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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 271
EGYPT VIOLENCE
WORLD PAGE 18
ALL STARS
TAKE FIELD
SPORTS PAGE 11
FARMERS WARN OF
HIGH MILK PRICES
BUSINESS PAGE 10
MORSI OPPOSITION GROUPS GROWING
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By Lisa Leff
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — The four
plaintiffs in the U.S. Supreme
Court case that overturned
California’s same-sex marriage
ban tied the knot Friday, just hours
after a federal appeals court freed
gay couples to obtain marriage
licenses in the state for the first
time in 4 1/2 years.
State Attorney General Kamala
Harris presided at the San
Francisco City
Hall wedding of
Kris Perry and
Sandy Stier as
hundreds of
s u p p o r t e r s
looked on and
cheered. The
couple sued to
overturn the
state’s voter-
approved gay
marriage ban along with Jeff
Katami and Paul Zarrillo, who mar-
ried at Los Angeles City Hall 90
minutes later with Mayor Antonio
Villaraigosa presiding.
“By joining the case against
Proposition 8, they represented
thousands of couples like them-
selves in their fight for marriage
equality,” Harris, who had asked
the appeals court to act swiftly,
said during Stier and Perry’s brief
ceremony. “Through the ups and
downs, the struggles and the tri-
umphs, they came out victorious.”
Harris declared Perry, 48, and
Stier, 50, “spouses for life,” but
during their vows, the Berkeley
couple took each other as “lawful-
ly wedded wife.” One of their twin
sons served as ring-bearer.
Although the couples fought for
the right to wed for years, their
weddings came together in a flurry
when a three-judge panel of the
9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals
issued a brief order Friday after-
noon dissolving, “effective
immediately,” a stay it had
imposed on gay marriages while
the lawsuit challenging the ban
advanced through the courts.
Sponsors of California’s same-
sex marriage ban, known as
Proposition 8, called the appeals
court’s swift action “outrageous.”
Under Supreme Court rules, the
losing side in a legal dispute has
25 days to ask the high court to
rehear the case, and Proposition
8’s backers had not yet announced
Same-sex marriages begin
STEPHEN LAM/REUTERS
Sandy Stier, left, and Kris Perry, plaintiffs of the lawsuit against Proposition 8, are welcomed as they prepare to
be married by California Attorney General Kamala Harris at City Hall in San Francisco Friday.
Appeals court lifts hold in California after U.S. Supreme Court ruling
L
ike the rest of California, the San
Mateo County Clerk’s Office late
Friday received confirmation the
Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals lifted its
stay on same-sex marriages.
The office of Mark Church,chief elections
officer and assessor-county clerk-
recorder,stayed open an extra hour until
6 p.m.Friday to issue licenses and perform
ceremonies if needed. For those who
didn’t jump on the chance the first day,
here’s some information about the legal
steps toward tying the knot.
Both people must obtain a license in
person with a valid government-issued
picture identification between 8 a.m.and
4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday at the
office at 555 County Center, First Floor,
Redwood City. There are no
appointments and the process may take
30 minutes depending on the line and if
the online form was completed prior to
arrival.
A license is $78; a confidential marriage
license is $80 and the marriage must take
place in San Mateo County. Payment
includes cash,Visa or Mastercard and the
fee for a certified copy is not included.
The marriage must happen within 90
days of issuance anywhere in California.
A county deputy marriage commissioner
can perform a civil ceremony in the clerk’s
chapel by appointment Monday through
Friday.The chapel can be booked at one
of four times daily and holds 20 people,
including one required witness.The cost
is $65.Ceremonies can also be broadcast
online.
Individuals can be deputized as a
marriage commissioner for one specific
day by paying $60, stating an oath and
signing a certificate.
The county clerk also maintains a list of
marriage commissioners for civil
ceremonies.The list is available online.
For more information, visit
www.smcare.org/clerk/marriage
Getting married in
San Mateo County
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Burlingame’s downtown could
be getting free parking, temporar-
ily, and a new mixed-use develop-
ment under proposals that go
before the City Council Monday.
Downtown and Burlingame
Avenue are going through some
changes. Portions of the road are
closed and construction is under-
way. Work started earlier this
month and should take 14 to 16
months. On Monday, the council
will consider allowing free park-
ing during construction to boost
business. During the same meet-
ing, the council will discuss enter-
ing into exclu-
sive negotia-
tions with
Grosvenor, an
i nt e r na t i ona l
property devel-
o p m e n t ,
investment and
fund manage-
ment group,
interested in
creating a mixed-use project down-
town.
The Burlingame Avenue
Streetscape project is expected to
finish next summer. Once com-
pleted, Burlingame Avenue will be
more pedestrian-friendly while
parking is changed from slanted to
parallel and the avenue’s two lanes
will be thinned to a total of 20
feet. Sidewalks will also be
widened from 10 to 16 feet with
bulb-outs for smaller pedestrian
crossing areas. The design will
include more landscaping and out-
side dining space.
There are 113 parking spaces,
excluding handicap spots, on
Burlingame Avenue. Twenty-four
of those spaces are currently
closed off to the public during
construction. The remaining 89
are metered between 8 a.m. and 9
p.m., Public Works Director Syed
Murtuza wrote in a staff report.
Free parking in Burlingame?
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A San Mateo robber serving 25
years to life in prison is still a
dangerous public risk if released,
according to a judge who refused to
resentence the county’s first peti-
tioner since voters changed the
Three Strikes guidelines.
Dwain Everett Davis, 46, is the
first San Mateo County prisoner to
have his request for reconsidera-
tion be heard. Davis testified
We d n e s d a y ,
cont r adi ct i ng
his original
statements in
the 1997 case,
before Judge
B a r b a r a
Mallach ruled
that he posed
“an unreason-
able risk of dan-
ger to the public” if resentenced as
a second-striker and released. The
Three-striker denied
new prison sentence
Kamala Harris
Judge calls San Mateo robber a public risk
Dwain Davis
See STRIKES, Page 24
See MARRIAGE, Page 24
City Council to decide on perk to aid construction impact
Syed Murtuza
See PARKING, Page 24
FOR THE RECORD 2 Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
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more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
ComedianRichard
Lewis is 66.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1613
London’s original Globe Theatre,
where many of Shakespeare’s plays
were performed, was destroyed by a
fire sparked by a cannon shot during a
performance of “Henry VIII.” (No
fatalities were reported.)
“Wouldn’t it be great if people could get to
live suddenly as often as they die suddenly?”
— Katharine Hepburn (1907-2003)
Actor Gary Busey
is 69.
Singer Nicole
Scherzinger is 35.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Celeste Hidalgo, 7, right, and Alana Griego, 5, cool off in the Pacific Ocean during a heat wave in Santa Monica The mercury
is predicted to soar well past 110 degrees Fahrenheit and perhaps top 120F starting on Friday in the deserts of southeast
California and southern Arizona,Weather.com and the National Weather Service said.
Saturday: Sunny. Highs in the 70s to
upper 80s. West winds 5 to 10 mph
increasing to 10 to 20 mph in the after-
noon.
Saturday night: Clear in the evening
then becoming partly cloudy. Lows in the
mid 50s to lower 60s. West winds 10 to
20 mph.
Sunday: Partly cloudy in the morning then becoming
sunny. Highs in the 70s to upper 80s. West winds 5 to 15
mph.
Sunday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the mid 50s to lower
60s. Southwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Monday: Sunny. Highs in the 70s to upper 80s.
Monday ni ght: Mostly clear in the evening then becom-
ing partly cloudy. Lows in the upper 50s to mid 60s.v
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
(Answers Monday)
INEPT MIGHT LENGTH TIRADE
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: He didn’t believe in the inventor’s plans for the incan-
descent bulb, so Edison — ENLIGHTENED HIM
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
CATYK
UIDAO
LAFDEW
LOGEIA
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
J
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Print your
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2 9 3
1 18 33 39 46 33
Powerball
June 26 Powerball
4 20 26 31 36
June 26 Super Lotto Plus
Daily Four
32 31 33 37
Fantasy Five
9 2 1
Daily three midday
I n 1767, Britain approved the Townshend Revenue Act,
which imposed import duties on glass, paint, oil, lead,
paper and tea shipped to the American colonies. (Colonists
bitterly protested, prompting Parliament to repeal the
duties — except for tea.)
I n 1880, France annexed Tahiti, which became a French
colony on December 30, 1880.
I n 1913, the Second Balkan War broke out as Bulgaria
attacked Serbia and Greece, its former allies from the First
Balkan War.
I n 1927, the first trans-Pacific airplane flight was complet-
ed as Lt. Lester J. Maitland and Lt. Albert F. Hegenberger
arrived at Wheeler Field in Hawaii aboard the Bird of
Paradise, an Atlantic-Fokker C-2, after flying 2,400 miles
from Oakland, Calif., in 25 hours, 50 minutes.
I n 1933, actor-director Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle died in
New York at age 46.
I n 1941, Polish statesman, pianist and composer Ignacy
Jan Paderewski (een-YAHS’ yahn pah-dayr-EF’-skee) died in
New York at age 80.
I n 1954, the Atomic Energy Commission voted against
reinstating Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer’s access to classified
information.
I n 1956, actress Marilyn Monroe married playwright
Arthur Miller in a civil ceremony in White Plains, N.Y. (The
couple also wed in a Jewish ceremony on July 1; the mar-
riage lasted 4 1/2 years).
I n 1967, Jerusalem was re-unified as Israel removed barri-
cades separating the Old City from the Israeli sector.
Movie producer Robert Evans is 83. Songwriter L. Russell
Brown is 73. Actor-turned-politican-turned-radio personality
Fred Grandy is 65. Rock musician Ian Paice (Deep Purple) is
65. Singer Don Dokken (Dokken) is 60. Rock singer Colin
Hay (Men At Work) is 60. Actress Maria Conchita Alonso is
56. Actress Sharon Lawrence is 52. Actress Amanda Donohoe
is 51. Violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter is 50. Rhythm-and-blues
singer Stedman Pearson (Five Star) is 49. Actress Kathleen
Wilhoite is 49. Producer-writer Matthew Weiner is 48.
Musician Dale Baker is 47. Actress Melora Hardin is 46. Rap
DJ Shadow is 41.
Punchy, the animated advertising
mascot for Hawaiian Punch juice drinks,
has been saying “How about a nice
Hawaiian Punch?” since he was created
in 1962. In some ad campaigns, Punchy
had a friend named Opie.
***
Humphrey Bogart (1899-1957) won
only one Academy Award during his
career. It was the Best Actor award for
“The African Queen” (1951). His co-star
Katharine Hepburn (1907-2003) was
nominated for Best Actress but did not
win.
***
Fifty-five years ago, the New Era Cap
Company developed a fitted cap as the
uniform headwear for Major League
Baseball. It was the introduction of the
baseball cap.
***
In the Peanuts comic strip, Charlie
Brown’s little sister Sally is in love with
blanket toting Linus van Pelt.
***
The following sentence has seven dif-
ferent spellings of the long e (”ee”)
sound: He believed Caesar could see peo-
ple seizing the seas.
***
When Bisquick came on the market in
1930, its ad slogan was “Makes
Anybody a Perfect Biscuit Maker.”
***
Since 1999, as much as half of the
world population of Tasmanian devils
have died due to a form of tumor-causing
facial cancer. Tasmanian devils are the
largest carnivorous marsupials in the
world, found primarily on the island of
Tasmania.
***
Can you name the show with the
theme song that begins “Who can turn
the world on with her smile?” See answer
at end.
***
When speaking to the pope, he should
be addressed as “Your Holiness.”
***
Pat Sajak (born 1946) left his job as
game show host of “Wheel of Fortune”
(1975-present) in 1989 to host a late
night talk show. After 15 months, the
talk show was canceled and Sajak
returned to the game show.
***
The most popular children’s books by
author and illustrator Richard Scarry
(1919-1994) are the books that take
place in Busytown. The residents of
Busytown are animals portrayed doing
human activities.
***
Brides in France break an egg on the
threshold of their new home before step-
ping in. The egg symbolizes luck and
healthy babies in the home.
***
The television sitcom “Green Acres”
(1965-1971) took place in the fictional
town of Hooterville. “Petticoat
Junction” (1963-1970) also took place
in Hooterville.
***
When gold was discovered in 1896 at
the Klondike River in Canada, 25,000
miners flocked to the area. The gold sup-
ply was exhausted by 1910.
***
The Sultan of Brunei lives in the
largest residential palace in the world.
The palace has 1,788 rooms, 257 bath-
rooms and a 110-car garage. Brunei is
part of Borneo on the South China Sea.
***
For thousands of years beginning in
the 12th century, Japanese military lead-
ers called shoguns ruled the country and
the emperor was just a figurehead. Power
was restored to emperors in 1868 when
Emperor Meiji (1852-1912) began his
reign.
***
Answer: The show is “Mary Tyler
Moore” (1970-1977), a sitcom about
the life and career of Mary Richards, a
producer at the fictional WJM-TV news-
room in Minneapolis. In 2002, a statue
of Mary Tyler Moore (born 1936) was
erected in downtown Minneapolis.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.
3 5 28 33 51 16
Mega number
June 25 Mega Millions
7 7 0
Daily three evening
1
12
22
Mega number
The Daily Derby race winners are Big Ben, No. 4, in first
place; Money Bags, No. 11, in second place; andGorgeous
George, No. 8, in third place.The race time was clocked at
1:46.69.
3 Weekend • June 29-30, 2013
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DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A Sonoma county volunteer firefighter
accused of setting fire to land near a reservoir off
Interstate 280 so he could watch the emergency
response received a year jail sentence on Friday
to start after he finishes serving time in Sonoma
County for similar crimes.
Nathaniel Ridgway Schmidt, 20, faced up to
two years in prison after pleading no contest
last month to felony arson of forest land.
Instead, he received half the amount plus five
years supervised probation. He was also ordered
into counseling and banned from possessing
flammable and combustible items like torches,
fireworks and matches. He will register for life
as an arsonist.
Schmidt confessed to the July 11, 2011 fire
near the Crystal Springs Reservoir while being
interviewed by a Sonoma County sheriff’s
detective about his attendance at four fires on
the coast between 2011 and 2012. Sonoma
County prosecutors also charged Schmidt with
four misdemeanor counts of phoning in false
reports to emergency dispatchers.
Schmidt belonged to the Timber Cove
Volunteer Fire Department and was near the
local reservoir for controlled burn training with
the California Department of Forestry and Fire
Protection and the San Francisco Public
Utilities Commission. About 30 minutes after a
supervisor directed him to walk the fire line
looking for hot spots, Schmidt reportedly
yelled that the fire was out of control and that
helicopters and fire units were needed before the
canyon burned. About a quarter-acre burned
before the fire was contained.
Schmidt liked the excitement of watching the
response to his reported emergencies, accord-
ing to District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe.
Schmidt will report to the county’s Maguire
Correctional Facility on Jan. 18 after finishing
his sentence in Sonoma County. He has credit
of one day earned before posting $50,000 bail.
Volunteer firefighter sentenced for arson
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
ADaly City parolee accused of holding his
girlfriend under hot water to “know what the
fires of hell are like” and forced her 3-year-old
son to bite her twice was sentenced Friday to
40 years to life in prison.
Judge Barbara Mallach denied Marcus
Randel Smith, 41, a new trial and denied the
defense request to strike the prior convictions
for the three-striker. After Smith proclaimed
his innocence in court and offered no remorse
toward his victim, Mallach said he “blamed
everyone except himself,” said District
Attorney Steve Wagstaffe.
Maintaining his inno-
cence is consistent with
his position throughout
the case, said defense
attorney Paul DeMeester.
“It’s hard so I’m very
remorseful but by the way
I’m very innocent,”
DeMeester said.
Wagstaffe called the
sentence a good outcome for the case.
DeMeester also noted that his client
received only 25 percent of the possible 160
years to life term.
Jurors deliberated six hours before convict-
ing Smith of kidnapping, forced oral copula-
tion, assault with a deadly weapon, false
imprisonment, making threats and misde-
meanor domestic violence and assault by
force. Jurors acquitted Smith of child endan-
germent.
According to prosecutors, Smith attacked
the woman Feb. 24, 2012 because he ques-
tioned her fidelity. A cable technician who
arrived at the home reportedly saw Smith
pushing the woman around and she quietly
begged him not to leave but he did out of fear.
She was ultimately able to escape to a neigh-
bor’s home to call police.
Before she fled, however, prosecutors told
jurors Smith forced her into a bedroom to
inspect her body for proof she was cheating.
He also assaulted her and made the boy bite her
twice, according to the prosecution, although
DeMeester said the jury’s acquittal discredited
that allegation. He threatened to kill her and
forced her under hot water while saying it rep-
resented the fires of hell before he sexually
assaulted her. He also reportedly brandished a
baseball bat and threatened to kill her, accord-
ing to prosecutors.
Smith’s prior convictions are making
felony threats and abusing a previous girl-
friend.
Parolee sentenced for beating girlfriend
Marcus Smith
MILLBRAE
Disorderly conduct. Aman was detained for being under
the influence on the 100 block of El Camino Real before
7:43 p.m. Tuesday, June 18.
Burglary. Someone reported an auto burglary on Rollins
Road before 1:13 p.m. Tuesday, June 18.
Vandal i sm. Avehicle was vandalized on the 200 block of
Anita Drive before 6:35 p.m. Monday, June 17.
Burglary. Property was stolen on the 100 block of Linda
Vista before 2:32 p.m. Monday, June 17.
Vandal i sm. Avehicle was vandalized on the 200 block of
Anita Drive before 6:35 p.m. Monday, June 17.
Police reports
4
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By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Take a break midweek to celebrate the
Fourth of July locally with music, food,
games and even fireworks.
Fun runs and park outings are part of the
family-friendly options offered this year in
Redwood City, Foster City, San Mateo and
Half Moon Bay. Few surprises can be
expected this year. Instead, it’s about main-
taining rich traditions for celebrating all
things red, white and blue on the Peninsula.
Redwood City and Foster City both offer a
full day of celebrating.
Starting at 7:30 a.m., a pancake breakfast
will be served at Fire Station 9, 755
Marshall St. It might be a great way to
carbo-load before taking part in the Fourth
of July Parade Run, a 5K fundraiser benefit-
ing the Redwood City Education
Foundation. Runners take off at 8:45 a.m.
At 9 a.m., the “Go For It!” car show will
kick off on the 2600 block of Broadway.
Runners normally clear the way by 10
a.m., when the parade starts. This year’s
theme, “Seventy Five Years of Pageantry, ”
will be explored along the parade route
which starts at Winslow and Marshall
streets, goes down Marshall and turns right
on Main Street, then right on Middlefield
Road, right on Winslow Street and a left on
Arguello Street, ending at Arguello and
Alden streets.
The San Mateo County History Museum
will get into the spirit as well. Children are
invited to hand-crank homemade vanilla ice
cream at the 103-year-old county court-
house in Redwood City. Then, those who
help make it, can take a taste of the cool
treat from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission to
the museum will be half price all day —
$2.50 for adults and $1.50 for seniors and
students over 5.
Fireworks start at 9:30 p.m. and will be
launched from the Port of Redwood City.
Public parking near the port is limited.
However, there will be a public viewing area
for those who want a front-row seat.
Foster City is also taking an all-day
approach with this patriotic holiday. The
all-you-can-eat pancake breakfast, hosted
by the Foster City Rotary Club, is 7:30
a.m. to 11:30 a.m. in the meadow at Leo
Ryan Park, 650 Shell Blvd. It is $10 for
adults, $4 for kids ages 5 to 13, and free for
those under 5. For more information call
345-4047.
The family and dog parade begins at
11:05 a.m. Registration will be held the
hour prior at the Recreation Center on Shell
Boulevard. From 10 a.m. until 5 p.m., arts
and craft vendors will be set up at Leo Ryan
Park. A barbecue, sponsored by the Lions
Club, will begin at 11:30 a.m. with last call
at 4:45 p.m. There will be family games and
concerts throughout the afternoon. Andy Z
will take the stage for a 45-minute show at
noon. Uphill Both Ways performs at 4:15
p.m. to 5:45 p.m. and Whiskey Dawn will
take the stage from 7 p.m. until 9:15 p.m.
Fireworks start promptly at 9:30 p.m.
Visitors are encouraged to walk or bike to
the event. Bring a blanket but not a tarp.
Those interested in celebrating the holi-
day on the coast should consider taking part
in the Ol’ Fashioned Fourth of July parade
starting at noon on Main Street in Half
Moon Bay. Pancakes will be served from 8
a.m. to noon at Mac Dutra Park on Main
Street before the parade.
The Ritz-Carlton in Half Moon Bay will
also host festivities this Thursday.
