P. 1
cafc285

cafc285

|Views: 127|Likes:
Published by sabatino123

More info:

Published by: sabatino123 on Jun 30, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

10/13/2015

pdf

text

original

Eight configuration parameters, each taking one of up to five preferred

configuration values, describe the overall operation of a given Versatile Bus

Case: 13-1224 Document: 29-1 Page: 33 Filed: 06/27/2013

23

configuration. Of these, the Board focused only on the sixth configuration

parameter (i.e., parameter “VI”), which specifies the number and configuration of

“wait lines” on the Versatile Bus. A “wait line” is a bus line that carries “wait

information.” Wait information tells an “owner” (e.g., a requester) whether a

“slave” (e.g., memory) attached to the bus is currently able to accept or sample

data in a particular transaction. (A1438[75:57-68].) As Bennett explains:

[T]here are a lot of meanings that can be ascribed to the
wait line, all generally subsumed under the concept that a
slave device is unable, unwilling, or indisposed from
accepting the data transfer activity within a transaction.

(A1438[76:20-24].) A slave drives a nonzero wait value onto a wait line to alert a

requester that data cannot presently be accepted by that slave for that particular

transaction and that the requester should therefore try again later. (See id.) Thus,

it is akin to a “busy signal” on a conventional telephone line, telling the caller to

try again later.

As shown below in red, in column VI of Figure 3, there are three options for

the number and configuration of wait lines in the preferred embodiment of Bennett

(below the dashed “envelope” line): one dedicated wait line (configuration digit =

3); zero wait lines (configuration digit =2); or “MPX,” which stands for a

“multiplexed” wait line (configuration digit =1). (See A1438[76:1-4].) Note that

two or four wait lines are also possible (configuration digits =4 or 5), but these are

not within Bennett’s preferred envelope. (A1438[76:57-67].)

Case: 13-1224 Document: 29-1 Page: 34 Filed: 06/27/2013

24

(A1149[Fig. 3] (boxes added).)

In the first case described above (wait-line configuration digit =3), the

system contains one dedicated wait line, separate and distinct from any other data

line. This means the slave for a given transaction can transmit wait information

simultaneously with the master transmitting data, since they are carried on

different lines. (A1439[77:40-43].) Like two cars passing on a two-lane road, they

can travel at the same time. In the second case described above (configuration

digit =2), there are zero wait lines and, therefore, wait information is not used at

all. (A1446[92:46-51].) In the third case described above (configuration digit =

1), wait information is “multiplexed” with data on a single line, such that both wait

information and data share the line. In this case, although there is no dedicated

Case: 13-1224 Document: 29-1 Page: 35 Filed: 06/27/2013

25

wait line, the slaves still transmit wait information by alternating it with the master

data on a shared line. (A1439[77:40-43].) Like two cars passing on a one-lane

road, one must wait until the other has gone first. They cannot pass at the same

time.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->