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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Wednesday • July 3, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 274
HEALTH CARE LAW
NATION PAGE 16
GIANTS CAN’T
GET ONE HIT
SPORTS PAGE 11
AUTO SALES
PICKING UP
BUSINESS PAGE 10
OBAMA DELAYS EMPLOYER MANDATE A YEAR
By Sally Schilling
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
About a dozen people sat on wood benches
outside of the Self Help Center at the San
Mateo County Courthouse in Redwood City
on a recent Monday. Every weekday, the cen-
ter helps people fill out paperwork and under-
stand their rights in domestic violence, child
custody and divorce matters.
On Monday mornings, the center partners
with the Legal Aid Society to hold a legal
clinic for landlords and tenants with housing
issues.
Inside the clinic, Susan Miller of East Palo
Alto sat down with a law student intern to talk
about her dispute with her landlord over utili-
ties.
Miller — whose name has been changed to
protect her identity in possible litigation —
noticed she was paying the Pacific Gas and
Electric bill for her entire apartment building,
which only has one electric meter. Along with
energy used in her two-bedroom apartment,
she is billed for her landlord’s office, the
building’s three garages, entryway, camera
system and laundry room, she said.
When she brought this to the attention of
her landlord, Miller, who is almost 70, said
her landlord intimidated and retaliated against
her.
Tears began running down her face as she
talked about feeling threatened in her home.
“I shouldn’t have to live like this,” she said.
Legal Aid Society Staff Attorney Larisa
Bowman brought Miller some tissues.
She told Miller that she would look up
something in the civil code about shared util-
Cuts spreadinglegal helpthin
See CUTS, Page 20
Tenants, landlords and families face reduced hours at legal assistance clinics
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
Larry Graubert, Hin Wing Lee, Deborah Dahut, Jerome Miller, Pauline Rich and Shirley Rich are unhappy with the way they have been treated
after the high-rise they live in was sold last summer. Below, Lee has slept in his living room for more than five weeks as workers have
removed asbestos and installed new plumbing into his unit.Equity Properties bought the former Townhouse Plaza near downtown San Mateo
last August and has rebranded it 55 West Fifth.
New owner, new problems
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Since new ownership has taken over the 17-story Townhouse Plaza
in San Mateo last year, it has rebranded the property 55 West Fifth and
started on a construction project to bring the property up to date.
Equity Residential bought the high-rise and adjacent properties near
downtown San Mateo from Westlake Realty Group for $93 million last
year, company spokesman Marty McKenna told the Daily Journal.
“We are renovating vacants, updating kitchens and baths to improve
the units and the property overall,” McKenna said.
With only a handful of high-rise apartment complexes in the area, 55
West Fifth offers views of the Peninsula that few others have.
Elderly in high-rise apartment complex feeling pushed out
See EQUITY, Page 8
BART talks
go nowhere
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Transit officials
last night said San Francisco Bay Area com-
muters should prepare for a third day of
transit disruptions as labor discussions with
rail workers have not yet yielded an agree-
ment.
The Bay Area Rapid Transit agency said
late Tuesday there was no indication striking
workers would return Wednesday.
Talks resumed after political pressure
mounted for a settlement.
The governor sent two of the state’s top
mediators — the chair of the Public
Employment Relations Board and the chief of
the State Mediation and Conciliation Service
— to facilitate further talks.
Still, commuters faced a third day of heavy
traffic, and crowded buses and ferries.
The striking unions and management
Downtown parkers
will get Friday perk
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Two hours of free parking will soon be
offered on Burlingame Avenue on Fridays —
a change the City Council hoped would bring
customers downtown during construction.
Construction is underway in downtown
Burlingame. As a result, portions of the road
are closed and some businesses have noted a
drop in business. Construction is expected to
take 14 to 16 months. To encourage people to
continue to visit the downtown, the council
agreed to support Free Fridays. The spots are
two-hour spaces so those who park on
Burlingame Avenue on the Free Fridays will
Two hours free in Burlingame
See FRIDAYS, Page 20
See BART, Page 7
FOR THE RECORD 2 Wednesday • July 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Talk show host
Montel Williams is
57.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1863
The three-day Civil War Battle of
Gettysburg in Pennsylvania ended in a
major victory for the North as
Confederate troops failed to breach
Union positions during an assault
known as Pickett’s Charge.
“A timid person is frightened before
a danger; a coward during the time;
and a courageous person afterward.”
— Jean Paul Richter, German author (1763-1825)
Attorney Gloria
Allred is 72.
Actor TomCruise
is 51.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A recently-hatched chick looks out from a crate at a chicken farm in Moca Dominican Republic. A ban by its neighbour Haiti
on the importation of Dominican chickens and eggs since June 7 last year has caused a crisis in the industry, according to
Dominican government sources,as they try to negotiate a lifting of the measure that Haitian authorities admit was imposed
due to the loss of import tax revenue.
Wednesday: Sunny in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Highs in the upper
70s to lower 90s. Northwest winds 5 to 15
mph.
Wednesday night: Mostly clear. Lows in
the lower to mid 60s. Northwest winds 5 to
15 mph.
Independence day: Partly cloudy in the morning then becom-
ing sunny. Highs in the mid 70s to upper 80s. West winds 5 to
10 mph.
Thursday night: Mostly clear in the evening then becoming
partly cloudy. Lows in the mid 50s to lower 60s. Southwest
winds 5 to 15 mph.
Friday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny.
Highs in the 70s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
(Answers tomorrow)
ALPHA TRUNK PERSON FEMALE
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: After the buffet aboard the cruise ship, every-
one came to a — FULL STOP
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
POSIL
DALUT
WARLSP
RUTPIN
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
J
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in
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Print your
answer here:
3 3 7
8 28 30 53 56 16
Powerball
June 29 Powerball
6 28 30 41 44
June 29 Super Lotto Plus
Daily Four
31 20 34 35
Fantasy Five
1 7 1
Daily three midday
In 1608, the city of Quebec was founded by Samuel de
Champlain.
In 1775, Gen. George Washington took command of the
Continental Army at Cambridge, Mass.
In 1890, Idaho became the 43rd state of the Union.
In 1898, the U.S. Navy defeated a Spanish fleet outside Santiago
Bay in Cuba during the Spanish-American War.
In 1913, during a 50th anniversary reunion at Gettysburg, Pa.,
Civil War veterans re-enacted Pickett’s Charge, which ended with
embraces and handshakes between the former enemies.
In 1938, President Franklin D. Roosevelt marked the 75th anniver-
sary of the Battle of Gettysburg by dedicating the Eternal Light
Peace Memorial.
In 1944, during World War II, Soviet forces recaptured Minsk.
In 1950, the first carrier strikes of the Korean War took place as the
USS Valley Forge and the HMS Triumph sent fighter planes
against North Korean targets.
In 1962, French President Charles de Gaulle signed an agreement
recognizing Algeria as an independent state after 132 years of
French rule.
In 1971, singer Jim Morrison of The Doors died in Paris at age 27.
In 1988, the USS Vincennes shot down an Iran Air jetliner over the
Persian Gulf, killing all 290 people aboard.
In 1993, Hall of Fame pitcher Don Drysdale died in Montreal,
Quebec, Canada, at age 56. Comedian “Curly Joe” DeRita, the
sixth member of the Three Stooges, died in Woodland Hills, Calif.,
at age 83.
Actor Tim O’Connor is 86. Jazz musician Pete Fountain is 83.
Playwright Tom Stoppard is 76. Writer-producer Jay Tarses is 74.
Folk singer Judith Durham (The Seekers) is 70. Actor Kurtwood
Smith is 70. Actor Michael Cole (“The Mod Squad”) is 68.
Country singer Johnny Lee is 67. Humorist Dave Barry is 66.
Actress Betty Buckley is 66. Rock singer-musician Paul Barrere
(bah-RAYR’) (Little Feat) is 65. Actress Jan Smithers is 64.
Actor Bruce Altman is 58. Former Haitian President Jean-Claude
Duvalier (doo-VAHL’-yay) is 62. Country singer Aaron Tippin is
55.
A scorpion kills its prey with venom,
using the stinger at the end of its tail.
***
On average, a mouse’s tail is as long
as its body.
***
Minnie Mouse’s full name is Minerva
Mouse. Her father is Marcus Mouse and
her grandparents are Marshall and
Matilda Mouse.
***
Visitors to Disneyland can visit the
home of Minnie Mouse in Toontown.
Minnie’s refrigerator is stocked with
cheese and she has a cake in the oven.
***
The object of the game Mouse Trap,
by Milton-Bradley, is to trap an oppo-
nent’s mouse-shaped game piece before
they trap yours. The trap consists of
miniature gears, a marble, a diving
board and a bathtub that cause a chain
reaction to drop the trap.
***
British inventor James Henry
Atkinson invented the Little-Nipper
mousetrap in 1897. It is the prototype of
the classic spring-loaded mousetrap that
slams shut when a mouse takes the bait.
***
The first patent ever issued for an ani-
mal went to Harvard University in 1988.
The mouse, known as the oncomouse,
had the oncogene added to its genetic
makeup, which makes it susceptible to
cancer and helps human cancer
research.
***
The symbol that represents the zodiac
sign of Cancer is the crab. Do you know
the animal symbols that represent the
following astrological signs? Aries,
Taurus, Pisces, Leo, Scorpio, Capricorn.
See answer at end.
***
After the assassination attempt on her
husband in 1981 First Lady Nancy
Reagan (born 1921) hired a personal
astrologer to predict safe times for
Ronald Reagan (1911-2004) to travel.
***
When two court astrologers to the
emperor of China failed to predict the
eclipse in 2134 B.C. they were behead-
ed. Eclipses were considered evil omens
and the emperor was upset at being
caught unaware.
***
A solar eclipse is caused when the
shadow of the moon is cast on the Earth.
A lunar eclipse is the shadow of the
Earth cast on the moon.
***
In the story of “Peter Pan” Peter loses
his shadow. Tinkerbell helps him search
for it and Wendy sews the shadow back
on.
***
The long running radio series “The
Shadow” (1936-1954) always began
with the line “Who knows what evil
lurks in the hearts of men? The Shadow
knows!” The invincible crime fighter
could become invisible by his ability to
cloud men’s minds. His alter ego was
Lamont Cranston, handsome young
man-about-town.
***
Vampires do not cast shadows, nor do
they have reflections in mirrors.
***
General Mills has a line of monster
themed cereals. Chocolate flavored
Count Chocula, blueberry flavored Boo
Berry and strawberry flavored Franken
Berry. Two other cereals that are no
longer available were Yummy Mummy
with vanilla marshmallows and Fruit
Brute with lime flavored marshmallows.
***
Answer: Aries — ram, Taurus — bull,
Pisces — fish, Leo — lion, Scorpio —
scorpion, Capricorn — goat. The sym-
bols for the other signs are: Gemini —
twins, Virgo — the virgin, Libra — the
scales, Sagittarius — the archer,
Aquarius — water bearer.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.
8 15 35 46 52 38
Mega number
June 28 Mega Millions
9 4 0
Daily three evening
4
16
8
Mega number
The Daily Derby race winners are Hot Shot, No. 3, infirst place;
GoldRush, No. 1, in secondplace; andWhirl Win, No. 6, in third
place.The race time was clockedat 1:41.51.
3
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FOSTER CITY
Disturbance. A man was hitting golf balls onto
Lantern Cove property on Port Royal Avenue
before 4:45 p.m. Wednesday, June 26.
Vandalism. Four juveniles TP’d a house on
Barbados Lane before 10:22 p.m. Tuesday, June
25.
Arrest. A woman was arrested for driving with-
out a license on Chess Drive before 9:42 p.m.
Tuesday, June 25.
Arrest. A woman was arrested for driving with-
out a license on Metro Center Boulevard and
Vintage Park Drive before 7:54 p.m. Tuesday,
June 25.
SAN CARLOS
Burglary. A commercial property was burglar-
ized on the 1100 block of Old County Road
before 8:58 a.m. Sunday, June 23.
Disturbance. A person was assaulted on the
1400 block of Walnut Street before 2:49 a.m.
Sunday, June 23.
Fraud. A credit card was forged on the 1400
block of El Camino Real before 12:18 p.m.
Saturday, June 22.
Disturbance. A person was detained for being
drunk in public on the 700 block of Elm Street
before 3:48 a.m. Saturday, June 22.
Citation. A man was cited for driving with a
suspended license on the 700 block of El
Camino Real before 7:26 p.m. Friday, June 21.
Arrest. A woman was arrested for having an
outstanding warrant on the 700 block of Walnut
Street before 6:23 p.m. Friday, June 21.
Citation. A man was cited for driving with a
suspended license on Brittan Avenue and El
Camino Real before 5:59 p.m. Friday, June 21.
Arrest. A man was arrested for burglary, petty
theft and being in possession of a controlled sub-
stance on the 1100 block of Old County Road
before 2:06 p.m. Friday, June 21.
Fraud. A check was forged and passed on the
1000 block of Laurel Street before 11 a.m.
Friday, June 21.
REDWOOD CITY
Shoplift. A man with short black hair and wear-
ing a white T-shirt and gray sweatpants was
refusing to return to the store on Walnut Street
before 2:14 p.m. Wednesday, June 19.
Suspicious circumstances. Someone reported a
man entered their side gate and went into back-
yard on Canyon Road before 2:01 p.m.
Wednesday, June 19.
Petty theft. Petty theft occurred at a home on
Ruby Street before 11:05 a.m. Wednesday, June
19.
Disturbance. A man was running and scream-
ing on Bradford Street before 3:26 a.m.
Wednesday, June 19.
Petty theft. Two license plates were stolen from
a vehicle on Iris Street before 5:39 p.m. Tuesday,
June 18.