Featuring pro-surfers, Adam Replogle and
Peter Mel, the Fourth celebration will
include a barbecue buffet on the gazebo
lawn, outdoor movie showings including
“Chasing Mavericks,” the relaxation of
special spa treatments pre-party, plus the
recreational fun of Segway and bike tours.
Northern California’s only ultra-luxury
resort is an exceptional place to be this
Independence Day.
The buffet, which is $75 per person or
$37.50 for those 5 to 12 years old, starts at
3:30 p.m. For more information on activi-
ties call 712-7000.
San Mateo is celebrating Fourth of July in
Central Park from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Fitzgerald Field will be full of fun with clas-
sic carnival games, a rock climbing wall,
music and more. The Capt’n Jack Spareribs
Show goes on at 1:15 p.m. and 4 p.m. The
Furs, Scales and Tails show starts at 3:30
p.m. The Central Park Music Series finishes
the day with Apple Z, which performs
dance/party music. Buy food from your
favorite vendor or bring a picnic to share
with the family.
Remember, safe and sane fireworks are
only allowed in two cities — San Bruno
and Pacifica. Booths selling fireworks are
up and open for business. Items purchased
from the booths benefiting local nonprofit s
need to be used in one of those two cities
only.
In Pacifica, the City Council recently
accepted recommendations from the
Fireworks Task Force Committee to limit
the use of fireworks on Linda Mar Beach to
an area extending about 10 feet east of the
tideline and north of the Taco Bell to the
north end of the Linda Mar Beach parking
lot. There are two alternative sites being
provided for setting off fireworks — the
asphalt areas of the south Linda Mar Beach
parking lot and the south Rockaway Beach
parking lot. Fireworks are not allowed on
any other beach areas in Pacifica.
Both cities increase enforcement for the
holiday. Possession of fireworks other than
those deemed as “safe and sane” is illegal.
There is a zero tolerance policy toward
those possessing illegal fireworks. Those
individuals are subject to arrest and a
$1,000 administrative fine.
heather@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Lots of fun planned for the Fourth of July
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DAILY JOURNAL FILE PHOTO
Members of the Redwood City Council enjoy the festivities during 2012’s Fourth of July parade.
Man acquitted of abusing girlfriend
Jurors Friday acquitted a 57-year-old Burlingame man of
allegedly strangling his live-in girlfriend into uncon-
sciousness and smashing her cellphone with a fire extin-
guisher when she tried calling 911 for help.
The jury returned its verdict on the third day of delibera-
tions on whether Kurt Heiner was guilty of domestic vio-
lence, assault, assault with a deadly weapon, battery, dis-
suading a witness by force, making criminal threats and
inflicting great bodily injury.
Heiner maintained his innocence but prosecutors argued
he attacked his girlfriend of six years in April 2012 after she
returned home from an international trip and claimed some
property was missing.
Heiner initially told Burlingame police the woman was
trying to break into his home and he didn’t know who she
was, according to the prosecution. He later allegedly said
she received the neck bruises during a trip to China.
Heiner has been free from custody on $175,000 bail.
Local brief
5
Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/BAY AREA/STATE
Bernard E. (Bernie) Esser Jr.
Bernard E. (Bernie) Esser Jr. died peacefully June 23,
2013 at his home in Millbrae, Calif., surrounded by his
family and his baseball books.
He was born in San Francisco Dec. 27, 1930, to Bernard
E. Esser and Gertrude Esser.
Bernie was a baseball and basketball
star at Lincoln High School, and a mem-
ber of Lincoln’s Athletic Hall of Fame.
After Lincoln, he attended the University
of San Francisco on a basketball schol-
arship, graduating in 1951. Bernie then
served as a lieutenant in the U.S. Army in
Korea for two years.
Bernie married his high school sweet-
heart, Elizabeth Ann (Elledge) in San
Francisco on June 27, 1952. They had
three children — sons Brooks (Stacey) and Brandt (Linda),
and daughter Barrie (Kevin). Bernie is also survived by his
brother Albert (Chris) and their children Craig, Leslie and
Kristen.
After his Army service, Bernie began a successful career at
Lockheed Missiles and Space Company in Sunnyvale,
California. He rose to the rank of vice president of
Operations, Missile Systems Division over the course of a
37-year career, before retiring in 1994.
Bernie was also actively involved in local government in
Millbrae, serving on the Parks and Recreation
Commission, before joining the City Council in 1964. He
remained on the council for a total of 14 years, and served
three terms as the city’s mayor.
There will be a private family service. The family requests
that in lieu of flowers, donations be made in Bernie’s name
to Mission Hospice and Home Care, 1670 S. Amphlett
Blvd., Suite 300, San Mateo, CA 94402.
Berri Ward
Berri Ward, born Ara Gyorgyi Herczeg on July 4, 1964,
died June 19, 2013 at the age of 48.
She is survived by her mother Maria; daughter Linda, son-
in-law Bishop and grandsons Dominick and Damion ; son
Jonathan; siblings Emese, Sandi, Dalma, George, Tunde
and Magor; as well as nieces, nephews, aunts, uncles,
cousins and many of her loving extended families, the
Stancils of Belmont, Calif. and the Wards of Millbrae,
Calif.
Born and raised in San Mateo County, Berri graduated
from Notre Dame High School, Belmont in 1982 and went
on to work for nearly 30 years in accounting at various
prominent Bay Area firms.
“She will be dearly missed.”
Family and friends are welcomed to attend a funeral mass
in celebration of her life 11 a.m. Tuesday, July 2 at
Cunningham Memorial Chapel, Notre Dame de Namur
University, Belmont. Sign the guestbook at www.crippen-
flynn.com.
Thomas C. Geary
Thomas C. Geary, born Nov. 1, 1917 in Victorville,
Calif., died Sunday June 23, 2013 in Redwood City, Calif.
Amasonic funeral service will be held 2 p.m. Wednesday
July 3 at the San Carlos Masonic Center; 1150 Arroyo Ave.,
San Carlos.
Bernie Esser Jr.
Obituaries
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The number of entities joining
San Mateo County and other agen-
cies in suing major banks they
claim manipulated a global bench-
mark interest rate continues to
grow.
On Friday, the law firm
Cotchett, Pitre & McCarthy
announced that Sonoma County
filed a lawsuit similar to those
filed this week by the Regents of
the University of California and
the San Diego Association of
Governments and in January by
San Mateo County, San Diego
County, the cities of Richmond
and Riverside, the Richmond
Joint Powers Financing
Authority, the East Bay Municipal
Utility District and the Riverside
Public Financing Authority.
The suits target 20 current or
former financial institutions that
set LIBOR, or the London
Interbank Offered Rate, which is
the world’s benchmark interest
rate used for setting short-term
interest rates. LIBOR is set daily
by the British Bankers’
Association based on an average
of the interest rates each member
bank reports and Libor-based
investments total in the trillions
of dollars every year.
As a result of the LIBOR manip-
ulation, many California public
entities and investors may have
received reduced interest payments
on interest rate swaps, corporate
bonds and other investments tied
to the rate, according to the attor-
neys.
More parties follow
county in suing banks
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Gov. Jerry
Brown’s administration on Friday
asked a panel of federal judges to
delay its order that California release
nearly 10,000 additional inmates by
year’s end, granting him time to
appeal the decision to the nation’s
high court.
The judges have said they will per-
mit no further delays in reducing
prison crowding, which they previ-
ously found was the leading cause of
an unconstitutional level of inmate
medical care. The judges have threat-
ened to cite Brown for contempt if he
does not immediately begin com-
plying.
If the three judges reject Brown’s
request for a stay, the state said it
intends to seek a reprieve from U.S.
Supreme Court Justice Anthony
Kennedy, who oversees appeals
from California and other Western
states.
Astay could delay inmate releases
by a year while the justices consider
California’s appeal.
The governor has said previously
that dangerous felons would have to
be released, but the judges said it
could be done without a threat to
public safety.
Complying with the order before
the appeal is considered by the
Supreme Court means that “a likeli-
hood of irreparable harm exists,” the
administration said in its 10-page
filing.
That would be because the court’s
directives “cannot be stopped or
undone. ... Individuals now incarcer-
ated will be released before the com-
pletion of their terms,” the adminis-
tration said.
It also argued that it is likely to
prevail before the nation’s high
court, even though the Supreme
Court has already sided with the
judges on the larger question of
reducing inmate overcrowding. The
high court supported the federal
judges’ 2009 inmate-release ruling
in a 5-4 decision in May 2011, with
Kennedy casting the deciding vote.
Yet the administration also said it
will comply with the release order if
a delay is not granted by the three
judges or the Supreme Court.
The three-judge panel last week
ordered the Democratic governor to
immediately begin taking steps to
reduce the population in California’s
33 adult prisons to the level they had
ordered previously. That would
include expanding good-time credits
that would lead to early release.
The judges also ordered the admin-
istration to take other actions
regardless of whether they conflict
with state or local laws. Those
include sending more inmates to fire-
fighting camps, paroling elderly
felons, leasing cells at county jails
and slowing the return of thousands
of inmates who are housed in private
prisons in other states.
If those measures are not enough
to trim the prison population to
about 110,000 inmates, the state
must release the rest from a list of
convicts considered at lower-risk to
be violent.
Brown seeks to delay freeing inmates
Man, 19, shot in chest at El Cerrito BART station
EL CERRITO — Police are looking for at least one sus-
pect who shot a 19-year-old man in the chest following
an argument at a BARTstation in El Cerrito.
Bay Area Rapid Transit officials say the shooting hap-
pened around 11:15 a.m. Friday when two groups got into
an argument outside the El Cerrito Plaza station.
Officials say the victim ran toward the station and
yelled “I’ve been shot!” before collapsing near a turn-
stile.
BART police say the victim was airlifted to John Muir
hospital in critical condition.
Investigators believe the victim and shooter know
each other but don’t know the nature of their relation-
ship.
The Contra Costa Times reports police closed the
streets near the station while they searched for the shoot-
er. The station reopened and train service resumed around
1 p.m.
Bay Area brief
6
Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
By Terry Collins
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Scores of commuters were
scrambling Friday to find alternate plans
after two of San Francisco Bay Area Rapid
Transit’s largest unions gave notice they
plan to go on strike if they can’t get a new
contract over the weekend.
“I don’t know what I’m going to do,” said
a frustrated Veronica Scruggs, a San
Francisco resident who takes the train to her
custodial job at the State of California
Office Building in downtown Oakland. “I’m
trying to see if I can stay with some friends
over here if BARTgoes on strike. I’m pray-
ing that they can get a deal done.”
The unions gave 72-hour notice of a pos-
sible strike late Thursday night as a cour-
tesy to passengers in preparation for a
potentially chaotic Monday morning com-
mute. The strike would start when their con-
tracts expire at 11:59 p.m. Sunday.
On Friday, Amalgamated Transit Union
(ATU) Local President Antonette Bryant
urged California Gov. Jerry Brown to issue a
60-day “cooling off” period “so we can sit
down and seriously negotiate.” BART offi-
cials earlier this week urged Brown not to
issue such an order.
The governor’s spokesman, Evan
Westrup, declined to comment.
BART’s last strike lasted six days in
1997. About 400,000 riders use BART each
weekday. On Friday, area transit officials
urged commuters to consider carpooling,
taking buses or ferries, working from home
and, if they must drive to work, leave earli-
er than usual.
Meanwhile, the unions’ say its strike
threat doesn’t guarantee a walkout as
around-the-clock negotiations are scheduled
through the weekend.
Josie Mooney, a negotiator for the
Service Employees International Union
(SEIU), Local 1021, said Friday outside
Oakland’s City Hall that talks were “fluid,”
as both sides want to avoid a strike. She said
the parties are still going back and forth
over salary, pensions, benefits and safety.
Employees want a 5 percent annual raise
over the next three years. Currently, train
operators and station agents are paid in the
low $60,000 range. Employees average
$16,590 in overtime annually and pay a flat
$92 monthly fee for health insurance.
BARThas offered a 1 percent raise annual-
ly over the next four years and wants
employees to contribute to their pensions.
But Mooney, the BART workers’ union
rep said, “the economic package they have
proposed is woefully inadequate given the
fact that our workers haven’t had a raise in
nearly five years.”
BART announced on Thursday that it was
offering the unions a new contract propos-
al.
On Friday, BART spokesman Rick Rice
said there was still “plenty of time” to reach
an agreement.
“There was some progress yesterday, with
both sides making proposals and respons-
es,” he said. “We’re looking forward to con-
tinuing that when we meet again today and
through the weekend.”
Also Friday, the unions representing
Oakland City clerical, public works and
parking enforcement workers have called a
1-day strike on Monday outside City Hall.
Commuters brace for
potential BART strike
AMenlo School student won many awards
at the recent International Russian Music
Piano Competition (which draws contest-
ants from all over the world and concluded in San
Jose). Anna Boonyanit, who just graduated
from Menlo’s Middle School and who will
be in ninth grade at Menlo School in the fall,
was the winner of the Junior Category (27
entrants). In addition, Anna was named the Most
Promising Young Talent, Best Bay Area
Contestant, Best Performance of a Beethoven
Sonata and Best Performance of Russian Music.
In these last three, she was competing against
all others in every age group, including 31 pros
in their 20s and 30s. Her prizes include an invi-
tation to perform at the opening concert at the
Chopin International Piano Competition in
Hartford CTand a recital at Carnegie Hall.
***
At its annual Founders Day Luncheon
held Feb. 22 at Dominic’s at Oyster Point, the
17th District PTA honored County
Superintendent Anne Campbell, among
others, as a way to celebrate the legacy and suc-
cess of the PTAas a voice for all school children.
Campbell was honored with the Golden Oak
Service Award, California’s most prestigious
PTA award, in recognition of the significant
contributions she has made to the welfare of
children and youth in San Mateo County.
Another 17th District PTA honoree,
Associate Superintendent Joan Rosas, is
also currently serving students and families in
her role at the San Mateo County Office
ofEducation. Rosas was recognized for her
longtime service to children and youth.
Susan Bell, the current 17th District PTA
president, was honored with the PTA
Continuing Service Award.
Mike Galisatus, a highly successful band
director at both the high school and college
level received the Honorary Service Award.
In addition to PTAAward recipients, the 17th
District also recognized Marei Kane of
Menlo-Atherton High School as San
Mateo County Secondary Teacher of the
Year and Sarah Coyle of Roosevelt
Elementary School as San Mateo
County Elementary School Teacher o f
the Year.
***
Galileo Learning, operator of Camp
Galileo for pre-kindergarten to rising fifth-
graders and Galileo Summer Quest for rising
fifth to eight graders, offers summer day camps
that foster the spirit of exploration and innova-
tion in kids throughout the Bay Area starting in
June.
Established in 2002, Camp Galileo has 22
Bay Area locations and offers one of the lowest
camper-to-staff ratios of any Bay Area camp.
Galileo Summer Quest is a summer camp in
which rising fifth to eighth graders dive deep
into one amazing major during each weeklong
session. Fantastic mentors and small, team-ori-
ented classes inspire campers to pursue their
passions—creating burgeoning visionaries in
the process. Galileo Summer Quest, founded in
2008, has 14 locations throughout the Bay Area
including one in San Carlos this year. To lean
more visit www.galileo-camps.com.
***
Nancy Cordero, a senior at San Mateo
High School, died a few months ago after
years of battling cancer. This has been extreme-
ly emotional for the Bearcat family. Cordero
was strong and always smiling and spreading
happiness, whether it be in cheer, dance, leader-
ship, basketball or track.
In March, the Jefferson Awards/Students
i n Action club at San Mateo High organ-
ized the first annual Nancy Cordero
Walkathon, raising over $1,500. Over 70
Bearcat students, alumni and families walked
around campus, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and hon-
ored Cordero. Food was sold, courtesy of student
volunteers and Taqueria La Cumbre.
TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL
Double, double toil and trouble. Witches
Bobby Dowd, Elise Jaremko, and Gregory
Thompson,left to right,confer withMacbeth,
played by Jordan Corley, at this June 27 dress
rehearsal of Shakespeare’s tragedy Macbeth.
They are part of this summer’s Bay Area Shake-
speare Camps held at the Odyssey School in
San Mateo. Two additional Shakespeare
Camps, the “Shakespeare Players”for ages 7-
13 and the “Upstart Crows” for ages 12-18,
begin on July 8. For more information go to
www.sfshakes.org or call 415-558-0888.
STATE/NATION 7
Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NSA leaker’s dad says
son would return to U.S.
WASHINGTON — The father of NSAleaker
Edward Snowden acknowledged Friday that his
son broke the law but said he doesn’t think he
committed treason, as the Obama administra-
tion renewed its calls to
Russia to expel Snowden
so he can be tried under the
Espionage Act.
Meanwhile, Ecuadorean
officials say Russian
authorities have stymied
the country’s efforts to
approve a political asylum
application from the for-
mer National Security
Agency systems analyst,
according to government officials with direct
knowledge of the case. Their accounts further
complicate the already murky understanding of
his current status.
Neighbor testifies about
Martin-Zimmerman fight
SANFORD, Fla. — Two neighbors and a
police officer gave accounts Friday in George
Zimmerman’s murder trial that seemed to bol-
ster the neighborhood watch volunteer’s con-
tention that he was on his back and being
straddled by Trayvon Martin during their con-
frontation.
Neighbor Jonathan Good said it appeared
the unarmed teen was straddling Zimmerman,
while another neighbor, Jonathan Manalo,
said Zimmerman seemed credible when he said
immediately after the fight that he had shot
Martin in self-defense. Officer Tim Smith testi-
fied that Zimmerman’s backside was covered in
grass and wetter than his front side.
All three were called as witnesses for prose-
cutors who are trying to convict him of sec-
ond-degree murder.
Good, who had perhaps the best view of any
witness, said he did not see anyone’s head
being slammed into the concrete sidewalk, as
Zimmerman claims Martin did to him.
Nation in brief
Edward
Snowden
By David Crary
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Across the country, this week’s landmark
Supreme Court rulings on same-sex mar-
riage have energized activists and politi-
cians on both sides of the debate. Efforts to
impose bans — and to repeal them — have
taken on new intensity, as have lawsuits by
gays demanding the right to marry.
The high court, in two 5-4 decisions
Wednesday, opened the way for California
to become the 13th state to legalize gay
marriage, and it directed the federal govern-
ment to recognize legally married same-sex
couples. A federal appeals court on Friday
lifted its freeze on same-sex marriages in
California, saying the state is required to
issue licenses to gay couples starting imme-
diately.
But the rulings, while hailed by gay-
rights activists, did not declare a nationwide
right for gays to marry. Instead, they set the
stage for state-by-state battles over one of
America’s most contentious social issues.
Already, some of those battles are heating
up.
In Pennsylvania, the only Northeast state
that doesn’t legally recognize same-sex
couples, gay state Rep. Brian Sims, a
Philadelphia Democrat, says he will intro-
duce a bill to allow same-sex marriages. The
bill may flounder in the GOP-led
Legislature, but the issue is likely to be
volatile in next year’s gubernatorial race,
pitting GOP Gov. Tom Corbett, an oppo-
nent of gay marriage, against any of three
Democrats who favor it.
In Arizona, gay-rights supporters have
begun circulating petitions aimed at repeal-
ing the state’s 2008 ban on same-sex mar-
riage by way of a ballot measure next year.
With California’s ban quashed, Arizona is
now among 29 states with constitutional
amendments that limit marriage to one-
man, one-woman unions.
Gay-rights activists and Democratic
politicians in several other states also hope
to repeal the bans in their states — in
Oregon, Ohio and Arkansas with possible
ballot measures next year, and in Nevada
and Michigan with referendums in 2016.
Ohio activist Ian James of FreedomOhio
said his group’s resolve to collect signa-
tures “has been doubled” as a result of the
Supreme Court decisions. And Oregon Gov.
John Kitzhaber, a Democrat who favors
repealing his state’s ban, said the court
action “underscores the urgency of extend-
ing the freedom to marry to all our citi-
zens.”
“Oregon has not yet lived up to the ideal
of equal rights for all,” Kitzhaber said.
In Indiana and West Virginia, some
Republican politicians want to move in the
other direction, joining the ranks of states
with constitutional bans. Both states have
laws that bar gays from marrying, but con-
stitutional amendments are viewed as more
durable measures that resist being over-
turned by litigation.
Gay marriage: A jumble lies ahead
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHOENIX — Ablazing heat wave expected
to send the mercury soaring to nearly 120
degrees in Phoenix and Las Vegas settled over
the West on Friday, threatening to ground air-
liners and raising fears that people and pets
will get burned on the scalding pavement.
The heat was so punishing that rangers took
up positions at trailheads at Lake Mead in
Nevada to persuade people not to hike.
