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  • Class 1 Worksheets
  • 1.1.1 Exercises
  • 1.1.2 Line displays for counting
  • 1.1.3 Exercises
  • 1.1.4 The succession of numbers
  • 1.1.5 Exercises
  • 1.2 Worksheet 2: Counting
  • 1.2.1 Finding the count of a given collection
  • 1.2.2 Exercises
  • 1.3 Worksheet 3: Counting pairs and triples, etc
  • 1.3.1 Forming and counting pairs
  • 1.3.2 Forming and counting triples
  • 1.4 Worksheet 4: The first twenty five numbers
  • 1.4.1 Exercises
  • 1.5 Addition and Subtraction
  • 1.5.1 Addition
  • 1.5.2 Exercises
  • 1.5.3 Subtraction
  • 1.5.4 Exercises
  • Class 2 Worksheets
  • 2.2. WORKSHEET 2: LINE DISPLAYS AND POSITION NUMBER 19
  • 2.2 Worksheet 2: Line displays and position num-
  • 2.2.1 Examples and Exercises:
  • 2.3.1 Examples of Straight Counting
  • 2.3.2 Exercises
  • 2.4. WORKSHEET 4: ADDITION AND SUBTRACTION 25
  • 2.3.4 Exercises
  • 2.4 Worksheet 4: Addition and Subtraction
  • 2.4.1 The concept of an empty collection and its count
  • 2.4.2 Exercises
  • 2.5.1 Adding or Subtracting 1
  • 2.5.2 Adding any number
  • 2.5.3 Addition Exercises:
  • 2.5.4 Subtracting any number
  • 2.5.5 Subtraction Exercises;
  • 2.6.1 Using the symbols ’=’, ’>’, and ’<’
  • 2.6.2 The order among Whole Numbers
  • 2.6.3 Exercises
  • 2.7.1 Exercises:
  • 2.7.2 Place value for two digit numbers
  • 2.7.3 Adding two digit numbers using place value
  • 2.7.4 Addition Exercises
  • 2.7.5 Subtraction using place value
  • 2.7.7 Place values in three digit numbers
  • 2.7.9 Adding more than two numbers
  • 2.7.10 Exercises
  • 2.8 Worksheet 7: Selling Almonds
  • 2.9. WORKSHEET 8: MULTIPLICATION AND DIVISION 45
  • 2.9 Worksheet 8: Multiplication and Division
  • 2.9.1 Visualizing Multiplication and its Properties:
  • 2.9.2 Exercises
  • 2.9.3 Visualizing Division and its Notation
  • 2.9.4 Exercises
  • 2.9.5 Products and Factors
  • 2.9.6 Exercises
  • 2.10. WORKSHEET 10. MEASUREMENTS 51
  • 2.10 Worksheet 10. Measurements
  • 2.10.1 The measuring scale or Ruler. The Number Line:
  • 2.10.2 Principles of measurements of lengths
  • 2.11. WORKSHEET 11. AREA MEASURE 53
  • 2.10.3 Exercises:
  • 2.11 Worksheet 11. Area Measure
  • 2.11.1 Examples and Exercises
  • 2.12. WORKSHEET 12. FRACTIONS AND FRACTIONAL MEASURES55
  • 2.12 Worksheet 12. Fractions and fractional mea-
  • 2.12.1 How are fractions used to represent parts of a whole
  • 2.13 Geometry
  • 2.13.1 POINTS:
  • 2.13.2 PLANES:

Elementary School Arithmetic Worksheets

Dayalbagh Elementary School Math Teachers guided by Nam P. Bhatia Department of Mathematics University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A. Visiting Teacher, Day Boarding School Dayalbagh, Agra, India March 1, 2013

2

Acknowledgment
The author is most grateful and most humbly acknowledges the motivation, encouragement and advice provided by Professor Prem Saran Satsangi Sahab, the chairman of the Education Advisory Committee, Dayalbagh. It was at his urging during my visit to Dayalbagh in the summer of the year 2004 that I got associated with the Day Boarding School in Dayalbagh. His remark that our students lack proper understanding of the fundamentals (or foundations) of mathematics has since motivated my association and work at the Day Boarding School. The Day Boarding School in Dayalbagh caters to students in grades VIXII. My initial work, naturally therefore, concentrated on the development of foundational materials and workshops on the foundations of school mathematics suitable for these levels. The notes prepared by me for the ongoing summer mathematics workshops at the Day Boarding School were published by the Dayalbagh Educational Institute (deemed university) in 2010 in book form with the title ”Foundations of School Mathematics”. This book has three chapters, namely, 1. Sets and Counting, 2. Geometry and Measurement, and 3. The Real Numbers and the Number Line. This book provides the basis for the ongoing mathematics workshops for grades VI-XII. Further ongoing work for Grades VIXII is motivated by the exhortation of Professor Prem Saran Satsangi Sahab made on the report of the workshops submitted on July 3, 2007: “I hope the participating math-teachers would produce small text books that focus on the most powerful and generative ideas with emphasis on concepts and fundamentals presented in a careful sequence, as opposed to bulky text books cramped with forgettable details”. During these summer workshops, it became clear that the incoming students in grade VI were not ready for the foundational material as exposed in the above noted book and summer workshops. Moreover, the medium of instruction in our schools being Hindi made it difficult for the students to comprehend the material, particularly at grade levels VI-IX. Though progress has been and is being made with the help of some Hindi translations, but it is slow. Furthermore, we realize that most current text books cater to the syllabi but do not provide the insights and understanding of the foundations which the great teachers, mathematicians, and successful practitioners of mathematics use to do their i

So a proposal was made to conduct workshops for elementary school teachers where the elementary school math material is covered with foundations. It soon became apparent that curriculum changes at the elementary school level will be more effective. N. This workshop focused on teacher presentations of the methodology and content of mathematics. 2012. 2013.P. Attempts were made to develop material for the grade VI students attending the summer workshops to cover the elementary school mathematics material with insights in the foundations. Another Dayalbagh Primary School Mathematics Teachers Workshop was arranged in the period July 25. We only know that successful practice of any art or science requires and is based on a deep intuitive understanding of the foundations. Such an understanding of the fundamentals of mathematics is crucial in applications and for problem solving skills. Finally. This is acquired through contact with teachers and through self effort and reflection on the subject. Teacher meetings were arranged(this included the Day Boarding School Math teachers and the elementary school math teachers) to exchange ideas as to how the content of these notes may be used in classroom activity. the books being used at present were critically examined on methodology and content. Bhatia February 15. 2012. Most of the existing textbooks commonly used in our schools and colleges are of little or no help in this. These workshops were carried out at the Distance Education Center during February 6-11. Encouragement and support of the REI Managing Committee in the above efforts is gratefully acknowledged. The notes prepared for grade VI with the title ”Number Systems and Arithmetic” provided the material for these workshops. Notes prepared for this purpose titled ”Number Systems and Arithmetic” were first used in summer workshops in 2011. Follow up primary school math teachers meetings brought about the proposal that WORKSHEETS for each of the grades I-V be prepared in Hindi for use in elementary school math teaching.ii ACKNOWLEDGMENT work.August 2. .

The activity of counting and measuring is carried out primarily through the use of numbers called ’the natural numbers’ and ’the fractions’. be it a ball. 2013. six. subtraction. multiplication and division on them through their use in counting and measuring.P. division but to develop an intuitive understanding of the number systems and the operations within those number systems that provide the language for expressing the results of counting and measuring. Most children. Measuring involves geometric shapes and their size. before joining an elementary school. two.Preface Mathematics education in Elementary Schools mainly deals with counting and measuring. five. These worksheets are designed to help students in elementary schools not only to acquire the necessary skills in carrying out efficiently the operations of addition. or any other single object or item imaginable. iii . The current texts use visualization for this purpose but they do not bring out even the meaning of the notation in use. nine. get their first lesson in counting from the mother. four. The number ‘ten’ is the count of the fingers on both hands. Bhatia February 15. This lesson essentially begins when the mother makes the child learn the number ‘one’ associated with a single object. Here the number ‘one’ is the count of any collection of objects that contains a single object. seven. subtraction. This issue of the worksheets is for grade I. three. The main goal of Primary School Mathematics education is to bring home to the students effectively the meaning of these numbers and the basic operations of addition. an apple. We use visualization extensively to bring out the key properties of arithmetic operations which are usually neglected in current texts. Visualizations is recognized as the most effective means to develop and teach the number systems and the arithmetic operations on them. and ends with the learning of the first ten counting numbers ‘one. eight. and ten’. the basic activity by which we keep track of our possessions and advance our perception of the universe we all live in or are conscious of during our wakeful condition.V. N. or a tree. multiplication. It will be followed by worksheets for grades II . The worksheets are not a replacement of prescribed texts and do not change the syllabi for these grades.

iv PREFACE .

. . . .5. . . 1. . . . v . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . .2 Exercises . . .2 Worksheet 2: Counting . . . . . . 1.5 Addition and Subtraction . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . .4. . .3 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . .2 Exercises . . . . .1 Exercises . . . 1. .1. . . . . . . . . .2 Line displays for counting . 1. . . . . . . . . 1. . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . .1 Addition .2 Worksheet 2: Line displays and position number . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . 1. .1 Examples of Straight Counting . . . . . . . .2 Forming and counting triples . . . . . . . . .3.1 Exercises . . . . The count of a collection. . . . 1. . . . . . . . . .4 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Exercises .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. . . . . .1 Exercises .2.4 Worksheet 4: The first twenty five numbers and 1. . 1. . . . . . . . . . .1 Finding the count of a given collection . . . . 1. . . . . The first numbers . . . . . . . . . .1 Forming and counting pairs . . . .1 Worksheet 1: The succession of counting numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . counting . 1. . . . . 2. . .3 Worksheet 3: Straight Counting. . . . . . .2 Exercises . i iii 1 twelve counting . . . . .3 Subtraction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1 Worksheet 1: Getting ready to count. . . . . . . . . 1 1 2 3 3 3 4 5 6 8 8 9 10 10 13 13 15 15 16 17 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 2 Class 2 Worksheets 2. .1 Examples and Exercises: . .3. . . . . . . . . . 2.4 The succession of numbers . . . . . 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. . . . . . . .Contents Acknowledgment Preface 1 Class 1 Worksheets 1. . . 1. .3 Worksheet 3: Counting pairs and triples. . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . etc . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . . . 1. . . . . . . . .1. . . 1. . .1. . .

12 2. . . .10 Exercises . . . . . . .1 POINTS: . 2. . . . . .10. . . .3 Adding two digit numbers using place value . . . 2. . .5 Subtraction using place value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . .2 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . .8 Exercises . . . . .5. . . . . .9. . The Number Line: . . .11 2. . . . . .7 2. . . . . Worksheet 4: Addition and Subtraction . . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . .7. .5. . . . Measurements . . . . . . . .1 Exercises: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9. . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9. . .2 Exercises . . 2. .3 Addition Exercises: .4 Subtracting any number . = . . . . . . . . . . . .10 2. Worksheet 10. .5. . .1 How are fractions used to represent parts of a whole .11. . . .4 Exercises . .1 The concept of an empty collection and its count .3 Exercises: .6. . 2. . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . .7. 2. . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . .5 2. . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . .7.6. . Worksheet 5: Using Straight Counting to Add or Subtract . . . . . . . . Worksheet 12. . . . Geometry .1 Adding or Subtracting 1 . . . ’>’.3 Visualizing Division and its Notation . . . . . Worksheet 5: The Order among numbers: Meaning of <. . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . .7. . . . . . . .7. . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Addition Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. Area Measure . . . .6 exercises .1 The measuring scale or Ruler. . . . . . .5 Subtraction Exercises.10. . . . . . . . . .13. .1 Examples and Exercises . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . .2 Principles of measurements of lengths . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9. . . . .2 PLANES: . . 2. . . .12. . . . . . . . . . . and ’<’ . . . . . . . Fractions and fractional measures . .5. . . . . . Worksheet 8: Multiplication and Division . . . . . .6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7. . . . 2. . . . . . .6 2. 2. . . . . . .vi 2. . .1 Using the symbols ’=’.3 CONTENTS A Most Important Observation about counting and the Count of a Collection . . . .9. . .8 2.4. 2. .10. . . . . . . . 2. 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . .1 Visualizing Multiplication and its Properties: . . . .4 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7. . . Worksheet 6: Counting in Groups and The Place Value Notation 2. . . . . . . .9 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9. .9 Adding more than two numbers . . . . . >. . . . . . .7.7 Place values in three digit numbers . . . . .7. . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . 2. . .2 Adding any number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . .2 The order among Whole Numbers . .6 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 24 25 25 28 29 30 30 31 32 33 33 34 34 34 35 35 36 37 37 38 38 39 39 40 40 42 42 45 46 47 48 50 50 50 51 51 52 53 53 53 55 57 57 57 58 . . . . . . . . . . . . .7. . . . . . . . . . .5 Products and Factors . .2 Place value for two digit numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Exercises . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Exercises . . . . . 2.3. . . . . . . . . 2. . 2. . . Worksheet 7: Selling Almonds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . . Worksheet 11. .13. . . . . 2.

. . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . 2. . . .13. .4 Curves and Paths . 2. 2. . . . vii 58 58 59 60 60 63 65 . . . . . . .13. . . . . .3 SPACE: . . . . . . . . . . . . .14. . . . . . . . . . . .CONTENTS 2. . . . .15 Shapes of some surfaces and solids . . . . .1 Equality of Curves in a Plane: .14 Plane Curves . . . . . . . .6 A characteristic property of lines and segments 2. . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13. . . . . . .5 Simple open and Simple closed Curves . . .13. . . . . . .

viii CONTENTS .