Disturbance. A woman was kicked by an
unknown man wearing a comic book t-shirt on
El Camino Real before 5:17 p.m. Tuesday, June
18.
SAN MATEO
Drunk. Two men were throwing beer bottles in
the air and letting them break onto the ground on
the 300 block of Tilton Avenue before 7:03 p.m.
Tuesday, June 18.
Battery. Someone reported being punched and
having their hair pulled out on the 3400 block of
Del Monte Street before 4:22 p.m. Monday,
June 17.
Drunk. A man wearing a black blazer and
brown pants was caught drinking in the lobby on
the 200 block of W 20th Avenue before 1:08
p.m. Monday, June 17.
Drunk. A man with a black hat, gray shorts and
black backpack was swearing out loud on the
1900 block of S El Camino Real before 8:26
a.m. Monday, June 17.
Police reports
Boys will be boys
Two juveniles were found shooting a BB
gun and roasting marshmallows with a
fire they had set on Trinidad Lane in
Foster City before 3:40 p.m. Tuesday,
June 25.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Two men accused of helping an 19-year-old
East Palo Alto man already in custody track
and attempt to murder a rival gangmember on
Highway 101 in Belmont last fall are now in
custody.
Raymond Lewis
Bradford, 27, and Marvin
Jake Ware, 25, appeared in
court for their initial
arraignment on premedi-
tated attempted murder,
weapons and gang charges
but put off pleas until July
10 to meet up with Eric
Valencia Vargas’ existing
case. Vargas has been in
custody since December,
approximately two months
after the Sept. 30, 20102
shooting that sent two to
the hospital. He has plead-
ed not guilty.
The three defendants, all
of East Palo Alto, belong
to the Da Vill gang while
their target is a member of
rival gang Midtown Taliban. The three alleged-
ly learned where the victim’s mother lived and
watched the home until they saw him leave in
a Dodge Charger driven by a friend. They
allegedly followed the vehicle across the San
Mateo Bridge and down Highway 101 before
pulling alongside and firing multiple times in
the Charger. The Charger swerved before
crashing into a fence and stopping in a
drainage ditch between Ralston Avenue and
Holly Street. Two of the passengers, a 24-year-
old man from Menlo Park and a 19-year-old
East Palo Alto man, were struck by bullets but
have since recovered.
“This was clearly a hit. They planned to exe-
cute the victim,” said District Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe.
Vargas was arrested for the shooting Dec. 6
in the juror parking lot outside the Hall of
Justice in Redwood City. However, he was
actually in custody before that after allegedly
fighting gang task force officers Nov. 14 when
they found him in possession of a loaded gun.
He posted bail but was rearrested two weeks
later after forensics linked his Glock to the
Sept. 30 highway shooting.
Authorities tracked Bradford and Ware from
Vargas’ cellphone but didn’t need to go far to
find them for arrest, either — both men were in
custody at the county jail awaiting prosecution
on other pending criminal charges.
Bradford is charged with attempted robbery
in a Middlefield Road jewelry store heist that
ended with the clerk pulling out a shotgun. He
also has two prior criminal strikes from outside
San Mateo County which leaves him facing at
least 50 years to life in prison if convicted.
Ware, a second-strike defendant for felony
assault with a firearm, has an Aug. 19 trial
pending for illegal possession of a firearm and
ammunition by a gangmember and felon.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Pair arrested and charged in
highway attempted murder
A third suspect is already in police custody
Raymond
Bradford
Marvin Ware
4
Wednesday • July 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A former auto technician with the California
Highway Patrol fraudulently billed the law
enforcement agency for more than $16,000 in
parts and labor, including equipment for his per-
sonal vehicle, according to prosecutors.
Lester Frank Gutierrez, 56, worked in con-
junction with the Serramonte Ford body shop
manager but only the Daly City technician has
been charged, said District Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe.
CHP is still investigating the manager’s case,
he said.
Gutierrez’s job was to maintain and service
the CHP vehicle fleet for its San Francisco divi-
sion. According to Wagstaffe, between August
2011 and September 2012,
Gutierrez submitted $2,859
worth of invoices for parts
and labor from Serramonte
Ford. CHP paid the bills but
later discovered the provid-
ed parts didn’t actually
work on its vehicles.
A subsequent audit
showed that Gutierrez and
the unnamed manager
billed CHP for $16,056 in
parts and labor that were never provided. CHP
also paid $1,700 for car parts Gutierrez person-
ally used, Wagstaffe said.
Defense attorney Tony Brass said his client
remains a “beloved employee” with CHP and
hopes to work the situation out.
“According to everyone I’ve spoken to he is
the kind of person who went above and beyond
his job duties to help out where he could and
when this came up he cooperated fully,” Brass
said.
CHP Sgt. Diana McDermott confirmed
Gutierrez, who was appointed as an auto tech in
Redwood City in 1990, is still employed but said
an administrative investigation is underway.
McDermott could not comment further on the
administrative action but said the CHP is not
brushing the charges aside.
“The CHP along with other law enforcement
has a lot of pride in what we do and in the trust
with the community so these allegations are
taken very seriously,” she said.
On Tuesday morning, Gutierrez pleaded not
guilty to charges of embezzling public funds and
set an Aug. 27 preliminary hearing date. He
remains free from custody on $75,000 bail post-
ed two days after his May 28 arrest.
Gutierrez returns to court July 25 for a
Superior Court review conference.
Former CHP auto technician charged with faking work
Lester
Gutierrez
“The CHP, along with other
law enforcement, has a lot
of pride in what we do and
in the trust with the community
so these allegations are
taken very seriously.”
— CHP. Sgt. Diana McDermott
5
Wednesday • July 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
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Family Owned & Operated
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STATE
GOVERNMENT
• Legislation by
Assemblyman Kevin
Mullin, D-South San
Francisco, expanding
the list of documents
used to validate vote-
by-mail ballots passed out of the Senate
Elections and Redistricting Committee
Tuesday.
Current law says a vote-by-mail ballot may
only be counted if the signature on the ballot
envelope compares with the signature on the
voter’s original registration form. This is part
of the reason that California has inordinately
high vote-by-mail rejection rates, according to
Mullin’s office.
• Senate Bill 637 was passed by the Senate
Elections Committee Tuesday. The bill,
authored by state Sen. Leland Yee, D-San
Francisco/San Mateo, would increase access
to elections by requiring county elections offi-
cials to open an early voting location on a
Saturday prior to Election Day.
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
Peninsula commuters affected by
the BART strike are flocking to
Caltrain and filling up SamTrans shut-
tles, a transit agency spokeswoman
said Tuesday.
Preliminary estimates indicate that
Caltrain has been accommodating as
many as 3,000 additional riders dur-
ing each peak commute period since
the strike began Monday, agency offi-
cials said.
Caltrain has added stops at the
Millbrae station to many of its express
trains, which run between San Jose
and San Francisco, to pick up com-
muters who would normally board
BART, Caltrain spokeswoman
Christine Dunn said.
So far, Dunn said, there has been
enough room on Caltrain to accom-
modate the extra passengers.
That could change if the BART
strike continues into next week, when
passengers who have been on vaca-
tion this week for the Fourth of July
holiday return to work, she said.
SamTrans is temporarily providing
free shuttles from the Daly City and
Colma BART stations to Evergreen
Avenue and Mission Street in Daly
City, where passengers can transfer to
San Francisco Municipal Railway
buses.
As many as 500 passengers used
the free shuttles during peak commute
periods on Monday, Dunn said.
Commuters flock to
Caltrain, SamTrans
during BART strike
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Bruno officials are pushing
for the maximum penalty — $3.85
billion — against Pacific Gas and
Electric for the fatal natural gas fire
and explosion that happened Sept.
9, 2010, according to legal argu-
ments filed with the California
Public Utilities Commission
Monday.
CPUC judges are expected to
decide later this summer how much
the company should be fined for
safety violations that led to the
explosion. California regulators
have recommended that the utility
pay a record $2.25 billion fine for
decades of negligence that led up to
the explosion. Since then, San
Bruno has stood firm that the
amount should be higher and not
include tax benefits.
“These credits would let PG&E
off the hook for more than 50 years
of systematic safety failures that
caused the 2010 explosion and fire,
which took the lives of eight citizens
of our city, destroyed 38 homes, and
left a hole in the heart of San
Bruno,” Mayor Jim Ruane said in a
press release. “We ask that this ill-
defined provision be struck com-
pletely from the penalty recommen-
dation so that PG&E can be held
accountable for this tragic disaster
and justice for the victims of San
Bruno can finally be served.”
Finding the appropriate penalty
has caused turmoil within the CPUC
in recent months. Recently, four
CPUC division attorneys were reas-
signed after refusing to sign the rec-
ommendation of Jack Hagan, direc-
tor of the CPUC’s Safety and
Enforcement division.
San Bruno is calling for the com-
pany to absorb the financial conse-
quences without state and federal
tax breaks.
Unlike a fine, which is not tax
deductible and is to be paid to the
state, the proposed CPUC penalty is
tax deductible. San Bruno also
demanded the CPUC direct PG&E
to adopt and fund a series of reme-
dial measures to ensure systemic
regulatory change in the future.
heather@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
San Bruno makes push
for maximum PG&E fine
City officials contend utility should pay for decades of negligence
No cause found for natural
gas smell in Redwood City
Firefighters responded to a smell
of natural gas at the Redwood City
Main Jail Tuesday afternoon but
could not find evidence of a gas
leak, a fire battalion chief said.
The smell was reported at 3:34
p.m. in several rooms on the lower
floors of the building at 300
Bradford St., fire Battalion Chief
Michael O’Leary said.
By the time firefighters arrived,
the affected rooms had been opened
up and ventilated and the smell was
no longer detectable. Neither fire-
fighters nor PG&E crews could find
evidence of a leak, O’Leary said.
O’Leary speculated that the smell
could have come from the large
industrial dryers in the laundry
room. He said while it appears to
have been a false alarm, it was “a
good drill for us.”
Truck gets stuck in
Golden Gate toll plaza
SAN FRANCISCO — Several
lanes of the freeway that carries traf-
fic south into San Francisco had to
be closed after a tractor-trailer got
stuck while trying to pass through
the Golden Gate Bridge toll plaza.
Bridge spokeswoman Mary
Currie says the front of the truck
became wedged between a pair of
toll booths Monday morning when
the driver attempted to drive
through a narrow lane meant for
cars. The cab suffered a broken axle
due to the tight fit.
CHP Officer Andrew Barclay says
the driver told authorities he had
tried to merge into one of the wide
lanes designed for trucks but could-
n’t because of traffic.
Barclay says a tow truck freed the
truck after about 2 1/2 hours.
Local briefs
Redwood City Planning
Commissioner Ernie Schmidt is
kicking off his campaign for City
Council from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Friday, July 19 at the Fox Theatre in
Redwood City.
***
San Mateo Mayor David Lim is
kicking off his re-election campaign
this week to seek a second term on
the council. The event is 2 p.m.,
Sunday, July 7 at El Sinaloense
Restaurant, 1622 Palm Ave. State
Sen. Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo, is
scheduled to attend as well as other
supporters.
Election Journal
SamTrans is temporarily
providing free shuttles
from the Daly City and
Colma BART stations to
Evergreen Avenue and
Mission Street in Daly
City, where passengers
can transfer to San
Francisco Municipal
Railway buses.
6
Wednesday • July 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
BAY AREA/STATE
Two workers shot, killed
at Oakland restaurant
OAKLAND — Oakland police say they
have arrested a suspect in the shooting deaths
of two workers at a Wingstop chicken wings
restaurant.
The Oakland Tribune
(http://bit.ly/1aymMWD) identified the slain
workers as 26-year-old Jose Santa Maria and
22-year-old Kenneth Bradley, who both are
from Richmond.
The Tribune says that police have revised
their initial statement that the slayings in the
city’s Grand Lake District late Monday
occurred during a robbery, but are not reveal-
ing a motive. Nothing was taken from the
restaurant.
The person arrested on Tuesday has not
been named. Police are reviewing surveillance
tapes and looking for a second suspect.
There were four employees and four or five
customers inside the restaurant at the time of
the shootings. No one else was injured.
Judge: Bridge work blamed
for dead birds can go on
PETALUMA — A federal judge has refused
to block work on a freeway bridge in Sonoma
County to assuage the concerns of wildlife
advocates who are worried that more birds
will die after becoming trapped in netting
designed to keep them off the project.
The Press Democrat of Santa Rosa reports
(http://bit.ly/1cNMIdA) that U.S. District
Judge Jon Tigar in San Francisco ruled
Tuesday that environmental groups did not
provide enough proof that continuing the con-
struction was likely to harm a colony of cliff
swallows that nests on the underside of the
Highway 101 bridge over the Petaluma River.
Since December, dozens of swallows have
gotten caught and died in the netting that’s
designed to create a 50-foot buffer between
them and construction workers.
State transportation officials say they have
reconfigured the meshwork and that no birds
have died there in three months.
Bay Area briefs
By Don Thompson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — State corrections offi-
cials said Tuesday they will comply with a fed-
eral court order to move thousands of inmates
out of two Central Valley prisons where an air-
borne fungus has led to widespread illnesses.
The Department of Corrections and
Rehabilitation does not yet know where it will
put the 2,600 displaced inmates as it juggles the
population within California’s 33 adult prisons,
department spokeswoman Deborah Hoffman
told The Associated Press.
Officials could seek an extension if they can-
not completely comply within the 90-day dead-
line set last week by U.S. District Judge Thelton
Henderson in San Francisco.
Officials had said they might appeal
Henderson’s order but then decided to comply.
The judge’s order requires corrections offi-
cials to transfer most black, Filipino and med-
ically at-risk inmates from Avenal and Pleasant
Valley state prisons because they are more vul-
nerable to health problems from Valley fever, a
fungal infection that is not contagious and orig-
inates in the soil of the San Joaquin Valley.