Zookeepers in Phoenix hosed down the ele-
phants and fed tigers frozen fish snacks. And
tourists at California’s Death Valley took pho-
tos of the harsh landscape and a thermometer
that read 121.
The mercury there was expected to reach
nearly 130 on Friday — just short of the 134-
degree reading from a century ago that stands
as the highest temperature ever recorded on
Earth.
“You have to take a picture of something
like this. Otherwise no one will believe you,”
said Laura McAlpine, visiting Death Valley
from Scotland.
The heat is not expected to break until
Monday or Tuesday.
The scorching weather presented problems
for airlines because high temperatures can
make it more difficult for planes to take off.
Hot air reduces lift and also hurts engine per-
formance. Planes taking off in the heat may
need longer runways or may have to shed
weight by carrying less fuel.
Smaller jets and propeller planes are
more likely to be affected than big airlin-
ers, officials said.
The National Weather Service said Phoenix
could reach 118 on Friday, while Las Vegas
could see the same temperature over the week-
end in what would be a record for Sin City. The
record in Phoenix is 122.
Temperatures are also expected to soar
across Utah and into Wyoming and Idaho,
with triple-digit heat forecast for the Boise
area. Cities in Washington state that are better
known for cool, rainy weather should break
the 90s next week.
“This is the hottest time of the year, but the
temperatures that we’ll be looking at for
Friday through Sunday, they’ll be toward the
top,” said National Weather Service meteorol-
ogist Mark O’Malley. “It’s going to be bak-
ing hot across much of the entire West.”
Phoenix, Las Vegas bake in scorching heat
NATION/WORLD 8
Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
S.A.M S A M
1940 Lesl i e St. , San Mateo, CA 94403
Sam
Tsang
Grand Opening!
92
101
Hillsdale
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South North
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JOHANNESBURG — Inspired by Nelson
Mandela’s struggles in South Africa, a young
Barack Obama joined campus protests in the
U.S. against the racist rule that kept Mandela
locked away in prison for nearly three decades.
Now a historic, barrier-breaking figure him-
self, President Obama arrived in South Africa
Friday to find a country drastically transformed
by Mandela’s influence — and grappling with
the beloved 94-year-old’s mortality.
It was unclear whether
Mandela’s deteriorating
health would allow Obama
to make a hospital visit.
The former South African
leader is battling a recur-
ring lung infection and is
said to be in critical condi-
tion at a hospital in the
South African capital of
Pretoria.
Speaking to reporters on Air Force One as he
made his way to Johannesburg, Obama said he
would gauge the situation after he arrived.
“I don’t need a photo-op,” he said. “And the
last thing I want to do is to be in any way
obtrusive at a time when the family is con-
cerned about Nelson Mandela’s condition.”
Obama’s visit to South Africa is seen as
something of a tribute to the man who helped
inspire his own political activism. The presi-
dent will pay homage to Mandela at Robben
Island, the prison where he spent 18 of his 27
years in prison. And with South Africa’s ruling
party, the African National Congress, facing
questions about its effectiveness, Obama will
urge the government and the South African
people to live up to the democratic example
set by their first black president.
“He’s a personal hero, but I don’t think I’m
unique in that regard,” Obama said during a
news conference Thursday in Senegal, the first
stop on his weeklong Africa trip. “I think he’s
a hero for the world. And if and when he pass-
es from this place, one thing I think we’ll all
know is that his legacy is one that will linger
on throughout the ages.”
Obama’s ties to
Mandela loom
over Africa visit
Barack Obama
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Obama administra-
tion issued its final compromise Friday for
religiously affiliated charities, hospitals and
other nonprofits that object to covering
birth control in their employee health
plans.
The Health and Human Services
Department said the final plan simplifies
how insurers provide the coverage separate-
ly from faith-based groups and gives reli-
gious nonprofits more time to comply.
However, the changes are unlikely to resolve
objections from faith groups that the
requirement violates their religious freedom.
More than 60 lawsuits have been filed
challenging the rule. The cases are expected
to reach the Supreme Court.
The birth-control rule was first introduced
in February 2012, as part of President Barack
Obama’s health care overhaul, drawing
praise from women’s groups and condemna-
tion from religious leaders. The original
plan exempted churches and other houses of
worship, but required faith-affiliated chari-
ties, universities and other nonprofits to
provide the coverage for their employees.
The regulation became an election-year
issue as Roman Catholic bishops, evangeli-
cals and some religious leaders who have
generally been supportive of Obama’s poli-
cies lobbied fiercely for a broader exemp-
tion. The Obama administration offered a
series of accommodations, leading to the
final rules released Friday.
Under the compromise, administration
officials said they simplified the definition of
religious organizations that are fully exempt
from the requirement. The change means a
church that also ran a soup kitchen would not
have to comply.
Other religious nonprofits must notify
their insurance company that they object to
birth control coverage. The insurer or admin-
istrator of the plan will then notify affected
employees separately that coverage will be
provided at no cost. The insurers would be
reimbursed by a credit against fees owed the
government.
Michael Hash, director of the health
reform office of the Health and Human
Services Department, said the final regula-
tion spells out in more detail the buffer
between religious charities and contracep-
tive coverage. Faith-based groups were
given another reprieve — until Jan. 1 — to
comply.
“There’s a much brighter line here — a
simpler line — and we think that responds to
a good many of the comments that we got,”
said Michael Hash, director of the Health and
Human Services office of health reform.
More than 400,000 comments were submit-
ted over the last several months, the agency
said.
Judy Waxman of the National Women’s
Law Center, an advocacy group based in
Washington, said she would prefer women
hear directly about the coverage from their
insurer, but her organization could accept the
plan. “It’s fair,” she said.
However, Eric Rassbach, an attorney with
the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, a pub-
lic interest law firm challenging the contra-
ception coverage rule, said “it doesn’t really
change the overall way they’re trying to do
this.” The Becket Fund represents many of
organizations challenging the regulation in
federal court.
The Catholic Church prohibits the use of
artificial contraception. Evangelicals gener-
ally accept the use of birth control, but some
object to specific methods such as the morn-
ing-after contraceptive pill, which they
argue is tantamount to abortion, and is cov-
ered under the policy.
Birth control rule finalized
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The focus of hotly con-
tested immigration legislation swung Friday
from the Senate to the House, where conser-
vative Republicans hold power, there is no
bipartisan template to serve as a starting
point and the two parties stress widely differ-
ent priorities.
“It’s a very long and winding road to immi-
gration reform,” said Rep. Tom Cole, an
Oklahoma Republican who said it could be
late this year or perhaps early in 2014 before
the outcome is known. His own constituents
are “very skeptical, mostly opposed,” he
said.
Supporters of the Senate’s approach sought
to rally support for its promise of citizenship
for those who have lived in the United States
unlawfully, a key provision alongside steps
to reduce future illegal immigration.
“The Republican Party still doesn’t under-
stand the depth...of this movement and just
how much the American people want compre-
hensive immigration reform,” Rep. Luis
Gutierrez, D-Ill., said on Friday. “We need to
make sure they come to this understanding.”
But Rep. Matt Salmon, R-Ariz., said in an
interview that any bill that results in citizen-
ship was a nonstarter. He called the approach
“patently unfair” to those trying to “do it the
legal way.”
Within hours after the Democratic-con-
trolled Senate approved its bill Thursday on a
68-32 vote, President Barack Obama tele-
phoned with congratulations for several
members of the bipartisan Gang of Eight who
negotiated an early draft of the bill that
passed.
Traveling in Africa, he also called House
Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, and
Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi of California
from Africa, urging them to pass an immigra-
tion bill.
Yet not even a firm timetable has been set.
The House Republican rank and file is
scheduled to hold a closed-door meeting on
the issue shortly after returning from a July 4
vacation, and Boehner has said previously he
hopes legislation on the topic can be passed
by the end of the month. Aides also say it is
possible the issue wouldn’t come to the floor
until the leadership had successfully resurrect-
ed a farm bill that was defeated last week.
In contrast to the all-in-one approach
favored by the Senate, the House Judiciary
Committee has approved a series of single-
issue bills in recent days, none including a
path to citizenship that Obama and
Democrats have set as a top priority.
Immigration faces obstacles in House
OPINION 9
Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Guest
perspective
Is the Proposition 8
decision good news?
Editor,
I am happy the Supreme Court recog-
nized that same-sex couples must be
treated equally under the law.
However, I’m alarmed by their deci-
sion on California’s Proposition 8,
Hollingsworth v. Perry. The Supreme
Court could have refused to take this
case, but they chose to take it and
then ruled that the Proposition 8 pro-
ponents had no standing. This wasn’t
an “easy way out” of the gay marriage
controversy, it was a specific deci-
sion to limit citizens’ access to the
courts. It follows the American Ex-
press v. Italian Colors decision a
week earlier, which also limits citi-
zens’ access to the courts by banning
class action suits against corpora-
t i ons.
While I disagree with Proposition 8
proponents, their grievance was legiti-
mate. They initiated and promoted a
ballot measure which won, but then
was not to be implemented, nor de-
fended in court because the governor
and state attorney general didn’t agree
with the outcome. Now, the Supreme
Court has ruled that Proposition 8 pro-
ponents don’t have standing. Who,
then, could have standing?
Imagine a similar situation with the
politics reversed. Imagine a gun
control measure voted by the people
but unimplemented by a NRA-be-
holden governor. Proponents would
have no judicial recourse. That’s un-
democratic.
Bruce Joffe
Piedmont
Not a viable solution
Editor,
Ruben Contreras’ “Housing solution”
letter of June 25, 2013 proposes tak-
ing over church property by eminent
domain to solve the state-mandated re-
quirement for an additional 2,000
housing units in Palo Alto.
I see two reasons why this is not a vi-
able solution. Taking over church
property as a way of solving the need
for additional housing needs is discrim-
inatory because it singles out a
particular group. Secondly, many
churches have services at other times
of the weeks in addition to Sundays.
Many churches also are utilized for var-
ious member activities during the
week.
I believe his proposal seeks to further
diminish the influence of religion in
the Bay Area.
John Bloomstine
San Carlos
Trash
Editor,
I was walking in my neighborhood
today (Wednesday morning) and I no-
ticed a filled dumpster of “trash” outside
of White Oaks School. Peeking out of
the top of this filled dumpster were sev-
eral chairs and larger plastic toys (or
possibly art easels).
Immediately, I thought, “Wow, they
talk about a tight budget and here they
are throwing away furniture.”
I can’t imagine that the school has an
entire dumpster of broken equipment.
Makes you wonder how did they sur-
vive the school year. Is there really no
other school in the area that could pos-
sibly use this equipment? Donate it to a
thrift store.
To think that all of this school equip-
ment will end up in a landfill. I know
this school has the cans for recycling,
compost and trash on the campus for
the students to use. However, at the end
of the school year, the effort to salvage
and reuse equipment is not a lesson
continued into the summer.
Taxpayers probably funded the origi-
nal purchase of the equipment. It would
be nice to see some fiscal restraint.
Please, promise me that when the
shiny, new equipment arrives that you
will be recycling the cardboard cartons.
John Durkin
San Carlos
Letters to the editor
The Sacramento Bee
T
he current prison standoff
between Gov. Jerry Brown
and a federal three-judge
panel reflects basic contradictions.
Californians want tough sentencing
laws, but they don’t want to pay for
more prisons or even for basic con-
stitutional health care for the pris-
oners it houses.
Brown has declared “victory” in
reducing prison overcrowding and
wants to do no more.
The judges, however, insist that
overcrowding remains a problem
and that the state must comply with
the 2009 order to get population in
the state’s 33 prisons to 137.5 per-
cent of design capacity (about
110,000 inmates) by Dec. 31.
This game of chicken, playing
with public safety, is so unneces-
sary. Brown can, and should, bring
Assembly and Senate leaders, law
enforcement officials, the federal
health receiver and special master,
the corrections secretary and Prison
Law Office attorneys in the same
room to negotiate a settlement.
Brown and legislators have shown
that they can get things done. To
their credit, they passed realignment
and voters approved dedicated fund-
ing for having people convicted of
nonserious, nonviolent and non-sex
crimes serve their time with coun-
ties, instead of state prison. The
month before realignment took
effect, California’s 33 state prisons
had 144,000 inmates. As of June
12, that had been reduced to
119, 400.
That reduction of 24,600 inmates
is a significant achievement, as is
construction of a new prison med-
ical facility with 1,722 beds in
Stockton scheduled to open in July.
With those two measures, the state
expects to be 9,636 above the cap
on Dec. 31. The governor needs to
lead a frank public discussion on
how the state can get to that cap in a
way that is sustainable over time
and preserves public safety.
To date, Brown has been simply
dismissive ... . Now is the time for
Brown to start negotiations toward a
settlement that puts the state, not
federal judges, in the driver’s seat
on reducing prison overcrowding to
137.5 percent of design capacity.
Brown should help settle prison lawsuits
Repeal the tax on
medical innovation
By Chuck McDougald
T
he jobless recovery is barely sputtering along.
Economic growth is anemic. The Christian
Science Monitor recently reported that manufactur-
ing activity contracted in May for the first time in eight
months, possibly signaling a return to mass layoffs and
job losses. What is the response in Washington?
Unbelievably, the geniuses in Congress have allowed an
additional tax to be slapped on med-
ical device manufactures — a tax that
hardest hits California and the Bay
Area, which is the center of med-tech
innovation.
The new tax on medical devices —
everything from stents to MRI
machines — seems small, at only 2.3
percent of sales. Yet small things can
make a big difference. After all, only
a few points separate the batting aver-
ages of all-stars from those of perennial benchwarmers.
However, this small amount is of more importance than
the batting averages, because this small amount will cost
tens of thousands of Americans their jobs.
The fact is, taxing something means we will get less of
whatever it is that we tax. That’s why environmentalists
push for higher gas taxes, so we consume less gas. It’s
why anti-smoking activists push for higher tobacco
taxes, so the consumption of cigarettes falls. And it’s why
local governments now require us to pay for shopping
bags at our local stores, so we use fewer of them.
As sure as night follows day, this new tax on medical
devices means we will have less innovation and fewer
jobs here in the Bay Area.
Not only are device manufacturers being taxed, but they
are being taxed on their sales, not on their profits. Think
about it. Living here in Silicon Valley, we know that
many innovative startups can lose money for years. Sure,
they have sales income, but their expenses and invest-
ment in disruptive technologies means they lose money.
Taxing device manufacturers on their income means that
some med-tech startups actually have to borrow money to
pay this new levy. This forces them to lose even more and
puts in jeopardy the life-saving technologies they are
developing.
Thirty-billion dollars will be sucked out of the economy
by this new tax, with the largest share coming from
California. California has the most med-tech jobs in the
country with 87,000 workers directly hired and another
279,000 who provide supplies, support and other func-
tions. Those directly employed in the California med-tech
industry make an average of over $62,000 per year while
the average salary in the private sector is only $47,000.
The Battelle Institute estimates that 7,200 of these
high-paying California manufacturing jobs will be
destroyed at a cost of more than $1.6 billion to our econo-
my due to this new tax.
Thankfully, a bipartisan group of House and Senate
members has mobilized to repeal this unfair and unwise
tax. In the U.S. House, H.R. 523 the Protect Medical
Innovation Act of 2013 has more than 250 co-sponsors
from both parties. In the Senate, S. 232 the Medical
Device Access and Innovation Protection Act has 34 sena-
tors on board.
Unfortunately, despite the pain caused by the medical
device tax in San Mateo County, in the Bay Area and
across California, U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo,
has not co-sponsored the Protect Medical Innovation Act
of 2013. However, to her credit, she did vote in favor of a
similar bill in the last Congress, H.R. 436 the Protect
Medical Innovation Act of 2012.
This is one area where Republicans and Democrats can
agree, that it makes no sense to slap additional taxes on
medical innovators and manufacturers, and that it makes
no sense to tax firms that are losing money while they
develop innovative medical devices.
Let’s join together, repeal this new tax, and help keep
our economy from tumbling back into recession.
Chuck McDougald headed the Veterans Coalition, first for
California, then for the Western Region, when Sen. John
McCain ran for president in 2008. In 2010, he served as
Statewide Volunteer Chair for Carly Fiorina’s campaign for
the U.S. Senate. He is currently the Western Region director
for ConcernedVeteransforAmerica.org. He lives in South
San Francisco with his wife and two kids.
Other voices
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BUSINESS 10
Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 14,909.60 -114.89 10-Yr Bond 2.478 -0.005
Nasdaq3,403.25 +1.38 Oil (per barrel) 95.01
S&P 500 1,606.28 -6.92 Gold 1,232.30
A FAMILY SHARING HOPE IN CHRIST
HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM
Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.
Call (650) 349-0100
HopeLutheranSanMateo.org
Baptist
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor
(650) 343-5415
217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services at 8 & 11 am
Sunday School at 9:30 am
Website: www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
Every Sunday at 5:30 PM
Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo ShinshuBuddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo
(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Ryuta Furumoto
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and 2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
Clases de Biblicas Y Servicio de
Adoracion
En Espanol, Si UD. Lo Solicita
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm
Congregational
• THE •
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
OF SAN MATEO - UCC
225 Tilton Ave. & San Mateo Dr.
(650) 343-3694
Worship and Church School
Every Sunday at 10:30 AM
Coffee Hour at 11:45 AM
Nursery Care Available
www.ccsm-ucc.org
Non-Denominational
Church of the
Highlands
“A community of caring Christians”
1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...
To know Christ and make him known.
901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223
Sunday services:
9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Nike Inc., up $1.36 at $63.68
The athletic shoe and clothing company reported fourth-quarter results
that topped Wall Street’s expectations.
AZZ Inc., down $4.54 at $38.56
The electrical equipment maker said that its fiscal first-quarter fell 9
percent and the results fell short of Wall Street predictions.
Accenture PLC, down $8.26 at $71.96
The consulting firm’s fiscal third-quarter net income grew nearly 18
percent, but its outlook fell short of Wall Street estimates.
Molycorp Inc., up 59 cents at $6.20
The SEC ended a public disclosures investigation into the rare-earth
minerals company, recommending no enforcement action be taken.
Nasdaq
Research In Motion Ltd., down $4.02 at $10.46
The BlackBerry maker posted a loss and warned of future losses after
the release of its make-or-break smartphones this year.
Finish Line Inc., up 66 cents at $21.86
The athletic shoe and clothing company’s first-quarter net income fell 59
percent, but its results easily topped expectations.
Dendreon Corp., up 4 cents at $4.12
The drug developer said that the European Medicines Agency committee
endorsed its prostate cancer treatment.
Pacific Sunwear of California Inc., up 29 cents at $3.62
A Wedbush analyst upgraded the retailer to “Outperform”from “Neutral,”
saying it appears poised for growth.
Big movers
By Bernard Condon
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Given the wild trad-
ing of late, it was a calm close to the
month.
After flitting between tiny gains and
losses most of Friday, the stock mar-
ket closed mostly lower, a peaceful end
to the most volatile month in nearly
two years.
“It’s a dull Friday,” said Gary Flam, a
stock manager at Bel Air Investment
Advisors. A bull market, he added, is
“rarely a straight march up.”
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index
ended its bumpy ride in June down 1.5
percent, the first monthly loss since
October. Still, the index had its best
first half of a year since 1998 — up
12.6 percent.
Investors still seem unsure how to
react to recent statements by Federal
Reserve officials about when the cen-
tral bank might end its support for the
economy.
Mixed economic news added to
investors’ uncertainty Friday. An index
of consumer confidence was almost
unchanged, but a gauge of business
activity in the Chicago area plunged.
“Investors don’t know what to make
of the news,” said John Toohey, vice
president of stock investments at
USAA Investment Management. “I
wouldn’t be surprised to see more ups
and downs.”
The S&P 500 stock index closed
down 6.92 points, or 0.4 percent, to
1,606.28. The Dow Jones industrial
average fell 114.89 points, or 0.8 per-
cent, to 14,909.60. The Nasdaq com-
posite index rose 1.38 points, or 0.04
percent, to 3,403.25.
Stocks have jumped around in June.
By contrast, the first five months of
the year were mostly calm, marked by
small but steady gains as investors
bought on news of higher home prices,
record corporate earnings and an
improving jobs market.
By May 21, the S&P 500 had
climbed to a record 1,669. Fed
Chairman Ben Bernanke spoke the
next day, and prices began gyrating.
Investors have long known that the
central bank would eventually pull
back from its bond purchases, which
are designed to lower interest rates and
get people to borrow and spend more.
Last week, Bernanke got more specific
about the timing. He said the Fed could
start purchasing fewer bonds later this
year, and stop buying them completely
by the middle of next year, if the econ-
omy continued to strengthen.