..Chapter 1 Class 1 Worksheets 1. 4. 2. Complete the succession of the first ten counting numbers in the following table by providing the missing word and or the missing number form. 7. 1 . i..e. . The first five counting numbers in words and numerals are Just as English words are written using the English alphabet A. whereas the number ten. while there are ten numerals which have the same count ten as the number of fingers on both hands of a person. 6.1. Thus ’BOOT’ is an English word.1 Worksheet 1: Getting ready to count.1 Exercises 1. The count of the English alphabet is twenty six or the number 26. numbers are written using the numerals 0. 1. 8. 3. 1. written in words. The first twelve counting numbers One 1 two 2 three 3 four 4 five 5 B. C. 5. The numbers 11 and 12 are also two digit numbers. The first twelve counting numbers. 10 is a two digit number as it uses the numerals 1 and 0. and their corresponding number forms are: one 1 two 2 three 3 four 4 five 5 six 6 seven 7 eight 8 nine 9 ten 10 eleven 11 twelve 12 Note that the first nine numbers are single digit numbers. . 9. Using numerals the number ten is written as 10. and ’123’ is a number..

. 6 . 2 three . numbers are line displays of numerals. 9 ten 10 2. Can you see why? English words are formed using line displays of some of the English alphabet.. CHAPTER 1... . 6 . 12 1. CLASS 1 WORKSHEETS four 4 five .. M .2 one 1 . whereas 1212 is a number.. Similarly... 9 ten 10 eleven .. Complete the succession of the first twelve counting numbers in the following table one . A.. eight 8 .. A display of objects along a line (here English alphabets) in the above picture is: A P Q R S B C Such a display of objects in a collection is called a line display.. ........ Thus N A A M and M A A N are correct line displays of the collection containing the English letters A..... .. But the line display N A M or the line display N A A A M is not a correct line display. A correct line display contains each object in the collection exactly once. eight 8 ..2 Line displays for counting The exhibit below is a collection of some of the English alphabets. four 4 five .... .. 2 three . P A Q S B C R It is sometimes convenient to display the objects (here some English alphabets) in a given collection along a line. .... For example DADA is a word.. Another line display of the objects in the same collection is P A Q S R C B This shows that there are many many possible line displays of the objects in a given collection.1. .. N. .

and so on. exactly once. Answer: 12 and 21. . 8. A D D Answer: The various line displays are: ADD.1.1. and 12 the twelve th counting number. 6 the second numeral. 2. 10 the tenth. Write all the numbers using each of the numerals 1. 1.5 Exercises 1. The number 12 is called ’twelve’. 11. 4. and 7 the third numeral. Write all numbers that can be obtained by a line display of the numbers 1. A P Q R S B C . Exhibit the alphabet in the picture below in all possible line displays. 2. 11 the eleventh. Thus 9 is the ninth. 12 the number 1 is called the first counting number. and DDA. 9. In a given line display of objects like that of the English alphabet below A P Q R S B C we say that A is the first alphabet in the display. 2. 2. THE FIRST TWELVE COUNTING NUMBERS3 1. And in a number like 567. Write all words using the letters in the word M AD. etc. DAD. Identify the third and seventh alphabet in the line display below. Write all numbers using each of the numerals 5.1. 1. S is the fifth alphabet in the display. 1. Each line display is an English word. Write all the numbers where each of the numerals 1 and 2 is used exactly once. where each numeral is used exactly once.3 Exercises 1.1. 7. 2. 2 the second counting number. 7. 6. WORKSHEET 1: GETTING READY TO COUNT. The word DDA is not a very familiar word. 4. 6. The number 21 is called ’twenty one’. 3. but it is a word. 3. 5.4 The succession of numbers In the succession of the counting numbers 1. 5. 10. 3.1. 5 is the first numeral. Here ADD and DAD are familiar words.

3. the fourth an ellipse. For example the count of the collection of special curves line displayed below is 5. Answer: It is an ellipse. Question: Draw and name the fourth curve in the above line display of curves. the second is called a square. The first curve in the display is called a circle. The number assigned is called the count of the collection. Identify the third. 5.4 CHAPTER 1.. and the fifth a rhombus. The last number 5 in the pairing gives the count of the collection of curves. Identify and display the first. and 5 shows the pairing as pointed out by the in-between up-down arrows. The next line display of successive numbers 1. 6. 2. as well as that of the collection of the alphabet. The objects in the line display below are very special curves. What are their names? 1. is paired with 1. 3. . CLASS 1 WORKSHEETS 2. 11. 10. 2. 3. seventh.2 Worksheet 2: Counting Counting means assigning a unique number to a given collection. 8. and 5 is also the count of the alphabet in the next line display. 9. and eighth numeral in the number 75757575. third. The assigning of a unique number to a given collection is done by pairing objects in the given collection with the successive numbers 1. 4. Thus the letter A is paired with the first number 1 and so also the first curve (the circle) above. 12. etc. 7. the third a triangle. second. 4. 4. and fifth curves in the display above of special curves.

and each object (here alphabet) is paired with a different number than that of the other. The pairing could be displayed in line display format as follows P (1) A(2) Q(3) S (4) B (5) C (6) R(7) A different pairing as given below in line display format is A(1) P (2) Q(3) R(4) S (5) B (6) C (7) It gives the same count. Note further that the above collection of alphabets can be line displayed and counted in five . for the collection. is the count of the collection.1.e. This may be done in any suitable way. In the display below of objects (here some English alphabets) each object (i.2. labeled. One should note that any line display of the objects gives a pairing with counting numbers as described above and any such pairing gives the same count for the given collection.1 Finding the count of a given collection It is not necessary to line display the objects in a collection for pairing with successive numbers. In the example above the count is 7.2. alphabet) is paired (identified. or tagged) with the successive counting numbers shown in the bracket after the alphabet. WORKSHEET 2: COUNTING 5 A P Q R S 1 2 3 4 5 1. The number 7 being the last number with which the last object is paired. P (1) A(2) Q(3) S (4) B (5) C (6) R((7) In this pairing. The pairing begins with the first counting number 1 and ends with the number 7. the successive numbers 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 have been used.. namely 7.

The count of all possible displays is twelve. 12. Count the triangles in the line display .2 Exercises O O T. the number 4. remember that the count of the alphabets displayed above is the number seven written 7 but the line displays are many. Count the curves in the line display 4. CLASS 1 WORKSHEETS thousand eighty two different ways and each will give the same count 7 for the collection. and the count of all possible line displays is a very large number.2. 1. i. 1. This count of possible line displays is a big number which is written as 5082. i. What is the count of the alphabets in each display? How many displays are there? Answer: The possible line displays are display 1: display 2: display 3: display 4: display 5: display 6: display 7: display 8: display 9: display 10: display 11: display 12: B B B T T T O O O O O O O O T O O B B O T T O B O T O O B O O T B O B T T O O B O O T B O B T O In each display the count of alphabets is Four. You will learn such bigger numbers later.e. Here the count of the collection of alphabets is 4. However. Exhibit all possible line displays of the alphabets in the word B O O T .6 CHAPTER 1. 3. but the count of the collection of all possible displays is 12.e. Count the alphabets in the word B 2.

The display of the six apples ends with a vertical bar | followed by a dotted line. How many A’s are in the name D A Y A L B A G H 10. Count the numbers in the display 5 4 1 2 8 3 9 6 7 10 7 6. 9. Count the dots in the display 7. Count the dots in the display 8. . There are ten apples in a basket. How many letters are there in the word DISP LAY M AT H ? 11. In the picture below six of the apples in the basket are line displayed where each letter A represents an apple. How many apples from the basket are not displayed? Display the remaining apples from the basket (use one A for each remaining apple) on the dotted line. WORKSHEET 2: COUNTING 5.1. Count the alphabets used in the word BISCU IT .2.

it is convenient to line display the items as shown below for the case of the nine big dots (line displayed below): The picture below shows the grouping in pairs (two big dots in each group). How many pairs of big dots can be formed? Is there an unpaired dot left? 2. then after the first removal of two almonds we will be left with only one almond in the bag and no other person can get two almonds from the bag.3 1... . It is important to realize that different collections can have the same count... If we keep removing two almonds at a time then how many persons may get two almonds each from the bag. ... given a bag of almonds. the answer depends on how many almonds were in the bag to start with.. How many Bananas are line displayed in the picture below: . Clearly. For example the collection of A’s and the collection of B ’s that are line displayed below have the same count... Then remove another two from the bag to give them to another person... Display six big dots in a line display.. 1.. 12....8 CHAPTER 1.... Note that there are four pairs of big dots in the collection of nine big dots and one big dots remains without pairing. CLASS 1 WORKSHEETS A A A A A A |. Word Answer: .3.. To see the answer for a given collection.. For example. Number Answer: . where each pair picked is boxed. A B A B A B A B A B A B A B What is the count of each collection? Write the answer as a word and as a number.. So. we may remove two almonds from the bag and give it to somebody or put them aside... 1... we can say that there are four pairs of dots and one unpaired dot in a collection of nine dots.. For example if there were three almonds in the bag to start with. etc Forming and counting pairs Any two items in a collection form a pair..1 Worksheet 3: Counting pairs and triples.

How many pairs of apples can be obtained from a collection of eleven apples? Are any apples left after all possible pairs are formed? 1.1. ETC 9 How many pairs of Bananas can you form? How many are left without pairing? 3..e. toys. You have twelve pistachios in a bag.3. You see twelve apples in a basket. sticks. sub-collections each containing three objects) from a given collection. 1. There are four birds sitting on a branch of a tree. etc. apples. one may obtain triples of objects (i. How many pairs of coins you have? 3. You have ten almonds in a bag. WORKSHEET 3: COUNTING PAIRS AND TRIPLES. How many of your friends get three pistachios each? What is left for you? If you give three pistachios each to three of your friends. The following picture shows that one can form three triples out of a collection of eleven big dots and two remain as not part of a triple. birds. The following picture shows that one can form three triples out of a collection of nine big dots. How many pairs of birds are there on the branch? Are any birds left without pairing? 2.2 Forming and counting triples Just as one can form pairs of objects from a given collection. You give three pistachios each to each of your friends. You have five coins in your pocket. How many pairs of apples can be obtained from a collection of twelve apples? Are any apples left after all possible pairs are formed? 4. One may use and practice using any objects like balls. how many will be left for you? . In the above examples the big dots represent objects.. You have eleven pistachios in a bag. You distribute three pistachios each to your friends. How many pairs of apples are there? 4. How many of your friends can get three almonds each? How many almonds you will have left? 5. Hoe many friends get three pistachios? How many are left for you? 6.3.

zero) single objects. shows one group of ten and no (i. four (4). eighteen . eighteen (18). two single objects among the twelve objects.. Similarly. twenty-four (24).10 CHAPTER 1. eleven (11). twenty-one (21). eleven and twelve. twelve (12).. twenty (20). nine (9) ten (10). Write the numerical form of each given number below: thirteen . then you may form one group of ten and will be left with two objects.e. In the number symbol 12 for the number twelve.. the numeral 1 on the left indicates that you have 1 group of ten. and ten objects below.4 Worksheet 4: The first twenty five numbers and counting The succession of natural numbers that one uses for counting continues indefinitely. each number is followed by another without there being a last number. twenty-three (23). fifteen 15 seventeen .e. Note that the singles box on the right in the last display is empty and the 0 in the singles place on the right in the notation 10 represents no singles. Write the word form of each number below: . shows one group of ten and one single object. thirteen (13. 1. Here we practice counting with the first twenty five numbers. i. The spoken word as written is followed by its numeric version expressed in round brackets below: one (1).. The numeral 2 on the right indicates that you have.. eleven.4. If you have twelve objects. seventeen (17)... nineteen (19).. seven (7). 2.. fifteen (15). twenty-five (25). besides the one group of ten. sixteen (16).1 Exercises 1. five (5). This is depicted below in the line displays of twelve. CLASS 1 WORKSHEETS Counting in groups of ten is the basis for the number notation. twenty-three . eight (8). twenty-two (22).. 1. two (2). The symbol 10 for the number ten. three (3). six (6). the symbol 11 for the number eleven. fourteen (14). So let us practice counting by tens and relating it to the numbers ten.

8 9....... ..... 21 ..... 2 3.. 2 3.... Count the successive pairs you have boxed! 1..24 .. . . Supply the missing successive numbers in the line display of the first twenty five successive numbers: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... Leave any numbers that cannot be paired unboxed! Count the successive pairs you have boxed! What is the count of the unboxed numbers? 1....... 4 5.. Count the number of alphabet in the line display below: A B C D E H J K L M N O P Q R T U Z Answer: Word: .......... 12 . 4 5.. There is one number left unboxed.... 10 11.4. ten ....... Display the numbers 1 to 10 in successive pairs by boxing successive pairs...... Count the successive pairs you have boxed! 8........ WORKSHEET 4: THE FIRST TWENTY FIVE NUMBERS AND COUNTING11 .............. Leave any numbers that cannot be paired unboxed! Count the successive pairs you have boxed! What is the count of the unboxed numbers? Answer:.. 24 3. Line display the numbers 1 to 24 in successive pairs by boxing successive two numbers... Display the numbers 1 to 15 in successive pairs by boxing successive pairs of numbers.... Display the numbers 1 to 20 in successive pairs by boxing successive pairs of numbers. 22 .1.. ............. ..... 5..15 16 17 18 ...... 20 4..... 6 7.... 12 13..... 10 Answer: The number count of successive pairs boxed is 5... 7... 6.. 6 7. 8 9........ 14 15 Answer: The count of boxed pairs is 7... 12 seven ... Display the numbers 1 to 21 in successive pairs by boxing successive pairs of numbers... Write the missing word or numerical form of the numbers below: ...... 15 thirteen 13 . 9.... Number: .Count the successive pairs you have boxed! 10..............

