills Introduced Solages 9 Losquadro 9 Duprey 8 Gjonaj 8 Sanders 8 Johns 7 Stirpe 7 Lupinacci 7 Friend 6 Barrett 6 Hikind 3 Arroyo 1 Rivera 0

Bills Passed At Least One House In both houses, members of the majority conference(s) had significantly higher numbers of bills passing their own chamber. In the Senate, Republicans averaged nearly nine times as many such bills as Democrats. Average Bills Passing at Least Percentage of All Bills Introduced One House Per Member Passing at Least One House 8.93 14.05% 2.65 8.54% 4.12 4.83% 35.50 33.26% 36.26 36.11%

Conference Assembly Dems Assembly GOP Senate Dems Senate IDC Senate GOP

In both houses, the top ten lists of the members with the most bills passing their own chamber contain only members of the majority conference(s). Senator Golden passed more bills through the Senate than any other member. Member Golden Bills Passed Own House 88 13

Young Lanza LaValle Marcellino Maziarz Carlucci DeFrancisco Bonacic Flanagan

57 55 53 52 51 48 47 46 46

Assemblyman Sweeney passed more bills through the Assembly than any of his colleagues. Bills Passed Own House 34 30 28 28 28 26 25 25 24 23

Member Sweeney Gottfried Wright Paulin Abbate Weinstein Dinowitz Magnarelli Magee Englebright

17 legislators introduced no legislation that passed their own chambers. Four of them (Boyland, Vito Lopez, Sampson, and Smith) spent much of the session dealing with legal difficulties, Assemblymember Losquadro and Castro resigned mid-session (as did the aforementioned Vito Lopez), and Assemblymembers Barron and Kearns’ calls for Speaker Silver to resign likely did not endear them to the individuals who decide which bills make their house’s active lists. Bills Passed Own House 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14

House Assembly Assembly Assembly Assembly Assembly Assembly Assembly Assembly Assembly Assembly

Member Barron Boyland Castro Ceretto Fitzpatrick Hikind Jacobs Kearns Lopez V Losquadro

Assembly Assembly Assembly Assembly Assembly Senate Senate

McDonough Montesano Raia Reilich Rivera Sampson Smith

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Same-As Bills As of June 23, 13,991 bills had been introduced in both houses. 7,848 of these (56.1%) had same-as sponsors in the other chamber on this date. It is possible that some of these bills had same-as versions earlier in the session, but lost this distinction by the end due to only one house’s version being amended. Nevertheless, these numbers can provide a rough estimate of how many bills had sponsors who successfully made the preliminary efforts of turning their proposals into serious legislation that had the potential of becoming laws. Of the five conferences, members of the Assembly Republicans were the least likely to find same-as sponsors in the opposite chamber. Percentage of Bills with Sponsor in Other House 52.32% 29.51% 57.33% 82.67% 71.22%

Conference Assembly Dems Assembly GOP Senate Dems Senate IDC Senate GOP

Ten Senators with the highest percentage of their sponsored bills having identical versions in the Assembly: Percentage of Bills With Member Bills Introduced Sponsor in Other House Sanders 8 100.00% Tkaczyk 25 96.00% Klein 113 91.15% Marchione 32 87.50% Lanza 178 85.96% Stewart45 84.44% Cousins Valesky 54 83.33% 15

Maziarz Griffo Latimer

196 102 56

83.16% 82.35% 82.14%

Ten Senators with the lowest percentage of their sponsored bills having identical versions in the Assembly: Percentage of Bills With Member Bills Introduced Sponsor in Other House Krueger 125 51.20% Parker 406 50.99% Ball 155 46.45% Avella 93 43.01% Breslin 50 42.00% Hoylman 43 39.53% Sampson 57 38.60% O'Brien 22 36.36% Adams 167 33.53% Smith 28 28.57%

Ten Assemblymembers with the highest percentage of their sponsored bills having identical versions in the Senate:

Percentage of Bills With Sponsor Member Bills Introduced in Other House Fahy 15 100.00% Solages 9 100.00% Barrett 6 100.00% Arroyo 1 100.00% Magee 70 95.71% Skoufis 15 93.33% Farrell 26 88.46% Cusick 147 87.76% Duprey 8 87.50% Rosa 15 86.67%

16

Ten Assemblymembers with the lowest percentage of their sponsored bills having identical versions in the Senate: Percentage of Bills With Sponsor in Other House 8.70% 8.16% 7.69% 7.50% 6.52% 5.41% 2.56% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

Member Bills Introduced Hooper 46 Curran 49 Lalor 13 Reilich 40 Raia 46 McKevitt 37 Boyland 39 McDonough 16 Hikind 3 Rivera 0

Bills Passing Both Houses In both houses, members of the majority conference(s) supported a higher average number of bills that eventually passed both houses. A revealing number in the chart below shows that 96.49% of the bills prime-sponsored by Assembly Republicans that passed their own chamber also passed the senate. This indicates that many of the bills introduced by members of the minority that were allowed to come to the floor for a vote may have been relatively non-controversial items of local interest. 5 Percentage of Bills Passing own House that Passed Other House 55.97% 96.49% 50.47% 52.11% 43.33%

Conference Assembly Dems Assembly GOP Senate Dems Senate IDC Senate GOP

Bills Passing Percentage of all Bills Bills Passing Both Houses per Introduced Passing Both Houses Member Both Houses 530 5.00 7.86% 110 2.56 8.24% 54 2.08 2.44% 74 18.50 17.33% 487 15.71 15.64%

5

As mentioned with respect to a previous chart, the totals in this chart are slightly lower than the total number of bills since it does not include bills introduced by “Rules” or “Budget.”