About half of the infections produce no symp-
toms, while most of the rest can bring mild to
severe flu-like symptoms. In a few cases, the
infection can spread from the lungs to the brain,
bones, skin or eyes, causing blindness, skin
abscesses, lung failure and occasionally death.
The two prisons, which house a combined
8,100 inmates, are about 10 miles apart and 175
miles southeast of San Francisco.
“Transferring thousands of inmates is an
extremely complex process. It will take time,”
Hoffman said. “We must identify where to send
individual inmates and which inmates from
other facilities can be transferred into Avenal
and Pleasant Valley.”
Transferring less vulnerable inmates into the
two prisons could create an additional problem
if those inmates object.
“This is a hard question. We are concerned
about the risk to other prisoners,” said Don
Specter, director of the nonprofit Prison Law
Office and lead attorney in the lawsuit involving
Valley fever. “The question is, ‘How great is the
risk?”’
He deferred to J. Clark Kelso, who was
appointed by Henderson to oversee medical care
within the state prison system.
State to move inmates over illness
LOCAL 7
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANFORD, Fla. — A judge tossed out a detec-
tive’s statement that he found George
Zimmerman credible in his description of fighting
with Trayvon Martin, a decision that benefits
prosecutors who are trying to discredit the defen-
dant’s self-defense claims.
Other efforts by prosecutors to attack
Zimmerman’s story on Tuesday included the
cross examination of a friend he called after
shooting Martin and the testimony of a doctor
who found the defendant’s injuries to be insignif-
icant. They also sought to introduce school
records that indicate Zimmerman had studied the
state’s self-defense law, in another swipe at his
truthfulness.
Prosecutors took the unusual step of trying to
pick apart the statements of an investigator they’d
called as a prosecution witness because some of
what he said appeared to help the defense.
Prosecutor Bernie de la Rionda asked the judge to
strike Detective Chris Serino’s statement that he
thought Zimmerman was credible when he
described how he got into a fight with Martin.
Serino was the lead investigator on the case for the
Sanford Police Department.
De la Rionda argued the statement was improp-
er because one witness isn’t allowed to evaluate
another witness’s credibility. Defense attorney
Mark O’Mara argued that it’s Serino’s job to
decide whether Zimmerman was telling the truth.
Judge Debra Nelson told jurors to disregard the
statement.
“This is an improper comment,” the judge said.
Zimmerman has said he fatally shot the
unarmed black 17-year-old in self-defense in
February of 2012 because Martin was banging his
head into a concrete sidewalk. Zimmerman, 29,
could get life in prison if convicted of second-
degree murder. He has pleaded not guilty.
To earn a conviction on the charge, prosecutors
must prove there was ill will, spite or a depraved
mind by the defendant.
The prosecutor also questioned Serino about his
opinion that Zimmerman didn’t display those
negative emotions toward Martin.
De la Rionda played back Zimmerman’s call to
police to report the teen wailing through his gated
community. Zimmerman uses an expletive, refers
to “punks” and then says, “These a-------. They
always get away.”
The detective conceded that Zimmerman’s
choice of words could be interpreted as being
spiteful.
The state has argued that Zimmerman profiled
Martin from his truck and called a police dispatch
number before he and the teenager got into a fight.
Zimmerman has denied the confrontation had
anything to do with race, as Martin’s family and
their supporters have claimed. Zimmerman’s
father is white and his mother is Hispanic.
Several moves by prosecutors Tuesday were
aimed at showing inconsistencies in
Zimmerman’s statements.
Prosecutors asked the judge to allow them to
introduce school records showing Zimmerman
took a class that addressed Florida’s self-defense
law. They say it will show he had knowledge of
the law, even though he claimed he didn’t in an
interview with talk show host Sean Hannity. The
interview was played for jurors.
O’Mara objected, saying the records were irrel-
evant. He referred to the prosecution’s efforts to
introduce them as “a witch hunt.”
The judge said she would rule later in the week.
Prosecutors attack Zimmerman
story in several different ways
reported being far apart on key issues includ-
ing salary, pensions, health care and safety.
Political pressure is mounting for a settle-
ment. In a letter, the state controller, lieu-
tenant governor and insurance commissioner
urged both sides to return to the bargaining
table.
The letter from the Democratic state offi-
cials said the strike has caused “widespread
personal hardship and severe economic dis-
ruption,” and it noted they were disappointed
“about the lack of productive proposals and
counterproposals in the days leading up to the
strike.”
The Bay Area Council, a business-spon-
sored public policy advocacy organization,
estimated the strike was costing the region
$73 million a day in diminished productivity
by workers delayed in traffic or forced into
longer commutes using other forms of transit.
The figure was based on state and regional
data, anecdotal evidence of commute times,
and assumptions about how many people
telecommute, said Rufus Jeffris, a spokesman
for the group.
Stephen Levy, director of the Center for
Continuing Study of the California Economy
in Palo Alto, countered that the disruption
might be annoying but the impact is minimal
on the $600 billion a year regional economy.
“There are no permanent losses,” he said.
“People work from home, people work hard-
er later the next day or make it up later. The
money not being spent in San Francisco
remains in the pockets of people who can
spend it at home.”
Commutes in the region were thrown into
chaos when the strike began early Monday
after talks with management broke down.
BART is the nation’s fifth-largest rail sys-
tem and carries passengers from the furthest
reaches of San Francisco’s densely populated
eastern suburbs to San Francisco International
Airport across the Bay.
Freeways have choked to a standstill. Lines
for ferry service tripled, and boats were
crammed to standing-room only.
Buses were stuffed with riders who felt for-
tunate to be on board as many commuters
were literally left in the dust when buses
zoomed by without as much as a honk or an
explanation.
About a hundred people waited single-file
at the downtown Berkeley bus station. Some
had watched multiple full buses cruise by for
hours.
“It’s already starting to wear on people,”
said Hilary Hartman, who arrived at San
Francisco’s Transbay Terminal at 6:45 a.m.
Her boss sent her home to work an hour later
when she was unable to get on a bus.
“You see the buses trickling in from the
East Bay, and it’s standing-room only, and
people’s faces are not super happy when
they’re getting off,” Hartman said.
BART, with 44 stations in four counties and
104 miles of lines, handles more than 40 per-
cent of commuters coming from the East Bay
to San Francisco, said John Goodwin, a
spokesman for the Metropolitan
Transportation Commission.
Transit authorities have made accommoda-
tions to help during the strike, including
longer carpool lane hours and additional fer-
ries and buses. BART doubled the number of
buses serving West Oakland to 36 on Tuesday.
The striking unions and management
reported being far apart on key issues includ-
ing salary, pensions, health care and safety.
The unions, which represent nearly 2,400
train operators, station agents, mechanics,
maintenance workers and professional staff,
want a 5 percent raise each year over the next
three years.
Continued from page 1
BART
LOCAL 8
Wednesday • July 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
With only a handful of high-rise apartment
complexes in the area, 55 West Fifth offers
views of the Peninsula that few others have.
But some of the building’s longtime tenants,
especially the older ones, told the Daily Journal
that Equity wants them to leave and many have
already. Some of the younger tenants have start-
ed to take notice and started to ask questions.
Some of the ones who remain have already
had their rent increase 15 percent and have had
$165 worth of utility bills added onto their
monthly rents, which Westlake previously paid
for. Equity closed on the property in August
2012.
“The minute this outfit took over, the rents
went right up,” said Larry Graubert, 82.
But the rent increase and monthly fees fall
down the ladder of complaints compared to all
the construction activity taking place in the
building.
Equity has pulled building permits with San
Mateo to remodel 87 kitchens, 154 bathrooms
and the construction of new closets and plumb-
ing systems for new combination washers and
dryers in every unit.
The washer and dryer installation is causing
residents the biggest headache, they say, since
construction is taking place on every floor and
eventually every unit.
Some of the residents, however, have chal-
lenged the assertion that the work is necessary
based on the language of their leases and have
tried to refuse the installation.
But Equity responded that the work will go
on.
“Every apartment home will be modified to
accommodate the washer and dryer, however, it
will be your decision, as to whether or not you
would like to have the appliance installed,”
Equity wrote in a letter to tenants.
But resident Jerome Miller, a younger tenant,
wrote Equity that he and his wife were happy
with the current laundry facility in place and
would consider any reduction of closet space to
diminish the value of the apartment.
Equity also warned that the apartments con-
tain asbestos and special methods would be used
abate it during the washer/dryer installations.
Miller, 43, expressed concern with the
asbestos abatement as being potentially life-
threatening.
“Please let me know on what legal basis you
intend to enter our unit for this project,” Miller
wrote to Equity in a response letter.
But Equity responded to Miller that the work
will go on and that he and his wife would have
to vacate the unit on the first day of work.
Miller, upset with Equity, came to learn that
he was not the only one with concerns — other
tenants, many of them in their 80s and 90s, were
also upset with the mandatory construction proj-
ect.
‘Intimidating’
Equity told the tenants it would take up to 14
days per unit to complete the plumbing work.
Beverly Murr, 80, has lived at the complex for
13 years and was opposed to the installation but
cannot do anything about it now because the
work has already begun in her 16th floor apart-
ment.
“It was intimidating. They just announced it
and now they have a key and they can come in
whenever they want,” Murr said about Equity
and the workers doing the installation. “I was
intimidated. I felt like I didn’t have a choice and
I’m not sure if I have a choice so I acquiesced.”
The water has also been turned off routinely
during all hours of the day and week, said
Shirley Rich, 93, who has lived at the complex
for 17 years.
Rich has a two-bedroom apartment with two
bathrooms but said she was unable to use the
master bedroom bathroom for at least nine
months after Equity bought the building and that
she has been scalded a few times now that the
hot water is running even hotter.
“When you mention anything — the staff is
condescending and say ‘you’re lucky to live
here,’” Rich said.
Shirley’s sister, Pauline, used to lead a holiday
decorating brigade for the lobby in past
Decembers but Equity staff tore it down this past
season, many of the tenants told the Daily
Journal.
“The Equity culture is so depressing,”
Graubert said. “I’m so angry.”
‘Unlivable’
One man who lives in the building, however,
may have it worse than any other tenant.
Workers came into Hin Wing Lee’s apartment
May 22 to install a closet and plumbing for the
washer and dryer and still have not left.
The washer and dryer is being installed in his
bedroom, and workers pulled Lee’s bed into the
cramped living room where he has been sleep-
ing since. The workers also rearranged furniture
throughout the apartment to make it essentially
unlivable, he said.
Lee, 88, contends he has lost a third of his liv-
ing space.
“How can they justify charging the same rent?
When I ask questions they never have answers,”
Lee told the Daily Journal.
Resident Rick Da Silva, a tech worker in his
40s, first contacted the Daily Journal about this
situation because of the way the elderly tenants
in the building have been treated.
“Their goal is clearly to make this property a
destination spot for the ever growing tech mar-
ket in Silicon Valley. I myself, working for one
of the largest of these companies, was initially
glad to find housing in this tough rental market.
I’ve since been saddened by what I’ve overheard
and observed in regards to the treatment of the
longtime tenants who have been here before
me,” Da Silva wrote the Daily Journal in an
email.
Rent increases
Equity is also charging tenants $35 a month if
they accept the washer and dryer unit now or
$75 a month after their lease expires and they
renew it.
Some tenants, such as 87-year-old Deborah
Dahut feel like they have been coerced into sign-
ing lease extensions after being told of huge rent
increases if they stay on month-to-month.
Dahut’s lawyer son, Henry, said his mother
was taken advantage of by scaring her into sign-
ing a new lease.
“She was bullied into a lease after Equity
threatened her with an absurdly high month-to-
month rate — which they ended up automatical-
ly deducting from her checking account — and
which they claim said auto-deduction was a mis-
take. After learning more about them on the
Internet it seems this episode involving my
mother was more likely a unfair business tactic
perpetrated against an elderly women who they
knew was vulnerable and frightened about her
future,” Henry Dahut wrote the Daily Journal in
an email.
Mayor David Lim, who is about to start a
remodel on his home, went to 55 West Fifth with
his family a couple of months ago to check on
leasing a unit while work is being done on their
home.
“We noticed a lot of construction and they
were very vague on how long the work would
take place. I was not impressed,” Lim told the
Daily Journal. He did not identify himself as the
mayor either and visited the complex as a “reg-
ular person,” he told the Daily Journal.
The pool was also filthy, he said.
Some of the tenants in the building have start-
ed a Facebook page to express their concerns
about living there.
For four-year tenant Miller, he has no prob-
lems with Equity trying to get the most money it
can out of the property. His concern is how the
current residents, especially the most vulnerable
ones, are being treated.
But even he has had his rent increase substan-
tially from $2,125 when he first moved in to
$2,620 today.
“That’s a lot of money for us,” he said.
To learn more go to:
www.facebook.com/#!/55WestFifthTenantsAsso
ciation?fref=ts
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
EQUITY
OPINION 9
Wednesday • July 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Fourth of July
Editor,
On July 4, 1776, Americans believed
that all people were created equal and
had unalienable rights to life, liberty and
justice. Each year since that date, Ameri-
cans have had a celebration to mark this
important day when the purpose of our
government was stated as assuring these
rights to all Americans in 2013.
Times have changed and we no
longer have the rights to life, liberty
and happiness. We may now be ar-
rested, tortured or killed if suspected
of being against our government. We
are presumed to be guilty and there
need not be any charges filed or any
trial. We are no longer safe in our
homes from unwarranted searches
and seizure of our property. We do
not have the right to peacefully as-
semble to petition the government
for a redress of grievances. Recent
polls show that only 10 percent of
the people are pleased with the ac-
tions of Congress. The rest of us
oppose the many wars and think that
raising the minimum wage would do
far more to stimulate our economy
than giving trillions to the same
banksters who caused the “Great Re-
cession.” Working people have lost
their jobs, their homes, their decent
standard of living and with the cuts
in all domestic programs things will
get worse.