. 18. There are . CLASS 1 WORKSHEETS 11... 17.. How many big dots are there now? Answer: There are nine big dots now... Line display the numbers 1 to 25. Two more birds fly in to sit on the same wire besides the others.. .. . How many groups of three numbers are there? Are any numbers left unboxed? Answer: There are . groups of four numbers.. The display below shows eight big dots...... How many almonds are there in the bag? Answer: . Box successive groups of four numbers. The display below shows six big dots. There are ... . Box successive groups of three numbers. unboxed numbers.... Three more big dots are added after the vertical bar as shown below... Line display the numbers 1 to 25...... Your Mom gives you two more.. How many birds are there now? Answer: ... 14.. 16. 15.... . Box successive groups of five numbers.... You see 7 birds sitting on an electric wire.. unboxed numbers. How many groups of four numbers are there? Are any numbers left unboxed? Answer: There are . 12... groups of three numbers. Line display the successive numbers 1 to 25.. You put another five almonds in the same bag.. groups of five numbers.... How many rupee coins you have now? Answer: .12 CHAPTER 1... You have 17 almonds in a bag. You have thirteen rupee coins. How many groups of five numbers are there? Are any numbers left unboxed? Answer: There are . There are .. 13.... unboxed numbers..

For example consider a collection of two dots and another of three dots. .. Number Form:. .. ADDITION AND SUBTRACTION You box three of them as shown below 13 How many are left unboxed? Answer: Five are unboxed.. . You see 6 birds sitting on a tree branch.....5 1. For example we have two apples on one tray and three apples on a second tray.. You take out and eat five almonds from the bag. If you have thirteen chairs in a room and you bring in one more chair in the room. . 22.1. then how many chairs are left in the room? Answer: Word Form: . If you have thirteen chairs in the room and you remove one chair from the room. then how many chairs are there in the room altogether now? Answer: Word Form: . You deposit all in your Bank account.. .. You have 23 almonds in a bag... Answer: .. You have 13 rupees.. and 5 in this situation is expressed in the statement 2 + 3 = 5 or also as 3 + 2 = 5..1 Addition and Subtraction Addition Given two collections of objects we may put them together(combine them) and make a single collection.. Answer: .... How many almonds are left in the bag? Answer: ...... 21..... The symbol ’+’ signifies ’addition’ and we read the statement as ’two plus three equals five’ or as ’three plus two equals five’... 1. . We also conclude from this that 2 + 3 = 3 + 2 as both the numbers 2 + 3 and 3 + 2 stand for the same number 5.... 20.. Number Form: ..5.... The relationship between the three counts 2... The counts of the two separate collections and the count of the single collection obtained from them are related. We may line display them for counting as follows: .. We therefore relate and understand the arithmetic through counting... 3... How many rupees are left with you. Three fly away...5. We have learned that numbers represent counts of collections. 23. We put all these apples on a single tray to obtain five apples on a single tray. How many are left on the tree branch. 19.

etc. We read the first statement as ’two plus three equals five’ and the second as ’three plus two equals five’.. This is then written as 2 + 3 = 5 for the first display and as 3 + 2 = 5 for the second display. This kind of line display identifies the process of adding the three dot collection to the two dot collection. Thus for display and understanding we may identify the objects in a collection in any suitable convenient way. For example if we are counting almonds or apples we may use the letter A to identify each object. In general this property is described symbolically by m + n = n + m. Symbolically it is written as 2 + 3. Thus the following two pictures using the letter O instead of a dot represent the process of adding the number 3 to the number 2 to obtain the sum 2 + 3 = 5. Since both counts when added result in the same number 5. 3 + 7 = 7 + 3. we can mentally picture the process and come up with the count of the combined collection. irrespective of their individual counts. The last display shows the collection obtained by adding the second collection to the first. We emphasize that counts are numbers and the counts do not depend on the nature of objects in a collection. And then to its right we display the collection of three dots. Now we straight count the combined collection in the last display and see that it has a count of five. The letter ’O’ may be used for any object. This property is named as ’the commutative property’ as it is true for the counts of any two collections.14 CHAPTER 1. The last statement expresses a property of addition. It produces the same display in either case. Thus. where m and n identify the counts of the two collections and m + n as well as n + m the count of the combined collection depending on how the two collections are line displayed for counting. That is why the two dot collection is displayed to the right of the three dot collection. O and O O O O O O O O O When the counts are small numbers. We may use our fingers . 13 + 12 = 12 + 13. we learn that 2+3 = 3+2. CLASS 1 WORKSHEETS or as The next picture shows that the two collections have been combined to obtain a single collection of five dots The first line display contains two dots. The second display indicates the process of adding the two dot collection to the three dot collection.

. 1.5. The line display for a collection of seven objects will appear as . When the counting process is clear.. the line displays are no more resorted in counting...5. For large numbers........... the process becomes cumbersome and we use the place value system.... Pictorially show that 3 + 1 = 1 + 3 = 4... Find 13 + 12 = .. The symbol ’−’ identifies subtraction (or removal)... 1.. 6. For example we have seven apples and we eat two of them so that we are left with only five apples.3 Subtraction Given a collection of objects we may remove some objects from the collection. The count of the apples that were eaten is 2 and the count of the remaining apples is 5.1.. 3 + 15 = . The subtraction in this case takes the form..... Calculate 15 + 6 = . 21 + 3 = ... ADDITION AND SUBTRACTION 15 or parts of fingers to aid in the addition process.. Line displays help in understanding the process and in counting. 21 + 4 = .. however.... 3. 4. The basic underlying process is straight counting as described in section 1. The relationship between these three numbers is expressed in the form 7 − 2 = 5.5. 21 + 2 = .. 15 + 9 = .. We may picture this as follows: Here the first line display has seven dots showing the seven apples we had originally.. 13 + 10 = .... The numeral 0 is used to express the count of an empty collection..2 Exercises 1. Mentally calculate 21 + 1 = ... Mentally find 1 + 15 = .... It should be kept in mind that when we remove all objects from a given collection we will be left with no remaining objects.. for example 3 − 3 = 0 for the case of a collection having count 3. Note that the count of the apples in the beginning was 7... 15 + 7 = . Pictorially show that 12 + 1 = 13.. The second display has the two dots replaced by circles showing the two apples that were eaten and the five dots that are left. 2. 4 + 15 = . Addition and subtraction are done using straight counting. 2 + 15 = .. We read the statement 7 − 2 = 5 as ’Seven minus two is five’ or as ’seven take away two is five’..... that means that the remaining collection has no objects in it or the remaining collection is empty.. But the underlying process remains straight counting. 5.2 on counting.

........ 9 − 5 = . 15 − 3 = .... 1..... Find the answer using line displays as above: (a) 3 − 1 = .. 4 − 2 = .......5.... CLASS 1 WORKSHEETS Here the empty box on the left shows that no dots are left and the box on the right shows the seven dots that have been removed by picturing them as circles....... 2. 7 − 3 = ... 16 − 6 = . 10 − 6 = .. 22 − 3 = ....16 CHAPTER 1.... (b) 13 − 5 = ..... (b) 12 − 2 = ..... 24 − 24 = .. Find the answer by mentally picturing line display of objects or using your fingers... 3.. (c) 21 − 1 = .4 Exercises 1. 3 − 3 = . 12 − 12 = ........... 17 − 10 = ....... 10 − 3 = .. (c) 20 − 13 = ....... (a) 5 − 2 = .............. .

8(eight). The succession of the first hundred counting numbers is given below: 1 11 21 31 41 51 61 71 81 91 2 12 22 32 42 52 62 72 82 92 3 13 23 33 43 53 63 73 83 93 4 14 24 34 44 54 64 74 84 94 5 15 25 35 45 55 65 75 85 95 6 16 26 36 46 56 66 76 86 96 7 17 27 37 47 57 67 77 87 97 8 18 28 38 48 58 68 78 88 98 9 19 29 39 49 59 69 79 89 99 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Note that numbers are written using the ten numerals 0(zero). 5(f ive). . 2(two). It is not possible to write all the numbers. each number followed by another. 5 (five. etc.. are the alphabet used for English words. c.1 Worksheet 1: The succession of counting numbers The succession of counting numbers begins with the number 1 (one) and is followed by the successive numbers 2 (two). 3(three). 1(one). but we will learn to write the number that follows any given number. 7(seven). . 4 (four).. b. You have learned the numbers up to the number 100 (one hundred). 9(nine) These numerals are the alphabet of the numbers just as the English letters a. It continues without a break. 3 (three.Chapter 2 Class 2 Worksheets 2. 4(f our). 17 . without end. . 6(six).

We see that every number has a successor. and 76 is the predecessor of 77. Note that the first line in the table above contains all the counting numbers written using a single numeral. Observe that for each number there is a number that comes just after it. and 76 is just before 77. 0. The ending number is 9. . The succession of numbers written with three numerals begins with the number 100 and ends with 999 (nine hundred ninety nine). A number that comes just before a number is called its predecessor. and every number except 1 has a predessor. The number that comes just after a number is called its successor. the number that follows is 101 (one hundred one). CLASS 2 WORKSHEETS It is important to keep in mind the order in which the succession of numbers is written. They begin with the number 10 (ten) and end with the number 99 (ninety nine). . Note for example that 78 comes just after 77 and so 78 is the successor of 77. . The number that follows the number 99 is 100 (one hundred) and it uses the three numerals 1. Similarly. . and 0. . 8 is the successor of 7. in that order. They begin with 1 and end with 9. 2. So. These begin with 1000 (one thousand) and end with 9999 (nine thousant ninety nine). and 100 is the successor of 99. It is followed by numbers that are written with two numerals. and 99 is the predecessor of 100.1. . Write the beginning and ending numbers in the succession of numbers that use five numerals. Although not exhibited in the table. . Answer: The beginning number is 1 . 100 is the first number that uses three numerals. Complete the succession of counting numbers in the last two line of the table 1 11 21 31 41 51 61 71 81 2 12 22 32 42 52 62 72 82 3 13 23 33 43 53 63 73 83 4 14 24 34 44 54 64 74 84 5 15 25 35 45 55 65 75 85 95 6 16 26 36 46 56 66 76 86 7 17 27 37 47 57 67 77 87 8 18 28 38 48 58 68 78 88 9 19 29 39 49 59 69 79 89 99 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 2.1 Exercises 1.18 CHAPTER 2. 1 has no predecessor as there is no counting number that comes before 1. Also observe that 1 comes just before 2. . 1 is the predecessor of 2. Thereafter comes the successive numbers that use four numerals.

. What number identifies the position of MUALI? Answer:. .... . . Consider the five children standing in line below: MILAN first 1 CYRUS second 2 MAULI third 3 NRYN fourth 4 AGAM fifth 5 Moving from left to right......... .. ....2 Worksheet 2: Line displays and position number When children are made to stand in line (i. given number 31 20 55 7 successor . CYRUS in second. We may also identify these positions by the numbers 1. .. NRYN in fourth. MILAN is in first position. . Write the successor and predecessor of each given number in the following table predecessor .2. 2... ... . WORKSHEET 2: LINE DISPLAYS AND POSITION NUMBER 19 3.. .. . 2. In the above line-up the number 5 identifies the position of AGAM in the line-up.. and AGAM in fifth position.. .e. Write the successor and predecessor of each given number in the table that follows... given number 99 100 999 1000 10000 9999 successor . . 4.. The line-up of children above is a typical example.. .. Arranging or placing objects or persons along a line is called a line-display of the objects or persons... MAULI in third. 4... . Some more examples are: . 3. are made to line-up) they are said to be standing in a position that is identified by a number which identifies the position of the child in the line... predecessor .2.. .. and 5 as is shown in the line up.... ....

. . Below is another line-up of the same children AGAM first 1 NRYN second 2 MAULI third 3 CYRUS fourth 4 MILAN fifth 5 Write down the position of each child in word and number: Answer: AGAM: first . English words are line displays of some English letters. . CLASS 2 WORKSHEETS 2... Mauli: ... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 The following is a line display of some big dots: .. 2. 5. Look at the word D A Y A L B A G H What number specifies the position of the first A? Answer: 2.. In what position is the letter M in the word D U M? Answer: M is in the third position. 3. .. MILAN: . . The word ’D U M’ is a line display of the letters D... .. What number identifies the position of the numeral 7? Answer: . 4.. NRYN: . The numbers below each dot identify the position of each dot in the display... Answer:.. What number specifies the position of the third A? Answer: ..2. What number identifies the position of the letter M in the word D U M? Answer: the number 3.. What number identifies the position of the letter U. Cyrus: fourth .. and U.. .20 CHAPTER 2. Below is a line display of the numerals used to write numbers. .1 Examples and Exercises: 1.. 2... .. Below is a line display of a few dots. M... 5.. We can also say that the first A is in second position... 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Question: Which numeral is in the first position? Answer: The numeral 0. Which numeral is in the third position? Answer: The numeral 2.