17

17 senators, as well as the Senate Rules Committee, introduced 16 or more bills that passed both houses. Seven senators - Hassell-Thompson, Montgomery, Peralta, Rivera, Sampson, Smith, and Stavisky – had no bills pass both houses. Bills Passing Both Houses 41 31 30 27 25 24 23 23 20 18 18 18 18 17 16 16 16 16

Member Golden Carlucci Bonacic Martins LaValle Rules Hannon Seward Grisanti Maziarz DeFrancisco Zeldin Little Griffo Klein Gallivan Nozzolio Valesky

13 Assemblymembers were the prime sponsors of at least a dozen bills that passed both houses. 24 introduced no such bills, and are identified in Appendix B. Bills Passing Both Houses 22 21 18 17 16 16 15 15 13 13 13 13 18

Member Abbate Magnarelli Magee Pretlow Paulin Thiele Sweeney Weinstein Gottfried Gunther A Zebrowski K Weisenberg

Jaffee

12

Resolutions 3,573 resolutions were adopted: 2,873 in the Senate, and 700 in the Assembly. Senate Republicans accounted for more than half of the two-house total. Resolutions per Resolutions Adopted6 Member 427 4.03 271 6.30 915 35.19 35 8.75 1892 61.03

Conference Assembly Dems Assembly GOP Senate Dems Senate IDC Senate GOP

21 Assemblymembers did not have any resolutions adopted. They are identified in Appendix C. Senator Latimer was the only member of his chamber to neither introduce nor pass at least one resolution. These are the legislators that had the most resolutions adopted in each chamber: Senator Resolutions Adopted Breslin 304 Bonacic 267 Parker 264 Fuschillo 229 Martins 161 Assemblymember Resolutions Adopted Kolb 36 Gunther A 30 Weisenberg 25 Finch 25 Oaks 22 Lupardo 20

6

Conference totals do not include resolutions introduced by Assemblymember Kearns or Senators Sampson or Smith.

19

VOTING PATTERNS Note: The following analyses of voting only look at votes cast on legislation, and do not include resolutions, confirmation votes or motions to amend. Opposition to Legislation The vast majority of bills that passed the Senate did so with little or no opposition.7 Total Nay Votes 0 1-9 10-19 20-29 Number of Percentage of All Bills Votes on Bills 745 51.59% 610 42.24% 69 4.78% 20 1.39%

Senator Golden was the only member of his house to vote “Aye” on every single bill. Senators Flanagan and Valesky also voted in the affirmative for every bill for which they cast a (but did not cast votes on 1 and 8 bills, respectively). There was a modest decrease in the percentage of bills receiving the support of over 90% of the votes cast between 2012 (91.17%) and 2013 (90.58%). More bills found opposition in the Assembly, but similarly to the Senate, most passed with little or no opposition.8 Total No Votes 0 1-10 11-25 26-50 50-59 60 or more Number of Votes % of All Votes on Bills on Bills 457 41.97% 330 30.30% 93 8.54% 200 18.37% 8 0.73% 1 0.09%

7

Since several bills were amended and voted on a second time, the total number of votes on bills is slightly higher in each house than the total number of bills passing as discussed at the beginning of this report. 8 In the course of producing this report, Legislative Bill Drafting appears to have adjusted their database to add one additional bill to the total that passed the Assembly. Due to the methodology we used, it is difficult to determine which bill was added, but it is likely the vote was included in our database of voting records. If we are missing one vote, however, the cumulative results might be off by 0.08%, and the tallies of votes for individual members might be off by 1.

20

No Votes/ Absences Ten Senators voted no on 100 or more bills. Aye Votes 1208 1195 1173 1249 1304 1299 1319 1327 1329 1311 Nay Votes 223 194 177 149 128 128 125 117 115 100 Abs/ Exc 13 55 94 46 12 17

Senator Ball Montgomery Perkins Krueger Espaillat HassellThompson Rivera Serrano Hoylman Sanders

33

Ten Assemblymembers—all Republicans—voted in the negative on 200 or more bills. Absences/ Yes No No Vote Assemblymember Votes Votes Taken Nojay 743 329 17 Friend 764 324 1 DiPietro 747 323 19 Lalor 683 304 102 Fitzpatrick 753 284 52 Tenney 770 274 45 Malliotakis 826 223 40 Borelli 867 222 Katz 818 221 50 Garbarino 875 208 6

Seven Senators were not present for the votes on 100 or more bills. Aye Votes 1115 1223 1240 1284 Nay Votes 11 31 33 7 Abs/ Exc 318 190 171 153 21

Senator Sampson Ranzenhofer Adams Ritchie

Diaz Squadron Parker

1268 1233 1251

36 74 89

140 137 104

15 Assemblymembers missed 150 or more votes. Six missed more votes than they were present for. Assemblyman Boyland led in this category, missing 74.29% of all votes. Absences/ Yes No No Vote Assemblymember Votes Votes Taken Boyland 279 1 809 Stevenson 356 733 Hikind 409 5 675 Robinson 526 4 559 Gjonaj 524 15 550 Rodriguez 734 6 349 Rivera 838 1 250 Barron 792 98 199 Kellner 908 16 165 Arroyo 927 5 157 Clark 931 3 155 Goldfeder 878 57 154 DenDekker 936 153 Weprin 937 152 Lopez V 78 2 150

22

Conference Loyalty: The Senate Votes Votes same as same as Votes same as Klein Skelos Stewart-Cousins 94.33% 94.24% 95.25% 99.62% 99.51% 97.68% 98.29% 98.39% 96.51%

Conference Dem Independent Dem Republican

Members of the IDC were the most likely to vote with their conference’s leader; members of the Democratic Conference were the least likely. (Note: Senators Sampson and Smith were omitted from this study). There was virtual unanimity in the voting patterns of Senate Majority Leaders Klein and Skelos: The two voted the same way 99.79% of the time. This is due to the co-leadership agreement whereby both need to agree on bills that are considered on the Senate floor. Thus the co-leaders ended up supporting nearly every bill that came before their house: of 1,444 votes on bills, Senator Klein voted in the negative only twice; Senator Skelos, once. Using this methodology, Senator Ball can be seen as the most independent senator, as his voting record differed the most drastically from each of the three leaders.