Investors dumped stocks, but then
had second thoughts this week as other
Fed officials stressed that the central
bank wouldn’t pull back on its support
soon. The Dow gained 365 points
Tuesday-Thursday. For the month, the
Dow moved up or down at least 100
points 16 of 20 trading days, the most
since September 2011.
Bonds have also been on a bumpy
ride in recent weeks, mostly down.
The prospect of fewer purchases by
the Fed sent investors fleeing from all
sorts of bonds — municipals, U.S.
Treasury securities, corporate bonds,
foreign government debt and high-
yield bonds. Investors pulled a record
$23 billion from bond mutual funds in
the five trading days ended Wednesday,
according to Bank of America Merrill
Lynch.
Stocks end month down
By M.L. Johnson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MILWAUKEE — Dairy farmers expressed frustration this
week with Congress’ failure to pass a farm bill, saying the
uncertainty made it hard to do business and some could go
under without changes to the federal milk program.
Farmers also worried that if a current nine-month exten-
sion of the 2008 farm bill expires with no action, a 64-year-
old law will kick in, sending milk prices spiraling. While
that might provide short-term profits, they say, it’d hurt
them in the long run because no one wants to buy milk at $6
a gallon.
The U.S. House voted down a farm bill June 20, about a
week after the Senate approved a different version. It was the
second year in a row that the House failed to pass the every-
five-years bill that sets funding for agriculture and food pro-
grams. Last year, it didn’t even vote, prompting the passage
in January of a slimmed-down extension of the 2008 law —
largely to avoid milk prices sharply increasing.
The Agricultural Act of 1949 sets a much higher price for
government purchases of cheese, butter and other dairy prod-
ucts than the U.S. has seen in decades. The government cut
the price in recent decades because if it didn’t, more compa-
nies would sell to the government than to retailers, unless
consumer prices rose to match.
Farmers fear if the higher prices kick in on Jan. 1, milk
and other dairy prices will rise until consumers just stop buy-
ing their products.
“I don’t think that’s good for anybody because we would
destroy demand,” said Pete Kappelman, a Wisconsin dairy
farmer and board chairman of Land O’Lakes, a farmer-owned
company that markets milk, eggs, butter and many other
products.
The farm bill failed in the House mainly because of dis-
agreement over food-stamp funding and dairy program
reforms farmers say are needed to keep them in business.
The government currently pays dairy farmers when milk
prices get too low. But the problem in recent years has been
the high cost of feed due to the ethanol industry’s demand for
corn as well as the drought. Farmers say milk costs almost as
much to produce as they can sell it for — and sometimes
more.
Kappelman, who has a 450-cow farm in Manitowoc, Wi s. ,
worked on a national dairy industry committee that proposed
a margin protection program that pays farmers when the
price difference between milk and feed shrinks to a certain
point.
He also supports a market stabilization program that
would require farmers to either reduce the amount of milk pro-
duced when prices drop too low or give up a portion of their
margin protection payments. The U.S. Department of
Agriculture would then use that money to buy and donate
dairy products to food banks and help low-income families.
Farmers warn of
high milk prices
without farm bill
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LAS VEGAS — There are no sure things in this city —
with one exception: Allegiant Air.
While other U.S. airlines have struggled over the past
decade from the ups and downs of the economy and the price
of jet fuel, Allegiant has been profitable for 10 straight
years.
The tiny airline focuses on a niche ignored by other air-
lines: It only flies from small cities to sunny vacation spots.
Allegiant entices people who otherwise wouldn’t fly with
low fares and non-stop flights. Then it aggressively pitches
them hotels, rental cars, show tickets and other entertain-
ment, earning millions in commissions.
Passengers face fees for almost every service and amenity
imaginable. At Allegiant, fees for checked baggage and
changing an itinerary — which are common on many air-
lines — are just the beginning.
The Las Vegas-based airline charges extra to book flights
online, or to use a credit card. Selecting a seat in advance
costs $5 to $75 each way, depending on the length of a
flight. Even a bottle of water costs $2.
Flying Allegiant isn’t glamorous. While other airlines
tout new aircraft with Wi-Fi and TVs in every seat, Allegiant
buys old planes to avoid hefty aircraft loans. And to pack in
as many passengers as possible, its seats don’t recline. But
for small-town Americans with limited flight options, these
inconveniences are worth it for a few days of sunshine.
Allegiant Air thrives on low costs, high fees
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
One has the unpredictability of a different
champion since 2005, the other has a for-
mer juggernaut champing at the bit to get
back to the top of the mountain.
Whichever District 52 tournament you
choose to follow this weekend, it won’t be
without its fair share of story lines —
which should make for two weeks worth of
exciting little league baseball.
Over in the 10-11 Minors tournament, 14
teams will battle to
become the champi-
on. Standing in
everyone’s way is a
Bel mont / Redwood
Shores team that will
try to become the
first repeat champion
in the 10-11 field since at least 2005. Last
season, Hillsborough came on strong near
the end of the tournament and ran through
the consolation
bracket to face off
against Belmont.
But behind Sean
Lee’s masterful pitch-
ing performance,
Bel mont / Redwood
Shores captured the
title. Using a blazing fastball, Lee dominat-
ed a potent Hillsborough lineup. Lee
allowed a check-swing double to Patrick
Dudley to lead off the game and did not give
up another hit. Hillsborough managed only
one other base runner — Jack Damelio was
hit by a pitch leading off the fourth — as
Belmont captured the District 52 champi-
onship with a 3-0 win.
This year, the 10-11 double-elimination
tournament heads to Red Morton Park in
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
After another tumultuous season, the
Notre Dame women’s basketball team is
making a change at the top.
Notre Dame de Namur
athletic department and
athletic director Josh
Doody announced Friday
the hiring of Angela
Kristensen as the Argos
new head women’s bas-
ketball coach.
“We are very excited to
have Angie come on
board.” Doody said via
press release. “She is a
great coach and her ability to recruit and her
familiarity with the conference makes her
excellent fit at NDNU. I am looking forward
to seeing the progression of our women’s
basketball team under her leadership.”
Kristensen comes to NDNU after spending
the better part of seven seasons at the helm
of fellow Pacific West Conference member
Dixie State College in St. George, Utah.
She helped oversee the Red Storm’s move
into NCAADivision II the same year NDNU
made the transition.
Kristensen was extremely successful at
Dixie State, leading the team to six straight
winning seasons and three straight second
place conference finishes. She led the Red
Storm to a 24-4 record in 2010-11, earning
the school’s first ever NCAA Division II
tournament berth and a national ranking of
No. 10.
In their only meeting last season, Dixie
State defeated Notre Dame de Namur 66-59
on Feb. 16.
Prior to Dixie State, Kristensen spent four
seasons at College of Saint Mary in Omaha,
Neb. At St. Mary, she compiled a 71-60
record, earned a trip to the NAIA National
Tournament and was named Midlands
Collegiate Athletic Conference Coach of
the Year in 2003-04.
Additionally, Kristensen spent a season
at Northwest Missouri State University as
the primary assistant under head coach Gene
Steinmeyer.
“I would like to thank Josh and the search
committee for all their hard work in this
process.” Kristensen said in the same
release. “I am extremely excited to stay on
the west coast and continue to coach in the
PacWest Conference.”
Kristensen takes over a NDNU program
that is coming off a 5-21 season in 2012-13
under Mike Rudder. The Argos went 5-9 at
By Michael Kelly
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DENVER — Michael Cuddyer and Jhoulys
Chacin kept rolling and stopped the
Colorado Rockies from sliding in the stand-
ings.
Cuddyer homered to extend his hitting
streak to 25 games, Chacin pitched eight
scoreless innings and the Rockies beat the
slumping San Francisco Giants 4-1 on
Friday night.
Wilin Rosario also went deep and Jordan
Pacheco had three hits for the Rockies, who
moved within three games of Arizona in the
NL West despite having lost eight of 10
entering the day.
Cuddyer’s streak is the longest in the
majors this season and extended his fran-
chise record. He has reached base safely in
44 straight games, also a club record.
“Cuddy’s so locked in right now, I don’t
know if you can swing the bat any better
than he is right now,” Rockies manager
Walt Weiss said. “He’s doing damage, too,
when he gets his hits. He’s been huge.”
Cuddyer, who signed as a free agent before
last season, has helped carry the team
through injuries to Troy Tulowitzki and
Dexter Fowler. Cuddyer is hitting .381 with
<< Neymar with chance to silence the world, page 12
• Lance Armstrong, who?, page 15
Weekend, June 29-30, 2013
MORE ARRESTS: AARON HERNANDEZ’S CASE GROWS DARKER WITH ANOTHER ARREST >> PAGE 13
District 52 All-Stars ready to take the field
See D-52, Page 13
LIGHT IT UP: TIME FOR CALI CLASICO
SJEARTHQUAKES
The Palo Alto sky will once again be lit up following San Jose’s clash with the L.A. Galaxy Saturday night at Stanford Stadium. On the
field,the Earthquakes continue a rather tumultuous season,but are 1-1 under interim head coach Mark Watson.For more San Jose news,
turn to page 12.
NDNU welcomes new basketball coach
Angela
Kristensen
Giants’ woes
persist in loss
See GIANTS, Page 16
By Howard Fendrich
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON — When a 19-stroke exchange
ended with Andy Murray’s Wimbledon oppo-
nent slapping a forehand into the net, thou-
sands of Centre Court spectators rose in uni-
son.
They applauded Murray’s first service
break. They screamed for joy. They waved
their Union Jacks and Scottish flags. It was
only a third-round match, merely 12 minutes
and three games old, yet to some that tiny
early edge seemed massively meaningful.
So imagine the reaction, louder and liveli-
er, when the second-seeded Murray finished
off his 6-2, 6-4, 7-5 victory over 32nd-seed-
ed Tommy Robredo of Spain less than two
hours later Friday to advance to Week 2. And
then, for a moment, try to fathom what
would happen if Murray ever were to win the
final point of The Championships, as the
Grand Slam tournament is known around
here, and become the first British man in 77
years to hoist the trophy.
“You need to be professional enough to
not let that stuff bother you and just concen-
trate on each match,” said Murray, who has
won 20 of his past 21 contests on grass,
including runs to last year’s final at the All
Murray wins
at Wimbledon
See TENNIS, Page 15
See ARGOS, Page 13
Red Morton Park,
Kiwanis and
Mitchell fields
9 a.m.
10-11 ALL-STARS
Belmont Sports
Complex No. 2
9 a.m.
11-12 ALL-STARS
SPORTS 12
Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
RIO DE JANEIRO — Neymar arrived
at the Confederations Cup following
lackluster performances in Brazil’s
famous yellow jersey. With three
goals in four matches, he’s helped the
hosts reach Sunday’s final against
world and European champion Spain
and can boost his stature even more
before joining Barcelona next month.
The 21-year-old forward was voted
man of the match in his team’s first
three games and played a key role in 2-
1 semifinal win over Uruguay.
“Barcelona must be beaming seeing
what he has been doing here,” Brazil
coach Luiz Felipe Scolari said. “He has
been playing well, making a differ-
ence against European defenders.”
Wearing the No. 10 jersey made
famous by Pele, Neymar opened the
scoring for Brazil in the opener
against Japan and also in the second
match against Mexico, both times
with remarkable goals. He netted his
third with a free kick against Italy and
assisted on both Brazil goals against
Uruguay.
“I’m really happy with how things
have turned out for me and for the
national team so far,” Neymar said
Friday. “We only have one match left
and I hope we can play well to finish
off with the title.”
Neymar attracted attention with
great performances with Santos in
Brazil, but critics were quick to down-
play his potential after he failed to
replicate that same success with the
national team.
He was often criticized for diving
too much, an issue that came up again
during the Confederations Cup when
Uruguay captain Diego Lugano accused
the Neymar of trying to “fool the ref-
erees and the rivals.”
The remarks prompted Brazil’s soc-
cer federation to put out a lengthy
statement in the player’s defense.
Neymar with chance to prove critics wrong
REUTERS
Brazilian star Neymar salutes the crowd after a semifinal win versus Uruguay.
By Robb Harris
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
RIO DE JANEIRO — FIFAPresident
Sepp Blatter responded Friday to criti-
cism of the cost of staging the World
Cup in Brazil by pledging to give at
least $100 million from profits back
to the country.
Soccer’s governing body gave
South Africa $100 million to invest in
development projects following the
2010 World Cup, but had not previous-
ly said it would establish a similar
“social fund” after the 2014 tourna-
ment to Brazil.
The Confederations Cup, a World
Cup warmup event, has been marred by
protesters denouncing billions of dol-
lars spent to host the World Cup —
money some say should be going
toward improving public services.
“We have left a legacy (in South
Africa), a special fund of $100 mil-
lion, this fund is controlled by the
Football (Association) of (South)
Africa, the government of South
Africa and FIFA,” Blatter said during a
news conference. “I am sure an amount
like that, or even higher, will be pos-
sible to have here. ... The aim from
FIFA is not to take profit out of the
country, but to put into the country. ”
Blatter said he can “understand this
social unrest” in Brazil while the tour-
nament has been taking place.
The demonstrations took off earlier
this month over a 10-cent hike in bus
and subway fare in Sao Paulo and mor-
phed into a mass, nationwide move-
ment voicing public dissatisfaction
with a range of issues such as govern-
ment corruption, poor education,
health care and spending on the World
Cup.
The government is projecting that
$13.3 billion will be spent on stadi-
ums, airport renovations and other
projects for the World Cup, with an
estimated $3.5 billion on the 12 ven-
ues.
As violence escalated in the streets
near to Confederations Cup matches,
with protesters clashing with police,
Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff
said her government would start to
invest in projects the public had been
demanding.
“They have promised to change —
this is not our problem, this is a polit-
ical problem, but something will be
changed,” Blatter said.
Then the World Cup will have this
platform when finally this can be
delivered. It’s all a question of
patience and a question of trust and
confidence.”
Blatter also expressed “trust and
confidence” in how the authorities
coped with “some uncomfortable situ-
ations we have witnessed” during the
Confederations Cup, declining to
comment on the police firing tear gas
and rubber bullets at some protesters.
Blatter, though, expects soccer to
help unite the nation, and Brazil will
lift the Confederations Cup on Sunday
if it can beat reigning world and
European champion Spain.
“Hope is one of the elements of
football ... we play football nowadays
in all perturbed countries in all the
world,” Blatter said.
Sepp Blatter pledges $100M to Brazil
Quakes bolster
defense, prepare
for Cali Clasico
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
While the San Jose Earthquakes prepare for their marquee
soccer event this season, the changes keep coming.
The Quakes will host the L.A. Galaxy Saturday night at
Stanford Stadium in the latest edition of the Cali Clasico —
a rivalry game that extends back to the birth of Major
League Soccer when San Jose was known as the Clash.
Los Angeles leads the overall series 25-17-9, but San Jose
has the advantage at home with a 12-9-6 record. The
Earthquakes are expecting over 35,000 soccer fans for that
game.
But before Saturday’s game, San Jose made news by
announcing the addition of U.S. men’s national team
defender Clarence Goodson. Per league and team policy,
terms of the deals were not disclosed.
Goodson, 31, began his professional career in Major
League Soccer with FC Dallas in 2004 and was selected in
by the Earthquakes in the 2007 MLS Expansion Draft. He
joins San Jose after three-year stints with IK Start of
Norway and Brondby of Denmark. He was also a member of
the United States 2010 World Cup squad in South Africa and
was named to his country’s 2013 Gold Cup roster along with
San Jose striker Chris Wondolowski. Goodson will report
straight to USMNT camp for the Gold Cup before joining
the Earthquakes following the conclusion of the tourna-
ment.
“We’re very excited to have Clarence join us,” said
Earthquakes interim head coach Mark Watson via the team’s
website. “He brings a lot of experience both in MLS and
internationally. He has great leadership qualities and will be
a fantastic addition to our back four. ”
The veteran defender was the No. 7 overall pick in the
2004 MLS SuperDraft by FC Dallas. He made 74 appear-
ances during his stay in Texas, tallying three goals and two
assists. The stalwart center back earned the starting job for
FC Dallas in his sophomore season and helped lead their
squad to three consecutive MLS Cup Playoff appearances
from 2005-07.
After being selected by the Earthquakes in 2007, Goodson
opted to pursue a career in Europe, but the Quakes held his
MLS rights. He signed with IK Start of Norway in January of
2008 and helped lead their squad to promotion to the coun-
try’s first division. Goodson moved to Brondby in
November of 2010 and earned the captain’s armband within
six months of joining his new club. He helped Brondby to
a third-place finish in his first season, earning them a spot
in the 2011-12 UEFA Europa League’s third qualifying
round. Goodson made 59 appearances during his three sea-
sons with Brondby.
Redwood City. Foster City and San Carlos
earned first-round byes and won’t begin
their play until Sunday. Foster City awaits
the winner of Palo Alto National and
Redwood City West. They kick off the
action Saturday morning at 9 a.m. on
Kiwamis Field. San Carlos will face the win-
ner of Hillsborough and San Mateo
National. Those two will tangle at 2 p.m.
on Mitchell Field.
Pacifica American begins its District 52
trek with a game against Palo Alto National
at 9 a.m. on Mitchell Field. Menlo-
Atherton will take on Redwood City East at
11:30 a.m. on Kiwanis. Over on the other
end of Morton, San Mateo American and
Half Moon Bay will do battle.
Alpin-West Menlo and the reigning
champions cap off the day’s activity with a
2 p.m. game.
Over in the Majors 11-12 bracket,
Hillsborough’s reign was interrupted by an
upstart and flashy Foster City team that
truly was the complete package last sum-
mer. It was the first time in five years a team
other than the red and blue had captured a
District 52 title.
It took a phenomenal pitching by
Dominic Monozon and a pair of clutch hits
for Foster City to beat Hillsborough 3-1 and
capture their first District 52 Majors title in
20 years.
The road to Titletown wasn’t easy but
Foster City sure made it look that way. In
five games, the black and teal outscored
their opponents 32-6 and had to beat the
reigning champions twice.
In 2013, the two teams are slated on the
same side of the 16-team bracket when play
begins Saturday at the Belmont Sports
Complex.
Foster City will take on San Mateo
American in the day’s primetime matchup.
Hillsborough has a 2 p.m. meet-up with
Redwood City West.
Starting at 9 a.m., Menlo-Atherton faces
off against the other Redwood City team,
East, on complex No. 2. Belmont-Redwood
Shores and San Mateo American play at the
same time.
Pacifica National and Alpine-West Menlo
have an 11:30 a.m. date and so do
Ravenswood and Palo Alto National.
The 2 o’clock hour brings fans a San
Carlos versus Half Moon Bay matchup on
one end of the complex, and that
Hillsborough versus Redwood City West
game on the other.
The in-between hour of 4:30 p.m. sees
Pacifica American and Palo Alto American
welcome in the evening.
Hillsborough has won seven 11-12 titles
since 2002. The last repeat champion
besides Hillsborough was San Carlos
National in 2002 and 2003.
SPORTS 13
Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Continued from page 11
D-52
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATTLEBORO, Mass.— An arrested man
from former New England Patriots tight end
Aaron Hernandez’s hometown was trans-
ferred to Massachusetts on Friday to face a
gun charge connected to the murder case
against Hernandez while a third suspect sur-
rendered to authorities in Florida.
Carlos Ortiz, who lives in Bristol, Conn.,
and Ernest Wallace, who walked into a South
Florida police station, were the men identi-
fied earlier as being with Hernandez and the
victim the night of his shooting death, a
prosecutor said.
Ortiz was charged with carrying an unli-
censed firearm in North Attleborough, where
Hernandez lives, on June 17, the day
Boston semi-pro football player Odin Lloyd
was found shot to death near Hernandez’s
home. Details of the charge weren’t
released.
Wallace, whose wanted poster was
released Thursday night, surrendered in
Miramar, Fla., police said. Authorities had
been seeking Wallace on a charge of acting
as an accessory after Lloyd’s murder. Details
of that allegation also weren’t released.
Police arrested Hernandez on Wednesday
at his home and charged him with orches-
trating Lloyd’s execution-style shooting.
Prosecutors said Hernandez orchestrated the
killing because Lloyd talked to the wrong
people at a nightclub.
Hernandez, Ortiz and Wallace were in a car
with Lloyd shortly before his death, Bristol
County, Mass., District Attorney C. Samuel
Sutter said.
“We now have in custody the three indi-
viduals who were in the silver Nissan
Altima,” Sutter said Friday when Ortiz was
arraigned on the gun charge in Attleboro
District Court.
All three men have ties to Bristol, Conn.:
Hernandez grew up there, Ortiz had been liv-
ing there, and authorities had conflicting
addresses for Wallace there and in Miramar.