THE COUNT OF A COLLECTION. we say that the count of the fingers on one hand is 5 (five). or balls in a box. The process of pairing or labeling is typically called as counting. We . . a child.. or a rupee coin in one’s pocket. This is the first picked apple.3 Worksheet 3: Straight Counting. The number 5 (five) or 10 (ten) is the count we have assigned to the fingers of one hand. Simply stated. the hair on one’s head. Every collection has a unique number assigned to it as the count of the collection.. the method of pairing or labeling the objects with successive numbers starting with the number 1 is used to assign a number as the count of the collection. . The position numbers of each numeral used in the number 4107303271 are noted below 4 1 1 2 0 3 7 4 3 5 0 6 3 7 2 8 7 9 1 10 In what position is the first 0 (zero)? Answer: 3.. For any collection of objects. planets of the sun.. called the count of the collection. In what position is the second 0 (zero)? Answer: 6 or in sixth position.. the count of each of these collections is the number 1 (one). For example. In what position is the second 3 (three)? Write the answer: . or also third position. a chair. like apples in a basket. WORKSHEET 3: STRAIGHT COUNTING.3. Counting numbers are line displays of numerals. Whenever a collection contains many objects. we start by picking an apple from the basket and mentally pairing it with the number 1. Be it an apple. an almond. 2. The count does not depend on the nature of the objects. stars in the Milky Way.. or almonds in a bag. To count the apples in a basket. To start with.. or that the number of fingers on both hands is 10 (ten). For practice you may arrange any items in a line display and assign position numbers to each object.21 4 Write the numerical position of each dot below the dot! 6.. think of any single object. respectively two hands. The process ends with the assignment of a number... It is like giving a special name to a child by which the child is known. or rupee coins in ones pocket.2.. almonds in a bag.. A typical example is counting apples in a basket. the count of a collection containing a single object is 1 (one). In what position is the first 3 (three)? Write the Answer: . The count of a collection. persons in a family. We put the first picked apple aside (outside the basket) and pick another apple from the basket and mentally pair it with the number 2 (the successor of 1). the count of a collection is a number that is assigned to it.

we write the successive numbers beginning with 1 below each letter as shown below: D 1 A 2 Y 3 A 4 L 5 B 6 A 7 G 8 The last counting number used in this pairing is 8. An example of pairing which does not use a line display is . This number 8 is the count of the collection of letters in the word ’DAYALBAGH”. Thereafter. Several examples of pairing and assigning the count follow 2. If it is 35. 3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 See that the numbers used in pairing are the successive counting numbers beginning with 1 and ending with 8. The last number used in this pairing is 8 and this number is the count of the collection of dots in the display. Line displays of objects in a collection are helpful in counting. CLASS 2 WORKSHEETS then put this second picked apple aside and pick another from the basket and mentally pair it with the number 3 (again the successor of 2). The number 8 is the assigned count of the collection of dots. i. has no more apples left. As an example consider the word ’Dayalbagh’. It is not necessary to line display the objects in a collection as long as the pairing of objects in the collection with successive numbers beginning with 1 is clearly shown.e. each adjacent dot is paired with the successor of the last number with which the previous dot was paired. To answer the question ’How many letters are used in the word ’Dayalbagh’ ?. It is customary to start be pairing the object on the left on the line with the number 1.3. The process of picking and pairing with successive numbers continues until the last apple has been picked and paired with a number that is the successor of the previously used number for pairing.22 CHAPTER 2. so the basket of apples is now empty. The picture below shows certain big dots arranged on a line (you may think of the dots as apples or almonds or any other objects in a collection whose count is to be found out). The numbers below each dot is the number with which that dot is paired. Consider counting the number of letters used in an English word. The process of pairing starts by pairing the first dot on the left with the number 1. 2. then the count is 35. This was the case in picking apples from a basket and pairing each pick with a successive number starting with 1.1 Examples of Straight Counting 1. If the last number used for pairing is 7 then the count of apples is 7.

For example the count of successive numbers beginning with 7 and ending with 16 is seen to be 10 as seen from the pairing 7 1 8 2 9 3 10 4 11 5 12 6 13 7 14 8 15 9 16 10 .23 P (1) A(2) Q(3) S (4) B (5) C (6) R((7) Here we find the count of the letters on a Board or in a picture. It is important to note that the count of a collection of successive numbers that begin with 1 and ends with a specified number is that specified number. THE COUNT OF A COLLECTION. The ending number in this situation is the assigned count of the collection of successive numbers that begins with 1. The last number used in the pairing is the count of the collection. If a collection of successive numbers starts with any other number different from 1 its count has to be found in the manner above indicated.3. etc. we pair each object in the collection with successive numbers starting with 1. This is shown in the table below for ending numbers up to 12 (twelve): collection 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 count 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 7 7 7 7 7 7 8 8 8 8 8 9 9 9 9 10 10 10 11 11 12 4.. For finding a count of a collection. 3.2. Starting with any one of the letters which is paired with the number 1 shown in a bracket after the chosen letter. we continue picking letters and pairing them with successive numbers 2. until all the letters have been paired with a number. The last number used in the pairing is the number 7 and it is the (assigned) count of the collection of letters. WORKSHEET 3: STRAIGHT COUNTING.

we note all the possible line displays of these letters given below: . 2. How many successive numbers are there that begin with 35 and end with 50? 4.. What is their count? Write your answer as a word and as a number! 5. 6. How many words are there on page 20 of your Book? Answer: . The first object picked in the process is paired with the number 1.. How many houses are there on the street or lane where you live? Answer: .. 9. How many walls are there in the class room? Answer:. How many pages are there in your Math Book? 10. Take a bag full of marbles and count them. How many legs does a Donkey have? 11.... and C . Line displays are helpful in counting but are not necessary to carry out the pairing process. 2. . Find the count of successive numbers beginning with 90 and ending with 99. Count the number of chairs in the class room! Give your answer in the word form and also as a number.... CLASS 2 WORKSHEETS The important thing to remember is that the count of a collection of numbers that contains all the successive numbers beginning with 1 and ending with a specific number..24 CHAPTER 2.3.. 8. .. What is the count of the successive numbers beginning with 1 and ending with 100. . And the count of the collection whose objects are paired with these one to one is the count of those successive numbers. 3. For example for counting the objects in the collection that contains the letters A. is that specific number. That the process assigns a unique number as the count of a collection becomes evident when line displays are used for counting..3.3 A Most Important Observation about counting and the Count of a Collection Note that counting is done by picking objects in a collection and pairing each successive picked object with a successive number.. B . 7.. How many letters are there in the word M AT HEM AT ICS ? number. 2..2 Exercises 1. The count is the number with which the last picked object is paired.

.4 Exercises Find the count of each collection below by using a line display of items in the collection. each line display gives the same count for the collection. Addition conceptualizes the process of putting or placing (i. a pair. Display all possible line displays in each of the above exercises! What is the count of the line displays in each exercise? 2.4.e. Thus to find the count of a collection using a line display.. The collection containing: an apple. adding) more objects in a collection.e. and 3. 2. 1.3. WORKSHEET 4: ADDITION AND SUBTRACTION A A B B C C 1 B C A C A B 2 C B C A B A 3 25 Here the last line that contains the successive numbers 1.2. 5. and a banana. shows the pairing and the fact that the count of the collection is 3 for each line display. and two bananas. 0. and 0. and C ? Your Answer: . Consider the two processes on examples: The Process of Addition: There is a basket containing some apples and we place some more apples into that basket. It shows that different line displays give the same count. The collection containing: three apples. But. 3. The Process of Subtraction: There is a basket containing some apples and we remove some apples from that basket. 2. namely. subtracting) some objects from a collection. B .4 Worksheet 4: Addition and Subtraction Common everyday problems point to the underlying concepts of Addition and of Subtraction of numbers. Question: ”What is the count of apples in the basket after we have placed in some more apples in the basket?” Addition answers this question. The collection containing the numbers: 21 and 12. Question: ”What is the count of . Straight counting is used to find the answer.. we need use only one of several possible line displays. the number 3 for the count of the collection. Subtraction conceptualizes the process of removing or taking out (i. most importantly. . 2. The collection containing the symbols: ∅. Question: How many line displays are there for the collection of letters A. 4.

The symbol ’5 + 3’ is used and it identifies the count of apples in the basket after we have added the 3 apples in the basket. The examples that follow explain the underlying notation for addition and subtraction.e. In this case we will use the symbol ’3 + 2’ to represent the count of apples after the move. since we now are adding two apples to the basket that already has three apples. Straight counting is used to find the answer. We put (place or add) 3 more apples in this basket. This results in the right basket having five apples and so we write ’3 + 2 = 5’. The symbol is simply read as ”five plus three” or as ”3 added to 5”. Notation for Addition: A basket has 5 apples. For the visualization of the number ’2 + 3’. The resulting picture will be The result of moving (adding) two apples in the left basket to the three apples in the right basket is now represented by the symbol ’3 + 2’. The result is represented by the picture Note that the left basket has five apples (Why?) and the right basket is empty (Why?).26 CHAPTER 2. We may indeed want to move the apples in the left basket (that has two apples) to the basket on the right (that has three apples). Now note that both symbols ’2 + 3’ and 5 represent the count of the apples in the left basket after completing the process of moving apples from the right basket to the left basket. This says that the result of adding 3 to 2 is 5. The basket on the right has three apples in it. CLASS 2 WORKSHEETS apples in the basket after we have removed some apples from that basket?” Subtraction answers this question. A pictorial illustration of the process of addition using dots (think of each dot as representing an apple) is as follows: The picture represents two baskets of apples. We may line display the objects in the following form (without showing the boxes). add) the apples from the basket on the right to the basket on the left. and the result of addition along with the resulting notation. we may start with the display of objects in a collection whose count is expressed as a sum of two numbers: Consider the objects of a collection whose count is 2 + 3 and it indicates that the collection is obtained by adding a collection of 3 objects to a collection of 2 objects. The problem of finding the number represented by the symbol ’5 + 3’ is solved by straight counting to get the answer 8. This means that 5 + 3 = 8. Note that the left basket is now empty. We move (i. This shows that the sum ’2 + 3’ number is the same as the number 5 and we write ’2 + 3 = 5’. . The count of the apples in the left basket (after the move) is 5. The basket on the left has two apples (represented by two dots).

2.4. WORKSHEET 4: ADDITION AND SUBTRACTION

27

or they may be displayed in two rows in the form

The first display suggests visualizing addition in the form + which suggests writing addition in the form 2+3=5 The second display suggests visualizing addition in the form =

+ = which suggests writing addition in the form 2 3 5 2 3 5

+ =

or

+

Combining collections of objects and the resulting relationship between the counts has motivated the concept of addition of numbers. The result of adding the two numbers 2 and 3 can be expressed in the form ”2 + 3 = 5” or ”3 + 2 = 5”. Since both sums equal the same number 5, we conclude that the sums are equal, i.e., 3 + 2 = 2 + 3. This conclusion is a property of the operation of addition. It is called the commutative property as it holds for all numbers. It is expressed symbolically by writing m + n = n + m, where m and n stand for any given numbers. Thus without finding the actual count of the combined collection we can say that 5 + 6 = 6 + 5, 123 + 7 = 7 + 123, etc., N otationf orSubtraction: A basket has 5 apples. We remove (subtract) 2 apples from this basket. The symbol 5 − 2 is used and it identifies the count of apples in the basket after removing 2 apples from the basket. The symbol is simply read as ”five minus two” or as ”2 subtracted from 5”. The problem of finding the number represented by the symbol ’5 − 2’ is solved by straight counting to get the answer 3. This means that 5 − 2 = 3.

28

CHAPTER 2. CLASS 2 WORKSHEETS

2.4.1

The concept of an empty collection and its count

When we think of a collection we think of certain objects. Thus ’Almonds in a bag’, ’Chairs in a room’, ’children in a class’, ’Bananas in a bunch’, are all examples of collections. The count of a collection refers to the objects only. The bag, the room, the class, and the bunch in the above examples were containers of those objects that were counted. Indeed, if the same objects were placed in a different container, the count will be the same. Now consider the concept of subtraction and the notation used for it. Subtraction identifies the count of a collection after removal of some objects from a given collection. Thus ’3 − 1’ identifies the count of a collection after one object has been removed from the collection that had three objects before removal. If we had removed all three objects, we clearly can identify the result by the symbol ’3 − 3’. However, now we have an empty container and no number (count) to identify the symbol ’3 − 3’ as a number. To rectify this situation, one introduces the notion of an empty collection: ’An empty collection is a container with no objects in it’. Now note that we have used the numeral ’0’ like an alphabet to write numbers. The un-ending succession of numbers used for counting starts with the number ’1’ but does not contain 0 as a number for counting. We have conceptualized an empty collection as a container without any objects in it. We now assign the numeral ’0’ as a count of an empty collection and from now on we call ’0’ as a number just like the numerals 1, 2, 3, etc are numbers. It allows us to answer questions like ’3 − 3 =?’, ’234 − 234 =?’, etc., by writing ’3 − 3 = 0’, ’234 − 234 = 0’, etc. We will see later the numeral 0 has a deep meaning in the notation that we use for numbers. Each of the ten numerals in a number has a place in that number that will identify a value called the place value. Since the system uses ten numerals we call it as ’Base ten number system’. By conceiving 0 as a number we have extended the succession of the counting numbers to the un-ending succession of numbers displayed below

The extended succession of numbers 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 1 11 21 31 41 51 61 71 81 91 . 2 12 22 32 42 52 62 72 82 92 . 3 13 23 33 43 53 63 73 83 93 . 4 14 24 34 44 54 64 74 84 94 . 5 15 25 35 45 55 65 75 85 95 . 6 16 26 36 46 56 66 76 86 96 . 7 17 27 37 47 57 67 77 87 97 . 8 18 28 38 48 58 68 78 88 98 . 9 19 29 39 49 59 69 79 89 99 .

2.4. WORKSHEET 4: ADDITION AND SUBTRACTION

29

We call this as the succession of whole numbers. Here the successor of the number 0 is the number 1 and 0 + 1 = 1 and 1 + 0 = 1. The table that follows is called the addition table. It identifies all the sums like 3 + 5, 7 + 5, 0 + 0, etc,. To see that ’2 + 5 = 7’, we look at the underlined ’2’ in the left most column, and the underlined ’5’ in the top row. The answer ’7’ appears at the junction of the row containing the underlined ’2’ and the column containing the underlined ’5’. ADDITION TABLE + 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 2 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 3 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 4 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 5 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 6 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 7 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 8 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 9 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

The table contains answers to one hundred sums. Students should establish all these sums by the method of straight counting. They should clearly conceptualize the correctness of sums like ’0 + 0 = 0’, ’2 + 0 = 0 + 2 = 2’ using the concept of an empty collection and its count.