If you want to fly the American flag
this year, I suggest you hang in upside
down in a sign of distress. We need to
join with our family, friends and neigh-
bors and come up with ways we can get
some democracy in our land. The cor-
rupt government we have now is not
serving the people of this nation. They
are paid lackeys of the very rich. We
need to vote out the “representatives”
who do not represent us and elect people
with ethics, morals and a sense of con-
cern for all life on earth.
Patricia Gray
Burlingame
Scalia weighing in
Editor,
In his not-too-surprising dissent regard-
ing the overturn of DOMA as
unconstitutional, Justice Antonin Scalia
declared that “The Supreme Court of the
US cannot overturn democratically
passed laws.”
He must have changed his mind since
the day before, when he gleefully sided
with the compact right-wing majority of
the Supreme Court and voted to gut the
Voters’ Rights Act, a law as “democrati-
cally passed” as they ever come.
Who, but a Republican president could
pick a bigot like Scalia for the Supreme
Court? What a setback for justice and
democratic values. We should also re-
member that Justice Scalia was a part of
the gang that stopped the Florida voter
count in 2000 and handed the presidency
to George W. Bush, resulting in a devas-
tating outcome for the country and the
world. Scalia is not only consistently on
the wrong side of history but also on the
wrong side of the nation.
Jorg Aadahl
San Mateo
Letters to the editor
A
nyone demanding a 23 per-
cent salary increase over
three years in even the best
of times has some gumption.
Particularly when the economy is still
on shaky ground and those making
that demand already have an annual
salary and benefit package of
$134,000 a year. Even more so when
those workers are already some of the
best paid in their profession and are
paid from tax payer revenue and fares.
So it is with BART workers who
left the negotiating table Sunday and
decided to strike — dropping the
entire region into a commuter night-
mare. The tales are varied — from
long lines at ferries, other trains,
buses and heavy traffic on the high-
way. This is a service that is relied
upon by the entire region — where
development is planned around its
stations. The obvious choice when
left without BART service is to get
into a car but not everyone in this
region has a car. And those without
cars are disproportionately low
income. So in essence, the people
suffering the most because of this
strike are people who make signifi-
cantly less than the people demand-
ing an unconscionable raise. Workers
contend they haven’t had a raise in
years and deserve it. But there are
many many people across the region
who haven’t had a raise in years and
you don’t see them plunging others
into a hot mess of transit.
It’s hard to have sympathy for work-
ers who have been offered an 8 per-
cent raise over four years by a transit
agency that has long struggled to
make ends meet and is largely funded
through tax revenue. BART manage-
ment has also asked that workers con-
tribute to pension and health care
plans, which has been lowered before
negotiations broke off. These are the
same workers who currently con-
tribute $92 a month toward medical
benefits regardless of the number of
people on the plan. Anyone who has
priced health insurance rates recently
knows that is a pretty good deal.
So when thousands of regular folks
are left stranded by a service on which
they regularly rely just so workers can
continue gold-lining their salary and
benefits package, it’s a little hard to
have sympathy for those workers.
Unless, of course, you feel sorry for
them for living in such a delusional
state. BART workers have backed off
their 23 percent salary demand, and
instead are asking for a 21 percent
increase over a three-year period.
That’s a concession? Not even in the
go-go dot-com times would this
demand be palatable. And it is this
type of extortion that got us into this
salary and pension mess in the first
place.
Workers say this strike action is also
about safety. Really? Spare us the
demonstrative nonsense. This is about
greed, plain and simple. And the rest
of us be damned.
Other worker groups are not allowed
to strike and usually go through a
binding arbitration procedure if there
is a contract dispute. You don’t see
police, fire or utility workers threaten
strike. We suggest one of our bold leg-
islators take up a bill that would
include transit workers in that group.
Get back to work
Independence Day
“L
iberty means responsibility. That’s why men
dread it.” — George Bernard Shaw. Tomorrow
we commemorate Independence Day, the day
when we are supposed to remember how fortunate we are
to be living in freedom and we are encouraged to renew our
allegiance to our flag. Yes, we are and we do. But I would
love to be able to have pride in my country. I would love to
think that this nation stands for something positive and glo-
rious. It would be great to think our leaders have the wel-
fare of humanity at heart. It would be wonderful to be able
to look at them and get that good feeling that goes with
honesty, forthrightness and
compassion instead of that
discouraging feeling that
results from knowing that all
are influenced and manipu-
lated by greedy and powerful
special interests. I would
love to be able to look at the
flag and think that it hasn’t
been tarnished and smudged
by opportunistic and insin-
cere politicians.
Marianne Williamson,
author of “The Healing of
America,” described it graph-
ically: “We have lost our
spiritual rudder and without
it we have neither individual nor collective wisdom. Our
national conscience is barely alive as we slither like snakes
across a desert toward any hole where money lies. Nothing
short of an internal awakening will heal this wounded
nation.”
It is impossible to feel truly proud of the only developed
country where the income gap between the wealthy and the
working class is so wide, where many corporations get
away with paying no taxes on billions of profits, where the
drug addiction rate, the homicide rate, the infant mortality
rate, the teen pregnancy rate, the poverty rate and the cost
of medical care far outstrip those of other industrialized
nations.
I would like to believe that our lawmakers have some
real compassion for the hungry and homeless. I would like
to feel our children are not getting short shrift. I would like
to believe our corporate world has something in mind
besides manipulating us to play right into their greedy
hands. I would rather not have to face the fact that the
obsession with technology is severely compromising our
physical, psychological and spiritual health.
So what will you be thinking as the fireworks go off and
the flags wave? What does that flag flying in front of your
house mean to you? Are you telling those who pass by that
you are patriotic — that you support our government, no
matter what? Or maybe you’re thinking what a good thing
it was when we declared our independence in 1776. Or
simply that you are proud of our country. Or that you want
to support democracy by working for change when you
believe it is needed. Or possibly you’ll just be standing
there, watching the parade go by, so to speak, seeing only
what you want to see.
Several years ago, then-congresswoman Lynn Woolsey
wrote: “I believe it is important that we remember the true
meaning of patriotism. It is not enough to support a war or
wave a flag. Genuine patriotism means affirming the values
that have made America strong for more than two centuries.
Patriotism means embracing, not stifling dissent. Truly
patriotic policy empowers American families, helping them
balance the competing demands of work and family. On the
other hand, exploding deficits and tax cuts for the wealthy
seem wholly unpatriotic to me. And what is patriotic about
sending billions of dollars to rebuild Iraq when our own
communities desperately need investment?”
It’s important to remember that patriotism requires
awareness and knowledge, plus a bit of humility, so we are
able to see where change might be needed, where we may
be taking too much for granted and becoming complacent,
when we might be becoming arrogant and/or self-satisfied
or lazy, or unaware of government seeking too much power
and/or not operating in a way not conducive to freedom
and liberty for all.
“…But for the right’s success in obscuring its aims, and
wrapping itself in the flag, I believe that most Americans
would strongly oppose the direction this country is going. I
have a vision — maybe just a hope — of a great revulsion:
a moment in which the American people look at what is
happening, realize how their goodwill and patriotism have
been abused, and put a stop to this drive to destroy much of
what is best in our country.” — Paul Krugman, “The Great
Unraveling.”
Yes, we do still enjoy the freedom to gripe and complain.
Thankfully, we can write and talk about what’s bothering
us about our system and what we think needs changing. If
only more Americans would appreciate this freedom
enough to shout from the rooftops, “Help us be proud
again!”
Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 700
columns for various local newspapers. Her email address is
gramsd@aceweb.com.
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BUSINESS 10
Wednesday • July 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 14,932.41 - 42.55 10-Yr Bond 2.48 0
Nasdaq3433.40 -1.09 Oil (per barrel) 99.60
S&P 500 1614.08 - 0.88 Gold 1243.40
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Tuesday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Acuity Brands Inc., up $5.46 at $81.39
The lighting maker said that its fiscal third-quarter net income fell 6
percent, but its adjusted results beat Wall Street estimates.
Constellation Brands Inc., down $1.90 at $51.25
The wine, beer and liquor company’s fiscal first-quarter net income fell
27 percent, partly due to costs related to an acquisition.
Zep Inc., down $3.14 at $13.40
The chemical maker reported a 27 percent drop in net income for the
third quarter as the company repositions itself and cuts inventory.
The Greenbrier Cos. Inc., down $1.43 at $22.27
The railcar company posted a loss for its fiscal third quarter, and also cut
its 2013 forecast for new railcar deliveries.
DaVita HealthCare Partners Inc., down $7.15 at $114
Shares of the dialysis services provider fell after the government proposed
potential Medicare cuts that could hurt the company.
Nasdaq
Zynga Inc., up 20 cents at $3.27
The maker of online game “FarmVille”said that it hired Don Mattrick,the
head of Microsoft’s Xbox division, as its CEO.
Achillion Pharmaceuticals Inc., down $2.10 at $6.26
The drug developer said federal regulators placed a hold on the study
of a drug combination involving a potential hepatitis C treatment.
A. Schulman Inc., down $1.23 at $26.60
Plastic compounds and resins supplier said that its fiscal third-quarter
earnings sank 69 percent, hurt by declining sales.
Big movers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The stock market
ended slightly lower Tuesday after reports
of intensifying political turmoil in Egypt
offset good news about the U.S. economy.
Stocks rose most of the day on positive
news about car sales, home prices and
manufacturing. But major indexes turned
lower after 1:40 p.m. Eastern Daylight
Time after news emerged that Egypt’s mil-
itary had drawn up plans to suspend the
country’s constitution, dissolve its legisla-
ture and set up an interim government.
Millions of protesters are demanding the
ouster of President Mohammed Morsi.
The price of oil climbed close to $100 a
barrel on concern that the crisis in the
largest Arab nation could disrupt the flow
of crude from the region.
“It’s more or less Egypt unrest,” said Sal
Arnuk, co-founder of Themis Trading, a
brokerage firm that specializes in stocks.
“These very large protests are being tele-
vised and broadcast — that’s spooking
people.”
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index had
climbed as much as 9 points shortly before
midday. It then fell as much as 8 points
before closing down 0.88 point, or 0.1 per-
cent, at 1,614.08
The Dow Jones industrial average fell
42.55 points, or 0.3 percent, to 14,932.41
The Nasdaq composite slipped 1.09 points,
a fraction of a percentage point, at
3,433.40
Trading activity was lighter than normal,
influenced by the upcoming July 4 holiday.
The stock market will close at 1 p.m. on
Wednesday, ahead of the Independence
Day holiday on Thursday. The market re-
opens Friday.
Crude oil jumped about $1 a barrel after
news emerged of the worsening political
situation in Egypt. Oil closed up $1.61 at
$99.60 a barrel in New York. It last crossed
$100 on Sept. 14 of last year.
The market’s early gains were driven by
a number of strong economic reports.
U.S. auto sales reached 7.8 million in the
six months to June, the highest first-half
total since 2007. That helped lift Ford’s
stock 44 cents, or 2.8 percent, to $16.18.
U.S. factory orders rose in May, helped
by a third straight month of stronger busi-
ness investment.
Also, U.S. home prices jumped 12.2 per-
cent in May from a year earlier, the most in
seven years, according to real estate data
provider CoreLogic. The increase suggests
the housing recovery is strengthening.
When trading resumes Friday, investors
will turn their attention to a key gauge of
the economy — the government’s month-
ly employment report.
Economists forecast that the U.S. econ-
omy added 165,000 jobs in June, accord-
ing to data compiled by FactSet. The Dow
surged 200 points June 7 after the Labor
Department said that U.S. employers
added 175,000 jobs in May. The Federal
Reserve has said the jobs market will be
critical in determining when it ends its
bond buying, which has kept interest rates
low and driven a surge in stocks this year.
Investors and traders are also starting to
think about corporate earnings, which
begin in earnest next week. While corpo-
rate profits have reached record levels,
most of the gains have come from cutting
costs rather than increasing sales.
“We’re in the middle of a transition,”
said Chris Wolfe, chief investment officer
at Merrill Lynch Private Banking and
Investment Group. “You would expect to
see, over the balance of this year and going
into next year, somewhat stronger macro-
economic data that translates directly into
stronger corporate revenue growth.”
Alcoa, the first company in the Dow to
report earnings, will release its second-
quarter results after the market closes July
8.
Stocks lower on Egypt turmoil
By Dee-Ann Durbin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT — Three years ago, U.S. car
buyers started trickling back into showrooms
after largely sitting out the recession. That
trickle has turned into a flood.
From owners of revitalized small business-
es that need to replace aging pickups to new
hires who need a fresh set of wheels for the
daily commute, increasingly confident buy-
ers pushed auto sales back to pre-recession
levels in the first six months of this year.
Sales in the January-June period topped 7.8
million, their best first half since 2007,
according to Autodata Corp. and Ward’s
AutoInfoBank. Automakers reported June
sales Tuesday. They rose 9 percent to 1.4
million.
The outlook for the rest of 2013 is just as
strong. The factors boosting sales — low
interest rates, wider credit availability, rising
home construction and hot new vehicles —
will be around for a while, and experts are
hard-pressed for answers when asked what
could slow things down.
“It all points to continuing improvement in
the auto market,” said Mustafa Mohatarem,
General Motors’ chief economist.
Analysts expect total sales of around 15.5
million cars and trucks in 2013, which would
be 1 million more than in 2012. New cars
and trucks sold at an annualized rate of 15.96
million in June, the fastest monthly pace
since December 2007. From January to May,
the pace averaged 15.2 million, according to
Jessica Caldwell, a senior analyst at car buy-
ing site Edmunds.com.