Hernandez pleaded not guilty to murder
and was denied bail Thursday. Ortiz also was
being held without bail pending a court
hearing on July 9. Wallace was taken to a
jail in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., pending extra-
dition proceedings, police said.
Hernandez’s lawyer argued in court that
the case is circumstantial. He said
Hernandez, who was cut by the Patriots the
day he was arrested, wanted to clear his
name.
Ortiz’s attorney, John Connors, said he
will seek bail for his client at the July 9
hearing.
He described Ortiz as a “gentle person”
and said he will advise Ortiz to plead not
guilty.
“I can say that his charge has nothing to
do with homicide,” Connors said.
Conn. man arraigned in
ex-Patriot’s murder case
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA MONICA — Past desks covered
with extreme sports magazines and refriger-
ators stocked with energy drinks, a small
isolation booth has been erected smack dab
in the middle of Red Bull’s airy offices in
Santa Monica, Calif. It’s not for hosting
meetings or employee breaks. It’s for play-
ing video games — very competitive video
games.
The beverage company’s North American
headquarters played host recently to the
chummy Red Bull Training Grounds ahead of
this weekend’s Major League Gaming
Spring Championship in Anaheim, Calif.
Red Bull is betting this new take on training
for competitive gaming — or e-sports, as
it’s known — will give its players, to bor-
row Red Bull’s slogan, wings.
The company, which is probably better
known for sponsoring action sports stars
and race cars than gamers, has previously
hosted other e-sporting events, but Training
Grounds marked the first time it focused on
schooling players.
Despite being stationed amid cubicles,
the inaugural Training Grounds event had
most trappings of a typical mammoth e-
sports event: lights, cameras, competitors,
commentators and prize money. However,
there was no live audience to cheer on the
eight international e-athletes, and the
gamers were only competing in one title,
the real-time strategy game “StarCraft II.”
For professional gamers,
it’s a big dress rehearsal
home but winless in 11 games on the roard.
The Argos did finish strong with back-to-
back wins to close out the season and return
four of their top five scorers.
Graduated is former Burlingame and
College of San Mateo standout Trish
Malaspina, who led the team in overall
scoring at just over 10 points per game. But
Kristensen gets a promising stud baller in
Taylor Dewees, who was second overall on
the team in scoring at 8.9 points per game,
but actually led the team in the same catego-
ry during conference play. She also led the
Argos in 3’s made.
Also back is Maya Arellanes who aver-
aged more than seven points per game in
conference play and was second on the team
in total assists.
Kristensen also gets a player in Jasmine
Walters who started in 25 of her 26 games.
She led the team in total assists and aver-
aged 5-and-5 per game during the season.
Also back is Charnisha Bradley, who saw
limited action last season but averaged over
five points per game when on the court.
“I am ready to help build this program and
NDNU back on the map.” Kristensen said.
“It is great to be a part of the Argonaut fam-
i l y. ”
Continued from page 11
ARGOS
14
Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS 15
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England Club and a London Olympics gold
medal. “I did a good job of that today. I
played well. My best match of the tourna-
ment, so far.”
The locals’ hopes that Murray will follow
up his 2012 U.S. Open victory with anoth-
er major title, this time at Wimbledon, only
increased in the aftermath of surprisingly
early losses this week by seven-time cham-
pion Roger Federer, two-time winner Rafael
Nadal and two-time semifinalist Jo-Wilfried
Tsonga.
All were seeded in the top six, and all were
on Murray’s half of the draw. Their depar-
tures mean the most daunting obstacle in
Murray’s path — until a potential final
against No. 1-ranked Novak Djokovic, any-
way — might very well be surging expecta-
tions.
“There’s a lot more pressure on me now,
with them being out,” Murray acknowl-
edged after compiling 40 winners and only
14 unforced errors against Robredo, taking
advantage of the zero-wind conditions under
the closed retractable roof.
“I mean, I don’t read the papers and stuff.
But there are papers in the locker room,”
Murray continued with a chuckle, “so you
see some of the headlines and stuff. It’s not
that helpful.”
Nadal’s stunning first-round exit, for
example, was viewed mainly through the
prism of how that result helped Murray, who
could have faced the 12-time major champi-
on in the semifinals. “Adios Rafa. Hello
Andy. Wimbledon dreams again,” read a
headline in The Times of London. The Daily
Mail’s take: “Great start for Andy — Rafa’s
out.”
All in all, then, Friday was a perfectly
British day, and not simply because Murray
won his third straight-set match in a row.
The lone other remaining singles player
from the host country, 19-year-old Laura
Robson, made her way into the third round
at Wimbledon for the first time, defeating
117th-ranked qualifier Mariana Duque-
Marino of Colombia 6-4, 6-1.
That match, like Murray’s, was played
with the Centre Court covered because of
rain that played havoc with the schedule,
and Robson heard her share of rowdy sup-
port, too. She also was serenaded with the
“Awwwwwww” that often accompanies a
mistake by a player the crowd really cares
about.
“I love when people get involved,”
Robson said. “Sometimes they do, like, a
massive groan if I hit a double-fault, but I’m
doing it as well. So, yeah, we’re just living
it together.”
Afew hours after Robson’s match ended,
putting her in Wimbledon’s third round for
the first time, a bookmaker sent out a
release noting that her odds of winning the
tournament went from 80-1 to 33-1.
Robson eliminated 10th-seeded Maria
Kirilenko in the first round, part of a wild
first week. All told, four top-10 men (each
on Murray’s half, coincidentally) and six
top-10 women lost already, equaling the
worst performance by the highest seeds at
any Grand Slam tournament in the 45-year
history of the Open era.
REUTERS
Britain’s Andy Murray returns a shot in his second round win at the All-England Club.
Continued from page 11
TENNIS
By John Leicester
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PORTO VECCHIO, Corsica — Lance
Armstrong made himself the uninvited guest
at the Tour de France on Friday, coming back
to haunt the 100th edition of the race and
infuriating riders both past and present by
talking at length in a newspaper interview
about doping in the sport.
Armstrong told Le
Monde that he still con-
siders himself the record-
holder for Tour victories,
even though all seven of
his titles from 1999-
2005 were stripped from
him last year for doping.
He said his life has
been ruined by the U.S.
Anti-Doping Agency
investigation that
exposed as lies his years of denials that he
and his teammates doped. He also took
another swipe at cycling’s top administra-
tors, darkly suggesting they could be
brought down by other skeletons in the
sport’s closet.
None of those comments broke new
ground, but in answering questions from Le
Monde — a newspaper he scorned when he
was still competing — Armstrong ensured
that his views on doping at the Tour would
have maximum impact in France and could-
n’t easily be written off as sour grapes being
hurled at the race from afar. The respected
daily is very much France’s newspaper of
record. Its interview with the rider and his
assertion that doping won’t be eradicated
from cycling dominated French airwaves
ahead of the race start on Saturday, causing
dismay and anger in the sport desperate to
prove that it has turned the page on his era
of serial cheating.
The Tour’s director, Christian
Prudhomme, suggested Armstrong was
milking the race’s notoriety to further his
own agenda.
“This is a very big tournament, just look
around: There are 2,300 accredited journal-
ists here, there are cameras everywhere. So
if someone wanted to transmit a message,
this is the time obviously, especially since
everyone likes this kind of controversial
statements,” he said.
Armstrong’s comments and the conster-
nation they caused highlighted cycling’s
dilemma: It is a sport fighting to give itself
a cleaner, brighter future by combating drug
cheats but much of that good work is being
overshadowed by the dirty secrets of dopers
from the past.
Pre-Tour, a drip-drip-drip of doping con-
fessions and revelations about the
Armstrong era have rained on the sport.
Armstrong’s former rival on French roads,
1997 Tour winner Jan Ullrich, admitted to
blood-doping for the first time. French
media also reported that a Senate investiga-
tion into the effectiveness of anti-doping
controls pieced together evidence of drug
use at the 1998 Tour by Laurent Jalabert, a
former star of the race now turned broadcast-
er.
Armstrong’s claim that it was “impossi-
ble” to win the Tour without doping in his
era echoed what he already told U.S. televi-
sion talk show host Oprah Winfrey in
January, when he finally confessed. Then,
he said doping was “part of the job.”
Lance Armstrong uninvited,
unwanted guest at 100th Tour
Lance
Armstrong
six home runs and 18 RBIs during
his streak.
“I haven’t changed anything, I
haven’t done anything different,”
he said. “Balls have just been
falling, things have been going
my way. I’m not really worried
about the streak, it’s just pitch to
pitch, at-bat to at-bat, evaluate the
situation and try to execute. It
doesn’t matter if you have a hit
streak or not, that’s your goal
every time you step to the plate.”
Cuddyer flied out to left in the
first inning before connecting in
the third. He worked the count to
2-0 before hitting a 79 mph cut
fastball just over the scoreboard in
right to give the Rockies a 3-0
lead. Rosario followed with a blast
to left to make it 4-0.
“Cuddyer was the big mistake
tonight,” Giants starter Barry Zito
said. “Going low and just throw-
ing a backdoor cutter up in the
zone instead of keeping it down.
Rosario, he hit a good pitch.”
Chacin (7-3) made it stand up
and earned his fourth straight win
with another standout perform-
ance.
The right-hander has emerged as
Colorado’s best pitcher in June.
He came within an out of a shutout
against Philadelphia on June 16
and threw seven scoreless innings
in a win over Washington last
week. He has thrown 15 straight
scoreless innings — one-third shy
of his career best — and has
allowed just two runs in his last 27
innings.
“I’ve just been trying to throw
strikes. I’ve been trying to attack
the hitter and make them swing,”
Chacin said. “That’s what I’ve
been doing the last three or four
starts. Everything has been work-
ing out and my fastball has been
strong.”
He was sharp again Friday, scat-
tering three hits and walking three
to help the Rockies snap a three-
game skid. He retired 10 in a row
after the Giants had first and sec-
ond with one out in the fourth,
then got Brandon Crawford to
ground out with two on to end the
seventh inning.
He retired the side in order in the
eighth and was hoping to finish
the game. But had thrown 95
pitches, close enough to the 100-
pitch limit for Rockies starters, so
Rex Brothers came on in the
ninth.
“I really wanted to go back. I felt
good and strong,” Chacin said.
“After they told me no, that’s good
for today, let Brothers get the last
three outs I said OK. But I really
wanted to go back out.”
Buster Posey homered among
his three hits for the Giants, who
have lost five straight and seven
of their last eight.
“I think we need to go out there
and relax and get everything click-
ing together,” Brandon Belt said.
Zito (4-6) allowed four runs and
10 hits while striking out three in
5 1-3 innings. The veteran left-
hander is 0-3 in his last five starts.
His last win came against Oakland
on May 30 and he is 0-5 in six
road starts this season.
The defending champions have
struggled to score runs during their
slide. San Francisco has managed
just 17 runs in its last seven
games and just avoided being shut
out for the seventh time this sea-
son.
“When you’re in something like
this, it’s human nature to start
pressing,” Giants manager Bruce
Bochy said.
16
Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
Continued from page 11
GIANTS
N.L trek still good for A’s
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Bartolo Colon
tossed eight innings of one-run
ball to win his eighth straight
start, powering the Oakland
Athletics past the St. Louis
Cardinals 6-1 on Friday night.
Colon (11-2) controlled the
game with an efficient fastball the
way he has so many others this
season, burnishing his All-Star
credentials and confounding crit-
ics who question how the 40-year-
old continues to dominate. He
allowed six hits, struck out five
and walked one to match Max
Scherzer of Detroit for the most
wins in the AL this season.
The A’s scored five runs in the
second inning to knock Shelby
Miller (8-6) out of the game and
drop the Cardinals (48-31) a game
behind Pittsburgh for the best
record in the majors — and the NL
Central lead.
Stephen Vogt homered to end an
0-for-32 stretch to start his career,
and four players drove in runs in
the second inning for the A’s in a
third straight victory.
Dan Otero pitched a scoreless
ninth to finish off the best first
half of the season for Oakland (47-
34) since 1992, when the club
started 48-33. The A’s remain a
half-game behind Texas for the AL
West lead.
Colon carried a perfect game
into the fifth, when Matt Holliday
walked with one out. Matt Adams
added a short fly that dropped in
front of a diving Coco Crisp in
center field for the first hit off
Colon, and David Freese followed
with an RBI single for the
Cardinals’ only run.
Colon tied his career high with
eight consecutive wins — which
he did in 2005, when he won a
career-best 21 games for the
Angels and captured the AL Cy
Young Award — and hasn’t lost
since May 9 at Cleveland. He is
the first A’s pitcher since Barry
Zito in 2005 to win eight in a row.
The right-hander also is the first
pitcher to win his first seven starts
since turning 40, according to
information from the Elias Sports
Bureau provided by the A’s.
SPORTS 17
Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 46 34 .575 —
Washington 40 39 .506 5 1/2
Philadelphia 38 42 .475 8
New York 32 44 .421 12
Miami 27 51 .346
18Central Division
W L Pct GB
Pittsburgh 49 30 .620 —
St. Louis 48 31 .608 1
Cincinnati 45 35 .563 4 1/2
Chicago 33 44 .429 15
Milwaukee 32 46 .410 16 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 42 37 .532 —
San Diego 40 40 .500 2 1/2
Colorado 40 41 .494 3
San Francisco 38 41 .481 4
Los Angeles 36 42 .462 5 1/2
Friday’s Games
Pittsburgh 10, Milwaukee 3
San Diego 9, Miami 2
Washington 6, N.Y. Mets 4
Atlanta 3, Arizona 0
Texas 4, Cincinnati 0
Colorado 4, San Francisco 1
Oakland 6, St. Louis 1
Chicago Cubs at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 49 33 .598 —
Baltimore 45 36 .556 3 1/2
New York 42 37 .532 5 1/2
Tampa Bay 41 39 .513 7
Toronto 39 40 .494 8 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 43 35 .551 —
Cleveland 41 38 .519 2 1/2
Kansas City 37 40 .481 5 1/2
Minnesota 35 41 .461 7
Chicago 32 44 .421 10
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 47 33 .588 —
Oakland 47 34 .580 1/2
Los Angeles 37 43 .463 10
Seattle 34 45 .430 12 1/2
Houston 30 50 .375 17
Friday’sGame
Cleveland 19, Chicago White Sox 10, 1st game
Baltimore 4, N.Y.Yankees 3
Detroit 6,Tampa Bay 3
Boston 7,Toronto 5
Texas 4, Cincinnati 0
Kansas City 9, Minnesota 3
L.A. Angels 4, Houston 2
AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Montreal 9 3 2 29 24 17
Philadelphia 7 5 4 25 25 24
New York 7 6 4 25 23 22
Kansas City 6 5 5 23 20 15
Houston 6 5 5 23 19 16
Columbus 5 6 5 20 19 18
New England 5 5 5 20 18 13
Chicago 5 7 3 18 15 21
Toronto FC 2 7 6 12 14 20
D.C. 2 11 3 9 8 26
WESTERNCONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Portland 7 1 9 30 28 16
Real Salt Lake 9 5 3 30 26 16
FC Dallas 8 3 5 29 25 20
Los Angeles 7 6 3 24 23 18
Vancouver 6 5 4 22 25 24
Seattle 6 5 3 21 19 17
Colorado 5 7 5 20 17 19
San Jose 4 7 6 18 15 25
Chivas USA 3 10 2 11 14 30
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
———
Saturday’s Games
Real Salt Lake at Toronto FC, 10 a.m.
FC Dallas at Philadelphia, 2:30 p.m.
Colorado at Montreal, 4 p.m.
Vancouver at D.C. United, 4 p.m.
Columbus at Sporting Kansas City, 5:30 p.m.
MLS GLANCE
vs.Galaxy
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/29
@Chicago
5:30p.m.
CSN-PLUS
7/3
@NERev
4:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/6
vs.Seattle
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/13
@Colorado
5:40p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/28
@Colorado
1:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/29
@Colorado
1:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/30
vs. Cardinals
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/28
vs. Cardinals
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/29
vs. Cardinals
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/30
@Reds
4:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/1
@Reds
4:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/2
vs. Cubs
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/2
vs. Cubs
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/3
vs.Norwich
City
7:30p.m.
7/20
vs.Portland
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/27
vs. Chivas
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/4
BASEBALL
COMMISSIONER’SOFFICE— Suspended Cleve-
land RHP Dillon Howard (AZL Indians) 50 games
for testingpositivefor anamphetamineinviolation
of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treat-
ment Program.
AmericanLeague
CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Reinstated 3B Conor
Gillaspie from paternity leave.
CLEVELANDINDIANS — Sent RHPs Brett Myers
and Blake Wood to Akron (EL) for rehab assign-
ments.OptionedLHPNickHagadonetoColumbus
(IL).RecalledRHPsTrevor Bauer andCarlosCarrasco
from Columbus.
DETROITTIGERS— Assigned RHP Jose Valverde
outright to Toledo (IL).Recalled RHP Bruce Rondon
from Toledo. Agreed to terms with RHP Will
LaMarche and OFs Raphael Rhymes and Adrian
Castano on minor league contracts.
HOUSTONASTROS — Agreed to terms with Cs
BrianHolbertonandJakeRodriguez,LHPChrisCot-
ton, 3B Adam Nelubowich and RHP Juan Santos
on minor league contracts. Assigned Cotton,
Nelubowich and Rodriguez to Tri-City (NYP) and
Santos to the GCL Astros.
SEATTLEMARINERS— Reinstated RHP Josh Kin-
ney from the 60-day DL and assigned him outright
to Tacoma (PCL). Selected INF Brad Miller from
Tacoma. Optioned INF Carlos Triunfel to Tacoma.
Designated for assignment INF Alex Liddi.
TEXASRANGERS-Sent RHPJoakimSoriatoRound
Rock (PCL) on rehab assignment igned LHP Cody
Ege, LHP Luis Pollorena, and RHP Chris Dula to
minor league contracts.
TRANSACTIONS
18
Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WORLD
Advertisement
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO — Tens of thousands of support-
ers and opponents of President Mohammed
Morsi rallied Friday in Cairo, and both
sides fought each other in the second-
largest city of Alexandria, where two people
were killed — including an American — and
85 were injured while at least five offices of
Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood were torched,
officials said.
The competing camps were trying to
show their strength before even bigger
nationwide protests planned by the opposi-
tion Sunday — the first anniversary of
Morsi’s inauguration — aimed at forcing
his removal.
The opposition says it will bring mil-
lions into the streets across Egypt, and
more violence is feared. Already, six people
have been killed in clashes this week,
including Friday’s deaths.
The Cairo International Airport was flood-
ed with departing passengers, an exodus
that officials said was unprecedented. All
flights departing Friday to Europe, the U.S.
and the Gulf were fully booked, they said.
Many of those leaving were families of
Egyptian officials and businessmen and
those of foreign and Arab League diplomats
— as well as many Egyptian Christians, the
officials said, speaking on condition of
anonymity because they were not author-
ized to talk to the press.
The U.S. State Department warned
Americans against all but essential travel to
Egypt, citing the uncertain security situa-
tion. It also said it would allow some
nonessential staff and the families of per-
sonnel at the U.S. Embassy in Cairo to
leave until conditions improve.
Opposition protesters in Alexandria
broke into the local headquarters of Morsi’s
Muslim Brotherhood and set fires, throwing
papers and furniture out the windows.
For several days, Brotherhood members
and opponents of Morsi have battled in
cities in the Nile Delta. With Friday’s
deaths, at least six have been killed this
week.
“We must be alert lest we slide into a civil
war that does not differentiate between sup-
porters and opponents,” warned Sheik
Hassan al-Shafie, a senior cleric at Al-
Azhar, the country’s most eminent Muslim
religious institution.
Morsi opponents massed in Cairo’s
Tahrir Square, the epicenter of the protests
in 2011 that ousted longtime leader Hosni
Mubarak. The crowd shouted, “Leave,
leave” — this time addressing Morsi. Tents
were put up on the grass in the middle of the
historic square.
Dozens of protesters also gathered at the
gates of the presidential palace in the
Heliopolis neighborhood of Cairo, urging
him to resign, Egypt’s state news agency
reported.
Violence flares in Egypt
REUTERS
Supporters of Egyptian President Mohamed
Mursi and anti-Morsi protesters clash in
Alexandria.
Vatican monsignor
arrested in 20M euro plot
VATICAN CITY — The plot involved an
armed police escort, a wealthy shipping family
and a plan to secretly transport $26 million (20
million euros) from a Swiss bank account into
Italy aboard a private jet. At the heart of the
story of greed: a silver-haired Vatican monsi-
gnor.