Senator Klein Golden Flanagan Valesky Skelos Smith Grisanti Savino Boyle Libous Hannon Ritchie Robach Felder Farley

Pct of Votes Same As Klein 100.00% 99.86% 99.86% 99.86% 99.79% 99.79% 99.72% 99.58% 99.52% 99.50% 99.43% 99.38% 99.38% 99.37% 99.31%

Senator Skelos Golden Flanagan Valesky Smith Klein Grisanti Boyle Hannon Libous Robach Felder Ritchie Savino Farley

Pct of Votes Same As Skelos 100.00% 99.93% 99.93% 99.93% 99.86% 99.79% 99.79% 99.72% 99.64% 99.57% 99.45% 99.44% 99.38% 99.38% 99.38%

Senator Stewart-Cousins Breslin Latimer Addabbo Smith Klein Golden Grisanti Flanagan Valesky Felder Skelos Peralta Hannon Savino

Pct of Votes Same As StewartCousins 100.00% 98.89% 98.75% 98.47% 97.92% 97.85% 97.85% 97.85% 97.85% 97.84% 97.82% 97.78% 97.76% 97.72% 97.71% 23

Lanza Gallivan Fuschillo Carlucci Maziarz Young Sampson Seward Marcellino Addabbo Martins Nozzolio Zeldin Latimer Little Larkin Breslin Kennedy O'Brien DeFrancisco Griffo Stewart-Cousins LaValle O'Mara Ranzenhofer Adams Peralta Diaz Marchione Bonacic Stavisky Gianaris Tkaczyk Dilan Avella Squadron Gipson Parker Sanders Hoylman Serrano

99.24% 99.16% 99.10% 99.03% 99.03% 99.02% 98.93% 98.89% 98.68% 98.68% 98.64% 98.61% 98.61% 98.55% 98.53% 98.23% 98.13% 98.06% 98.05% 97.99% 97.97% 97.85% 97.69% 97.46% 97.45% 97.33% 97.32% 97.09% 96.53% 96.45% 95.78% 95.50% 95.43% 95.36% 94.39% 94.34% 93.91% 93.36% 92.91% 92.04% 92.04%

Lanza Fuschillo Gallivan Young Maziarz Carlucci Seward Sampson Marcellino Martins Nozzolio Zeldin Little Latimer Addabbo Larkin O'Brien DeFrancisco Breslin Griffo LaValle Kennedy Stewart-Cousins O'Mara Ranzenhofer Adams Peralta Diaz Marchione Bonacic Stavisky Tkaczyk Gianaris Dilan Squadron Avella Gipson Parker Sanders Hoylman Serrano

99.31% 99.31% 99.23% 99.23% 99.10% 98.96% 98.96% 98.93% 98.89% 98.86% 98.82% 98.82% 98.60% 98.48% 98.47% 98.30% 98.12% 98.06% 98.06% 98.04% 97.90% 97.85% 97.78% 97.53% 97.45% 97.33% 97.25% 97.16% 96.59% 96.52% 95.71% 95.50% 95.43% 95.29% 94.26% 94.18% 93.84% 93.28% 92.84% 91.97% 91.83%

Sampson Boyle Stavisky Martins O'Brien Fuschillo Marcellino Libous Robach Lanza Gianaris Gallivan Carlucci Farley Adams Ritchie Kennedy Young Maziarz LaValle Seward Nozzolio Zeldin Little Tkaczyk Diaz Larkin DeFrancisco Squadron Griffo Dilan O'Mara Ranzenhofer Avella Bonacic Marchione Gipson Sanders Parker Hoylman Serrano

97.69% 97.65% 97.65% 97.57% 97.56% 97.51% 97.51% 97.43% 97.37% 97.37% 97.37% 97.34% 97.30% 97.30% 97.25% 97.21% 97.16% 97.12% 97.02% 96.99% 96.88% 96.88% 96.74% 96.57% 96.47% 96.40% 96.31% 96.12% 96.02% 95.93% 95.70% 95.50% 95.45% 95.29% 95.27% 94.72% 94.39% 94.26% 94.10% 94.04% 93.77% 24

Rivera Hassell-Thompson Espaillat Krueger Perkins Montgomery Ball

91.34% 91.17% 91.06% 89.34% 87.04% 86.18% 84.42%

Rivera Espaillat Hassell-Thompson Krueger Perkins Montgomery Ball

91.27% 90.99% 90.96% 89.27% 86.81% 85.96% 84.35%

Rivera Hassell-Thompson Espaillat Krueger Perkins Montgomery Ball

93.21% 92.36% 91.90% 91.27% 88.74% 87.33% 83.09%

25

Conference Loyalty: The Assembly Votes same Votes same as Conference As Silver Kolb Dem 96.91% 84.38% GOP 83.18% 89.98%

Seven Assembly Democrats voted the same way as Speaker Silver (who voted yes on 100% of bills) with every vote they cast. Assemblymember Barron, who voted with the Speaker on 88.99% of bills, was the conference member who most frequently voted differently than the Speaker. Three Republicans - Assemblymembers Lalor, Nojay, and DiPietro – differed from the Speaker the most frequently. Assemblymember Boyland was the most likely to disagree with Minority Leader Kolb. Since Assemblymember Kearns seems to have participated in a majority of his party’s conference discussions this year, he was grouped with the Democrats for the purposes of calculating this conference’s percentage of votes with the Speaker. Notably, his votes were slightly more likely to agree with Silver’s – they agreed 97.37% of the time – than the votes cast by all other Assembly Democrats. Pct of Votes Cast Same as Assemblymember Kolb Kolb 100.00% Oaks 96.36% Finch 96.15% Jordan 95.74% Barclay 95.48% Reilich 95.07% Corwin 95.03% Blankenbush 94.71% Stec 94.57% Butler 94.44% Duprey 94.05% Palmesano 93.88% Tedisco 93.37% Schimminger 93.36% Walter 93.35% Giglio 93.09% Hawley 92.84% McLaughlin 92.24% Goodell 91.98% Losquadro 91.43% Crouch 91.38% 26

% of Votes Cast Assemblymember Same as Silver Mr. Speaker 100.00% Lentol 100.00% Castro 100.00% Cook 100.00% Hooper 100.00% Weprin 100.00% DenDekker 100.00% Stevenson 100.00% Lavine 99.91% Otis 99.91% Perry 99.91% Brook-Krasny 99.91% Rosa 99.90% Markey 99.89% Rivera 99.88% Morelle 99.82% Schimel 99.82% Weisenberg 99.81% Farrell 99.81% Mosley 99.80% Aubry 99.72%