Demand for big pickups has been the driv-
ing force. GM, Ford and Chrysler sold
157,480 full-size pickup trucks combined in
June. That is up around 25 percent from the
same month a year ago and almost double
the number the companies sold in June 2009,
a year when total sales sank to a 30-year low.
GM said its new Chevrolet Silverado and
GMC Sierra, which went on sale last month,
are spending just 10 days on dealer lots
before being sold. A 60-day stay is typical.
The pickup boom helps everyone, but
especially the Detroit automakers, which sell
the vast majority of trucks. And prices are
rising as automakers add fancier features.
Pickup trucks sold for an average $40,361 in
June, up 2 percent from last year, according
to Kelley Blue Book.
But trucks weren’t the only thing driving
sales. Small and subcompact cars sales were
also strong, possibly because young gradu-
ates went shopping for a new car, said Kelley
Blue Book analyst Alec Gutierrez. Relatively
high gas prices also may have steered some
buyers to more fuel-efficient models, he said.
Gas averaged $3.60 a gallon nationwide in
June, or 10 cents more than a year ago.
Sales of Ford’s recently updated Fiesta
subcompact more than doubled, while the
Hyundai Elantra small car saw a 22-percent
gain.
Family-haulers also did well to start the
summer road trip season. Honda said sales of
its Odyssey minivan jumped 26 percent. The
Toyota RAV4 SUV was up 36 percent, while
sales of the Jeep Grand Cherokee SUV rose
33 percent.
Auto sales maintain momentum, led by pickups
U.S. home prices rise in May by most in seven years
WASHINGTON — U.S. home prices jumped 12.2 percent
in May from a year ago, the most in seven years. The increase
suggests the housing recovery is strengthening.
Real estate data provider CoreLogic said Tuesday that home
prices rose from a year ago in 48 states. They fell only in
Delaware and Alabama. And all but three of the 100 largest
cities reported price gains.
Prices rose 26 percent in Nevada to lead all states. It was fol-
lowed by California (20.2 percent), Arizona (16.9 percent),
Hawaii (16.1 percent) and Oregon (15.5 percent).
CoreLogic also says prices rose 2.6 percent in May from
April, the fifteenth straight month-over-month increase.
Steady hiring and low mortgage rates have encouraged more
Americans to buy homes. Greater demand, a limited number of
homes for sale and fewer foreclosures have pushed prices high-
er. Prices are still 20 percent below the peak reached in April
2006, according to CoreLogic.
Sales of previously occupied homes topped the 5 million
mark in May for the first time in 3 1/2 years. And the propor-
tion of those sales that were “distressed” was at the lowest level
in more than four years for the second straight month.
Distressed home sales include foreclosures and short sales. A
short sale is when a home sells for less than what is owed on
the mortgage.
Home sales are expected to increase in the coming months.
That’s because the number of people who signed contracts to
buy homes rose in June to the highest level since December
2006. There’s generally a one- to two-month lag between a
signed contract and a completed sale.
One worry is that higher mortgage rates could slow the hous-
ing recovery. Still, rates remain low by historical standards.
And increases in rates could boost home sales. That’s’ because
many Americans may act to lock in the lower rates before they
rise further.
A survey by the University of Michigan released last week
found more Americans believe it is a good time to buy a home
because both rates and prices are just starting to rise.
Business brief
<< Aussie team leads the time trials, page 12
• CSM’s Feldman sent to Baltimore, page 15
Wednesday, July 3, 2013
WIMBLEDON: MARQUEE NAMES STILL IN PLAY FOR MEN’S CHAMPIONSHIP AT THE ALL-ENGLAND >> PAGE 12
By Eddie Pells
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON — If Sabine Lisicki had a let-
down after defeating Serena Williams, it did-
n’t show.
If Lisicki is penciling herself into the
Wimbledon final, she isn’t saying.
Showing no drop-off after her dramatic vic-
tory over Williams, the 23rd-seeded Lisicki
returned Tuesday and made quick work of a
much less intimidating opponent, 46th-ranked
Kaia Kanepi, dispatching her 6-3, 6-3 in 65
minutes to advance to her second career
Wimbledon semifinal.
“I was ready today,” Lisicki said. “I knew
from the past, out of experience, that I needed
to make the switch quickly to be ready, and
that’s what I did.”
Indeed. Lisicki opened the match by break-
ing Kanepi’s serve in the first game and didn’t
look back in that set. In the second, she had
one hiccup — a game in which she double-
faulted three times to drop a break and fall
behind 2-1. She broke back right away, how-
ever, and won four of the next five games to
close out the match.
Now, the 23-year-old German finds herself
in the Wimbledon semifinals for the second
time in three years. Her win against Williams
REUTERS
Sabine Lisicki of Germany celebrates her quarterfinal win over Kaia Kanepi at the All-England Club during the Wimbledon championships.
Lisicki keeps winning
Reds’ Bailey no-hits Giants
See WOMEN, Page 13
By Larry Lage
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Vincent Lecavalier, Danny Briere and Ilya
Bryzgalov have injected some more intrigue
into NHL free agency.
The potential crop of free agents this sum-
mer wasn’t exciting, a year after Ryan Suter
and Zach Parise created a buzz by hitting the
market, but some bought-out veterans are
boosting interest in who signs where this
week.
“The depth isn’t what it has been in past
year, but there are some very good players
available,” Nashville Predators general man-
ager David Poile said in a telephone inter-
view with The Associated Press on Tuesday.
“It’s a different situation, though, with the
lower cap so it’ll be interesting to see what
this crop of free agents gets both in terms of
salary and years.”
The NHL’s salary cap will be $64.3 million
for the 2013-14 season, a total significantly
less than the $70.2 million in contracts teams
could have on the books during the lockout-
delayed season.
The Tampa Bay Lightning let Lecavalier,
their 33-year-old captain, go last week. The
Philadelphia Flyers took advantage of both
of their compliance buyouts to cut ties with
Briere, a 35-year-old forward, and
See NHL, Page 14
By Joe Kay
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CINCINNATI — Homer Bailey threw his
second no-hitter in 10 months and the first
in the majors this season, pitching the
Cincinnati Reds to a 3-0 victory over the
slumping San Francisco Giants on Tuesday
night.
Bailey (5-6) became the third Reds pitch-
er with more than one no-hitter, joining Jim
Maloney and Johnny Vander Meer — still
the only big leaguer to
toss two in a row. Bailey
beat the Pirates 1-0 in
Pittsburgh last Sept. 28
and got another 17 starts
later.
The last pitcher to
throw one no-hitter and
then another before any-
one else in the majors
accomplished the feat
was Hall of Famer Nolan Ryan, according to
STATS.
Baseball’s career strikeout king did it for
the California Angels on Sept. 28, 1974,
against Minnesota, and June 1, 1975, vs.
Baltimore.
Bailey walked Gregor Blanco leading off
the seventh, the only Giants batter to reach
base. First baseman Joey Votto threw out
Blanco as he tried to advance from second to
third on a grounder.
With 27,509 fans on their feet chanting
“Homer! Homer!” Bailey finished it off by
See GIANTS, Page 14
See PUIG, Page 14
Yasiel Puig probably won’t finish the season
hitting .436, though by now there’s a growing
number of people in Los Angeles who surely
believe he can.
Hard to fault them, because Puig has turned
a lot of people into believers in the month he
has played baseball in the big leagues.
The buzz he’s generating at Dodger Stadium
is reminiscent of what Fernandomania was
like when Fernando Valenzuela took the
mound more than three decades ago. The
numbers he’s put up in his first month at the
plate bring comparisons to the debut of Joe
DiMaggio 77 years ago.
He’s a 22-year-old phenom who put a spark
in the Dodgers when
they were desperate for
it most. He may have
saved manager Don
Mattingly’s job, and he
may just save the season
for the Dodgers.
History says it won’t
last. Never does at this
level, where pitchers and
hitters continually
engage in a cat-and-
mouse game of adjust-
ments and more adjust-
ments.
But there’s not much
doubt by now that the player called “wild
horse” by Mattingly in spring training because
of the way he attacks the game is something
special. Fans make sure they’re back from the
beer lines in time to watch him hit, and even a
Puig strikeout has a certain air of excitement
to it.
“He kind of reminds me of myself,”
Dodgers center fielder Matt Kemp said.
“Sometimes he plays too hard, and sometimes
you have to tell him: ‘Man, calm down. You
Puigmania
breaks out
TIM
DAHLBERG
NHL free
agency
heats up
Homer Bailey
SPORTS 12
Wednesday • July 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NICE, France — Simon Gerrans
started cycling because another
Australian, who first wore a Tour de
France yellow jersey, lent him a bike
to help him recover from an injury.
Now Gerrans is wearing a Tour
leader’s jersey of his own.
He was part of the Orica Greenedge
squad that won the team time trial by
less than 1 second Tuesday in the
fourth stage, putting him in the over-
all lead.
One day in yellow doesn’t place
him in the category of his famous
countrymen Phil Anderson, the first
Aussie to wear the coveted jersey in
1981, or Cadel Evans, the 2011 Tour
winner.
But the 33-year-old Gerrans is still
proud of his accomplishment after
Anderson introduced him to the sport.
“Phil was the first Australian to
wear the yellow jersey and now to be
the latest Australian to wear the yel-
low jersey, it’s a very special feeling,”
he said.
Considered an outsider to win the
15.5-mile dash along the streets of the
southern seaport of Nice, Orica edged
pacesetter Omega Pharma-Quickstep
by 0.75 seconds and finished in 25
minutes, 56 seconds. The top four
teams finishing within 10 seconds of
each other.
Gerrans, who won stage 3 in a
sprint finish, took the overall lead
from Belgian rider Jan Bakelants.
Chris Froome of Sky team is 3 sec-
onds behind Gerrans for the overall
lead, while two-time Tour champion
Contador is 6 seconds behind
Froome.
Gerrans said Anderson was his first
coach and “lent me a bike to get start-
ed in competitive cycling” as a “form
of rehabilitation because of some
knee injuries I sustained while racing
motorbikes.”
Gerrans, who is not a contender for
overall victory, hopes to keep the jer-
sey for “a couple more days.” The
next two stages are mostly flat, so he
may well be able to protect his lead if
there are no crashes or he gets anoth-
er stage win like he did on Monday.
The Orica riders formed a circle
and then hugged and slapped each
other on the back when they were
sure of the win.
“It’s certainly been a very, very big
two days,” said team sporting director
Matt White. “Most teams are judged
very much by how they perform here
at the Tour de France.”
Race favorite Froome’s Sky team
finished third, 3 seconds off the pace,
while rival Contador’s Saxo-Tinkoff
finished 9 seconds back.
“We’ll take that result,” Sky team
boss Dave Brailsford said. “The boys
pulled together.”
The peloton returned to mainland
France after three stages in the sear-
ing heat and sinewy climbs of
Corsica.
Under sunny blue skies, the teams
set off at 4-minute intervals and the
overall team standings were reversed,
meaning the first team to go was
Argos-Shimano and the last was
RadioShack.
Argos-Shimano, including Marcel
Kittel — the German who won the
Tour’s hectic first stage — finished
last, nearly 2 minutes off the pace.
Omega set a ferociously quick time
despite the fact their best rider —
Tony Martin — was carrying the
scars from his fall on stage 1.
Aussie Gerrans in lead after Tour team time trial
REUTERS
The Orica Greenedge team rides down the streets of Nice, France.
Connecticut cops: Double slaying
probe tied to Aaron Hernandez
BOSTON — Boston police have asked author-
ities in the Connecticut hometown of Aaron
Hernandez for their help with an investigation into
a double homicide connected to the former NFL
star, police said Tuesday.
Hernandez is already charged with murder in
the shooting death of his friend Odin Lloyd, whose
body was found June 17 near Hernandez’s home
in North Attleborough, Mass.
The request from Boston police in the July 2012
double homicide was based on evidence devel-
oped through the investigation of Lloyd’s slaying,
Bristol Police Lt. Kevin Morrell said. He said
police were asked to search the same home in
Bristol for both investigations, and a vehicle was
seized at the address on Friday.
Two people were killed in the shooting in
Boston’s south end on July 15, 2012. Witnesses
reported seeing people inside a grey SUV with
Rhode Island plates open fire on a vehicle carrying
the victims.
SPORTS 13
Wednesday • July 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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made her the new, odds-on favorite to win the
title and even pushed Britain’s favorite tennis
player, Andy Murray, off the back pages of a
couple London tabloids.
All of which means almost nothing — at
least to hear Lisicki tell it.
“Match by match,” she said. “Did that from
the start and will continue to do that.”
Her next opponent is No. 4 Agnieszka
Radwanska, who defeated No. 6 Li Na 7-6 (5),
4-6, 6-2 in a match that took more than 3 1/2
hours to complete and included two rain
delays, an injury timeout and a final game that
lasted more than 10 minutes.
The other semifinal will pit No. 15 Marion
Bartoli of France against No. 20 Kirsten
Flipkens of Belgium.
Flipkens beat eighth-seeded Petra Kvitova
4-6, 6-3, 6-4 to knock the last remaining
Grand Slam tournament winner out of the
draw. Flipkens won her first career Grand
Slam quarterfinal, continuing quite a come-
back from health problems that dropped her to
No. 262 last year, not even eligible for the
Wimbledon qualifying tournament.
“The people believing in me, I can count on
one hand,” said Flipkens, who was sidelined
with blood clots in her legs. “It’s amazing.”
Bartoli eliminated the last remaining
American singles player, beating Sloane
Stephens 6-4, 7-5 in a match that included a 2
1/2-hour rain delay. After the delay, Bartoli
came out and won two points to secure the
first set. Soon after, she was showered with
boos because she had asked the umpire to stop
the match in the first set when it started sprin-
kling on Court 1.