The latest corruption
scandal to hit the Holy See
unraveled in public on
Friday as Monsignor
Nunzio Scarano, a Vatican
accountant, was arrested in
the customs-dodging Swiss
bank case. He is also under
investigation in a separate
case of alleged money-
laundering involving his
Vatican bank account.
The developments came two days after Pope
Francis created a commission of inquiry into the
Vatican bank to get to the bottom of the prob-
lems that have plagued it for decades and con-
tributed to its reputation as an unregulated, off-
shore tax haven.
With Francis’ reform-minded hand now run-
ning the show, the Vatican said it was prepared
to fully cooperate with Italian investigators,
who described a remarkably detailed scheme
allegedly spearheaded by Scarano to benefit
some very wealthy friends.
World in brief
Monsignor
Nunzio Scarano
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JOHANNESBURG — As Nelson Mandela
remained in critical condition in hospital
Friday, a family feud over where the 94-year-
old former president should be buried went to
the courts, according to South Africa’s nation-
al broadcaster.
Mandela’s oldest daughter, Makaziwe, and
15 other family members have pressed a court
application to get Mandela’s grandson to
return the bodies of three of Mandela’s chil-
dren to their original
graves in the eastern rural
village of Qunu, according
to the SABC.
The grandson, Mandla
Mandela, acknowledges
having reburied the three
bodies 20 kilometers (13
miles) away in the Mvezo
village, where he plans to
create a Mandela shrine,
hotel and soccer stadium,
according to the South
African Press Association.
Grandson Mandla Mandela has until
Saturday to respond to the court filing, reports
said.
The anti-apartheid leader built his retire-
ment home in Qunu and was living there until
his repeated hospitalizations which started at
the end of last year. Nelson Mandela attended
the burial of his son at the family plot in Qunu
in 2005, and it was widely expected that the
leader himself will be buried there.
But his grandson exhumed the bodies of
Mandela’s three children and moved them to
nearby Mvezo, which is the former president’s
birthplace and where the grandson holds
authority as chief.
Family feuds
over Mandela
burial location
Nelson
Mandela
Natalie Cole
en Español
R&B singer to
release first
Spanish album
SEE PAGE 23
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Staggeringly implausible, cartoonishly
comical, Roland Emmerich’s “White House
Down” is refreshingly dumb.
Refreshing because carefree action absurd-
ity, once the province of the summer cinema,
is on the outs. Solemnity — even for caped,
flying men in tight-fitting trousers — is in.
But there’s an inarguable, senseless pleas-
ure in watching Jamie Foxx, as the president
of the United States, kicking a terrorist and
shouting: “Get your hands off my Jordans!”
Hail to the chief, indeed.
“White House Down” follows Antoine
Fuqua’s “Olympus Has Fallen,” released in
March, as the second movie this year to
imagine an assault on 1600 Pennsylvania
Avenue. The two films are very similarly
plotted, but “White House Down” is notably
less serious, more content to loosen the
strings and acknowledge its own inherent
preposterousness.
This becomes particularly crystalized
somewhere around the time Foxx’s President
James Sawyer and his rescuer, Channing
Tatum’s wannabe secret service agent, are
careening across the White House lawn in the
president’s limo while terrorists shoot in
pursuit. Onlookers behind a fence — media,
regular people, the Army — merely gape in
awe, as if frozen by the idiocy.
“White House Down” is most entertaining
when it’s a simple, ludi-
crous buddy movie, with
Tatum and Foxx fleeing
across the White House
grounds, dropping one-
liners as they go, eluding
a gang of assailants led
by a bitter turncoat
(James Woods) and his
ferocious henchmen
(including Jason Clarke,
swapping sides in the war
on terror following “Zero
Dark Thirty”).
This is a kind of corona-
tion for Tatum as a movie
star. He’s now reached the
level that he can breeze
through a blatantly silly
movie and look none the
worse for it. He’s John
Cale (not to be confused
with the Velvet
Underground musician, although, how could
you?), a Silver Star veteran of Afghanistan
and a police bodyguard to the speaker of the
house (Richard Jenkins).
For his Secret Service interview at the
White House, he’s brought along his poli-
tics-obsessed 11-year-old daughter (the
promising Joey King). But it goes poorly,
partly because his would-be boss turns out to
be an old flame (Maggie Gyllenhaal) who
doubts he’s grown up. There’s some reason to
believe her, since Cale (in the mold of most
action heroes) is an absentee, divorced dad.
It’s an archetype defined by Bruce Willis in
“Die Hard,” a movie “White House Down”
apes right down to the wife-beater tank top.
When the Capitol dome is detonated and the
White House invaded, Cale is separated from
his daughter and stumbles into the kidnap-
ping of the president. From there, it’s a
series of chases through the handsome,
recreated halls of the White House, where
golden light filters in through venetian
blinds but seemingly scant security measures
exist.
Emmerich, the director of spectacles like
“Independence Day” (a movie he references
in “White House Down”) and “2012,” has
made blowing up the White House some-
thing of a fetish, having already done it in
both of those movies. It’s a style of block-
buster that now feels dated, like a ‘90s kind
of big-budget moviemaking that depends on
explosions, flashes of comedy and star
charisma.
The charm of Tatum — toned but goofy —
carries the film. Foxx, a more gifted comic
actor, is left off-screen for large chunks. His
president is a kind of liberal fantasy version
of Barrack Obama, boldly removing all
troops from the Middle East, thereby spark-
ing the fury of the Beltway’s white power
players.
‘White House Down’
a silly throwback
Hillbarn Theatre auditions
Audition for Mame by bringing 16 bars of sheet music in a
style similar to that of Mame. The audition takes place 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at 1285 Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City.
349-6411. Free.
The Legendary Lumber Kings at Cypress Lawn
Visit their tombs and listen to the tales of giants who lev-
eled the forests,harvesting the wood to build railroads,shore
up mines and create cities in California and throughout the
Pacific Basin. These were the Lumber Kings. Join historian
Michael Svanevik for this new and very different view of Cy-
press Lawn. The event is 1:30 p.m. Saturday at the tent by
the East Gardens Archway.This is a leisurely walk on hilly ter-
rain. Please wear comfortable walking shoes and dress
appropriately for the unpredictable Colma microclimate.
550-8811. Free.
Belmont summer concert
The Fred McCarty Band plays country and western for the
third concert of the Belmont Summer Concerts.The concert
takes place 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday at Twin Pines Meadow,
Belmont. Admission is free and refreshments will be sold.
595-7441.
Local Sports Briefs
Channing
Tatum
Jamie Foxx
See DOWN, Page 21
By Sangwon Yun
Greetings from Seoul! I find myself in the
rather unique position of writing this piece
while no longer a resident of California.
Shortly after graduation, my parents and I
moved from Foster City to Korea. I will be
spending the summer over here before flying
back to the United States for college.
For my parents who were born and raised
in Korea, this move
effectively amounted to a
return home. However,
despite having been born
on the other side of the
Pacific, I’ve spent almost
all of my life in the
states. For me, this move
was about finding a new
home.
I’ll be honest. I miss
the Bay Area. That’s not to say that Seoul
does not have its own unique charms. Public
transportation is remarkably ergonomic and
the subway is often faster than driving. The
availability of anything (except for perhaps
land) never seems to be an issue. But all
things considered, this publication’s distri-
bution range is truly a vibrant, diverse,
beautiful community.
Although I am becoming increasingly
acclimated to this way and pace of life, the
little things still get me: Jeffrey’s, the
Peninsula YMCA, Central Park and more.
The homesickness has subsided over time,
but that does not make it any less real.
At first, I led myself to believe that I
missed these places for what they offered.
Yet, having found other restaurants, a gym,
various parks and more here in Seoul , I rec-
ognize now that it was never the actual loca-
tions themselves. It was the experiences,
the memories and the people.
In many ways, I made the proverbial
“move away from home to college” three
months before the traditional window. In the
interim week between graduation and the
move, while sleeping on the floor amongst
cardboard boxes and open suitcases, every
spare moment had been an opportunity to
say “Take care. Talk soon” one last time.
There were a lot of lingering handshakes, a
handful of late-night dinners and plenty of
reminiscing.
Looking back, I could not be more glad to
have spent my last few days the way I did.
Still, even that week was not nearly enough
time to catch everybody on the way out the
door. To the graduates who will be moving
on in the fall, make sure to carve out some
quality time to say those last, few words.
Wait until the last minute, and you might end
up looking like those poor souls sobbing “I
A time of new
beginnings
See STUDENT, Page 21
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
REUTERS
Southern California dog groomer Catherine Opson walks her dogs Porsche,left,and Kobe at a park in Dana Point Opson,
a professional dog groomer, has won multiple awards for her creative approach to dog grooming.
BEST IN SHOW?
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
THE LIES LOVERS TELL: HAROLD PIN-
TER’S BETRAYAL AT OFF BROADWAY WEST
THEATRE COMPANY. The concept is a familiar
one — a wife has an affair with her husband’s best
friend — but in Betrayal, playwright Harold Pinter
turns time around to make an intriguing puzzle of
what has happened. Betrayal depicts key moments in
the extramarital affair of art gallery owner Emma with
literary agent Jerry, the best friend of her publisher
husband Robert. The seven-year long affair has been
over for two years when the play begins in 1977 with
a meeting between the former lovers. Nine scenes
reveal their story in reverse chronological order, end-
ing in 1968 with Emma and Jerry meeting for the first
time. Each unfolding scene changes the meaning of
the ones that came before. One hour and thirty min-
utes with one intermission. Written by Harold Pinter.
Directed by Richard Harder. Through July 20.
TICKETS AND STAGE DIRECTIONS: $40
General Admission. www. offbroadwaywest.org or
800-838-3006. Off Broadway West Theatre Company
is located in the Phoenix Theatre at 414 Mason St.,
Suite 601 (between Geary Boulevard and Post Street),
near Union Square in San Francisco.
AN ASIDE: Off Broadway West Theatre Company
Artistic Director Richard Harder said, “We have all
heard the famous line, ‘oh what a tangled web we
weave when first we practice to deceive,’ and
Betrayal, by Harold Pinter, is just such a wonderful
example! The history of this play for all actors is to
consider the unspoken word and what the characters
are really thinking in those famous pauses in order to
ADAM SIMPSON
Harold Pinter’s Betrayal, at Off Broadway West Theatre Company in San
Francisco,is a penetrating look at a romantic triangle.Here,Keith Burkland,
left,as the husband,and Brian O’Connor as the husband’s best friend and
the wife’s lover, deal with an awkward moment by lapsing into silence.
Through July 20.
See CITY, Page 21
WEEKEND JOURNAL 21
Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
If “White House Down” had pushed the farce further,
Emmerich’s overlong romp could have been something
special. But the comedy in James Vanderbilt’s screenplay
only comes in spurts.
Many of its biggest laughs don’t come when they’re
cued up, but at the film’s attempts at emotion. Woods, for
example, gravely announces: “Killing Ted Hope was the
second hardest thing I’ve had to do in my life.” If stripped
of its production value, “White House Down” would make
one hysterical off-Broadway one-act.
“White House Down,” a Columbia Pictures release, is
rated PG-13 for prolonged sequences of action and vio-
lence including intense gunfire and explosions, some lan-
guage and a brief sexual image. Running time: 137 min-
utes. Two stars out of four.
Continued from page 19
DOWN
love you” to each other in the sappy apocalypse movies.
Whether we’ll be back for holidays is beside the point.
When I caught up with a college friend, he pointed out that,
after a single semester, he and some of his classmates had
already grown apart. His point was only further evidenced by
how much he himself had changed.
In my situation, because my family will likely live in
Korea for several years before moving back, I realize that the
likelihood of seeing any of my high school classmates in
the near future is very, very small. Nevertheless, with the
promise that we will see each other again, my friends and I
parted ways agreeing not to disappoint the other when that
day arrived.
Just like in “John Q.” Not goodbye; See you later!
Sangwon Yun is a recent graduate at Aragon High School. Student
News appears in the weekend edition. You can email Student News at
news@smdailyjournal.com.
Continued from page 19
STUDENT
give the play its just due. Actually, Mr. Pinter stated at times
that he never planned for the pauses to be such an important
focus in the play. He just felt that the characters would natu-
rally have to consider the weight of what was being said to
them within the construct of the situation and circumstance
and, thus, we have the ‘infamous pauses.’”
OH, AND DID YOU KNOW? From 1956 until 1980,
playwright Pinter was married to actress Vivien Merchant.
From 1962 to 1969, Pinter was engaged in a clandestine
affair with journalist Joan Bakewell. It was this relationship
that inspired him to write Betrayal.
***
AMERICA’S CUP PARK OPENS JULY 4 . An open-
ing ceremony on July 4 marks the debut of the America’s
Cup Park at Piers 27/29 on the San Francisco Embarcadero
and the start of the competition for the America’s Cup, the
oldest trophy in international sport. Entrance to the park is
free, with a range of family activities available, including
interactive exhibits featuring the science of the America’s
Cup; the Flying on Water cinema where theater-goers expe-
rience the sensation of racing on a spectacular AC72 cata-
maran; and a Kids Area featuring sail hoists and other hands-
on activities. Food and beverages are available in the
America’s Cup Park, which also provides a public waterfront
promenade around the perimeter of Piers 27/29. The
Opening Ceremony on July 4 at the America’s Cup Pavilion
(located within the America’s Cup Park) is a ticketed event
that begins at 3 p.m. Up to 300 members of the four com-
peting teams will take to the stage, along with entertain-
ment from the competing nations of Italy, Emirates Team
New Zealand, Sweden and the United States. $9 of the $10
ticket price will support the America’s Cup Healthy Ocean
Project. Tickets at ticketmaster.com.
***
50 SHADES! THE MUSICAL. WHO KNOWS? YOU
MIGHT LAUGH UNTIL IT HURTS. The producers of 50
Shades! The Musical want to make it very clear that their
show is not associated with or endorsed or authorized by
E.L. James or Vintage Books, both of whom are connected
with, well, you know, those wildly popular books. Still,
you might want to check out 50 Shades! The Musical, which
opens with a ladies book club deciding to read Fifty Shades
of Grey and continues with their interpretation of the best-
selling novel. Performance includes dance numbers and 11
original songs with a live band backing. Marines’
Memorial Theatre. 609 Sutter St., Second Floor). July 23
through July 28. Tickets at www.shnsf.com or (888) 746-
1799. The producers would also like to say that like the
book series, 50 Shades! The Musical is not for those under
the age of 18, but does not cross boundaries that would make
general audiences squirm.
Susan Cohn is a member of the American Theatre Critics Association
and the San Francisco Bay Area Theatre Critics Circle. She may be
reached at susan@smdailyjournal.com.
Continued from page 20
CITY
22
Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEEKEND JOURNAL 23
Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Audrey McAvoy
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HONOLULU — Hawaii’s volcanoes, rainforests and
beaches will soon be visible on Google Street View.
Google Inc. said Thursday it was lending its backpack
cameras to a Hawaii trail guide company to capture
panoramic images of Big Island hiking trails.
Photos will be loaded to Google Maps and the Hawaii
Visitors and Convention Bureau website, gohawaii.com.
“The most magical places that we all know and love in
Hawaii need to be reached on foot — they need to be
explored that way,” said Evan Rapoport, Street View proj-
ect manager.
Mountain View, Calif.-based Google has already taken
Street View images of the Grand Canyon and other places
popular with travelers.
This is the first time the Silicon Valley company has
handed over its “Street View Trekker” to another party to
have someone else take the images.
Rapoport said Google will offer the technology to other
organizations around the world who want to sign up for
similar partnerships. Groups like tourism boards, govern-
ment agencies, universities and nonprofit organizations
might be among those to use the device, he said.
Having people who know a given place best take Street
View images will make Google Maps more interesting and
useful, he said.
On the Big Island, Hawaii Forest & Trail guides carrying
the trekker device will walk along more than 20 state and
national park trails by the end of September.
Hawaii Forest & Trail will mail memory cards with the
images to Google, which will process the data. Photos
from 15 cameras in the trekker will be stitched together
for a 360-degree panorama, Rapoport said.
The images should be online by the end of the year or
early next year, said Jay Talwar, chief marketing officer of
the Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau.
The project is a partnership between Google and the
visitors bureau, which promotes the state to North
American markets. The agency plans to expand the effort
to the rest of the state. It’s currently looking for partners
who will take Street View images of trails on other Hawaii
islands.
Hawaii hiking
trails to be on
Google Street
By E.J. Tamara
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA MONICA — It’s been four
years since Natalie Cole received a kid-
ney from a Salvadorian donor, and the
singer says it not only connected her to
Hispanic culture, it has given her the
strength to record her first post-opera-
tion album — totally in Spanish.
“I don’t believe in coincidences. I
believe everything happens for a reason.
That this was a Latin family, I feel like
I’m part Latino now. That (made) the
desire to make this record became even
stronger,” Cole said recently during a
private listening session of “Natalie
Cole En Espanol,” released this week.
This is Cole’s first album since she
received her kidney in May 2009. Her
donor was a young woman from El
Salvador who died while giving birth to
a baby boy, Lucas, said Cole (the
Grammy-winner received the donation
after suffering from hepatitis C, a liver
disease spread through contact with
infected blood).
“I couldn’t totally
grasp, understand it,
but there’s some-
thing there, the spirit
of this young girl,
the spirit of this fam-
ily, the spirit of the
Latin culture, of a
Latin heart is inside
me,” the 63-year-old
said.
Produced by Cuban-American Rudy
Perez, the 12-track album is a compila-
tion of Latin American classics, plus a
Spanish-language version of the
Beatles’ “And I Love Her.” It includes
titles like “Solamente Una Vez” by
Mexican Agustin Lara, “El Dia que Me
Quieras” by Argentine Carlos Gardel
and a medley of “Voy a Apagar La Luz”
and “Contigo Aprendm” by Mexican
Armando Manzanero, as well as two
duets: “Besame Mucho,” with Italian
Andrea Bocelli, and “Bachata Rosa,”
with Dominican music legend Juan
Luis Guerra.
The album title is reminiscent of her
famous father Nat King Cole’s “Cole
Espanol,” which brought him love and
recognition in Spanish-speaking coun-
tries.
Cole, who famously sang with her
deceased father with technological wiz-
ardry on the best-selling
“Unforgettable,” now sings “Acercate
Mas” with him on the new album over a
recording he did in Cuba in 1956. This
duet was possible thanks to a recently
discovered recording that Nat King Cole
did in Cuba in 1956, said Perez.
Both father and daughter recorded their
Spanish albums learning the lyrics pho-
netically; neither of them spoke the lan-
guage.
“Black people and Hispanic people
have the same kind of feel for passion,
for music, for fun, for heart,” Cole said.
“We are very similar in that way and that
to me is the next language. I love French
... I love Portuguese, I love Italiano, but
for me right now is Espanol.”
Natalie Cole releases Spanish album
Natalie Cole
By Derrick J. Lang
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA MONICA — Past desks cov-
ered with extreme sports magazines and
refrigerators stocked with energy drinks,
a small isolation booth has been erected
smack dab in the middle of Red Bull’s
airy offices in Santa Monica, Calif. It’s
not for hosting meetings or employee
breaks. It’s for playing video games —
very competitive video games.
The beverage company’s North
American headquarters played host
recently to the chummy Red Bull
Training Grounds ahead of this week-
end’s Major League Gaming Spring
Championship in Anaheim, Calif. Red
Bull is betting this new take on training
for competitive gaming — or e-sports,
as it’s known — will give its players, to
borrow Red Bull’s slogan, wings.
The company, which is probably bet-
ter known for sponsoring action sports
stars and race cars than gamers, has pre-
viously hosted other e-sporting events,
but Training Grounds marked the first
time it focused on schooling players.
Despite being stationed amid cubicles,
the inaugural Training Grounds event had
most trappings of a typical mammoth e-
sports event: lights, cameras, competi-
tors, commentators and prize money.
However, there was no live audience to
cheer on the eight international e-ath-
letes, and the gamers were only compet-
ing in one title, the real-time strategy
game “StarCraft II.”
“The idea behind Training Grounds is
to find that happy medium between com-
petition and training,” said Rob
Simpson, Red Bull’s e-sports program
manager. “While we do have a prize pool
on the line ... focus is really on analysis
and growing as players. I think it’s a
positive thing that people want to con-
sume this kind of information.”
Simpson isn’t just referring to the
eight “StarCraft II” players who were
gearing up for the MLG championship
but also the 200,000 spectators who
watched more than 20 hours of matches
broadcast online by Red Bull. The inau-
gural event was as much of a promotion-
al affair as it was preparation for players
who will be battling in this weekend’s
MLG contest.