Clark Boyland Abbate Benedetto Kim Titus Camara Arroyo Mayer Millman Sweeney Lupardo Steck Magnarelli Hevesi Cymbrowitz Robinson Crespo Rodriguez Lifton Abinanti Russell Ortiz Wright Hikind Galef Heastie Colton O'Donnell Paulin Quart McDonald Brennan Nolan Kellner Titone Gottfried Jaffee Pretlow Rozic Simotas

99.68% 99.64% 99.61% 99.54% 99.53% 99.53% 99.52% 99.46% 99.45% 99.45% 99.45% 99.45% 99.45% 99.44% 99.44% 99.41% 99.25% 99.19% 99.19% 99.17% 99.08% 98.98% 98.97% 98.82% 98.79% 98.77% 98.70% 98.68% 98.62% 98.60% 98.59% 98.58% 98.53% 98.50% 98.27% 98.26% 98.26% 98.24% 98.16% 98.00% 97.87%

Graf McDonough McKevitt Raia Rabbitt Katz Lopez P Ra Stevenson Montesano Magee Santabarbara Saladino Brook-Krasny McDonald Quart Clark Magnarelli Kearns DenDekker Galef Farrell Lupardo Hooper Morelle Lavine Aubry Camara Lentol Cymbrowitz Mr. Speaker Rosa Russell Steck Colton Cook Otis Perry Abbate Weisenberg Mosley

91.32% 91.30% 91.18% 90.20% 89.57% 89.49% 89.13% 88.77% 88.67% 88.32% 87.94% 87.73% 87.59% 87.44% 87.25% 87.03% 87.00% 87.00% 86.93% 86.92% 86.85% 86.65% 86.64% 86.60% 86.56% 86.46% 86.46% 86.40% 86.39% 86.39% 86.37% 86.36% 86.35% 86.35% 86.33% 86.30% 86.28% 86.28% 86.28% 86.25% 86.24% 27

Maisel Moya Lopez V Fahy Weinstein Kearns Gjonaj Sepulveda Gantt Magee Glick Jacobs Scarborough Ryan Buchwald Dinowitz Braunstein Santabarbara Kavanagh Espinal Rosenthal Losquadro Goldfeder Peoples-Stokes Bronson Roberts Simanowitz Ramos Englebright Thiele Zebrowski K Gibson Cahill Solages Gunther A Stirpe Skoufis Miller Skartados Barrett Cusick

97.86% 97.53% 97.50% 97.43% 97.41% 97.37% 97.22% 96.71% 96.55% 96.42% 96.31% 96.31% 96.24% 96.17% 96.14% 96.13% 95.96% 95.64% 95.22% 94.95% 94.58% 94.29% 93.90% 93.83% 92.75% 92.75% 92.59% 92.50% 92.38% 92.29% 92.29% 92.01% 91.92% 91.92% 91.83% 91.78% 91.46% 91.35% 91.09% 91.00% 90.91%

Heastie Curran Crespo Schimel Mayer Sweeney Kim Hevesi Arroyo Benedetto Millman Paulin Abinanti Markey Ortiz Johns Brennan Rivera Ceretto Titone Hikind Weprin Lifton Titus Nolan O'Donnell Tenney Rodriguez Pretlow Wright Gottfried Jaffee Simotas Lupinacci Fahy Buchwald Kellner Garbarino Maisel Rozic Gantt

86.21% 86.20% 86.19% 86.19% 86.19% 86.19% 86.17% 86.15% 86.11% 86.10% 86.00% 85.99% 85.99% 85.96% 85.93% 85.91% 85.82% 85.77% 85.69% 85.69% 85.68% 85.65% 85.54% 85.47% 85.42% 85.36% 85.30% 85.14% 85.08% 85.07% 84.99% 84.88% 84.74% 84.72% 84.71% 84.71% 84.69% 84.63% 84.51% 84.44% 84.33% 28

Hennessey McKevitt Brindisi Raia Schimminger Gabryszak McDonough Barron Giglio Tedisco Duprey Ra Ceretto Rabbitt Saladino Stec Kolb Johns Butler Crouch Finch Blankenbush Oaks McLaughlin Curran Lopez P Graf Barclay Jordan Corwin Reilich Lupinacci Walter Goodell Montesano Palmesano Garbarino Hawley Borelli Malliotakis Katz

90.63% 90.44% 90.42% 90.04% 89.61% 89.51% 89.11% 88.99% 88.93% 88.61% 88.13% 87.88% 87.32% 87.00% 86.81% 86.69% 86.37% 85.95% 85.77% 85.70% 85.62% 85.35% 85.33% 85.30% 85.13% 85.12% 84.84% 84.83% 84.78% 84.76% 84.69% 84.67% 84.22% 83.73% 83.47% 81.99% 80.79% 80.67% 79.61% 78.74% 78.73%

Fitzpatrick Gabryszak Borelli Sepulveda Weinstein Ryan Moya Gunther A Dinowitz Friend Glick Braunstein Jacobs Kavanagh Castro Gjonaj Cusick Lalor Espinal Goldfeder Malliotakis Stirpe Scarborough Brindisi Lopez V Nojay Rosenthal Simanowitz Peoples-Stokes Skartados DiPietro Thiele Barrett Englebright Zebrowski K Bronson Skoufis Roberts Gibson Hennessey Miller

84.09% 84.04% 83.98% 83.80% 83.78% 83.59% 83.52% 83.52% 83.45% 82.86% 82.72% 82.69% 82.67% 82.32% 82.11% 82.09% 82.04% 82.01% 81.86% 81.76% 81.74% 81.71% 81.66% 81.64% 81.25% 81.10% 80.94% 80.92% 80.79% 80.76% 80.51% 80.48% 80.29% 80.20% 80.11% 79.83% 79.83% 79.65% 79.54% 79.37% 79.34% 29

Tenney Fitzpatrick Friend DiPietro Nojay Lalor

73.75% 72.61% 70.22% 69.81% 69.31% 69.20%

Cahill Solages Ramos Robinson Barron Boyland

79.19% 78.82% 78.78% 78.37% 76.29% 75.81%

30

Participation in Floor Debates Between the beginning of 2013 and June 18th (the most recent date for which records are currently available), 471,749 words were spoken on the Senate floor.9 The following chart shows how many words each Senator is listed as saying. Of course, the length of a member’s comments does not necessarily reflect how much of substance they said, but we believe this information provides one additional measure through which one can analyze legislative activity. In addition, these totals are likely to be interesting to the Capitol observers who spend countless hours watching floor debates.