“I didn’t really get why the crowd was so
against me at that point,” Bartoli said.
“Already, the courts were a bit slippery even
when it’s dry. When it’s wet, it can get dan-
gerous. I didn’t want to stop the match for no
reason. It was a precaution. I saw the crowd go
against me but I’m just glad to be moving on
to the semifinals.”
This is her deepest trip at a Grand Slam
since the 2011 French Open and her deepest
trip at Wimbledon since 2007, when she lost
to Venus Williams in what remains her only
Grand Slam final.
Radwanska moved one win from her second
straight Wimbledon final, putting Li away on
the eighth match point. Radwanska called for
a medical timeout after the second set so a
trainer could work on her right thigh. Up 5-2
in the third set, she called for the trainer again
for a quick treatment on both legs.
“If it’s the end of a Grand Slam you don’t
really think about the pain or anything else,”
Radwanska said. “You just fight until the end.
That’s what I was doing today.”
With Radwanska advancing, Poland is guar-
anteed a semifinalist in both the men’s and
women’s draws. On Wednesday, Jerzy
Janowicz plays Lukasz Kubot in an all-Polish
men’s quarterfinal.
“I kind of started it,” said Radwanska, who
last year became the first Polish woman to
reach a Grand Slam final since 1939, before
falling to Williams. “It’s great to have, now,
the guys doing very, very well. Especially
Jerzy. He’s a young, great, upcoming player. I
believe he’s also going to be top-10. This is,
for sure, not his last quarterfinal of a Grand
Slam.”
While all the other quarterfinalists were bat-
tling each other and the rain, Lisicki had the
luxury of sitting back and watching all the
action unfold. Her match against Kanepi was
over quickly — and nowhere near as grueling
as the emotion-packed upset over Williams the
previous day.
Continued from page 11
WOMEN
Sports briefs
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON — No. 1-seeded Novak Djokovic
and No. 2 Andy Murray have yet to lose a set,
let alone a match, so far at Wimbledon.
The way things have been going at the All
England Club this fortnight, that’s quite an
accomplishment.
Rafael Nadal, a 12-time Grand Slam champi-
on, was beaten in the first round. Roger Federer,
owner of a record 17 major titles, went out in the
second, as did four-time major champ Maria
Sharapova. Five-time Wimbledon winner
Serena Williams’ 34-match winning streak
ended in the fourth round.
And on and on it’s gone, with no top-20 play-
er other than Murray left on his side of the draw,
and a record-equaling number of withdrawals or
mid-match retirements because of health prob-
lems.
“Everyone was a bit on edge, a little bit
uptight,” reigning U.S. Open champion Murray
acknowledged, “because of what was happen-
ing with the injuries, withdrawals, upsets and
stuff.”
He and Djokovic have made it all look so rou-
tine, though, heading into the men’s quarterfi-
nals Wednesday.
On the top half of the bracket, Djokovic — a
six-time Grand Slam titlist and the only remain-
ing past Wimbledon winner — will face No. 7
Tomas Berdych of the Czech Republic, the 2010
runner-up. No. 4 David Ferrer of Spain plays
No. 8 Juan Martin del Potro of Argentina, the
2009 U.S. Open champion and the third man
who hasn’t dropped a set through four matches.
On the bottom half, it will be Murray against
54th-ranked Fernando Verdasco of Spain, and
No. 24 Jerzy Janowicz against his Davis Cup
teammate and pal, 130th-ranked Lukasz Kubot,
in a match between the first two Polish men to
reach a Grand Slam quarterfinal since 1980.
“Magical,” Janowicz said.
In keeping with the unpredictable nature of
the tournament, whoever wins the women’s title
will be a first-time Grand Slam champion.
Thursday’s semifinals are 2012 runner-up
Agnieszka Radwanska of Poland against 23rd-
seeded Sabine Lisicki of Germany (who beat
Williams on Monday), and 2007 runner-up
Marion Bartoli of France against 20th-seeded
Kirsten Flipkens of Belgium.
Janowicz and Kubot will be playing in the
quarterfinals at the grass-court Grand Slam tour-
nament for the first time, as will Verdasco and
del Potro. Ferrer lost at that stage last year.
The other three have much more solid
Wimbledon bona fides: Murray (2012) and
Berdych (2010) have been the runner-up, while
Djokovic won the title in 2011.
“I feel good about myself in this moment. I
think I actually play a better tennis on grass than
I played two years ago, when I won this tourna-
ment,” said Djokovic, who never before had
won every set he played in five previous trips to
the Wimbledon quarterfinals. “For now, I’m
feeling good. I’m No. 1 of the world. I have no
reason to be concerned about my game.”
He is bidding to reach the semifinals for a
13th consecutive Slam, the second-longest
streak in men’s tennis history, behind only
Federer’s 23-semifinal run.
Djokovic has played in seven of the last 10
major finals, and he’s combined with Federer
and Nadal to win 31 of the past 33 trophies.
The only other men in those eight-plus years
to win a Grand Slam title were Murray and del
Potro. Murray has elbowed his way into the
upper echelon, turning the Federer-Nadal-
Djokovic Big 3 into a Big 4 lately, participating
in the finals of the last three major tournaments
he entered (he missed this year’s French Open
with a bad back).
Djokovic, Murray head cast for quarters
REUTERS
Novak Djokovic celebrates a Wimbledon win.
getting Brandon Crawford on a high come-
backer, striking out Tony Abreu and retiring
Blanco on a grounder to third baseman Todd
Frazier.
When Votto caught the throw for the final
out, Bailey raised both arms in triumph, remi-
niscent of that grand moment in Pittsburgh last
September, then hugged catcher Ryan
Hanigan.
Teammates poured onto the field to cele-
brate and doused with a red sports drink.
It was the 16th no-hitter in Cincinnati histo-
ry. No Reds pitcher had thrown a no-no at
home since Tom Browning’s 1-0 perfect game
against the Dodgers at Riverfront Stadium on
Sept. 16, 1988.
Bailey became the third pitcher in the histo-
ry of baseball’s first professional franchise to
get more than one.
Vander Meer threw the only back-to-back
no-hitters in major league history in 1938,
beating Boston and Brooklyn. Maloney had a
no-hitter at Wrigley Field in 1965 and one at
home against Houston in 1969.
The Giants were no-hit for the 16th time.
The last three pitchers to hold them hitless
were all named Kevin — LA’s Gross in 1992,
Florida’s Brown in 1997 and Philadelphia’s
Millwood in 2003.
Bailey was facing a lineup in a deep funk —
two runs or less in nine of San Francisco’s last
12 games. He didn’t need much help to keep
the no-hitter going — the Giants went rather
quietly.
Last year was the season of the no-hitter,
with seven in all, which tied the modern
record. By this point, five had been thrown. So
far in 2013, there had been only two close
calls.
Texas’Yu Darvish was working on a perfect
game when he gave up a two-out single in the
ninth to Houston’s Marwin Gonzalez during a
7-0 win on April 2. Detroit’s Anibal Sanchez
gave up a one-out single in the ninth to
Minnesota’s Joe Mauer in a 6-0 win on May
24.
SPORTS 14
Wednesday • July 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
can’t make every play.’ But he’s done an
amazing job in his first month in the big
leagues. He’s gotten big hits and made big
plays on defense. He’s doing a lot, and I think
we’re just feeding off the kid.”
A month ago the question was whether the
Cuban could handle the lifestyle of a major
league player. Now it’s whether one spectacu-
lar month in the bigs is enough for an invite to
the All-Star game.
Already, a write-in campaign for Puig is
underway online. Even if that falls short, it
would be hard to imagine fellow players not
voting Puig in as a backup or manager Bruce
Bochy not using one of his selections on him.
His statistical sampling is small, yes, but it
tells a big story. In just 101 official at bats he’s
hitting .436 and his OPS of 1.180 is the best in
the National league. His 44 hits since being
called up on June 3 are a monthly rookie
record for the Dodgers, and only DiMaggio
(48, May 1936) had more in his first calendar
month in the majors.
He looks a lot like Bo Jackson once did,
though so far he’s connected with curve balls
at a lot higher rate than Jackson ever did. His
seven home runs have included shots down
the left-field line and into the right-center
bleachers.
He’s also figured out how to say the right
things in postgame interviews, even if they’re
translated from Spanish.
“I’m really excited to be part of that list,”
Puig said after getting four hits Sunday in a
win against Philadelphia, “but more excited
that the team is winning.”
Indeed, the team is finally winning, much to
the relief of Mattingly and the new owners
who bankrolled more than $200 million in
payroll this year. The Dodgers still haven’t
reached .500, but after winning eight of their
last nine are just four games out in the NL
West.
Puig wasn’t supposed to be the player to get
them there, even after impressing everyone in
his first stint in spring training. He was sent to
the minors for seasoning before things really
got desperate at Chavez Ravine and he was
called up to play right field.
He hasn’t been out of the lineup since, ener-
gizing his teammates not only with his bat but
with daredevil base running that doesn’t
always end well. After stealing two bases him-
self last week to set up the winning run in a
game, Kemp was asked what the difference
was in the Dodgers of early season and mid-
season.
“Puig,” he answered.
The Dodgers took a big chance on Puig,
who was viewed as a raw talent when he was
signed for $42 million over seven years in a
gamble only a deep-pocketed team can afford.
The contract now looks like a bargain on a
team loaded with big contracts, including one
with Andre Ethier, who used to occupy right
field at Dodger Stadium and could be the odd
man out in the outfield once Carl Crawford
returns from injury.
For all Puig is doing on the field for the
Dodgers, his impact on the franchise might be
greater than his ability to hit or run the bases.
Before he was called up the Dodgers were
struggling mightily, and Dodger Stadium was
littered with empty seats.
Now, fans who are notorious for leaving
early to beat the traffic are staying to the end
of games just to get another chance to see
Puig hit.
The .436 average isn’t likely to last the sum-
mer. But early indications are Puigmania
could be in for a long run in LA.
Continued from page 11
PUIG
Bryzgalov, a 33-year-old goaltender.
Potential free agents such as forward Mike
Ribeiro, who appears to have passed on re-
signing with Washington, or other players
who weren’t welcomed back, will hit the mar-
ket Wednesday for the first of a two-day inter-
view period before any deals can be signed.
“It’s great to have players out there,” Detroit
Red Wings coach Mike Babcock told AP, “but
you have to have money to spend.”
Lecavalier, Briere and Bryzgalov, along
with the other free agents, will be able to sign
as soon as Friday with teams willing to make
an aggressive move by offering a relatively
long-term contract to jockey for position in
the closely contested league.
Lecavalier likely will be the No. 1 target.
“Are we interested? Absolutely,” said Dallas
Stars general manager Jim Nill, entering his
first offseason leading a franchise. “But so are
probably 28 other teams. It’ll come down to
money and fit.”
Lecavalier didn’t mesh with Tampa Bay’s
plans, or at least his contract didn’t with seven
years and $45 million remaining on it. The
four-time All-Star, drafted No. 1 overall by the
Lightning in 1998, helped the franchise hoist
the Stanley Cup in 2004 and scored a fran-
chise-high 383 goals. By buying him out, it
saved Tampa Bay more than $7.7 million cap
space for the upcoming season. The move cost
them $32 million over 14 years because he is
due two-thirds the value of his deal spread
over twice the term of the contract. He scored
a league-high 52 times during the 2006-07
season and had 32 points in 39 games during
the shortened season.
Lecavalier hit the market running, too. In
fact, at least two teams — Philadelphia and
Boston — had informal discussions with him
during NHL Draft weekend in Newark, N.J.
Briere scored just six goals and had a mere
16 points in 34 games last season, but he’s just
two years removed from a 34-goal, 34-assist
year. The Flyers chose to buy out the final two
Continued from page 11
NHL
Continued from page 11
GIANTS
SPORTS 15
Wednesday • July 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 49 34 .590 —
Washington 42 41 .506 7
Philadelphia 40 44 .476 9 1/2
New York 35 45 .438 12 1/2
Miami 30 52 .366 18 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Pittsburgh 51 31 .622 —
St. Louis 49 32 .605 1 1/2
Cincinnati 48 36 .571 4
Chicago 35 45 .438 15
Milwaukee 33 49 .402 18
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 42 41 .506 —
Colorado 41 43 .488 1 1/2
San Diego 40 44 .476 2 1/2
Los Angeles 39 43 .476 2 1/2
San Francisco 39 44 .470 3
Tuesday’s Games
Milwaukee 4, Washington 0
Philadelphia 3, Pittsburgh 1
N.Y. Mets 9, Arizona 1
Atlanta 11, Miami 3
Boston 4, San Diego 1
Cincinnati 3, San Francisco 0
L.A. Dodgers 8, Colorado 0
Chicago Cubs at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
St. Louis at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 51 34 .600 —
Baltimore 47 37 .560 3 1/2
Tampa Bay 45 39 .536 5 1/2
New York 44 39 .530 6
Toronto 41 42 .494 9
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 45 38 .542 —
Detroit 44 38 .537 1/2
Kansas City 38 42 .475 5 1/2
Minnesota 36 44 .450 7 1/2
Chicago 33 47 .413 10 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 48 35 .578 —
Texas 48 35 .578 —
Los Angeles 39 43 .476 8 1/2
Seattle 36 47 .434 12
Houston 30 54 .357 18 1/2
Tuesday’sGames
Detroit 7,Toronto 6
Boston 4, San Diego 1
Seattle 9,Texas 2
Chicago White Sox 5, Baltimore 2
Cleveland 6, Kansas City 5
N.Y.Yankees 7, Minnesota 3
Tampa Bay 8, Houston 0
Chicago Cubs at Oakland, late
AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Montreal 9 3 2 29 24 17
Philadelphia 7 5 4 25 25 24
New York 7 6 4 25 23 22
Kansas City 6 5 5 23 20 15
Houston 6 5 5 23 19 16
Columbus 5 6 5 20 19 18
New England 5 5 5 20 18 13
Chicago 5 7 3 18 15 21
Toronto FC 2 7 6 12 14 20
D.C. 2 11 3 9 8 26
WESTERNCONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Portland 7 1 9 30 28 16
Real Salt Lake 9 5 3 30 26 16
FC Dallas 8 3 5 29 25 20
Los Angeles 7 6 3 24 23 18
Vancouver 6 5 4 22 25 24
Seattle 6 5 3 21 19 17
Colorado 5 7 5 20 17 19
San Jose 4 7 6 18 15 25
Chivas USA 3 10 2 11 14 30
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
———
Saturday’s Games
Real Salt Lake at Toronto FC, 10 a.m.