Since the e-sports genre first pressed
start with arcade face-offs in the 1980s
and LAN parties in the 1990s, there are
more competitors than ever before, with
a growing gap between seasoned pros
and newbs. Those involved agree the
more time gamers play in championship
settings, the better they fare against the
ruthless Zerg alien race in “StarCraft.”
“I think the biggest issue for players is
that no matter how much they practice at
home, once they get up on a stage and
have those lights and cameras in their
faces, they get distracted,” said Sean
“Day(9)” Plott, a former competitor who
now serves as an e-sports commentator.
“They choke and start playing at a level
far below what they usually do at home.”
Besides providing a mock-up of a big-
time competition, Red Bull applied the
science it uses on other athletes to the
gamers participating in Training
Grounds.
For pro gamers, a dress rehearsal
Since the e-sports genre first pressed start with arcade face-
offs in the 1980s and LAN parties in the 1990s, there are more
competitors than ever before, with a growing gap between
seasoned pros and newbs.Those involved agree the more
time gamers play in championship settings.
LOCAL/NATION
24
Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SATURDAY,JUNE29
SanBrunoAmericanLegionPost#409
Community Breakfast. 8:30 a.m. to 11
a.m.TheAmericanLegionSanBrunoPost
#409, 757 San Mateo Ave., San Bruno.
Scrambled eggs, pancakes, bacon, ham
or sausage and French toast will be
served. There will also be juice, coffee or
tea.$8foradultsand$5forchildrenunder
10. For more information call 583-1740.
HillbarnTheatreAuditions. 10a.m.to4
p.m.1285 Hillsdale Blvd.,Foster City.Free.
Audition for Mame by bringing 16 bars
of sheet music in a style similar to that of
Mame. For more information call 349-
6411.
One-Day Adoption Event. Noon to 4
p.m. Pet Food Express, 631 Broadway,
Millbrae.The Peninsula Humane Society
& SPCA will be visiting with adoptable
rabbits. $20 for adoption. For more
information go to www.PHS-SPCA.org.
Open Artist Reception with Earl
Junghans. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. 2560
Embarcadero Road, Palo Alto. Meet
watercolor artist Earl Junghans and see
Baylands Watercolors at this open
reception.Opentoall ages.Free.For more
information go to http://www.evols.org.
MagicDan.2 p.m.Belmont Library,1110
AlamedadelasPulgas,Belmont.For more
information call 591-8286.
Financial WorkshopsbytheSalvation
Army andWells Fargo. 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.
409 S. Spruce Ave., South San Francisco.
Free. For more information contact
laine.hendricks@usw.salvationarmy.org.
The Golden Gate Radio Orchestra. 3
p.m. Crystal Springs UMC, 2145 Bunker
Hill Drive, San Mateo. Free refreshments
at intermission.Tickets are $15. For more
information call 871-7464.
RedwoodSymphony. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Courthouse Square, 2200 Broadway,
RedwoodCity.Free.For moreinformation
call 780-7311.
Powerage:TheUltimateAC/DCTribute
ExperienceWithJungleRooster.8p.m.
Club Fox, 2209 Broadway, Redwood City.
$15. For more information go to
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
AmyObenski withSteveUccello. 8:30
p.m.Surf Spot,4627PacificCoastHighway,
Pacifica.Free.For moreinformationemail
contactamy@obenski.net
The Five Deadly Improvisers:
ImprovisedKungFuMayhem. 11 p.m.
The Dragon Theatre, 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. The Five Deadly
Improvisers will be performing a martial
arts double feature: two unique and
completelymade-upon-the-spot stories
basedonsuggestionsfromtheaudience.
Ticketsare$10.For moreinformationcall
415-430-7656.
SUNDAY,JUNE30
Palo AltoConcours d‘Elegance 47th
Annual CharityEvent. 9:30 a.m. to 4:30
p.m.SanMateoCountyEventCenter,1346
Saratoga Drive, San Mateo. Enjoy an
exhibition or rare, exotic and highly
collectable automobiles from both the
United States and around the world.$25
in advance. $30 at the gate. Ages 16 and
under arefreewhenaccompaniedbyan
adult.Freeparking.For moreinformation
call 813-1100.
Calendar
Offering free parking in downtown could
attract patrons and show businesses that the
city is concerned about the possible nega-
tive impacts during construction, he wrote.
On the other hand, free parking could
encourage people to stay in the parking
spots longer rather than allowing for the
usual seven to eight average turnovers per
day.
If the council considers offering free park-
ing, it would also need to give direction as
to which parking spots would be free.
It’s not just the streetscape that could be
changing in downtown Burlingame.
Burlingame previously requested propos-
als for developing downtown parking lots.
Among the two which the council decided to
continue talks with was Grosvenor. On
Monday, the council will consider execut-
ing an 18-month exclusive negotiation
agreement with the company.
Grosvenor put forward a mixed-use project
using lot E, between Lorton Avenue and
Park Road. The concept, which encompass-
es the post office land, includes an “urban
village” with 100 residential units, 35,000
square feet of retail and/or restaurant space
and 125 residential parking spaces.
The sale of the Burlingame Main Post
Office, located at 220 Park Road, was
approved by postal officials in February
2012. Since then, the U.S. Postal Service
has been researching the property before
putting it on the market. It’s not yet on the
market but, city officials were told it could
be this summer. Since it has also been
deemed historically significant, that will
need to be addressed as well.
At the same meeting, the council will
revisit the idea of a community garden.
The $20,000 plan was put on pause in
2011 after city officials became aware that
the proposed location, which included park-
ing spots, was space promised to a local
hotel under an old agreement.
Aportion of Bayside Park is still the pro-
posed location. However, now the commu-
nity garden is proposed to be much smaller.
In 2011, the plan called for building 40
plots near the west end of the Golf Center
parking lot, which would eliminate 40 of
the 234 parking spaces. The city is now
considering building 22 beds that will be
located between the batting cages and stor-
age sheds at Bayside Fields, according to a
staff report by Parks and Recreation
Director Margaret Glomstad.
To make this location work, three young
redwood trees will be removed. Three new
redwood trees will be planted at Bayside
Fields. Additional fencing will be installed
to manage the garden. The Burlingame
Community Garden will be managed by the
Parks and Recreation Department but main-
tained by the members of the garden. The
proposed planter box fee is $65 per year.
The fee is expected to cover the costs of
water, Glomstad wrote.
If the project is approved, the cost will be
covered using money from the city’s capital
improvement budget.
The council meets 7 p.m. Monday, July 1
at City Hall, 501 Primrose Road.
heather@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
PARKING
decision returns Davis to prison with the
original 25 years to life term intact.
Davis had two priors, including robbery,
when he was convicted in December 1998 of
being a felon in possession of a firearm. The
previous April, San Mateo police officers
saw Davis lurking outside a store. When
confronted, he reportedly fled and was spot-
ted throwing a handgun away. The situation
was similar to the conduct in the previous
robbery, according to prosecutors.
Mallach was also the judge who sentenced
Davis originally in 1999. At the time, the
law stated a person convicted of two violent
and serious felonies could automatically be
sentenced to 25 years to life if convicted of
a third crime regardless of severity.
Prosecutors did have the option of not seek-
ing a third strike and judges did have discre-
tion not to count it in sentencing but the
variances in application statewide increased
the support for the November measure.
The changed law states third strikes will
only be imposed for serious and violent
crimes and already sentenced inmates must
also abide by the same guidelines for recon-
sideration. Statewide, approximately 2,800
prisoners were projected to qualify includ-
ing roughly a dozen from San Mateo
County. The responsibility is on the pris-
oner rather than the court to petition for
resentencing.
Davis’ criminal history began with incar-
ceration at the California Youth Authority in
1984 followed by multiple convictions in
the ensuing years for possessing drugs for
sale, battery on a peace officer and numerous
robberies.
District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe said his
office did not think Davis qualified for recon-
sideration because he used a weapon, but
Mallach felt otherwise.
Although Davis is the first to have a suit-
ability hearing, another former three-striker
is the first to be resentenced under the new
guidelines. Henry Lowe, serving 25 years to
life for drug possession after eight prior
robbery convictions, petitioned the court
and Wagstaffe said his office agreed based on
the non-violent nature of the offense and his
good conduct while in prison. Mallach
resentenced him to eight years which he had
served more than and he was released.
Lowe was convicted as a three-striker dur-
ing the 1990s when felons with a long his-
tory of going in and out of prison were often
prosecuted as such, Wagstaffe said.
“The world has changed since then,” he
said.
More than 20 felons have petitioned for
reconsideration but most aren’t eligible, he
said.
Five more cases are currently in the
pipeline although only one is presently
scheduled for an Aug. 2 hearing to determine
if he is still a danger. Wagstaffe said his
office opposed Gary Valentine’s release
because he is still dangerous. Valentine was
sentenced as a three striker for unlawfully
burning property, a lesser offense than
arson and not considered a serious or violent
felony.
Continued from page 1
STRIKES
whether they would do so.
“The resumption of same-sex marriage
this day has been obtained by illegitimate
means. If our opponents rejoice in achiev-
ing their goal in a dishonorable fashion,
they should be ashamed,” said Andy Pugno,
general counsel for a coalition of religious
conservative groups that sponsored the
2008 ballot measure.
“It remains to be seen whether the fight
can go on, but either way, it is a disgraceful
day for California,” Pugno said.
The Supreme Court ruled 5-4 Wednesday
that Proposition 8’s sponsors lacked
authority to challenge the ban after Harris
and Gov. Jerry Brown, both Democrats,
refused to defend the ban in court.
The decision lets stand a trial judge’s dec-
laration that the ban violates the civil
rights of gay Californians and cannot be
enforced.
The Supreme Court said earlier this week
that it would not finalize its ruling in the
Proposition 8 case until after the 25-day
period, which ends July 21. But San
Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera,
who joined the two couples in the lawsuit,
said Friday that the 9th Circuit panel had the
power to lift the stay it imposed.
“The fact of the matter is the only thing
holding up the weddings was the stay that
the 9th Circuit had in place,” Herrera said.
“The fact that there is a separate 25-day peri-
od allowing the petition to go for a rehear-
ing is separate and apart from that stay. ”
Brown directed California counties to
start performing same-sex marriages imme-
diately after the appeals court’s order. A
memo from the Department of Public Health
said “same-sex marriage is again legal in
California” and ordered county clerks to
resume issuing marriage licenses to gay cou-
ples.
Continued from page 1
MARRIAGE
COMICS/GAMES
6-29-13
friday’s PUZZLE sOLVEd
PrEViOUs
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Want More Fun
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Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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1 Rolex rival
6 Tusked animal
10 Poise
12 Frolicked
14 Jungle chargers
15 Flung
16 Clears
18 Frequently
19 Ms. Teasdale
21 “Como — ?”
23 Swamp
24 “Wolf Man” Chaney
26 Twins, e.g.
29 Farm products
31 Multipurpose truck
33 They may be sealed
35 Shopping center
36 Robbins or Conway
37 Portico
38 Shakespearean king
40 Worn-down pencil
42 Kind of poodle
43 Volcano goddess
45 Chive relative
47 Environmental prefx
50 Knee neighbors
52 Wild feline
54 Pulled ahead
58 Grills
59 Record player
60 Sit-down occasion
61 Moccasin, maybe
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1 Boathouse gear
2 Speed meas.
3 Yale grad
4 Lost cause
5 Unprincipled
6 Promotes
7 Mantra chants
8 Lhasa —
9 Coral formation
11 Youth org.
12 Hwys.
13 Insect killer
17 Guard
19 “Love Story” writer
20 Ulterior motive
22 Runs a fever
23 Not masc.
25 Away
27 Please, to Hans
28 Frighten
30 Strike
32 Ostrich kin
34 Make a comment
39 Bring to mind
41 Goat sounds
44 Back muscles
46 German industrial center
47 Recede
48 Crocus bulb
49 Reed instrument
51 CEO aides
53 Hush-hush org.
55 Mexican Mrs.
56 Response to a rodent
57 Woodland creature
diLBErT® CrOsswOrd PUZZLE
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saTUrday, JUnE 29, 2013
CanCEr (June 21-July 22) -- You should be able
to weather any fnancial problems if you’re able to
manage your resources prudently. Take care not to
buy anything you don’t need, or you’ll go broke very
quickly.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- You’re inclined to be too
assertive in your demands, so it’s important to
use moderation in your tactics. Harshness will be
counterproductive.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Organize your time by
delegating certain assignments that you’re unable
to handle on your own. The more effcient the
assistance you can get, the better.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- This is one of those
days when you’re likely to fare better doing business
with total strangers than you will with your regular
sources. Broaden your horizons.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- It’s important that
you manage things effectively, or you could end up
losing ground. When you make any gains, be sure to
consolidate your accomplishments.
saGiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- I t
would smart to walk away from potential
complications that could quickly become
insurmountable. Solutions are likely to be found
through those who oppose you.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Be protective
of your position, especially when it comes to an
important joint endeavor. If there is any trouble, it
could be every person for him- or herself.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- To negotiate an
effective agreement, there must be parity between
parties. It won’t stand the test of time if it’s a good
deal for you but not for anyone else.
PisCEs (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Don’t delegate
important tasks to someone who might not be able
to perform up to your expectations. Take the long
view, and do things right.
ariEs (March 21-April 19) -- In hopes of making a
good impression, you could be more generous than
you should or need be. It’s plain foolish to think that
you can buy your way to popularity.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) -- Domestic issues
and demands could be much heavier than you’re
prepared to handle. Even if you do more than is
expected, you’re not likely to satisfy everyone.
GEMini (May 21-June 20) -- It’s best that you don’t
discuss your plans before you have a chance to
implement them. If you can’t live up to your claims,
you’ll end up feeling like a failure.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 25
THE DAILY JOURNAL
26
Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
AUTMOTIVE -
NOW HIRING
SERVICE TECHNICIANS
OILSTOP DRIVE-THRU
OIL CHANGE
• Excellent benefits
• No experience necessary
• Complete training program
• Retirement program
• Advancement opportunities
• Competitive pay
APPLY IN PERSON AT
2009 El Camino Real, San Mateo
Monday-Saturday 8-6
For more info: www.oilstopinc.com
CALL CENTER Positions - Internet Car
Parts, Adam McCoy, (415)999-9823
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CUSTOMER SERVICE/
SEAMSTRESS -
YOU ARE INVITED
Are you:
Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have:
Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for emplployment benefits
Sewiing skills
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available for
Customer Service/Seamstress.
Call for appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo CA, 94402
110 Employment
EXPERIENCED COOKS, Avanti Pizza. .
3536 Alameda, MENLO PARK, CA
(650)854-1222.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256111
The following person is doing business
as: Golden 1 Plumbing, 62 E. 39th Ave
#B, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Mous-
tafa Elattar, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Moustafa Elattar /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/29/13, 07/06/13, 07/13/13, 07/20/13.)
GARDENING HELP WANTED Watering
planting, P/T $15 an hour,
(650)552-9026
GREAT CLIPS
@ Sequoia Station
Redwood City
Now Hiring
Stylists & Managers.
Call Flo/Randy
408 247-8364 or 408 921-9994
Grand Opening Soon!
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
HOTEL -
Experienced front desk agent position,
and maintenance person position.
Fax resume: (650)589-7076.
Email: ac@citigardenhotel.com
MAINTENANCE
General Maintenance Assistant
private school, full time,
Tuesdays through Saturdays.
Grounds maintenance, cleaning, re-
pairs, painting, etc. Must be profes-
sional, reliable, lift 50+ lbs. Must
read, speak and write English fluent-
ly. Full criminal background check
and physical will be required.
To apply, email
jreams@mmboa.org
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256179
The following person is doing business
as:Vocal One Studio, 825 Kathryne Ave.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Margaret
Mefford, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Margaret Mefford /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/08/13, 06/15/13, 06/22/13, 06/29/13.)
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 521602
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Vanessa M. Gianelli
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Vanessa M. Gianelli filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Vanessa M. Gianelli
Proposed name: Vanessa M. Jaco
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on July 24,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 06/07/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 06/06/2013
(Published, 06/22/13, 06/29/13
07/06/2013, 07/13/2013)
CASE# CIV 521692
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Justin Makepeace James
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Justin Makepeace James filed
a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Justin Makepeace James
Proposed name: Justine Makepeace
James
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on July 23,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 06/07/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 06/06/2013
(Published, 06/15/13, 06/22/13
06/29/2013, 07/06/2013)
27 Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
BURLINGAME SCHOOL DISTRICT
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS AND PROPOSALS (RFQ/P)
ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES
Measure “D” Bond Program
The Burlingame School District is requesting qualified persons, firms, partnerships, corpora-
tions, associations, or professional organizations to provide full architectural planning, program-
ming, and design services for the modernization, renovation, and expansion of six (6) elementa-
ry schools and one (1) middle school under the $56 million dollar Measure “D” Bond Program.
A pool of qualified firms will be selected for future consideration to provide architectural services
for certain Projects under the Program. Additionally, at this time the District is requesting qualifi-
cations and proposals from respondents interested in being considered for two of the Projects
under the Program.
Respondents to this Request for Qualifications and Proposals (“RFQ/P”) should mail or deliver
Seven (7) bound copies, One (1) unbound copy and One (1) electronic copy on CD or flash
drive of their Statement of Qualifications (“SOQ”) or Statement of Qualifications and Statement
of Proposals (“SOQ/P”), as further described herein, to:
Robert Clark, Ed.D.
Assistant Superintendent/Chief Business Official
Burlingame School District
1825 Trousdale Drive
Burlingame, CA 94010
All responses are due by 2:00 p.m., on July 29, 2013.
FAX OR EMAIL RESPONSES WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
To obtain a copy of the Request for Statement of Qualifications and Proposal, interested firms
may visit the Burlingame School District website at www.bsd.k12.ca.us or stop by the District
Office at the address above to pick up a paper document.
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, June 29, July 5, and July 12, 2013
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 522489
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Hector Javier Alcala and Paula Alcala
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Hector Javier Alcala and Pau-
la Alcala filed a petition with this court for
a decree changing name as follows:
a: Present name: Lourdes Margarita Al-
cala-Enriquez
a: Proposed name: Lourdes Margarita
Alcala
b: Present name: Javier Alcala-Enriquez
b: Proposed name: JavierAlcala
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on August 13,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 06/25/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 06/25/2013
(Published, 06/29/13, 07/06/2013,
07/13/2013, 07/20/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256180
The following person is doing business
as: GeekyBug, 240 Arbor Ln. SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Drewry Wolf, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Drewry Wolf /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/08/13, 06/15/13, 06/22/13, 06/29/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256232
The following person is doing business
as: Betty Yuan Insurance Services
Group, 119 Woodbridge Cir., SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered by
the following owner: EBAA Insurance
Services, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 06/07/2013.
/s/ Anndrew Yuan/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/08/13, 06/15/13, 06/22/13, 06/29/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256142
The following person is doing business
as: Great Clips, 917 Briana Ct., SAN
JOSE, CA 95120 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Grace GCCA, LLC,
CA. The business is conducted by a Lim-
ited Liability Company. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Mark Grace /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/08/13, 06/15/13, 06/22/13, 06/29/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255803
The following person is doing business
as: Sunny Day Cleaning Service, 1101
Elmer St., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Maria Del Carmen Valdez, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Maria Valdez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/08/13, 06/15/13, 06/22/13, 06/29/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255942
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Peninsula Building Design, 2) Pen-
insula Building Design & Drafting, 735 In-
dustrial Rd., Ste. 207 SAN CARLOS, CA
94070 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: David Howell, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
01/01/2012.
/s/ David Howell /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/08/13, 06/15/13, 06/22/13, 06/29/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255754
The following person is doing business
as: Kiosko Mexicano, 726 Grand Ave.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Maria Luz Gonzalez, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ Maria Luz Gonzalez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/15/13, 06/22/13, 06/29/13, 07/06/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255898
The following person is doing business
as: Gold Rush Limo, 2575 Galway Pl.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
AA Royale, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Rizza Allas /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/15/13, 06/22/13, 06/29/13, 07/06/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256304
The following person is doing business
as: Los Andes Smart Services, 45 Studio
Circle #7, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Ninfa De Terceros and Eber H. Terceros.
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Married Couple. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Eber Terceros /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/15/13, 06/22/13, 06/29/13, 07/06/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256189
The following person is doing business
as: Bay Area Aesthetic Surgery, 66 Bo-
vet Road, Suite 101, SAN MATEO, CA
94402 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Joel B. Beck, M.D., Inc, CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Joel B. Beck /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/22/13, 06/29/13, 07/06/13, 07/13/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256560
The following person is doing business
as: Koa Boxing, 1129 Capuchino Ave.