Senator SENATOR KRUEGER SENATOR LIBOUS SENATOR DeFRANCISCO SENATOR RIVERA SENATOR GIANARIS SENATOR KENNEDY SENATOR PARKER SENATOR SQUADRON SENATOR ESPAILLAT SENATOR GRISANTI SENATOR DIAZ SENATOR GIPSON SENATOR HASSELL-THOMPSON SENATOR KLEIN SENATOR NOZZOLIO SENATOR GRIFFO SENATOR CARLUCCI SENATOR LARKIN SENATOR HOYLMAN SENATOR MARCHIONE SENATOR GOLDEN SENATOR STEWART-COUSINS SENATOR LaVALLE SENATOR LITTLE SENATOR TKACZYK SENATOR BONACIC SENATOR MAZIARZ SENATOR STAVISKY
9

Words Spoken 40,064 26,406 17,305 12,036 11,144 10,249 9,695 7,206 7,023 7,003 6,904 6,805 6,792 6,775 6,672 6,449 6,307 6,248 5,401 4,899 4,828 4,765 4,742 4,602 4,369 4,299 4,242 4,028

Assembly transcripts are maintained in a slightly different format that make statistical analysis more difficult.

31

SENATOR MONTGOMERY SENATOR FUSCHILLO SENATOR SAVINO SENATOR LATIMER SENATOR MARTINS SENATOR FLANAGAN SENATOR PERALTA SENATOR SKELOS SENATOR RANZENHOFER SENATOR YOUNG SENATOR SANDERS SENATOR PERKINS SENATOR ADAMS SENATOR BALL SENATOR MARCELLINO SENATOR BRESLIN SENATOR SMITH SENATOR SERRANO SENATOR FARLEY SENATOR RITCHIE SENATOR VALESKY SENATOR LANZA SENATOR ROBACH SENATOR SEWARD SENATOR HANNON SENATOR O'BRIEN SENATOR O'MARA SENATOR GALLIVAN SENATOR AVELLA SENATOR ZELDIN SENATOR DILAN SENATOR ADDABBO SENATOR BOYLE SENATOR SAMPSON SENATOR FELDER

3,859 3,833 3,644 3,550 3,371 2,991 2,891 2,817 2,764 2,627 2,562 2,517 2,382 2,380 2,284 2,208 2,179 1,954 1,904 1,852 1,733 1,654 1,551 1,428 1,293 1,240 1,184 1,112 1,048 941 858 836 452 430 1

Several members also served as Acting President at various points in the 2013 session. This does not include totals for days when they were the only legislator in attendance, and did little but gavel in and out. 32

Acting President ACTING PRESIDENT GRIFFO ACTING PRESIDENT VALESKY ACTING PRESIDENT SAVINO ACTING PRESIDENT CARLUCCI ACTING PRESIDENT FLANAGAN ACTING PRESIDENT O'MARA ACTING PRESIDENT YOUNG ACTING PRESIDENT NOZZOLIO ACTING PRESIDENT LITTLE ACTING PRESIDENT BONACIC ACTING PRESIDENT ROBACH ACTING PRESIDENT MARCHIONE

Words Spoken 18,724 16,961 5,132 2,546 1,695 1,606 1,334 474 346 222 198 36

38 other individuals spoke on the Senate floor: Words Spoken 95,330 1,240 643 556 451 405 376 360 359 359 326 324 280 266 261 258 257 250 241 241 229

Speaker THE SECRETARY MAJOR GENERAL TOWNSEND THE PRESIDENT10 RABBI BUTMAN RABBI BERKMAN REVEREND DEMOSTHENE PASTOR HASSELBACH REVEREND CAMPBELL PASTOR YOUNG RABBI JOSEPH BISHOP MURPHY BROTHER CHANG REVEREND DARDEN REVEREND YOUNG JUDGE PETER SKELOS IMAM MUHAMMAD ASIL KHAN IMAM KHAN PASTOR JONES CHAPLAIN KALLERSON RABBI MILLER BRIGADIER GENERAL TRAINOR
10

LG Duffy

33

PASTOR CORDOVA PASTOR CLEMENT REVEREND JENSEN PASTOR MONROSE BISHOP ABIOLA CHAPLAIN SHERER PASTOR GLOVER APOSTLE JEAN IMAM CHOWDHURY ARCHBISHOP THOMAS MR. PATIENCE CHAIRMAN DeFRANCISCO FATHER ALEXANDER ASSEMBLYMAN FARRELL ASSEMBLYMAN OAKS THE ASSEMBLAGE SENATORS

214 205 201 190 174 171 149 142 115 94 77 52 44 43 2 1 1

34

The following chart shows the number of bills advanced from each standing committee prior to passing in their respective house. The Ethics Committee in the Senate and the Ethics and Guidance Committee in the Assembly each passed zero bills. These committees typically have not been used to consider bills, but rather as one cog in Albany’s byzantine system of enforcing ethics laws. Besides the ethics committee, the standing committees that advanced the fewest bills that eventually were passed by their chambers were, in the Senate, the New York City Education Subcommittee (1 bill) and Infrastructure and Capital Investment (3); in the Assembly, Oversight, Analysis and Investigation (0) and Libraries and Education Technology (2).11

Senate Committee Aging Agriculture Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Banks Children and Families Cities Civil Service and Pensions Codes Commerce, Economic Development, and Small Business Consumer Protection Corporations, Authorities and Commissions Crime Victims, Crime and Correction Cultural Affairs, Tourism, Parks and Recreation Education Elections Energy and Telecommunications Environmental Conservation Ethics Finance Health
11

Bills in Committee that Passed Senate 9 27 8 12 23 7 43 153

Assembly Committee Aging Agriculture Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Banks Children and Families Cities Governmental Employees Codes

Bills in Committee that Passed Assembly 16 16 6 8 14 15 39 245 22 23 36 12 7 37 17 14 52 0 506 70

12 Economic Development Consumer Affairs and 27 Protection Corporations, Authorities and 34 Commissions 41 Correction Tourism, Parks, Arts and Sports 17 Development 60 Education 6 Election Law 27 Energy 50 Environmental Conservation 0 Ethics and Guidance 230 Ways and Means 50 Health

This information was obtained by performing searches on 6/22 of bills that passed each house that were in each committee at any time. It is possible that some committee agendas were never made public, which would keep their full tallies form being reflected in this chart.