FC Dallas at Philadelphia, 2:30 p.m.
Colorado at Montreal, 4 p.m.
Vancouver at D.C. United, 4 p.m.
Columbus at Sporting Kansas City, 5:30 p.m.
MLS GLANCE
@Chicago
5:30p.m.
CSN-PLUS
7/3
@NERev
4:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/6
vs.Seattle
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/13
@Reds
4:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/3
@Reds
4:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/2
@Reds
10:10a.m.
CSN-BAY
7/4
vs.Dodgers
4:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/6
vs.Dodgers
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/5
vs.Dodgers
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/7
vs.Mets
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/8
@Royals
11:10a.m.
CSN-BAY
7/6
@Royals
5:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/5
@Royals
11:10a.m.
CSN-BAY
7/7
@Pirates
4:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/8
vs. Cubs
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/4
vs. Cubs
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/2
vs. Cubs
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/3
vs.Norwich
City
7:30p.m.
7/20
vs.Portland
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/27
vs. Chivas
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/4
BASEBALL
National League
CHICAGOCUBS—Traded RHP Scott Feldman and
C Steve Clevenger to Baltimore for RHPs Jake Arri-
eta and Pedro Strop and two international signing
bonus slots.Optioned Arrieta to Iowa (PCL).Traded
RHP Carlos Marmol to the L.A. Dodgers for RHP
Matt Guerrier.Traded INF Ronald Torreyes to Hous-
tonfor twointernational signingbonusslots.Placed
OF Ryan Sweeney on the 60-day DL,retroactive to
Sunday. Recalled OF Dave Sappelt and LHP Chris
Rusin from Iowa (PCL).
COLORADOROCKIES—Placed OF Dexter Fowler
onthe15-dayDL,retroactivetoJune26.Reinstated
RHP Edgmer Escalona from the 15-day DL.
MIAMI MARLINS—Optioned OF Jordan Brown
toNewOrleans (PCL).Recalled2BDonovanSolano
from New Orleans.
MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Agreed to terms with
SSs Henry Correa and Franly Mallen, C Johel Aten-
cio, RHP Nelson Hernandez and OF Nicolas Pierre
on minor league contracts.
NEWYORKMETS—Sent SS Ruben Tejada to Las
Vegas (PCL) for a rehab assignment.Optioned INF
ZachLutztoLasVegas.RecalledRHPGonzalezGer-
men from Las Vegas.
PITTSBURGHPIRATES—Optioned INF Josh Har-
rison to Indianapolis (IL). Recalled RHP Brandon
Cumpton from Indianapolis.Agreed to terms with
RHP Jerry Mulderig on a minor league contract.
ST.LOUISCARDINALS—Agreed to terms with OF
Carlos Talavera, SS Hector Linares, RHP Sandy Al-
cantara and LHP Kerrion Bennett on minor league
contracts.
SANDIEGOPADRES—Sent SS Everth Cabrera to
Fort Wayne (MWL) for a rehab assignment.
TRANSACTIONS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO — The Chicago Cubs
dealt starting pitcher Scott Feldman
to the Baltimore Orioles on Tuesday
and traded former All-Star Carlos
Marmol to the Los Angeles Dodgers
in exchange for veteran reliever
Matt Guerrier.
The Cubs got right-handed pitch-
ers Jake Arrieta and Pedro Strop as
well as two international signing
bonus slots from the Orioles in
exchange for Feldman and catcher
Steve Clevenger.
Feldman signed a one-year con-
tract with the Cubs and went 7-6
with a 3.46 ERA in 15 starts this
season. He is 46-50 with a 4.66
ERA in 219 major league games
over nine seasons.
Feldman was scheduled to start
Tuesday night at the Oakland
Athletics. Instead, lefty Chris Rusin
was called up from Triple-A Iowa to
take his place.
Arrieta is 20-25 with a 5.46 ERA
over the last four seasons with
Baltimore (2010-13). Strop was 5-2
with three saves, 24 holds and a
2.44 ERA last season as the primary
setup man for the Orioles. He has
battled a back strain this year, going
0-3 with a 7.25 ERA. Arrieta will be
assigned to Iowa while Strop is
expected to report to the Cubs later
this week.
Guerrier is 25-33 with six saves
and a 3.54 ERA over 10 seasons in
the major leagues. He went 2-3 with
a 4.80 ERA this season before being
designated for assignment by the
Dodgers on Sunday. The Cubs des-
ignated Marmol for assignment last
week after he had gone 2-4 with two
saves and a 5.86 ERA in 31 appear-
ances, striking out 32 while walking
21 batters.
An All-Star as a setup man in
2008, Marmol’s best year as closer
was 2010, when he had 38 saves in
43 chances along with 138 strike-
outs and 52 walks. But fans had
been booing him and management
was eager to cut a deal with the
Dodgers, who also acquired an
international signing bonus slot.
The Cubs also said they had
acquired two international signing
bonus slots from the Houston Astros
for minor league infielder Ronald
Torreyes, who batted .260 with two
home runs and 25 RBI in 64 games
with Double-A Tennessee this sea-
son. He was originally acquired by
the Cubs with left-handed pitcher
Travis Wood and outfielder Dave
Sappelt from Cincinnati for left-
handed pitcher Sean Marshall in
2011.
Sappelt was recalled from Iowa,
and outfielder Ryan Sweeney (frac-
tured rib) was placed on the 60-day
disabled list retroactive to Sunday.
Cubs deal CSM’s Feldman to Orioles, Marmol to Dodgers
16
Wednesday • July 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATION
by
Special:
4 Speakers
650-354-1100
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATLANTA — Overdose deaths in the U.S. are
rising fastest among middle-aged women, and
their drug of choice is usually prescription
painkillers, the government reported Tuesday.
“Mothers, wives, sisters and daughters are
dying at rates that we have never seen before,”
said Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers
for Disease Control and Prevention, which com-
piled the data.
The problem is one of the few health issues the
CDC is working on that are clearly getting worse,
he added.
For many decades, the overwhelming majority
of U.S. overdose deaths were men killed by hero-
in or cocaine. But by 2010, 40 percent were
women — most of them middle-aged women
who took prescription painkillers.
Skyrocketing female overdose death rates are
closely tied to a boom in the overall use of pre-
scribed painkillers. The new report is the CDC’s
first to spotlight how the death trend has been
more dramatic among women.
The CDC found that the number and rate of
prescription painkiller overdose deaths among
females increased about fivefold 1999 to 2010.
Among men, such deaths rose about 3 1/2 times.
Overall, more men still die from overdoses of
painkillers and other drugs; there were about
23,000 such deaths in 2010, compared with about
15,300 for women. Men tend to take more risks
with drugs than women, and often are more
prone to the kind of workplace injuries that lead
to their being prescribed painkillers in the first
place, experts say.
But the gap has been narrowing dramatically.
Studies suggest that women are more likely to
have chronic pain, to be prescribed higher doses,
and to use pain drugs longer than men. Some
research suggests women may be more likely
than men to “doctor shop” and get pain pills from
several physicians, CDC officials said.
But many doctors may not recognize these
facts about women, said John Eadie, director of a
Brandeis University program that tracks prescrip-
tion-drug monitoring efforts across the United
States.
The report highlights the need for “a mindset
change” by doctors, who have traditionally
thought of drug abuse as a men’s problem, he
said. That means doctors should consider the pos-
sibility of addiction in female patients, think of
alternative treatments for chronic pain, and con-
sult state drug monitoring programs to find out if
a patient has a worrisome history with painkillers.
The CDC report focuses on prescription opi-
oids like Vicodin and OxyContin and their gener-
ic forms, methadone, and a powerful newer drug
called Opana, or oxymorphone.
Overdose drug deaths spike
among middle-aged women
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — In a major concession
to business groups, the Obama administration
Tuesday unexpectedly announced a one-year
delay, until 2105, in a central requirement of
the new health care law that medium and large
companies provide coverage for their workers
or face fines.
The move sacrificed timely implementation
of President Barack Obama’s signature legis-
lation but may help the administration politi-
cally by blunting a line of attack Republicans
were planning to use in next year’s congres-
sional elections. The employer requirements
are among the most complex parts of the
health care law, which is designed to expand
coverage for uninsured Americans.
“We have heard concerns about the com-
plexity of the requirements and the need for
more time to implement them effectively,”
Treasury Assistant Secretary Mark Mazur said
in a blog post. “We have listened to your feed-
back and we are taking
action.”
Business groups were
jubilant. “A pleasant sur-
prise,” said Randy
Johnson, senior vice presi-
dent of the U.S. Chamber
of Commerce. There was
no inkling in advance of
the administration’s
action, he said.
Under the law, companies with 50 or more
workers must provide affordable coverage to
their full-time employees or risk a series of
escalating tax penalties if just one worker
ends up getting government-subsidized insur-
ance.
Originally, that requirement was supposed
to take effect next Jan. 1. Business groups
complained since the law passed that the pro-
vision was too complicated. For instance, the
law created a new definition of full-time
workers, those putting in 30 hours or more.
But such complaints until now seemed to be
going unheeded.
The delay in the employer requirement does
not affect the law’s requirement that individu-
als carry health insurance starting next year or
face fines. That so-called individual mandate
was challenged all the way to the Supreme
Court, which ruled last year that requirement
was constitutional since the penalty would be
collected by the Internal Revenue Service and
amounted to a tax.
Tuesday’s action is sure to anger liberals
and labor groups, but it could provide cover
for Democratic candidates in next year’s con-
gressional elections.
The move undercuts Republican efforts to
make the overhaul and the costs associated
with new requirements a major issue in con-
gressional races. Democrats are defending 21
Senate seats to the Republicans’ 14, and the
GOP had already started to excoriate Senate
Democrats who had voted for the health law
in 2009.
Senior White House adviser Valerie Jarrett
cast the decision as part of an effort to simpli-
fy data reporting requirements.
She said since enforcing the coverage man-
date is dependent on businesses reporting
about their workers’ access to insurance, the
administration decided to postpone the report-
ing requirement, and with it, the mandate to
provide coverage.
“We have and will continue to make
changes as needed,” Jarrett wrote in a White
House blog post. “In our ongoing discussions
with businesses we have heard that you need
the time to get this right. We are listening.”
Republicans called it a validation of their
belief that the law is unworkable and should
be repealed.
“Obamacare costs too much and it isn’t
working the way the administration prom-
ised,” said Senate Republican leader Mitch
McConnell of Kentucky. “The White House
seems to slowly be admitting what Americans
already know ... that Obamacare needs to be
repealed and replaced with common-sense
reforms that actually lower costs for
Americans.”
Delays in major requirement of health law
Mark Mazur
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEATTLE — The lawyers who represent poor
people charged with federal crimes across the
country say they already face an unfair fight when
they head into court against the resources of the
Justice Department — and that’s only going to get
worse if draconian budget cuts occur as planned
next year.
As a result of the automatic cuts known as
sequestration, federal public defender offices have
recently been told they must reduce spending by
14 percent for fiscal year 2014, on top of the
roughly 9 percent suffered this year.
The result, the lawyers say, will be drastic lay-
offs for public defenders, expensive case delays
and costly appeals — all for nothing, as pricier pri-
vate attorneys are expected to step in to fill the void
at government expense.
“Absent some immediate action, federal defend-
ers will begin the process this summer of laying off
between a third and half of their staff,” said a
memo prepared by several federal public defend-
ers. “They will begin closing many offices. The
cuts will result in irreparable damage to the crimi-
nal justice system, and paradoxically, greater
expense to the taxpayer as indigent defendants are
increasingly assigned private counsel.”
Congress provides about $1 billion for the rep-
resentation of criminal defendants who can’t
afford their own lawyer. The money is split evenly
between federal public defender program, which
was established in 1970, and private attorneys,
who are generally paid $125 an hour to represent
defendants who can’t be represented by the public
defenders because of conflicts of interest or other
reasons.
Because the right to counsel is a constitutional
guarantee, the federal defenders have no control
over their workloads. When someone is charged
and needs a lawyer, they’re appointed. If public
defenders have to take fewer cases due to staffing
cuts that work will fall to the private lawyers —
who cost substantially more than full-time federal
defenders, studies have shown.
“There are no actual savings here,” said Tom
Hillier, the chief federal public defender in Seattle.
“Sooner or later Congress is going to have to come
to grips with the fact that they’re destroying insti-
tutions, and they’re not saving money.”
Under this year’s cuts, some public defenders
lost their jobs and the rest are taking up to 20 days
of unpaid leave. The federal public defender’s
office in Los Angeles is simply closing for three
weeks in September. The chief federal defender in
southern Ohio laid himself off.
In New York, the trial of Osama bin Laden’s
son-in-law was delayed because the public
defenders who were representing him had to take
furloughs, and in Boston, the lawyers for the sur-
viving marathon bombing suspect have had to do
it amid unpaid time off.