2.4.2

Exercises

Use the method of straight counting to establish the sums using pictorial illustrations. 1. 5 + 7 = ...?, 2 + 2 = ...?, 1 + 0 = ...? 2. Verify the correctness of your answer from the addition table. 3. 5 − 2 = ...?, 9 − 5 = ...?, 7 − 7 = ...?. 4. 67 + 1 = ...?, 100 + 1 = ...?, 769 + 1 = ...?. 5. 786 + 2 = ...?, 788 + 2 = ...?, 788 + 4 = ...?. 6. 2 + 786 = ...?, 2 + 788 = ...?, 4 + 788 = ...?.

four. and continue to straight count by recalling the next two successive numbers four and five that come after three. the child starts with the count two of the coins in one pocket and continue to straight count by recalling the next three successive numbers three. namely. The process of of subtracting a single item from a collection (this means subtracting 1 from a number) whose count is given may be displayed as shown in the two examples below: − 4 ∗ 3 and 4 − 234 ∗ 233 Note that 3 is the predecessor of 4.30 CHAPTER 2. How many coins does the child possess? If the question is put to the child. This points to a universal rule. Subtracting 1 from a number is motivated by removing a single item from a nonempty collection. etc. For example.5. Or alternately. Thus 4 + 1 = 5. The child has indeed mastered the art of straight counting and the process of addition of two numbers using straight counting.5 Worksheet 5: Using Straight Counting to Add or Subtract A child has two coins in one pocket and three in the other pocket. if the count of a collection is 4 and we add a single item to it. namely Subtracting 1 from a non zero number gives its predecessor. 2. and 233 is the predecessor of 234. Straight counting tells us that 4 + 1 = 5. consider removing a single item from a non empty collection. 234 + 1 = 235.1 Adding or Subtracting 1 Adding 1 to a number is motivated by adding a single item to a given collection. and 22 + 1 = 23. This points to the universal rule for subtracting 1 from a non zero number (remember that we can not remeove any item from an empty collection).. then the count after addition is 4 + 1. Adding 1 to a number gives its successor. and pronounce that he has five coins. And if we start with a count of 22 and add one item then the count after addition is 22 + 1. We recognize now that 5 is the successor of 4. Straight counting gives the predecessor in this case. say the count three. The count of the collection after adding a single item is obtained by adding 1 to the count of the collection before the addition. he may start with the count of the coins in one pocket. CLASS 2 WORKSHEETS 2. and five to triumphantly say that he has five coins. The process of adding a single item to a collection (this means adding 1 to a number) whose count is given may be displayed as shown in the two examples below: + 4 ∗ 5 and + 234 * 235 Similarly. and 23 is the successor of 22. .

five’ and states the answer as ’5’. 4. The two steps can be combined to write 3 + 2 = (3 + 1) + 1 = 4 + 1 = 5.2 Adding any number In the example of the child at the beginning. + 2 ∗ 3 ∗ 3 ∗ 4 ∗ 3 ∗ 4 ∗ 5 . Which allows us to conclude that (3 + 1) + 1 = 3 + (1 + 1). 2 + 1 = 3. meaning 2 + 2 = 4. Some examples are 1. 2 + 1 = 3. Since 2 = 1 + 1. The second row continues after the seperating vertical line with the successive numbers 3. 2 + 3 = 5.2. Then adding the second star (that means adding teo stars) the count becomes 4. WORKSHEET 5: USING STRAIGHT COUNTING TO ADD OR SUBTRACT31 2.5. We may illustrate this as + 3 ∗ 4 ∗ 5 The illustration in fact answers the two questions ’3 + 1 =?’ and ’3 + 2 =?’. four. Such illustrations can be used to see the truth of many statements. the child loudly says ’four. Illustration + 2 2. It says that 3 + 1 = 4. and 3 + 2 = 5. Similarly. five’ to conclude 2 + 3 = 5. in answering 2 + 3 =?. we notice that for answering ’3 + 2 =?’. .5. This illustration answers the three questions ’2 + 1 = 3’. Finally adding the third star we get ’2 + 3 = 5’.. Illustration + 2 3. This is illestrated below + 2 ∗ 3 ∗ 4 ∗ 5 In this illustration we are adding three objects represented by three stars in the first row to the two objects whose count 2 is noted as the first number in the second row. Under the first star is the number 3 showing that when we add one object to the given two the count becomes 3. This means that to add 2 we actually add 1 twice. the child loudly says ’three. The steps also indicate that the child adds ’1’ three times to the number ’2’ to get the result 2 + 3 = 5. and 5 that come after 2. He thus pronounces the three successive numbers that come after two to get the answer ’5’.i. and 2 + 3 = 5’ to conclude 2 + 3 = 5. He has thus pronounced the two successive numbers that come after ’3’ to answer the question. 2 + 2 = 4. we can write 3 + 2 = 3 + (1 + 1). ’2 + 2 = 4’.e.

. ? 75 + 6 = ..5. 4 + 75 = 79........... ? 75 + 4 = . 2..... ? 1.. ? 5 + 4 = . Extending the above idea. Adding singles ... we think of adding two items to a collection.32 4. ? (d) 95 + 3 = . CLASS 2 WORKSHEETS ∗ 238 ∗ 239 ∗ 240 5.. This allows us to conclude 5 + 2 = (5 + 1) + 1 = 6 + 1 = 7... They represent adding four object to three. we may illustrate as below to conclude ’4 + 3 = 7’... Note the four stars in the first row.. Illustration + 237 CHAPTER 2...... ? 95 + 5 = ..... ? 95 + 4 = ........ ? 5 + 5 = . For addition we write the succession of Successors of the given number.. 237 + 3 = 240.... Thus to add 2 to any number...3 Addition Exercises: (a) 5 + 3 = . 2 + 3 = 3 + 2.. ? 15 + 5 = . ? (b) 15 + 3 = . The knowledge that adding 1 to any number gives its successor.... ? (c) 75 + 3 = ........ one item at a time... ? 15 + 4 = . we illustrate 75 + 4 = 79.. This is correct as both sums equal the samr number 5 as seen from the two illustrations + 2 ∗ 3 ∗ 4 ∗ 5 and + 3 ∗ 4 ∗ 5 As another example consider finding the sum 4 + 3 =?.. ? 15 + 6 = . Thus to find the sum 5 + 3 we write 5 + 3 = ((5 + 1) + 1) + 1 = (6 + 1) + 1 = 7 + 1 = 8........ + 75 ∗ 76 ∗ 77 ∗ 78 ∗ 79 6. ? 5 + 6 = . ? 75 + 5 = .. Similarly. one item at a time. 230 + 2 = (230 + 1) + 1 = 231 + 1 = 232. can be used to find the sum of any two numbers... adding 3 to a number is obtained by adding three items to a collection.... Since 4 + 75 = 75 + 4 by the commutative property.. + 4 To find the sum 3 + 4 we may display + 3 ∗ 4 ∗ 5 ∗ 6 ∗ 7 ∗ 5 ∗ 6 ∗ 7 and conclude that 3 + 4 = 7.. ? 95 + 6 = .... Thus to find 5 + 2 we write 5 + 2 = (5 + 1) + 1.

Similarly.2. respectively......5.. ? 14 + 80 = . ? (b) 14 + 10 = ............ to answer ’3 − 1 =?’..5.... and 3 − 2 = 1 as the result of removing two objects. for example..... Adding tens (a) 3 + 10 = .. For subtraction we write the succession of predescessors of the given number. just as we can add any number to a given number. Moreover we cannot subtract a number that follows the given number in the succession of numbers... ? 3 + 20 = ......... ? 2. WORKSHEET 5: USING STRAIGHT COUNTING TO ADD OR SUBTRACT33 2...? 8 − 4 = . ? 3 + 30 = ..... and ’34 − 1 =?’...... ? (b) 75 + 39 = . 121 − 124 are meaningless. We will learn later that by extending the number system we can subtract any number from a given number.... ? 14 + 30 = ......... we simply write the predecessor of 3. the second example shows 37 − 1 = 36 and 37 − 2 = 35... ? 3. The answer can be obtained by removing one object at a time until two objects are removed.. This gives the answer 3 − 1 = 2...4 Subtracting any number We have already noted that subtracting the number 1 gives the predecessor.... and 34 − 1 = 33......... which is the result of removing one object from a collection of count 3. This may be displayed in a similar way to that adopted for addition.......? 13−7 = ..? 0 − 0 = .. ? 14 + 17 = .? 2 − 3 = ..?... ? 14 + 20 = ....? 15−6 = .? . (c) 15−4 = .. The illustration below displays the subtraction in the two cases − 3 ∗ 2 ∗ 1 and 37 ∗ 36 ∗ 35 Note that in the first example we have 3 − 1 = 2 ... For example..?? (b) 6 − 0 = . 2.. Substacting single numbers (a) 3 − 1 = . we cannot subtract any number from 0. answering the question ’3−2 =?] or ’37−2 =?’ is conceived as removing two objects from a collection whose count is 3. More Adding (a) 14 + 15 = ....? 7 − 3 = ...... 37.5 Subtraction Exercises. 1. and 34. We must always keep in mind that just as we cannot remove any items from an empty container.....? 17−8 = .. ?19 + 15 = . ? 3 + 70 = ...? 15−5 = . Subtraction conceptualizes the removal of objects from a given collection... The resulting count after removal is the answer.. This means that expressions like 3 − 5.....5... respectively. ? 14 + 16 = ..

’>’. < 9 < 10 < .34 CHAPTER 2. The expression m > n means the same as the expression n < m. Thus 5 > 3. we write ’m > n’ whenever the number m comes after the number n in the succession of numbers. .. In such a write-up the three dots between numbers represent the successive numbers between the number on the left of the dots and the number on the .1 Using the symbols ’=’.. ’equal to’ that we use in our every day language to express a form of comparison of two objects. The order among successive whole numbers is expressed as follows 2... and ’=’ are used in a manner to give meaning to the expressions like ’less than’. So far we have used numbers to express counts. < n < . This means that the number m comes after the number n in the succession of whole numbers.6. ’smaller than’... .. And this is just the right answer.. . The same is conveyed in symbols by writing ’10 > 8’ or by writing ’8 < 10’..... Who has more money? Many of you will answer that Ram has more money. . We read the statement ’m > n’ as ’m is greater than ’n’. All these statements mean only that a count of 10 is greater than a count of 8.. Thus 3 < 5 and 69 < 75. When there is a need to emphasize that letters ’a’ and ’b’ represent different objects we express it by writing ’a = b’.. and 75 > 69.? 2. and ’<’ ’a = b’ simply means that the letters ’a’ and ’b are used for or represent the same object. The intuitive idea of a collection having more objects than another collection is made precise by using these symbols.? 2.. . We simply say that 10 is greater than 8 or that 8 is less than 10.? 16 − 10 = .. It is read as ’n is less than m’.. ..2 The order among Whole Numbers 0 < 1 < 2 < 3 < . (b) 17 − 18 = .6 Worksheet 5: The Order among numbers: Meaning of <. ....?. bigger than’. < m < .. Given two numbers m and n. ’greater than’.? 81 − 7 = . Thus ’2 = 3’ simply asserts that the numbers 2 and 3 are not the same or are different. (a) 16 − 11 = ... You could also say that Ram has more than Shyam or that Shyam has less than Ram. since the numbers 2 and 3 are not the same we cannot write 2 = 3.? 25 − 6 = .. In particular.. . CLASS 2 WORKSHEETS (d) 25 − 4 = . 2.6. Subtracting any number. ’>’. >. Thus ’a = 3’ simply says that the letter ’a’ stands for the number ’3’.... Ram has 10 rupees and Shyam has 8. = The symbols ’<’..

... 1.. The box on the left contain the bags containing ten almonds each that you have made and the one on the right contains any left over unbaged loose almonds. 2 in ascending order! Answer: . 9.. Answer: 2.. Arrange the numbers 0. 15.3 Exercises 1. 1 in ascending order! Answer: .5. 3. . Thus the first occuring three dots stand for ˙ < 7 <8 4 < 5 <6 The next occurring three dots stand for all the successive numbers that come after 10 but that are before the number m. 5....2.... 4.. Note that 2 < 7 < 9.....3 2. each containing tem almonds. After bagging you may be left with some loose almonds... Question: What do the three dots between the number m and the number n signify? Question: What do the three dots after the number n signify? 2.. and the number 3 in the box on the right indicates that the right box contains three loose unbaged almonds. 45... but their number will not be more than nine (Why?).... 25.... Indicate the order among the pairs of numbers 0... 4. In the picture below.. Arrange the numbers 35. 8. 9........ 6. WORKSHEET 6: COUNTING IN GROUPS AND THE PLACE VALUE NOTATION35 right of the dots.7.. .... 25... 9.. 2 in ascending order! Answer: 2.... So you start making bags of almonds......7 Worksheet 6: Counting in Groups and The Place Value Notation Imagine that you have a box full of almonds and you want to sell them. Note that 9 > 8 > 3.. 3. For selling the almonds you display them in two boxes. . 55 in descending order. Arrange the numbers 12. 5.. 7.303 303.23 3.. You will make a profit if you make bags where each bag contains ten almonds and you sell each bag of almonds for rupees five...6. the number 1 in the left box indicates that the left box contains one bag of almonds (remember that each bag has ten almonds in it). .32 32. 3..7 23. . . 10. 3 in descending order! Answer: 9... each bag containing ten almonds.. Arrange the numbers 8.... You have made as many bags as possible. Arrange the numbers 7.