35

Higher Education Housing, Construction, and Community Development Infrastructure and Capital Investment Insurance Investigations and Government Operations

34 Higher Education 17 Housing 3 27 Insurance 81 Governmental Operations Oversight, Analysis and Investigation 38 Judiciary 13 Labor Libraries and Education Technology 134 Local Government 8 Mental Health 1 10 Racing and Wagering Real Property Taxation 578 Rules Small Business 17 Social Services 115 Transportation 31 Veterans' Affairs

18 30

35 53 0 44 20 2 53 14

Judiciary Labor

Local Government Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities New York City Education Subcommittee Racing, Gaming and Wagering Rules Social Services Transportation Veterans, Homeland Security and Military Affairs

8 34 403 7 5 35 12

36

Appendix A: Senate Bill Introduction/ Passage Totals Percentage of Bills Bills Bills Passed Bills Passing With Sponsor in Resolutions Introduced Own House Both Houses Other House Adopted 167 8 1 33.53% 4 106 4 2 60.38% 3 93 4 2 43.01% 38 155 29 10 46.45% 9 100 46 30 66.00% 267 34 11 8 61.76% 6 50 7 6 42.00% 304 10 10 10 100.00% 146 48 31 78.77% 19 80 47 18 66.25% 40 111 5 1 72.07% 8 54 4 1 55.56% 4 141 2 2 55.32% 8 45 19 12 57.78% 39 24 9 5 54.17% 1 96 46 12 62.50% 8 61 45 12 78.69% 229 110 36 16 55.45% 25 57 2 1 80.70% 2 32 2 1 53.13% 26 208 88 41 75.96% 45 102 37 17 82.35% 73 156 42 20 73.08% 9 104 44 23 70.19% 36 62 43 84 113 125 178 49 56 257 67 77 126 32 105 2 2 6 42 3 55 21 8 53 26 33 52 16 40 53.23% 39.53% 54.76% 91.15% 51.20% 85.96% 81.63% 82.14% 79.38% 74.63% 67.53% 68.25% 87.50% 74.29% 6 8 29 4 2 4 115 63 44 77 55 58 161 37

Member Adams Addabbo Avella Ball Bonacic Boyle Breslin Budget Carlucci DeFrancisco Diaz Dilan Espaillat Farley Felder Flanagan Fuschillo Gallivan Gianaris Gipson Golden Griffo Grisanti Hannon HassellThompson Hoylman Kennedy Klein Krueger Lanza Larkin Latimer LaValle Libous Little Marcellino Marchione Martins

2 3 16 2 15 8 5 25 12 18 12 10 27

Maziarz Montgomery Nozzolio O'Brien O'Mara Parker Peralta Perkins Ranzenhofer Ritchie Rivera Robach Rules Sampson Sanders Savino Serrano Seward Skelos Smith Squadron Stavisky StewartCousins Tkaczyk Valesky Young Zeldin

196 89 91 22 41 406 78 90 117 79 23 58 44 57 8 114 48 96 29 28 101 101 45 25 54 180 60

51 1 30 3 17 11 4 2 32 24 1 21 24 2 27 3 39 23 3 2 12 4 25 57 35

18 16 1 12 5 1 11 10 6 24 1 11 2 23 8 1

83.16% 74.16% 68.13% 36.36% 70.73% 50.99% 55.13% 55.56% 70.09% 73.42% 56.52% 72.41% 70.45% 38.60% 100.00% 78.95% 81.25% 70.83% 79.31% 28.57% 69.31% 66.34% 84.44% 96.00% 83.33% 56.67% 80.00%

5 48 127 31 43 264 20 7 81 127 2 9 4 1 3 4 36 69 27 10 16 12 58 9 18 13

10 4 16 14 18

38

Appendix B: Assembly Bill Introduction/ Passage Totals Percentage of Bills With Sponsor in Resolutions Other House Adopted 75.00% 55.38% 100.00% 1 50.00% 2 28.57% 8 100.00% 2 39.13% 1 74.19% 4 38.89% 5 33.33% 4 2.56% 2 86.21% 4 32.94% 1 85.00% 18 31.82% 6 27.27% 83.33% 100.00% 36.84% 39.73% 64.86% 42.86% 47.37% 20.69% 44.29% 22.45% 33.33% 73.08% 19.63% 8.16% 87.76% 36.36% 48.89% 50.34% 37.50% 2 1 10 3 1 2 2 1 2 9 5 7 4 5 6 2 1

Member Abbate Abinanti Arroyo Aubry Barclay Barrett Barron Benedetto Blankenbush Borelli Boyland Braunstein Brennan Brindisi Bronson BrookKrasny Buchwald Budget Butler Cahill Camara Castro Ceretto Clark Colton Cook Corwin Crespo Crouch Curran Cusick Cymbrowitz DenDekker Dinowitz DiPietro

Bills Bills Passed Bills Passing Introduced Own House Both Houses 104 28 22 65 11 5 1 1 32 4 2 35 2 2 6 3 1 23 31 8 3 18 3 2 21 1 1 39 29 8 6 170 16 6 40 11 10 22 2 2 11 12 10 19 146 74 14 19 87 70 49 15 104 107 49 147 55 45 147 40 2 7 10 5 17 5 1 3 10 5 11

4 8 5 1 12 5 1 15 10 4 25 2

4 2 1 10 5 1 7 4 3 8 2

39

Duprey Englebright Espinal Fahy Farrell Finch Fitzpatrick Friend Gabryszak Galef Gantt Garbarino Gibson Giglio Gjonaj Glick Goldfeder Goodell Gottfried Graf Gunther A Hawley Heastie Hennessey Hevesi Hikind Hooper Jacobs Jaffee Johns Jordan Katz Kavanagh Kearns Kellner Kim Kolb Lalor Lavine Lentol Lifton Lopez P Lopez V