#4, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Aaron
Laqua Kaheaku, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Aaron Laqua Kaheaku /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/29/13, 07/06/13, 07/13/13, 07/20/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256561
The following person is doing business
as: Jerry’s Pool Service, 11 Inyo Place,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Jerry
Lindley, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 01/01/2006
/s/ Jerry Lindley /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/29/13, 07/06/13, 07/13/13, 07/20/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256522
The following person is doing business
as: TLC’S Services, 833 Hillside Blvd.,
DALY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Benjamin
R. Luna, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Benjamin R. Luna /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/29/13, 07/06/13, 07/13/13, 07/20/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256566
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Quality Cleaning Services, 740
Masson Ave., #1, SAN BRUNO, CA
94066 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Ceasar Omontes, same ad-
dress and Daniel D. Jimenez, 4632 Al-
hambra Dr., Freemont, CA 94536. The
business is conducted by a General Part-
nership. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Ceasar Omontes /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/29/13, 07/06/13, 07/13/13, 07/20/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256516
The following person is doing business
as: 1) The Hioh Company, 2) Xian2, 146
Oxford Ln., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Hoey Cheung, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 01/01/2013.
/s/ Hoey W. Cheung /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/29/13, 07/06/13, 07/13/13, 07/20/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256453
The following person is doing business
as: Topps Handyman Services, 1202
Carlisle Dr., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Troy Ocampo same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ Troy Ocampo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/29/13, 07/06/13, 07/13/13, 07/20/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256554
The following person is doing business
as: Gold Tree Happy Spa, 471 El Cami-
no Real, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Helen Wang Hao, 532 San Antonio Ave.,
CA 94066. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Helen Wang Hao /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/29/13, 07/06/13, 07/13/13, 07/20/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256079
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Petals Florist, 1600 El Camino
Real, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Maria
Loreto Hernandez-Valdivia, 51 N. Dela-
ware St., San Mateo, CA 94401 and
Juan Gabriel Ramirez Manuel, 435 N.
San Mateo Dr., Apt. 5, San Mateo, CA
94401 . The business is conducted by a
General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Maria L.Hernandez-Valdivia /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/29/13, 07/06/13, 07/13/13, 07/20/13.)
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, $90.,
(650)610-9765
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIER 5200 BTU window air conditioner
- never used, in box, $95. obo, (650)591-
6842
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WEBER BRAND Patio Refrigerator,
round top load, for beer, soda, and wa-
ter. $30 obo (650)591-6842
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $90.,
(650)596-0513
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
67 USED United States (50) and Europe-
an (17) Postage Stamps. Most issued
before World War II. All different and de-
tached from envelopes. All for $4.00,
(650)787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MENORAH - Antique Jewish tree of life,
10”W x 30”H, $100., (650)348-6428
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
STAINED GLASS WINDOW - 30” x 18”,
diamond pattern, multi-colored, $95.,
SOLD!
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria
650-873-8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $700 obo
(650)766-3024
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
303 Electronics
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HARMON/KANDON SPEAKERS (2)
mint condition, great, for small
office/room or extra speakers, 4 1/2 in.
high, includes cords $8., SOLD!
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center draw locks all comes with
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame SOLD!
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3 MEDAL base kitchen cabinets with
drawers and wood doors $99
(650)347-8061
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
ACROSS
1 “Dad Is Fat”
author/comedian
Gaffigan
4 Wipe away __
9 More popular
song, usually
14 Not getting by the
censors
16 How some errors
are shown
17 Tough
taskmasters
18 Panache
19 Powerful military
tactic
21 Basic Latin verb
22 Big cheer
23 Giant Giant
24 Greenstreet co-
star in “The
Verdict” (1946)
26 Letters above
WXYZ
27 Team Frisbee
game
30 Place cheek by
jowl
34 Pocket protector?
35 Altar attire
36 Dog seen with
Kvack the duck
38 Signs of affection
39 Bad marks
41 Some auditors
43 Tuba relatives
45 ’60s pop group __
Bravos
46 Eponymous
California
museum founder
47 Brighton beer,
briefly
48 Mo. in which
Caesar was born
51 Caspian feeder
53 Clownfish host
56 Staycation locales
58 Kakadu National
Park site
59 Admits customers
60 What many tests
measure
61 “The Glass Bead
Game” author
62 Places for
runners
63 Couple in “Annie”
DOWN
1 Egg size
2 Collectively
3 Women’s
magazine __
Claire
4 Cardinals’ home
5 Warm-weather
wear
6 “I would rather eat
a golf ball than
see this movie
again” writer
7 Voices in il coro
8 Property flippers,
e.g.
9 Family gal
10 Blends
11 When many
grazing animals
migrate
12 Fish without
pelvic fins
13 Chick follower?
15 Morticia’s cousin
20 Nabbed
25 Glass part
26 High point in 1980
news
27 Mouse movers
28 Droid message
29 “__ Turannos”:
E.A. Robinson
poem about a
complex
marriage
30 Ring tactics
31 “The Producers”
bombshell
32 “Halo: Reach”
and “Kinect
Adventures!”
notably
33 No spring chicken
37 Bearing gifts?
40 One on a liquid
diet?
42 Controls
44 Some NFL
linemen
47 Vigorously
denounce
48 Voight’s actress
daughter
49 Strike caller
50 Lists in a regatta
51 “Oops!”
52 Sheet in a regatta
54 “The Clan of the
Cave Bear”
author
55 Framing item
57 Compass dir.
By Mark Bickham
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
06/29/13
06/29/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
28
Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of San Bruno, California (the “City”)
at its regular meeting on, Tuesday, July 9, 2013, at the Senior Center starting at 7:00 p.m., 1555
Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno, will hold a Public Hearing, consider waiving the first reading,
and introduce Ordinance of the City Council of the City of San Bruno, Establishing Garbage Serv-
ice Rates.
Notice of Public Hearing
Ordinance Establishing Garbage Rates
The City Council of the City of San Bruno will consider ordinances containing proposed rate in-
creases for garbage rates of 2.61% to Recology Garbage and Recycling Services for 2013-14 to
be Effective September 1, 2013 and a 4.48% Rate Increase for Recology to Initiate an Organics
Program to be Effective January 1, 2014 as Presented in the Notice of Proposed Increase Mailed
to All Property Owners.
Any person may appear and be heard as to whether the proposed rates and charges are discrimi-
natory, excessive, insufficient, or not compliant with State law. A full copy of the ordinances are
available during business hours in the City Clerk's Office, 567 El Camino, San Bruno, Ca 94066
(650) 616-7058.
/s/ Carol Bonner,
San Bruno City Clerk
June 28, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, June 29, 2013.
304 Furniture
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR (2), with arms, Italian 1988 Cha-
teau D'Ax, solid, perfect condition. $50
each or $85 for both. (650)591-0063
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COPENHAGEN TEAK dining table with
dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions. 48/88"
long x 32" wide x 30" high. $95.00
(650)637-0930
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
COUCH. GREEN Cloth with end reclin-
ers on both sides. Beverage holder in the
middle, $50 (650)572-2864
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
304 Furniture
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 draw dresser 61" wide,
31" high, & 18" deep $50., (650)592-
2648
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
GLASS DINING Table 41” x 45” Round-
ed rectangle clear glass top and base
$85 (650)888-0129
304 Furniture
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
LIGHT WOOD Rocking Chair & Has-
sock, gold cushions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
304 Furniture
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
RECLINER ROCKER - Like new, brown,
vinyl, $99., SOLD!
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, SOLD!
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR with wood carving,
armrest, rollers, and it swivels $99.,
(650)592-2648
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEAK TV stand, wheels, rotational, glass
doors, drawer, 5 shelves. 31" wide x 26"
high X 18" deep. $75.00 (650)637-0930
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
WICKER ENTERTAINMENT CABINET -
H 78” x 43” x 16”, almost new, $89.,
(650)347-9920
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
3 PIECE fireplace set with screen $25
(650)322-2814
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
BREVILLE JUICER - Like new, SOLD!
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, (650)578-9208
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
1/2 HORSE power 8" worm drive skill
saw $40 OBO (650)315-5902
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
BLACK & DECKER CORDLESS 18 volt
combo drill, vacuum, saw, sander, two
batteries & charger, brand new, $95.
obo, SOLD!
BLACK AND Decker, 10” trimmer/edger
, rechargeable, brand new, $50
(650)871-7200
BOB VILLA rolling tool box & organizer -
brand new with misc. tools, $40. obo,
(650)591-6842
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
308 Tools
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTMANS PROFESSIONAL car buf-
fer with case $40 OBO (650)315-5902
CRAFTSMAN 14.4 VOLT DRILL - bat-
tery & charger, never used, $35. obo,
SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 3/8” 16.8 volt drill & vac-
uum combo, brand new, with charger,
$45. obo, SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DEWALT 18 volt battery drill with 2 bat-
tery & charger $45 OBO SOLD!
DREMEL HIGH SPEED ROTARY TOOL
- all attachments, never used, $25. obo
SOLD!
ELECTRIC HEDGE trimmer good condi-
tion (Black Decker) $40 (650)342-6345
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LADDER - 24' aluminum 2 section ladder
$20., SOLD
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 21” Belt Sander with long cord,
$35 (650)315-5902
MILLWAUKEE SAWSALL in case with
blades (like new) $50 OBO SOLD!
NEW DRILL DRIVER - 18V + battery &
charger, $30., (650)595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SANDER, MAKITA finishing sander, 4.5
x 4.5"' used once. Complete with dust
bag and hard shell case. $35.00 SOLD!
SMALL ROTETILLER 115 Volt Works
well $99.00 (650)355-2996
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
TOOL BOX - custom made for long
saws, $75.,SOLD!
TOOLAND INC
Name brands * Huge inventory
Low prices
Personalized service
M-F 7"30 - 6; Sa: 9 - 4:30
1369 Industrial, San Carlos
(650)631-9636
www,tooland.com
TORO ELECTRIC POWER SWEEPER
blower - never used, in box, $35. obo,
(650)591-6842
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $65 (650)341-8342
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
IBM SELECTRIC II typewriter self cor-
recting $25 (650)322-2814
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
3 LARGE old brown mixing bowls $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History,
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
5 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $9. for all
(650)347-5104
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEO 75 with jackets 75 with-
out $100 for all, SOLD!
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
310 Misc. For Sale
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99., (650)580-
3316
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASTRONOMY BOOKS (2) Hard Cover
Cambridge Encyclopedia of Astronomy,
World of Discovery, $12., (650)578-9208
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14., (650)578-9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, excellent
condition, $43., (650)347-5104
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, $43.,
(650)347-5104
BAY BRIDGE Framed 50th anniversary
poster (by Bechtel corp) $50
(650)873-4030
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection SOLD!
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY Jake AB Scissor Exercise Ma-
chine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
C2 MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES -
style wall mount, plug in, bronze finish,
12” L x 5”W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
(650)578-9208
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOOD HEALTH FACT BOOK - un-
used, answers to get/stay healthy, hard
cover, 480 pages, $8., (650)578-9208
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HABACHI BBQ Grill heavy iron 22" high
15" wide $25 (650)593-8880
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
KELTY SUPER TIOGA BACKPACK -
$40., (650)552-9436
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model", $250., (650)637-0930
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LAUNDRY SORTER - on wheels, triple
section, laundry sorter - $19., (650)347-
9920
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, (650)341-1861
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW COWBOY BOOTS - 9D, Unworn,
black, fancy, only $85., (650)595-3933
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
29 Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
310 Misc. For Sale
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., (650)578-9208
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. White Rotary
sewing machine similar age, cabinet
style. $85 both. (650)574-4439
SLIDE PROJECTOR - Airequipt Super-
ba 66A slide projector and screen.
$50.00 for all. (650)345-3840
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STAINED GLASS panels multi colors
beautiful work 35" long 111/2" wide $79
OBO (650)349-6059
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TENT - one man packable tent - $20.,
(650)552-9436
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, (650)341-1861
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLKSWAGON NEW Beatle hub cap,
3, $70 for All (650)283-0396
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WEBER GO ANYWHERE GAS BARBE-
QUE - never used, in box, $40., SOLD!
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
MARTIN D-18S 1971 Guitar $1500.
Great sound. Great Condition
(650)522-8322
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
ATTRACTIVE LADIES trench coat red,
weather proof size 6/8 $35
(650)345-3277
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
316 Clothes
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS JACKET - size XXL, Beautiful
cond., med., $35., (650)595-3933
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW! OLD NAVY Coat: Boy/Gril, fleece-
lined, hooded $15 (415)585-3622
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
brand new, never worn for $25
(650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
150 COPPER spades for #6 strand.
Copper wire. $50.00 for all.
(650)345-3840
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
PVC SCHEDULE 80 connectors and
coupling. 100 pieces in all. $30.00 for all
(650)345-3840
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 AIR rifles, shoots .177 pelets. $50 ea
Obo (650)591-6842
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$25.(650)368-0748.
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
BIKE TRAINER Ascent fluid $85
(650)375-8021
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
FOR SALE medium size wet suit $95
call for info (650)851-0878
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BAG with 15 clubs $35. SOLD.
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels, $85.
obo, (650)223-7187
ROWING MACHINE. $30.00
(650)637-0930
SCHWINN STATIONARY RECUMBENT
BIKE, $45., SOLD!
STATIONARY EXERCISE BICYCLE -
Compact, excellent condition, $40. obo,
(650)834-2583
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL EXERCISE- Pro Form 415
Crosswalk, very good condition $200 call
(650)266-8025
318 Sports Equipment
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40.,
(408)764-6142
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALE
Saturday,
June 29th
8AM to 3PM
637 Bainbridge Street,
Foster City
Bedroom set,
housewares, bicycles,
clothing , desk,
patio set
and more!
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
325 Estate Sales
UNEXPECTED
TREASURES
Estate Sale
Woodside
Saturday, June 29
& Sunday June 30
9am to 2 pm each day
1281 Canada Rd.
No parking in the Bike Lane or
on the foot path
50 years accumulation
packed into home
Clocks, watch parts, tools,
furniture, vintage advertising, full
kitchen & garage
& more Unexpected Treasures
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
SLEEP APNEA breathing machine com-
plete in box helps you breathe, costs $$$
sacrifice for $75, (650)995-0012
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
381 Homes for Sale
VOLUNTEER WITH
Habitat for Humanity
and help us build homes and
communities in East Palo Alto.
Volunteers welcome
Wed-Sat from 8:30-4pm.
415-625-1022
www.habitatgsf.org
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
470 Rooms
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
515 Office Space
SAN MATEO DRIVE beautiful Medical
Office space for rent only $75/day.
Paulsurinder1@yahoo.com
620 Automobiles
004 INFINITI g35 x with 62k miles. All
wheel drive luxury sport sedan loaded
with all options (no navigations).#4508
come with warranty reduced price of
$12995.00 plus fees. (650)637-3900
2001 AUDI a6 Avanti wagon with 79k
miles in excellent conditions and fully
loaded, this is the best priced on internet.
#5050 reduced price at $8500.00 plus
fees.. (650)637-3900
2001 BMW 330 ci coupe with 108k miles
black on black automatic sports and pre-
mium package #5041 in great conditions,
clean car fax offerd at $8995.00 plus
fees. (650)637-3900
2002 CHRYSLER PT Cruiser Limited
with 121k miles; she is fully optioned and
in excellent driving conditions clean Car
Fax. #4515 sale price $4995.00 plus
fees. (650)637-3900
2003 FORD Mustang convertible with
102k miles. gt package with all power
group and power top. Ready for
summer.clean car fax#5031 on sale
for $7995.00 plus fees. (650)637-3900
2003 JEEP grand Cherokee Limited with
100k miles great looking suv one owner
clean Car fax fully loaded with
options.#4520.sale price $8995.00 plus
fees (650)637-3900
2004 CHEVY Malibu classic with 87k
miles. Clean Car Fax and 3 moths war-
ranty.automatic with all power package.
#4437 runs and looks great very roomy,
priced at $5850.00 plus fees. (650)637-
3900
2004 FORD Explorer Eddie bauer with
146k miles. third row seat all all other op-
tions clean Car fax #4330. This nice suv
has a very very low price of $7995.00
plus fees.. (650)637-3900
2004 HONDA Civic lx 4 door automatic
with 154k miles. Looks and drives very
nice; hard to find. #4517. Clean car and
3000 miles warranty. On sale
for $5995.00 plus fees. (650)637-3900
2008 HYUNDAI Accent gls 4 door auto-
matic with49k miles. Looks great and
runs excellent, awesome on gas and
very low miles. clean Car Fax. Priced at
$7995.00 plus fees. (650)637-3900
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
ACCURA 1997 3.0 CL CP Black, Auto-
matic $3300, (650)630-3216
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBIL”79Royal Delta 88, 122k
Miles, in excelleny Condition $1,800
(650)342-8510
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$2,500 Bid (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,400.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo Rob SOLD!
HONDA 1983 ASCOT VT 500 Motorcy-
cle, looks like 2012, must see. $1100,
obo, SOLD!
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $50. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
NEW MOTORCYCLE HELMET - Modu-
lar, dual visor, $69., (650)595-3933
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., SOLD!
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $60 for all
(650)588-7005
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPEAR tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Four steel
13in rims. Factory Hub Caps. $150. San
Bruno. SOLD!
JEEP TJ 2004-2006 (1) ALUMINUM
WHEEL & TIRE, brand new condition,
$90., SOLD!
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
670 Auto Parts
Bath
TUBZ
Over 400 Tubs on display!
World’s Largest “Hands-On, Feet-In”
Showroom
4840 Davenport Place
Fremont, CA 94538
(510)770-8686
www.tubz.net
Asphalt/Paving
AIM CONSTRUCTION
John Peterson
• Paving • Grading
• Slurry Sealing • Paving Stones
• Concrete • Patching
We AIM to please!
(650)468-6750
(408)422-7695
Lic.# 916680
Cabinetry
Contractors
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Concrete, decks, retaining
walls, fences, bricks, roof,
gutters, & drains.
Call David
(650)270-9586
Lic# 914544 Bonded & Insured
30
Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Contractors
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Home repairs &
Foundation work
Retaining wall • Decks • Fences
No job too small
Gary Afu
(650)207-2400
Lic# 904960
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
Concrete
CHETNER CONCRETE
Lic #706952
Driveways - Walkways
- Pool Decks - Patios - Stairs
- Exposed Aggregate - Masonry
- Retaining Walls - Drainage
- Foundation/Slabs
Free Estimates
(650)271-1442 Mike
Construction
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Solas
Electric
Best Rates
On all electrical work
7 days a week
Free Estimates
(650) 302-7906
CA License 950866
Bonded and Insured
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
JOSE’S
COMPLETE GARDENING
Complete gardening &
Landscaping
Commercial & Residential
Licensed
Free Estimates
(650)315-4011
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Landscaping
ASP LANDSCAPING
• All kinds of Concrete • Stamp
• Retaining Wall • Tree Service
• Brick • Roofing • Fencing
• New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435
(650)834-4495
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Painting
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
VICTOR’S FENCES
House Painting
•Interior •Exterior
Power Wash
•Driveways •Sidewalk •Houses
Free Estimates
(650)583-1270
or (650)808-5833
Lic. # 106767
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of
Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets
(650)461-0326
Lic# 983312
HAMZEH PLUMBING
5 stars on Yelp!
$25 OFF First Time Customers
All plumbing services
24 hour emergency service
(415)690-6540
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tree Service
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
21 Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Cemetery
CRIPPEN & FLYNN FUNERAL
CHAPELS
Family owned & operated
Established 1949
Personalized cremation &
funeral services
Serving all faiths & traditions
Woodside chapel: (650)369-4103
FD 879
Carlmont chapel: (650)595-4103
FD 1825
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)868-0082
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Home Care
MY ERRAND SERVICES
Help is on the way
• New Mother Assistance
• Senior Assistance • General Errands
• House & Pet Sitting • Event Help
• House Keeping • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
(650)201-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GREAT FULL BODY
MASSAGE
Tranquil Massage
951 Old County Rd. Suite 1,
Belmont
10:00 to 9:30 everyday
(650) 654-2829
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
Massage Therapy
UNION SPA & SALON
Grand Opening
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT
SENIOR LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
Video
ADULT VIDEOS $99 (415)298-0645
32 Weekend • June 29-30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins ª Dental ª Jewelry ª Silver ª Watches ª Diamonds
1Z11 80fll0¶8M0 ß90 ª ëâ0·J4¡·¡00¡
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
t%FBMWJUI&YQFSUTt2VJDL4FSWJDF
t6OFRVBM$VTUPNFS$BSF
XXX#FTU3BUFE(PME#VZFSTDPN
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRYsBURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 7/31/13
WEBUY
$â0 $â0
OFF
Established 1979
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR

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