....... = ... + ... + .. How many almonds in the left box? Answer: .. How many almonds in the left box? Answer: . 2 7 . How many almonds in the right box? Answer: 3 almonds..... 2 0 4.. ... . . almonds..... Question: How many bags of almonds are in the left box? Answer: ......... How many in both boxes? Answer: ....... How many almonds in the right box? Answer: .. bags = .. How many almonds in both boxes? Answer: . = .. How many almonds in the left box? Answer: .. Question: How many bags of almonds are in the left box? Answer: .. How many in both boxes? Answer: ... Question: How many bags of almonds are in the left box? Answer: . bag.7.. bags = ... almonds. How many in both boxes? Answer: .....36 CHAPTER 2..1 Exercises: Answer the following questions by looking at the displaysthat follow the question: 1.. bag.. almonds. Question: How many bags of almonds are in the left box? Answer: ......... 1 0 2.......... How many almonds in the right box? Answer: . almonds.. almonds.. bag.. bags = . bags = .. 1 4 3. How many almonds in the left box? Answer: . .. almonds. How many almonds in the right box? Answer: ... 2. = ...... bag. How many almonds in both boxes? Answer: 10 + 3 = 13 almonds.. How many almonds in the left box? Answer: 1 bag = 10 almonds... + ... How many almonds in the right box? Answer: ..... almonds.... CLASS 2 WORKSHEETS 1 3 Question: How many bags of almonds are in the left box? Answer: 1 bag.... almonds.. + .. = ..

.... almonds.. This means that the first numeral 2 on the right of 32 stands for the number 2 or two singles..... and the result of adding singles is the number 7. + .... and the next numeral 3 stands for the number 30 or three tens. since 2 + 5 = 7. bag. since each bag contains 10 almonds. Thus in working with numbers.. the value or number it stands for. = ..7.... While doing addition and subtraction we can add singles to singles and tens to tens to get the result. How many in both boxes? Answer: ..3 Adding two digit numbers using place value Adding means combining two collections to get a single collection.. In this way each numeral in a number has a place value...2. we must keep this property of numbers in mind.7. Question: How many bags of almonds are in the left box? Answer: .7. bags = .. Consider adding the two collection 3 2 and 2 5 We may exhibit the addition and the answer in the form 3 2 + 2 5 = 5 7 Where the result of adding tens is the number 5.. How many almonds in the right box? Answer: . WORKSHEET 6: COUNTING IN GROUPS AND THE PLACE VALUE NOTATION37 5.. This is done on examples below: 2. since 3 + 2 = 5. Another common form to express addition is . How many almonds in the left box? Answer: ....2 Place value for two digit numbers We saw in the examples and exercises that a two digit number like 32 expresses the count of almonds in 3 bags of almonds together with 2 loose unbaged almonds which was expressed in the form 3 2 This shows that the number 32 is the sum 30 + 2. 3 2 2. Keeping in mind the place values we write this in the form 32 + 25 = 57. almonds.

namely 3 + 2 = 5. 6 7 − 2 5 = 4 2 This result is written as 67 − 25 = 42. ? B.... and the numbers in the tens place are added to get the number of tens.. 89 10 ... + + + + 2. Observe that in adding we use place values until the operation is complete. So consider removing 25 objects from a collection that has 67 objects. 52 07 . The result is exhibited in the bottom line.7.... 13 23 .4 Addition Exercises Use place values of numerals in a number to find the following sums: A. This is an advantage over straight counting (Why is it an advantage?). 12 + 17 = .7... Or one may use the form 67 25 42 - The result is obtained by subtracting the numeral in singles place from the numeral in singles place and subtracting the numeral in tens place from the numeral in tens place.. 17 31 . And we only need to add one digit numbers no matter how large the numbers may be.. ... CLASS 2 WORKSHEETS 3 2 5 2 5 7 + Here the numbers in the singles place are added to get the sum of singles.. Remember that the count 25 consists of 2 tens and 5 singles. ? 79 + 20 = ... namely 2+5 = 7.5 Subtraction using place value Subtraction means removing objects from a collection.. 54 + 45 = .. The process of removing can be depicted in the form where we remove 2 bags from the tens box and 5 singles from the singles box to get the result..... ?.. 2..38 CHAPTER 2...

7. For example in counting almonds it will mean that we have ten or more bags each containing ten almonds.. In this case we again bag ten bags of almonds in a bigbag.....2. 47 31 .. the next numeral 4 represents four tens or a count of 40. 2.. Thus we see that in the number 345.... 53 − 31 = .. 23 23 .. and the next box to its left contains 3 bigbags of almonds each containing ten bags each containing 10 almonds or 100 almonds altogether.. Let us say the counting stops with 3 bigbags. So the total count of almonds is 300 + 40 + 5 = 345 almonds.. the numeral 5 on the right represents the number 5 (5 singles).7 Place values in three digit numbers While counting a large collection in groups of tens.. B. . The next box contains 4 bags of almonds each containing 10 almonds. The following example illustrates this 3 4 5 + 4 3 1 = 7 7 6 The addition and result is exhibited in one of the following two forms: A.. exercises 25 − 12 = .. the number of tens may be ten or more. and hundreds to hundreds to get the count of the combined collection.. tens to tens........ Combining two collections into a single collection can be done by adding singles to single.7... so that a bigbag will contain 100 almonds. and 5 loose almonds... We may depict the result in three boxes as follows: Display of 345 almonds 3 4 5 Here the box on the right contains 5 loose unbaged almonds. See that We have indeed 300 + 40 + 5 = 345. 79 − 22 = .. 345 + 431 = 776 B..7. Each bigbag will contain ten small bags... 55 − 15 = . 59 07 . 89 10 . WORKSHEET 6: COUNTING IN GROUPS AND THE PLACE VALUE NOTATION39 2.6 A.. 12 − 2 = .... 4 small bags. and the next numeral 3 to its left represents three hundreds or a count of 300..

. 567 − 2 = .?.?.7.. 7 1 . say..........?... 2....7.. CLASS 2 WORKSHEETS 3 4 7 4 3 7 5 1 6 + Similarly.. 7 0 .. 5 4 .. .. 9 0 .. 6 + 4 + 5. 3 2 ....... 2 2 .. If the counts of apples in the three baskets are.?. Question: How do we exhibit the process and find the count of apples in the box... tens from tens and hundreds from hundreds... 9 3 .8 A.9 Adding more than two numbers Consider that you have three baskets of apples and you transfer the the apples in the baskets in to a box... subtraction can be carried out by subtracting singles from singles. + 3 5 . 5 + .. 758 − 425 = .. and 6.. then we may express the count of apples in the box by any of the six symbols 4 + 5 + 6.. B. 8 0 . 5 + 6 + 4...... 5 + 4 + 6... 5. 708 + 191 = ....... + 2 3 .. 745 − 431 = 314 B... 5 5 . 5 .. 2 7 ........ 2 0 .... 323 − 122 = .. 0 9 .... 7 1 ... D. 4 + 6 + 5. ! 3 . 3 2 ..?.. 8 0 .. 5 4 .... 4.?.. 320 + 129 = ... 320 − 120 = . 6 + 5 + 4.?... 7 4 3 4 3 1 5 1 4 2... 1 5 ... As an example consider 7 4 5 − 4 3 1 = 3 1 4 The subtraction and result is exhibited in one of the following two forms: A. 567 + 2 = .?. 1 0 .. + C.40 CHAPTER 2. Exercises 123 + 321 = . 6 5 .

The calculation can be made by any of the two ways of calculation that were used above to calculate the sum ’4+5+6’. Both calculations tell us that the count of apples in the box is the number 15. This is as expected. Note that this gives meaning to the symbol ’4 + 5 + 6’. namely. So we calculate 4 + 5 + 6 = 4 + (5 + 6) = 4 + 11 = 15. The method also tells us how to calculate sums containing more than three numbers. + . we must carry out the addition. The method certainly works because we add only two numbers at a time throughout the process. Indeed as we expect. however. For any three numbers m.7. Since we only have learned to add two numbers at a time.2. But we want to be sure of that. n. This is an important property of addition and we call it the Associative Property of Addition. The brackets in form (4 + 5) + 6 tell us to add first the first two numbers 4 and 5. The first was the Commutative Property of addition of any two numbers m and n. m+n=n+m The commutative together with the associative property of addition ensure that all the six symbolic expressions at the beginning of this section represent the same number. For example to calculate the number expressed by the symbol ’4 + 5 + 6 + 7’ we do the calculation as follows 4 + 5 + 6 + 7 = ((4 + 5) + 6) + 7 = (9 + 6) + 7 = 15 + 7 = 22. we would like to use this knowledge to carry out the addition of three numbers. and then to add the third number 6 to the sum of the first two. We could also carry out the calculation by first adding the last two numbers. First. say the sum 4 + 5 + 6 in the form (4 + 5) + 6. So we write. The important observation is that each of two expressions ’(4 + 5) + 6’ and ’4 + (5 + 6)’ allows us to calculate the required count and they both give us the same number. . WORKSHEET 6: COUNTING IN GROUPS AND THE PLACE VALUE NOTATION41 We expect each of these symbols to represent the same count. p it is stated in the form (m + n) + p = m + (n + p) The associative ptroperty of addition is the second important property of addition. In this fashion we calculate 4 + 5 + 6 = (4 + 5) + 6 = 9 + 6 = 15.

+ ...... Now you have baged the almonds you had in bags containung ten almonds and bigbags contain one hundred almonds and you also have some loose unbaged almods. (e) 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 = ((1 + 2) + 3) + 4 = (.... + . + ..+3 = . + 7 = ..)+3 = .....42 CHAPTER 2... + .. the display of almonds will change... Since thre are ten bags of almonds in each bigbag and each bag sells for five rupees.. each bag of almonds for rupees five..........) + ... We made bags each containing ten almonds.) + . = .. = ..... the price of the bigbag will be 5 + 5 + 5 + 5 + 5 + 5 + 5 + 5 + 5 + 5..... + ....... + 3) + 4 = .. You can certainly find the answer be straight counting.. and you decide to sell each loose almond for rupee one........ (d) 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 = (1 + 2) + (3 + 4) = ........ = .... So let us start selling....... 12 + 21 + 33 = (.. (g) 4 + 4 + 4 + 4 + 4 + 4 = ((4 + 4) + (4 + 4)) + (4 + 4) = (8 + ... (c) 7 + 6 + 5 = (7 + 6) + 5 = .... (b) 5 + 6 + 7 = 5 + (6 + 7) = 5 + . 2.... So with each customer we shall see how much money we get and the display for the next customer..+.. 2..7. (f) 3+3+3+3+3 = ((3+3)+(3+3))+3 = (...8 Worksheet 7: Selling Almonds In this section we learned to count in groups of ten. + .. Find the indicated sums (a) 5 + 6 + 7 = (5 + 6) + 7 = .. ... = ......... + 5 = .... You now display them to sell and your display is Display of almonds 3 4 5 Money in box 0 rupees Think that after you sell some almonds to a customer. = .. = .............. CLASS 2 WORKSHEETS 2..... An easier way is to group the sum (since we only add two numbers at a time) and see that the sum is (5 + 5) + (5 + 5) + (5 + 5) + (5 + 5) + (5 + 5) = 10 + 10 + 10 + 10 + 10 = 50 This calculation says that we must sell each bigbag for rupees fifty. 10 + 11 + 12 + 13 = (... Let us fix the price for each bigbag containing one hundred almonds.) = ............... 3.... = . You will sell each bigbag of almonds for rupees fifty......) + (..... and bgbags each containing one hundred almonds.10 Exercises 1..... We wanted to make a profit by selling each bag of ten almonds for rupees five... + ....... + 4 = ....

You pick three almonds from the loose almonds box and you hand them to the customer and ask for rupees three (each loose almond sells for rupee one). If you sold all your almonds to the first customer that comes. The customer pays you fifteen rupees. You put the money in your money box. So you actually take one bigbig bag from the bigbig bags box (it contains ten bags) and you give the customer three bags out of it and put the remaining seven bags in the bags box. 3. and 5 for loose almonds for a total of 150 + 20 + 5 = 175 rupees. The third customer: Can I have three bags of almonds please? You: Certainly. The customer pays you ten rupees.2. The first customer: Can I have three almonds please? You: Certainly.8. 2. You put the money in your money box. WORKSHEET 7: SELLING ALMONDS 43 1. The display of almonds and the money in your money box after the third customer is Display of almonds 2 9 2 Money in box 28 rupees . You think since you do not have three bags in the bags box. then you will get 150 for the bigbig bags. 20 for the bags. The customer pays you three rupees. The second customer: Can I have two bags of almonds please? You: Certainly. 4. You pick two bags of almonds from the box containing bags and you hand them to the customer and ask for rupees ten (each bag of almond sells for five rupee ). Now you ask the customer for fifteen rupees (the price of three bags). The display of almonds and the money in your money box after the second customer is Display of almonds 3 2 2 Money in box 13 rupees Justify The change in the display after the second customer! Now you attend the next customer. The actual process of sales goes as follows. You put the money in your money box. The display of almonds and the money in your money box after the first customer is Display of almonds 3 4 2 Money in box 3 rupees Justify The change in the display after the first customer! Now you attend the next customer. This is your expected sale proceeds.