8 381 15 15 26 19 45 6 195 94 106 11 70 25 8 56 17 30 102 19 157 51 49 13 45 3 46 21 43 7 17 41 197 11 74 14 91 13 59 117 40 17 23

5 23 2 8 11 3 2 4 11 8 3 3 4 2 14 3 5 30 3 22 5 6 5 6 9 16 1 2 2 14 5 3 7 1 13 8 12 5

5 11 6 8 3 2 2 7 2 3 4 2 8 1 5 13 3 13 5 2 4 2 3 12 1 1 2 3 2 7 1 9 2 9 5

87.50% 30.45% 46.67% 100.00% 88.46% 26.32% 24.44% 66.67% 44.10% 50.00% 22.64% 54.55% 64.29% 60.00% 75.00% 55.36% 47.06% 60.00% 51.96% 42.11% 70.70% 66.67% 59.18% 69.23% 75.56% 0.00% 8.70% 28.57% 65.12% 42.86% 23.53% 14.63% 70.05% 54.55% 45.95% 85.71% 25.27% 7.69% 59.32% 43.59% 55.00% 41.18% 30.43%

4 4 1 12 1 25 1 11 2 6 4 8 5 1 1 1 1 6 30 8 2 1

3 3 4 19 2

2 2 4 36 1 3 6 10

40

Losquadro Lupardo Lupinacci Magee Magnarelli Maisel Malliotakis Markey Mayer McDonald McDonough McKevitt McLaughlin Miller Millman Montesano Morelle Mosley Moya Nojay Nolan Oaks O'Donnell Ortiz Otis Palmesano Paulin PeoplesStokes Perry Pretlow Quart Ra Rabbitt Raia Ramos Reilich Rivera Roberts Robinson Rodriguez Rosa Rosenthal Rozic

9 30 7 70 80 49 14 11 16 13 16 37 14 60 59 14 64 13 23 14 58 46 63 223 24 18 122 74 104 259 41 17 101 46 31 40 0 10 30 29 15 201 52

6 2 24 25 6 2 3 4 6 1 5 1 11 12 3 3 2 11 6 15 7 6 7 28 10 3 21 6 1 3 7

6 1 18 21 3 2 2 1 5 1 5 1 2 11 2 2 2 6 6 2 4 7 16 5 1 17 3 1 3 5

77.78% 66.67% 57.14% 95.71% 68.75% 61.22% 71.43% 72.73% 81.25% 61.54% 0.00% 5.41% 57.14% 50.00% 61.02% 35.71% 79.69% 53.85% 52.17% 21.43% 70.69% 32.61% 39.68% 30.49% 54.17% 72.22% 67.21% 50.00% 24.04% 27.80% 68.29% 23.53% 16.83% 6.52% 51.61% 7.50% 0.00% 50.00% 73.33% 41.38% 86.67% 45.27% 61.54%

20 2 8 9 2 2 6 3 6 1 5 14 7 1 8 2 17 3 5 22 3 3 1 14 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 8 14 1 10

1 7 3 3 20 3

1 5 2 2 5 2

41

Russell Ryan Saladino Santabarbara Scarborough Schimel Schimminger Sepulveda Silver Simanowitz Simotas Skartados Skoufis Solages Stec Steck Stevenson Stirpe Sweeney Tedisco Tenney Thiele Titone Titus Walter Weinstein Weisenberg Weprin Wright

24 36 27 21 43 37 87 17 22 32 63 20 15 9 21 16 25 7 50 91 61 186 82 57 19 55 65 124 200

6 7 4 7 6 7 11 1 14 2 6 5 6 3 7 5 1 2 34 1 3 16 4 10 2 26 17 7 28

4 7 4 4 2 6 10 8 1 3 4 2 2 6 5 1 15 1 3 16 2 4 2 15 13 1 11

70.83% 69.44% 14.81% 61.90% 48.84% 62.16% 77.01% 82.35% 68.18% 40.63% 77.78% 60.00% 93.33% 100.00% 85.71% 56.25% 44.00% 85.71% 72.00% 16.48% 29.51% 81.18% 42.68% 40.35% 42.11% 76.36% 72.31% 50.81% 32.00%

4 2

2 2 1 1 16 3 3 3 2 13 1 1 7 4 18 6 3 4 4 4 4 25 2 2

42

Appendix C: Voting Totals for Senators

Senator Adams Addabbo Avella Ball Bonacic Boyle Breslin Carlucci DeFrancisco Diaz Dilan Espaillat Farley Felder Flanagan Fuschillo Gallivan Gianaris Gipson Golden Griffo Grisanti Hannon HassellThompson Hoylman Kennedy Klein Krueger Lanza Larkin Latimer LaValle

Aye Votes 1240 1413 1361 1208 1389 1439 1416 1430 1417 1268 1376 1304 1435 1416 1443 1433 1418 1379 1356 1444 1399 1442 1396 1299 1329 1414 1442 1249 1435 1386 1423 1397

Nay Votes 33 21 83 223 49 5 27 14 27 36 67 128 8 7 11 10 65 88 27 2 6 128 115 30 2 149 9 23 21 31

Abs/ Exc 171 10 13 6 1

140 1 12 1 21 1 16

18 42 17

46 35 16 43

Libous Little Marcellino Marchione Martins Maziarz Montgomery Nozzolio O'Brien O'Mara Parker Peralta Perkins Ranzenhofer Ritchie Rivera Robach Sampson Sanders Savino Serrano Seward Skelos Smith Squadron Stavisky Stewart-Cousins Tkaczyk Valesky Young Zeldin

1397 1410 1427 1391 1384 1430 1195 1426 1410 1344 1251 1345 1173 1223 1284 1319 1437 1115 1311 1436 1327 1430 1443 1443 1233 1383 1413 1379 1436 1414 1424

5 19 17 48 17 12 194 18 26 33 89 37 177 31 7 125 7 11 100 8 117 14 1 1 74 61 31 64 12 18