The customer gives you the money and you put it in the money box to be ready for the next customer. 6. The customer gives you the money and you put it in the money box to be ready for the next customer. The display of almonds and the money in your money box after the fifth customer is Display of almonds 1 7 6 Money in box 89 rupees Justify The change in the display after the fifth customer! Now you attend the next customer. The fifth customer: Can I have one bigbag bag of almonds and three almonds for my three kids lease? You: Certainly. So you take one bag from the bags box (it contains ten almonds) and you give the customer three almonds for the kids and put the remaining loose almonds in the loose almonds box. You give the customer three loose almonds for the kids first and then a bigbig bag and ask for fifty three rupees. Then you take another bag from the bags box to give the customer a bag that he asked. 5. The sixth customer: Can I have one bigbag bag of almonds and three almonds for my three kids please? You: Certainly. You give the customer three loose almonds for the kids first and then a bigbig bag and ask for fifty three rupees. Now you ask the customer for eight rupees (the price of one bag and three loose almonds). The display of almonds and the money in your money box after the sixth customer is Display of almonds 0 7 3 Money in box 142 rupees . You thank the customer and put the money in your money box. The fourth customer: Can I have one bag of almonds and three almonds for my three kids lease? You: Certainly. 7. The customer pays you eight rupees.44 CHAPTER 2. You think since you do not have three loose almonds in the loose almonds box. The display of almonds and the money in your money box after the fourth customer is Display of almonds 2 7 9 Money in box 36 rupees Justify The change in the display after the fourth customer! Now you attend the next customer. CLASS 2 WORKSHEETS Justify The change in the display after the third customer! Now you attend the next customer.

I do not have them anymore..... for now. Let us say that each box of apples contains. rupees.. The seventh customer: Can I have one bigbag bag of almonds please? You: Sorry.. say 75 apples.... WORKSHEET 8: MULTIPLICATION AND DIVISION 45 Justify The change in the display after the sixth customer! Now you attend the next customer.. 75 + 75 + 75.. A fruit seller buys 3 boxes of apples from the wholesale market... Try finding the above .... .9.9 Worksheet 8: Multiplication and Division Addition and subtraction provide the basis for the two operations that are called multiplication and division..K. A warehouse may have up to a thousand boxes of apples.... 5 + 5 + 5 + 5. Division: It conceptualizes the process of repeated subtraction. but can I have some almonds? You: Certainly. . where the three dots are used to indicate that the number 75 is erpeated 237 times in the eum 75 + 75 + · · · + 75 We have learned to add more than two numbers.. Examples of repeated addition are 3 + 3 + 3.. 237 boxes of apples . but I will get more tomorrow... How many apples are there in all the boxes in the warehouse? Answer:75+75+· · ·+75. Money in box 180 rupees How much money you have in your money box? Answer:. Why is your actual money more than your expected money. The customer gives you the price and you put it in the money box.... I can sell you all that I have.. So you hand himm the seven bags and three loose almonds and ask for ... Customer: O..K... Customer: Well that will be O.. Consider the two processes on examples: The Process of Multiplication and its notation: Boxes of apples are stored in warehouses before they are brought to the market for sale to the fruit sellers... Justify the difference! 2. 8. How much money would you have if you had sold all your almonds to the first customer? Answer:.. Multiplication: It conceptualizes the process of repeated addition. Fill in the The display of almonds and the money in your money box after the seventh customer! Justify the numbers you fill! Display of almonds . but the calculation takes time when the sum contains many many numbers to add...2. say... Question: How many apples did the fruit seller buy? Answer: 75+75+75. . . The warehouse has.

. Calculate 3 × 9. + .1 Visualizing Multiplication and its Properties: We start with the display of objects in a collection whose count is expressed in the form of a product: For example the number 3 × 4 stands for the repeated sum 4 + 4 + 4 .... We note that 35 − 5 × 6 = 3... 4. Since 5 × 6 = 6 + 6 + 6 + 6 + 6. The visualization with line displays were helpful in straight counting (for finding the count of a collection) and for comprehending the process and the fundamental properties of addition and subtraction. Answer: 3 × 9 = (9 + 9) + 9 = 18 + 9 = 27. We repeatedly remove (take out) 6 apples from the basket.. Question: ”How many times the process was repeated and what is the count of apples left after the process stops? Division answers this question. Repeated sums when written in multiplication notation are called products. 75 + 75 + · · · + 75 = 237 × 75. Exercises: Write the numbers expressed in the multiplication notation as sums: 1. to calculate such sums. Using multiplication notation the sum 75 + 75 + 75 is written as 3 × 75 which reads ’three times seventy five’.... Find the product 6 × 11.46 CHAPTER 2. i.9. The two symbolic expressions stand for the same number. we note that we must take out 6 apples from the basket five times when the process stops to leave three apples. CLASS 2 WORKSHEETS noted sum. For example. + . at which time we cannot remove 6 apples and the process stops. apples. namely. The Process of Division and its Notation: A basket contains. 3 × 9 = . The answer is written in the form 35 = 5 × 6 + 3 or in the 3 form 35 6 = 5 + 6..e. The expression is read ’237 times 75’ and means that the number 75 is to be added 237 times.. Simply stated ’3 × 75 = 75 + 75 + 75’. So we need to find quicker ways to find the number represented by the sum. 6 × 11 = − − − − + − − − − + − − − − + − − − − + . 3... Then we learned that group counting in groups of 10 is helpful in understanding the notation used for numbers and provides a different method for addition and subtraction (that uses place value) than straight counting. say 35. 2. visualizing the operation of addition using collections allowed us to see the two fundamental properties of addition. the commutative property and the associative property of addition. The objects in a collection whose count is 3 × 4 may be displayed as below * * * * * * * * * * * * . + . Similarly.. The next section introduces rectangular displays of objects in a collections which are helpful in understanding the notation and properties of multiplication. The notion of multiplication helps here. 2. until the basket is left with less than 6 apples.

7 × 9. The second display has one column of 10 objects and a column of 2 objects for a count of 12.2 Exercises 1. where the objects in each of the three rows are displayed in three columns * * * * * * * * * * * * This tells us that the count of objects is the same in each display. Actual counting of objects in any of the displays shows that the count of objects in each display is 12.Thus actual counting confirms the same. 1 × 9. 0×9 . Use any means to calculate: 9 × 9.9. 8 × 9. We conclude form this that 3 × 4 = 4 × 3 a property of multiplication called the commutative property. WORKSHEET 8: MULTIPLICATION AND DIVISION 47 The same objects can also be displayed in the another form as below. 3 × 9. 5 × 9. This provides a good visual means for finding the number 3 × 4 or 4 × 3.2. For example. Such rearrangement of objects in a display can be used to calculate the number represented by a product of two numbers. 4 × 9. 2 × 9. 6 × 9. 2. Visual means can also be used to find the counts. we may rearrange the objects in any of these displays in the form * * or the form * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * The first display has one row of 10 objects and a row of 2 objects to give a count of 12.9.

This may be visualized as follows: Start with a line display of 9 objects. Imagine that you have a bag of almonds. 2. Somebody may ask: ’How many times you took out two almonds from the bag. MULTIPLICATION TABLE × 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 2 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 3 0 3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 4 0 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 6 0 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 7 0 7 14 21 28 35 42 49 56 63 8 0 8 16 24 32 40 48 56 64 72 9 0 9 18 27 36 45 54 63 72 81 Use any means to verify entries in the multiplication table given above.. as for example * * * * * * * * * . 0 × 0. 7 × 5. The process of taking out and giving two almonds will stop when you are left with less than two almonds in the bag. means finding the maximum number of times you can subtract 2 from 9 and to know what number is lefyt after subtraction process is complete. Question: Why will the process stop? Answer: Becuse you can not take out two almonds now(the bag is left with less than two almonds).48 CHAPTER 2. It identifies all the products like 3 × 5. and how many almonds were left in the bag?’ You can answer this question if you were counting the number of field workers who got two almonds each.3 Visualizing Division and its Notation Division is repeated subtraction. we look at the underlined ’2’ in the left most column. say 9 by 2. If the count of almonds in the bag is known you may repeatedly subtract the number 2 from the count of almonds in the bag until the result of repeated subtraction is 0 oe 1(the two numbers less than 2). The table that follows is called the multiplication table. You can continue to take out and give two almonds to a field worker as long as there are two or more almonds left in the bag.9. etc. That is when the process stops. To see that ’2 × 5 = 12’. You repeatedly take out two almonds at a time (perhaps to distribute to people working in the fields). Dividing. The answer ’10’ appears at the junction of the row containing the underlined ’2’ and the column containing the underlined ’5’. and the underlined ’5’ in the top row. CLASS 2 WORKSHEETS 2.

The repeated subtraction can be shown as 2 9 2 7 2 5 2 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 4 Step 1 2 3 4 The right column shows the number of times the number 2 has been subtracted in the marked step. The 1 at the bottom of the second column is the remainder after the fourth step.2. This can be done by putting a vertical bar after every two successir eobjrcts.9. The result may be written in one of two forms A. The 4 at the bottom of the third column is the sum of the entries in the third column. Each entry showing the number of times 2 was subtracted. This can help reduce the number of steps in which the final result is obtained. At each step we may subtract 2 any number of times as long as subtracation can be carried over. For example. 9 = 4 × 2 + 1. starting from the right or left as shown below * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Each display shows that you can subtract 2 from 9 four times and will be left with one object. WORKSHEET 8: MULTIPLICATION AND DIVISION 49 Now form groups of 2 objects each. the result may be obtained in two steps as shown below 2 9 4 5 4 1 2 2 4 Step 1 2 or even in one step as shown below 2 9 8 1 4 4 Step 1 . 2 =4+ 1 2 C. 9 − 4 × 2 = 1 D. 9 ÷ 2 = 4 with remainder 1 9 B.

. i. 7 25 21 4 3 3 Step 1 The calculation shows that 25 ÷ 7 = 3 with remainder 4. Is 51 ÷ 1 = 51 true? Explain your answer. Verify that 17 × 3 = 51. 4.. where 12 is divided by one of its factors. 18 ÷ 3.?. Whenever a number can be written as a product of two numbers. 19 ÷ 3. 51 ÷ 17 = 3.? .9. In such cases we symply express the result of division without specifying the remainder.. Verify that 36 = 6×6 = 4×9 = 2×18 = 1×36.4 Exercises 1. Note that the remainder is 0 in 12 ÷ 3. as well as in 12 ÷ 4. 3. 21 ÷ 3 10 ÷ 3. 36 9 = . 3 or 4. 12 = 3 × 4..9.e. the divisor is a factor of the given number.9.. In fact this is always the case in any division by a factor. 2. 4 2. 36 ÷ 18 = ..... It calculates 25 ÷ 7. i. Which numbers among 2. It is sometimes 0. It is therefore customary to say that a number is divisible by another number. 10 ÷ 5 3.6 Exercises 1.. whenever the remainder in division is the number 0.. 15 are factors of the number 15... 1. Thus since.. In fact.?. Then answer: 36÷6 = .?. the numbers in the product are called factors of the given number.5 Products and Factors The process of division.. Then answer the questions .. repeated subtraction shows that for any division problem the remainder is always less than the number with which we divide. 2. What is 12 ÷ 3 = .?.. 2... One can easily see from the definition of a product that division by a factor has remainder 0. 5. the numbers 3 and 4 are factors of the number 12. Calculate 10 ÷ 2.e.. Explain why? 2.. 15 3 = .. Explain why the expression 3 ÷ 0 has no meaning. for example.. Find 17 ÷ 3....? 4. We also write 12 3 = 4 and 12 = 3... and 12 ÷ 4 = 3. 10 ÷ 4.?..50 CHAPTER 2. What is 12 ÷ 4 = . or equivalently. Thus we write 12 ÷ 3 = 4. 12 = 3 × 4... CLASS 2 WORKSHEETS The next example shows the division of 25 by 7. 20 ÷ 3...

Measuring is done using a scale. etc. The Number Line: Shown below are a six inch ruler and a ten centimeter ruler. the first one centemeter segment in the centemeter ruler is between the points marked 0 and 1. etc. In the inch ruler the first one inch segment is shown divided into eight equal parts. which tell us how much space is taken by a liquid like water. WORKSHEET 10. The line marked with the successive numbers 0. . Then there are liquid measures. The length of this first one inch segment is one inch. the other major activity that helps explore the world around us is that of measuring. 2. Similarly. .10 Worksheet 10. 4. A 6 inch ruler 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 A 10 centimeter ruler 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Note that the first one inch segment in the inch ruler is between the points marked with the numbers 0 and 1. appears as follows and we call it a number line: The Number Line 0 1 2 3 . milk. The scheme of chosing a point and marking (or labeling) it with a number yields a unique point for each number and is described later. We measure lengths or distances using a measuring tape. Its length is one centemeter. . To measure heaviness of an object we use weights. 4. Then one choses other points on the line and marks them with the successive numbers 2. 3. 2. . . Measurements Besides counting. For this one starts with a line and choses two points marked with the numbers 0 and 1. MEASUREMENTS 51 2. Inches and centimeters are only two of the commonly used units of measure.10. 1. One may indeed designate any length as a unit length and make a scale or ruler that uses the chosen length as a unit of measure.10. The common feature of all types of measures is that they are stated by assigning a number and a unit of measure. 3.1 The measuring scale or Ruler..2. There are measures of areas and volumes. 5. In the centemeter ruler the first one centemeter segment is shown divided unto ten equal parts and the remaining one centemeter segments are shown divided into two equal parts. . The segment between 0 and 1 is assigned the measure 1 unit and is called the chosen unit segment.