42 15 5 43 2 55 8 67 104 62 94 190 153

318 33

137

8 17 1

44

Appendix D: Voting Totals for Assemblymembers Yes No Absences/ No Assemblymember Votes Votes Vote Taken Abbate 1012 4 73 Abinanti 1078 10 1 Arroyo 927 5 157 Aubry 1086 3 Barclay 923 165 1 Barrett 991 98 Barron 792 98 199 Benedetto 1084 5 Blankenbush 874 150 65 Borelli 867 222 Boyland 279 1 809 Braunstein 1045 44 Brennan 1073 16 Brindisi 963 102 24 Bronson 1010 79 Brook-Krasny 1058 1 30 Buchwald 1047 42 Butler 898 149 42 Cahill 1001 88 Camara 1035 5 49 Castro 98 12 Ceretto 930 135 24 Clark 931 3 155 Colton 1047 14 28 Cook 1076 13 Corwin 923 166 Crespo 984 8 97 Crouch 905 151 33 Curran 922 161 6 Cusick 990 99 Cymbrowitz 1015 6 68 DenDekker 936 153 Dinowitz 970 39 80 DiPietro 747 323 19 Duprey 950 128 11 Englebright 1006 83 45

Espinal Fahy Farrell Finch Fitzpatrick Friend Gabryszak Galef Gantt Garbarino Gibson Giglio Gjonaj Glick Goldfeder Goodell Gottfried Graf Gunther A Hawley Heastie Hennessey Hevesi Hikind Hooper Jacobs Jaffee Johns Jordan Katz Kavanagh Kearns Kellner Kim Kolb Lalor Lavine Lentol Lifton Lopez P Lopez V

1034 1061 1057 893 753 764 973 1047 1007 875 956 916 524 1045 878 911 1070 912 1000 814 989 987 1058 409 958 992 1062 936 819 818 1037 1001 908 1054 938 683 1088 1083 1080 927 78

55 28 2 150 284 324 114 13 36 208 83 114 15 40 57 177 19 163 89 195 13 102 6 5 38 19 153 147 221 52 27 16 5 148 304 1 9 162 2

30 46 52 1 2 29 46 6 50 59 550 4 154 1 14 80 87 25 675 131 59 8 123 50 61 165 30 3 102 6

150 46

Losquadro Lupardo Lupinacci Magee Magnarelli Maisel Malliotakis Markey Mayer McDonald McDonough McKevitt McLaughlin Miller Millman Montesano Morelle Mosley Moya Mr. Speaker Nojay Nolan Oaks O'Donnell Ortiz Otis Palmesano Paulin Peoples-Stokes Perry Pretlow Quart Ra Rabbitt Raia Ramos Reilich Rivera Roberts Robinson Rodriguez

33 1082 917 1050 1066 1052 826 942 1083 1039 966 946 882 993 1083 803 1087 1011 1027 1089 743 1050 913 1074 1058 1088 847 1059 882 1088 1069 1052 957 937 958 975 913 838 1010 526 734

2 6 166 39 6 23 223 1 6 15 118 100 152 94 6 159 2 2 26 329 16 157 15 11 1 186 15 58 1 20 15 132 140 106 79 165 1 79 4 6

33 1 6 17 14 40 146 35 5 43 55 2 127 76 36 17 23 19 20 56 15 149

22 12 25 35 11 250 559 349 47

Rosa Rosenthal Rozic Russell Ryan Saladino Santabarbara Scarborough Schimel Schimminger Sepulveda Simanowitz Simotas Skartados Skoufis Solages Stec Steck Stevenson Stirpe Sweeney Tedisco Tenney Thiele Titone Titus Walter Weinstein Weisenberg Weprin Wright Zebrowski K

999 1030 979 1069 1005 869 1032 921 1087 975 970 925 1055 992 996 1001 944 1081 356 916 1083 965 770 1005 1019 1051 838 1054 1063 937 1009 1005

1 59 20 11 40 132 47 36 2 113 33 74 23 97 93 88 145 6 82 6 124 274 84 18 5 157 28 2 12 84

89 90 9 44 88 10 132 1 86 90 11

2 733 91

45 52 33 94 7 24 152 68

48

Laughter According to the Senate transcript, the chamber broke down in laughter 170 times between the beginning of session and June 18th. These are the individuals whose remarks inspired laughter.

(Laughter.) SENATOR LIBOUS SENATOR DeFRANCISCO ACTING PRESIDENT GRIFFO12 SENATOR KRUEGER SENATOR GIANARIS SENATOR MAZIARZ SENATOR ESPAILLAT SENATOR SKELOS SENATOR DIAZ SENATOR FUSCHILLO SENATOR GRISANTI SENATOR LARKIN ACTING PRESIDENT SAVINO ACTING PRESIDENT FLANAGAN SENATOR GIPSON ACTING PRESIDENT BONACIC SENATOR LaVALLE MAJOR GENERAL TOWNSEND SENATOR NOZZOLIO SENATOR BALL SENATOR STAVISKY SENATOR PARKER SENATOR GRIFFO SENATOR HOYLMAN SENATOR LATIMER RABBI BUTMAN SENATOR SMITH SENATOR SANDERS SENATORS SENATOR YOUNG SENATOR FLANAGAN ACTING PRESIDENT LITTLE
12

163 38 29 9 6 6 5 5 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

In this chart, members might be listed twice if they made the chamber laugh both while serving as Acting President and as a Senator.

49

SENATOR LITTLE SENATOR BRESLIN SENATOR MARCHIONE SENATOR SQUADRON SENATOR BONACIC SENATOR TKACZYK SENATOR MONTGOMERY SENATOR KENNEDY ASSEMBLYMAN OAKS SENATOR HASSELL-THOMPSON (Laughter; applause.) BISHOP MURPHY SENATOR STEWART-COUSINS SENATOR STAVISKY (Laughter; cheers from gallery.) SENATOR DIAZ (Laughter; cheers from the gallery.) SENATOR ESPAILLAT (Laughter; groans.) SENATOR GIPSON (Laughter; inaudible comments.) SENATOR GIANARIS

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

50