. that is has length one unit. . The remaining points 3. Thus the segment has length of 3 centimeters as seen from the picture below: Measuring with a 10 centimeter ruler P 0 1 2 Q 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 2. We also write |AC | = |AB | − |CB |. the symbol |AB | is used to express the length of the segment AB and we also write |AB | = |AC | + |CB |.52 CHAPTER 2. are chosen. Thus the length of the segment P Q. and we write AB = AC + BC .2 Principles of measurements of lengths 1. CLASS 2 WORKSHEETS The choice of points marked 0 and 1 is arbitrary. . . 4. The segment between the points 0 and 1 is called the chosen unit segment. This segment is the chosen unit of maeasure (like the inch or the centemeter). and the segment between 1 and 2 equals (has legth equal to) the segment between 0 and 1. This reading gives length of the segment as a number of the units (inches or centimeters). the segment AB is called the sum of the segments AC and BC . After this choice the point marked 2 is chosen so that 1 is between 2 and 0. To measure a segment P Q as shown below P Q one alligns the end point P with 0 on the ruler and reads the mark on the ruler with which Q gets alligned. and we write AC = AB − CB . and the seqment between the point and its predesessor equals the segment between 0 and 1. 2. the segment AC is seen as being obtained by removing (subtracting) the segment CB from the segment |AB . . Addition and Subtraction of segments. as measured earlier is written |P Q| = 3 cm. to ensure that each is brtween its successor and predecessor. thereafter. Moreover. ADDITION: Consider the picture of a segment AB and a point C between A and B as shown below: A C B Here.10. SUBTRACTION: In the same picture as above. 5.

. (d) |RQ| + |P R| = . |RQ| = . Now measure it in inches.... = . + ......... Measure the lengths of the segments P Q. (a) |P Q| = .2. Answer:. P R Q Answer the following questions.. RQ in the picture below in centimeters....cms.. WORKSHEET 11.. cms... P R. cms. What is the length of the segment P Q in the picture in section 2. + .. AREA MEASURE 53 2. = . |P R| = ... 3...... ..... Answer: .. For this the accepted unit area is the area of a square whose sides are all of one unit length like the one below with side length equal to 1 cm: 1 cm2 area 2... (e) |P Q| − |RQ| = ..... 2.. (c) |P Q| − |RQ| = ... Measeure (find length of) the segment AB below in centimeters. Area Measure To measure an area we first establish a unit area. 2. .... A B 5. − .......cms.3 Exercises: 1. . = . .11 Worksheet 11...2. = .10...cms. ..... How many one inch segments are there in a six inch ruler? Answer:.....11... 4....1 Examples and Exercises First consider the example of a rectangle with adjecent sides of length 2 cm and 3 cm as shown below: .cms.. How many one centemeter segments are there in a ten centemeter ruler? Answer:.... (b) |P R| + |RQ| = ..11. − .10.

.. Area of square B = 9 . divide into unit squares and find their areas. This is shown below: Rectangle divided into six unit squares 2 1 0 1 2 3 By counting the number of unit squares into which the rectangle is divided we see that the area of this rextangle is 6 square centimeters which is written as 6 cm2 . divide into unit squares and find their areas. A B C Answer: Area of square A = 4 cm2 . . Area of square C = ..54 CHAPTER 2. 2. cm2 . Measure the sides of the three rectangles. 1.. . CLASS 2 WORKSHEETS Rectangle with sides 2 cm and 3 cm This rectangle can be divided into 6 unit squares (the unit being the centimeter square)... Measure the sides of the three squares below in centimeters..

More generally.. A B C Answer: Area enclosed by curve A = 6 cm2 . Cut a one meter length of string in two pieces.... can be used to represent the length of each piece. .. in fact anything measurable. arise in practice. whether of length.. ... Consider some examples.. 1.. FRACTIONS AND FRACTIONAL MEASURES 55 A B C Answer: Area of rectangle A = . .. or power.... . divide into unit squares and find the enclosed areas. or volume.. or energy. Area enclosed by curve B = .. 2.. Area within curve C = ... . or area. This is the case with all types of measures. What is the length of each of the pieces? You can see intuitively that none of the numbers 1.. . .... . or weight. 3. . Measure the sides of each of the simple closed curves.. We consider some cases to learn how fractional measures..12 Worksheet 12.. . 2..... ... Fractions and fractional measures In measuring parts of a whole we frequently use numbers that are called FRACTIONS. . . Area of rectangle C = ... WORKSHEET 12. 3. .. and numbers that are called fractions.2. Area of rectangle B = .12.

. . consider dividing a unit square into four equal parts. . 3. 3. The next five pictures below show a unit segment (end points 0 and 1) divided into two.2). 2 3 3 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 6 6 6 6 6 are fractions which identify the dividing points on each segment. . This is done in the three pictures below: 1 6 1 5 2 6 1 4 2 5 3 6 1 3 2 4 3 5 4 6 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 6 1 1 1 1 1 OBSERVE: The black area in each square is 1 4 unit squares. . . . . . We may indeed divide a given segment into any number of equal parts. . three.10. and six equal parts. five. we have |AB | = |AC | + |CB | and |AC | = |AB | − |CB | (see 2. . then none of the numbers 1. can be used to represent the lengths |AC | and |CB |. 4. respectively. . 2. . |AB | = 1 unit. Any point C on this segment divides the segment AB in to two segments AC and CB as shown below: A C B Here indeed by the accepted rules for addition of lengths. . . where m and n represent counting numbers of our choice is called a fraction. CLASS 2 WORKSHEETS 2. To see how fractions are used to indicate parts of areas. In general any number written in the form m n . Consider any segment and label its end points as A and B . . . four. 0 0 0 0 0 Here the numbers 1 1 2 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 5 . In other words we need new numbers to represent such lengths. So that if for example.56 CHAPTER 2.

When the unit segment between 0 and 1 is divided into two equal parts. an area into two equal areas. a weight 1 (one half) of the into two equal weights.. on a given curve or line or surface. The idea of a point is represented by a dot. Each of these four equal triangles has area 1 4 unit squares. These are not defined (in spite of many books containing their so called definitions).1 POINTS: On a clear night the stars on the background of the sky are perceived as so many shiny dots. Thus curves. Points are represented by dots and named using capital letters. 2.e. Each of 1 unit squares. Indeed points cannot be seen (though we tend to forget this). and space. surfaces. GEOMETRY 57 Here the unit square on the left is divided into four equal squares. 2. i. lines. Points represent location in space. planes.2.13. we simply say that each part is 2 original. a legth into two equal lengths. The unit square on the right these four squares has area 4 is divided into four equal triangles. For example we have named below four points represented by four dots using letters A. These are intuitively understood from physical obsvations. Some observations that help in the intuitive understanding are given below. and space are collections of points. 2 2 2.. etc.1 How are fractions used to represent parts of a whole Whenever we divide something into two equal parts. curves. C . They are thus abstractions of the perception left in our brain from certain physical examples or observations.13. lines.12. In the map of a country the location of cities is indicated by dots on the map.13 Geometry The basic items in geometry are points. the dividing point marked by the fraction 1 2 is such that the segment between 0 and 1 1 equals the segment between and 1. planes. a volume into two equal volumes. D next to the dots: C D A B . surfaces. B .

ceiling and walls. No physical representation gives any reasonable idea of space. The use of the word ‘most’ suggests that there may be exceptional points on a curve.13. An end point of a curve is a point such that one can only move to the point or from the .3 SPACE: We think of space as a collection of all points.58 CHAPTER 2. a rubber band. One must keep in mind that any physical object can only represent a part of a geometric plane. Thus the drawing or sketch obtained by moving a pen (or pencil) on a piece of paper provides a representation of a physical curve. Each particle of air in the room representing a point in space. though we think of space as the interior of the room we may be in. The room is indeed limited by floor. A simple type of exceptional point is an end point.4 Curves and Paths A piece of string. whereas space has no such limitation. a path in a jungle. running track in a school playground. or any smooth flat surface like the floor or the wall of a room. the chalk board. An air plane moving through space moves on a curve in space. because planes extend indefinitely. a path around a lake. 2. a river as seen from the window of a high flying airplane. The following are examples of curves: Curves have the inportant property that while moving along the curve one can move through most points on the curve in one direction or its opposite direction. the top of a table. CLASS 2 WORKSHEETS 2.13. Table top and geometric plane 2. all suggest the idea of a curve.2 PLANES: The idea of a plane is obtained by observing the surface of a calm lake.13.

5 Simple open and Simple closed Curves An open curve is distinguished by the property that for any two points A and B on the curve. Thus a child going to school from home covers the path (home to school) in one direction and covers (or retraces) the same path (school to home) in the opposite direction. We shall use the word ’path’ for a curve or part of a curve along which one may move from one point to another without reversing direction and passing each point of the path exactly once.13. Some more examples of simple open curves are A Line A B Segment with end points A and B A Ray with end point A A Angle with vertex A Angle with vertex A A . The totality of all streets being the curve. Here are some examples of curves with two end points (dots represent end points). if the only exceptional points (if any) are end points. 2. GEOMETRY 59 point but not through the point. Thus the following figures show a curve with a direction of motion indicated by an arrow. It is called simple. A street map of a town or city showing all the streets is a general example of a curve that has many exceptional points. On a curve or path we shall indicate the direction of movement (when necessary) by means of an arrow. namely the crossings of streets. Thus paths are simple open curves. A Path or a track is part of a curve with the property that one may move along the path from one point to another in one direction or in the opposite direction.2.13. Here the path (home to school) is part of the curve that represents all roads in the neighborhood in which the home and school are located. there is only one way or path to move from A to B without retracing any part of the path or moving through any point of the path more than once.

but many many simple open curves with end points A and B . The following are some general examples of curves (exceptional points that are not end points are marked by a dot): A path is said to represent a simple closed curve if one can ‘travel’ (or walk) along the path and get back to the starting point without retracing any part of the path or going through any point on the path more than once. a ray. In other words two given points determine a unique segment with the two given points as end points and also a unique line that contains the two points.These properties may be thought of as intuitively clear. CLASS 2 WORKSHEETS A line. .6 A characteristic property of lines and segments It is important to observe that for any two points A and B . The following are examples of simple closed corves: 2. They are accepted as true in School Geometry (also called Euclidean Geometry).14 Plane Curves In School Geometry one mainly studies curves that lie in a plane. and are part of a collection of accepted rules (also called axioms) of Euclidean Geometry. there is exactly one segment with end points A and B . although there may be many many si mple open curves (with or without end points) that contain the two points. a segment. Two other examples of simple open curves with end points A and B are: B B A A 2.60 CHAPTER 2. Moreover. Observe also that a line has no end points.13. there is only one line that contains the two points. The most common examples of such paths are a path around a lake or the oval shaped running track in a school playground. All curves that are drawn on a chalk board or piece of paper are plane curves in the plane of the chalk board or the paper. or an angle are basic common examples of simple open curves. This means that all points on the curve are in a fixed plane.

Other noteworthy simple closed curves in a plane that are of great interest and importance are. as three points which are not on the same line determine a plane.. identify all three sides and angles of this triangle. and C as marked C Side with end points A and C A B The angle at vertex B is marked. a circle. Many are made of segments like the following 1.2. A triangle is formed by three points. The triangle below has vertices A. Any two sides with a common vertex represent an angle of the triangle. each of which is called a vertex of the triangle. a square. The side marked is the segment with end points A and C . PLANE CURVES 61 Most common examples that are studied are of simple closed curves in a plane. i. A line and a point that is not on the line also determine a unique plane. TRIANGLES:Triangles are the most common and also perhaps most important examples of simple closed curves. Each side of a triangle is a segment with two of the vertices as end points.14. It has three sides and three angles. As an exercise. Some other examples of triangles are Every triangle is necessarily a plane curve. only one plane can contain three points that are not on a line. A SQUARE: . This means that only one plane can contain a line and a point that is not on that line. a rectangle. This is so. Their shapes are shown below 2. B .e. and an ellipse.

MORE RECTANGLES: 6. A CIRCLE: A Circle 7.62 CHAPTER 2. CLASS 2 WORKSHEETS A Square 3. A RECTANGLE: A Rectangle 5. MORE CIRCLES: . MORE SQUARES: 4.

14. AN ELLIPSE: An Ellipse 9. As examples consider a segment and an angle and their . MORE ELLIPSES: A deeper study of these forms and disinguishing them from other forms and shapes the concept of equality of segments and angles as well as the notion of a right angle is used (this does not require measurements of segments and angles).14.2.1 Equality of Curves in a Plane: We call two planer curves as being the same or equal if the trace of one fits exactly the other. if 2. PLANE CURVES 63 8.

. If it does. one makes a trace of one of the curves and then sees if the trace fits the other curve exactly.64 CHAPTER 2. As examples consider the segment with end points A and B shown above and its trace. The traces are drawn on a thin (or tracing) paper placed over the curve. In these two case. The curve is visible through the thin paper placed over it and one draws an exact copy of the curve on the thin paper with a pen or pencil. A Segment Trace of segment A B B The picture below shows an angle and the trace of the same angle. CLASS 2 WORKSHEETS traces shown below. otherwise they are un-equal. Three possible situations arise when we try to place and fit the trace with three segments shown below with end points C and D. In Case 1 and Case 3 the trace does not fit the segment with end points C and D. Case 1 C Segment Trace of segment A Case 2 C Segment Trace of segment A Case 3 C Segment Trace of segment A D B D B D B Only in Case 2 the trace of segment with end points A and B fits exactly the segment with end points C and D. The traces are shown as a dashed segment and dashed angle. the two segments are not equal. Trace of Angle Angle To assertain if two curves are equal (this means that one is an exact copy of the other). then the two curves are equal (or same). In this case the two segments are equal.

A Sphere: A Ball or Sphere 2.15 Shapes of some surfaces and solids 1. A BRICK or Rectangular Parallelopiped A Brick 4.15. A RIGHT CIRCULAR CYLINDER A Cylinder 5. A RIGHT CIRCULAR CONE . SHAPES OF SOME SURFACES AND SOLIDS 65 2.2. A Cube A Cube 3.

A PYRAMID A Pyramid 7. A PRISM A PRISM .66 CHAPTER 2. CLASS 2 WORKSHEETS A Cone 6.

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