Federal public defenders
warn of dire budget cuts
FOOD 17
Wednesday • July 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EXPIRES: July 31, 2013
JACK’S RESTAURANT & BAR: SAN BRUNO
1050 Admiral Court, Suite A
San Bruno, CA 94066
Phone: (650) 589-2222 | Fax: (650) 589-5042
iLoveJacks.com
By Michael Felberbaum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
RICHMOND, Va. — Nearly 80 years ago
Richmond revolutionized the beer world. For
it was in this Southern city in 1935 that
canned beer — complete with how-to instruc-
tions — was first sold.
Krueger’s Cream Ale and its punch-top can
became an instant hit, propelling the humble
beer can to iconic status. That is, until
Americans returned to bottles and the
beloved craft brews they contained, a cultural
turn that left canned beer looking decidedly
low-brow.
But more recently craft brewers rediscov-
ered cans, realizing they weren’t just retro-
cool, but with a few tweaks might even be
able to kick bottles in the can.
Welcome to the beer can revolution, 2013-
style. Technology once again is transforming
how Americans drink their beer.
Today, Budweiser sells a bow tie-shaped
can that mirrors its iconic logo, Miller Lite
sports a punch-top can, drinkers know their
Coors Light is cold when the mountains on
the can turn blue, Sam Adams Boston Lager
comes in cans designed to improve the taste,
and now Sly Fox Brewing Co. sells beer in
“topless” cans designed to turn into cups
when opened.
“It’s not your father’s beer can anymore,”
says Jim Koch, founder and owner of the
Boston Beer Co., the maker of Sam Adams.
Both craft brewers and craft beer drinkers
are coming around to the idea of cans. More
affordable supplies and canning equipment
also are helping the boom. In 2002, just one
craft brewery was using cans. Now around
300 different breweries offer close to 1,000
beers in cans, according to CraftCans.com, a
site that tracks the canned beer revolution.
“Craft beer in cans is becoming more main-
stream each and every day,” says Brian Thiel,
regional sales manager with packaging firm
Crown Holdings. “The stigma that has exist-
ed continues to get lifted.”
Koch, a self-proclaimed purist, at first
“stubbornly resisted” putting Sam Adams in
cans. But after spending more than two years
and $1 million developing a couple dozen
prototypes, the “Sam Can” was born. Koch
says that with a bigger lid and a more defined
lip, the redesigned can forces your mouth
open more and puts your nose closer to the
opening, creating a better flavor experience.
Admittedly, it’s “not going to make the
angels sing when you drink it,” says Koch,
who is allowing other craft breweries to use
the redesigned can. “But my experience with
Sam Adams since I started it in my kitchen is
that slight but noticeable improvements con-
stantly and repeated over 30 years makes a
great beer.”
Meanwhile, Sly Fox Brewing Co. decided
to go all the way and blew the lid off with its
cans — literally.
In April, the Pennsylvania brewery began
selling its Helles Golden Lager in cans with a
peel-off top (think soup can). While litter
laws prevent it from being sold in all states it
distributes in, the can is getting noticed. The
brewery also sells its flagship Pikeland Pils in
the same cans exclusively at Citizens Bank
Park, the home of the Philadelphia Phillies.
Lowly cans making comeback in craft beer
SLY FOX BREWING COMPANY
Sly Fox Brewing Company has designed a can
that becomes a cup when opened.
Landmark New Orleans restaurant closes
NEW ORLEANS — Brennan’s, a dining landmark in New
Orleans, has unexpectedly closed and its future is uncertain.
The closure is the latest development in a longtime family
feud.
Owen “Pip” Brennan is a son of the founder and until
recently a manager of the restaurant. He is involved in state
and federal litigation with his brother Ted Brennan over con-
trol of the business.
Food brief
18
Wednesday • July 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FOOD
By Sara Moulton
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Even though fruit and cheese tend
to go together like soup and sand-
wich, the first time I saw watermel-
on and feta cheese paired up on a
menu it struck me as very odd.
Apples and cheddar? Sure. Pears
and Stilton? You know it. But I was
sure that watermelon was much too
watery to stand up to the bold flavor
of feta, no matter that everyone
tends to love the interplay of sweet
and salt in general, and that the
combo is hugely popular in Egypt,
Israel and throughout the Balkans.
Well, those folks are right and I
was dead wrong. Watermelon and
feta are a great match — and they
are at the center of this salad.
I must confess that I’ve only
recently come to love watermelon.
Part of the problem is that it always
seemed kind of monstrous. You
brought one home from the super-
market, chopped it into hunks, and
still had to empty out your whole
refrigerator to store it. These days
there are options. First, of course,
we can buy it in pieces and some-
times by the slice. Secondly, there
are now littler guys — seedless
watermelons — so called because
they contain only tender little edible
seeds, much like the seeds in a
“seedless” cucumber.
The user-friendly new packaging
aside, I also appreciate watermel-
on’s healthfulness. The aptly-named
edible is in fact 92 percent water by
weight, which is at the core of its
unique ability to hydrate us. Finally
— and duh! — it’s delicious, and
particularly refreshing when accent-
ed with a spritz of citrus.
With the watermelon, feta and
cucumber in place, I filled out the
salad with some dark bitter greens
— namely arugula — and fresh
herbs. You’re welcome to substitute
watercress for the arugula, and any
one of your favorite herbs for the
mint and cilantro.
As for the onion, there’s a way —
if you have a little extra time — to
abbreviate the lingering smell of it
on your breath. Just soak the slices
in a strainer set in a bowl of ice
water for 15 minutes. Then drain
and dry it and add it to the salad.
The whole process not only tamps
down onion breath, it also makes the
little rascals crispier and crunchier,
too.
The grilled pork tenderloin here
plays the same role as the chicken or
shrimp added to a Caesar salad — it
turns a side dish into a meal. By the
way, the tenderloin is one of the
leanest cuts of pork. And so long as
you don’t overcook it — and give it
a bit of a rest before slicing — it
will be tender and juicy.
Now to the dressing, which teams
up feta and buttermilk. Given its
ability to provide creaminess (and
tang) to a recipe without adding a
ton of fat, buttermilk is one of my
favorite cheating ingredients. And
the feta is so flavorful — and its tex-
ture so pleasurable — that I crum-
bled some extra onto the finished
salad.
At the end, you’ll add some
crunch in the form of homemade
baked whole-wheat pita croutons.
These are so easy to make, I never
bother with the packaged varieties,
which are usually deep-fried and
loaded with fat.
Voila, the perfect summer meal in
a bowl. Refreshing and filling.
Grilled pork tenderloin with
watermelon-arugula salad
Start to finish: 50 minutes (25
minutes active)
Servings: 4
4 ounces feta cheese, crumbled,
divided
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1/3 cup buttermilk
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
Ground black pepper
Two 6-inch whole-wheat pita
pockets
Olive oil cooking spray
Kosher salt
1-pound pork tenderloin, trimmed
3 cups arugula
1/2 cup thinly sliced red onion
1/2 cup fresh mint leaves
1/2 cup fresh cilantro leaves
2 cups cubed and seeded water-
melon
1 cup cubed seedless cucumber
Heat the grill to medium. Heat the
oven to 400 F.
While the grill and oven are heat-
ing, in a blender combine half of the
feta, the lemon juice, buttermilk and
olive oil. Blend until smooth.
Season with pepper, then stir in the
remaining feta. Set aside.
Split each pita pocket into 2
rounds. Spray the rough sides of
each round lightly with the cooking
spray, then sprinkle lightly with salt.
Cut each round into 8 triangles. On
a rimmed baking sheet arrange the
triangles in a single layer. Bake on
the middle shelf of the oven until
golden and crisp, about 8 minutes.
Set aside to cool.
Spray the pork with the olive oil
spray, then season it lightly with salt
and pepper. Grill it directly over the
heat, turning it a quarter turn at a
time, until a thermometer inserted at
the thickest part registers 140 F to
145 F for medium, about 6 minutes
per side. Transfer the pork to a plate,
cover it loosely with foil and let it
rest for 10 minutes.
In a large bowl, combine the
arugula, onion, mint, cilantro,
watermelon and cucumber. Add the
pork juices from the resting pork to
the feta dressing, whisking to incor-
porate.
Place a mound of the salad on
each of 4 plates. Slice the pork
crosswise into rounds 1/2 inch thick
and arrange a quarter of the slices
on top of each mound of salad.
Drizzle the dressing on top of the
pork, then divide the pita croutons
between the plates. Serve immedi-
ately.
Nutrition information per serving:
370 calories; 120 calories from fat
(32 percent of total calories); 13 g
fat (6 g saturated; 0 g trans fats);
100 mg cholesterol; 31 g carbohy-
drate; 4 g fiber; 10 g sugar; 33 g pro-
tein; 820 mg sodium.
Salad proves watermelon and feta better together
FOOD/WORLD 19
Wednesday • July 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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“There have been a lot of different mini-innovations ... but
never that important to craft beer,” said Sly Fox brewmaster
Brian O’Reilly. “(The new can) is different and interesting to
people, but there’s a real benefit because you can smell the
beer ... it really allows you to appreciate the full character of
the beer.”
Sly Fox still cans several of its beers in traditional alu-
minum cans and defends the polished package as a perfect fit
for craft beer.
Its website even has a page that encourages beer drinkers to
“respect the cans because the cans respect the beer.” The page
lists the benefits of cans — portable, space-saving, faster-
cooling, more light-resistant and super-recyclable — and
debunks myths that the cans impart a metallic taste to beer,
are unsophisticated and don’t store as well as bottles.
The can now used by Sly Fox was first debuted by Crown
Holdings at the FIFA World Cup soccer tournament in South
Africa in 2010 as part of a partnership with SABMiller.
While many of the innovations tout a better drinking expe-
rience, there is a marketing element to it, too.
“What’s next may be cool, it may be setting themselves
apart. But there is a point where it becomes gimmicky and it
loses its functionality and its form and its integrity,” Thiel
said.
Sam Adams’ Koch agrees: “If it doesn’t make the beer taste
better, then don’t do it just to get noticed,” he said. “The cus-
tomer will reward you with more of their business if you give
them a better tasting product than their alternatives.”
Continued from page 17
CANS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO — With the clock ticking, Egypt’s
besieged president said Tuesday that he will not
step down as state media reported that the pow-
erful military plans to overturn his Islamist-
dominated government if the elected leader
doesn’t meet the demands of the millions of
protesters calling for his ouster.
Mohammed Morsi’s defiant statement sets up
a major confrontation between supporters of
the president and Egyptians angry over what
they see as his efforts to impose control by his
Muslim Brotherhood as well as his failure to
introduce reforms more than two years after the
revolution that ousted his autocratic predeces-
sor Hosni Mubarak.
Writing Tuesday on his official Twitter
account, Morsi said he
“asserts his adherence to
constitutional legitimacy
and rejects any attempt to
breach it and calls on the
armed forces to withdraw
their ultimatum and rejects
any domestic or foreign
dictates.”
The leaking of the mili-
tary’s so-called political
road map appeared aimed
at adding pressure on Morsi by showing the
public and the international community that the
military has a plan that does not involve a coup.
With tensions high, at least seven people
were killed in three separate clashes between
Morsi’s supporters and opponents in Cairo,
according to hospital and security officials, who
spoke on condition of anonymity because they
were not authorized to speak to the media. The
officials did not give more details. The violence
raised the overall death toll to 23 since Sunday
when a mass protest was held to mark the
anniversary of Morsi’s inauguration.
Protesters on Tuesday turned to a new target,
massing a giant crowd outside Cairo’s Qasr el-
Qobba presidential palace where Morsi has
been working in recent days — though he was
not believed to be inside — in addition to filling
wide avenues outside another palace, central
Tahrir Square and main squares in cities nation-
wide.
Morsi’s supporters also increased their pres-
ence in the streets, after his Muslim
Brotherhood and hard-line Islamist leaders
called them out to defend what they say is the
legitimacy of the country’s first freely elected
president. Tens of thousands held marches in
Cairo and other cities.
With the clock ticking on the military’s ulti-
matum, many in the anti-Morsi and pro-Morsi
camps were vowing to fight to the end.
The president’s Islamist backers have stepped
up warnings that it will take bloodshed to dis-
lodge him, saying they would rather die fight-
ing a military takeover than accept Morsi’s
ouster just a year after the country’s first free
election.
“Seeking martyrdom to prevent the ongoing
coup is what we can offer as a sign of gratitude
to previous martyrs who died in the revolution,”
Brotherhood stalwart Mohammed el-Beltagy
wrote Tuesday in his official Facebook page.
Egypt’s Morsi defiantly says he won’t step down
Mohammed
Morsi
LOCAL 20
Wednesday • July 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
She told Miller that she would look up
something in the civil code about shared util-
ities for her.
“I feel better already,” said Miller, whose
friend encouraged her to seek out the Legal
Aid Society.
“I want to make sure they don’t do this to
anybody else,” she said. “Why should I pay a
PG&E bill for an entire apartment building?”
Her monthly energy bills were above
$1,000 at one point, she said.
She gathered up her stack of bills and
hugged Bowman before leaving the center.
“I have become empowered to do this,” she
said.
But Miller also knows there are no guaran-
tees that things will play out in her favor
against the landlord.
“But I know at least these people know
what’s going on,” she said.
Feeling the squeeze
Staff attorney Bowman glanced around the
clinic. Two law student interns were helping
tenants and one attorney was advising a
Spanish-speaking landlord.
Many people who come to the Landlord
Tenant Clinic have been served with eviction
notices, said Bowman.
A tenant has five days — counting week-
ends — to file an eviction response with the
court. On the sixth day, if the court has not
received a response, it can enter a default
judgment against the tenant, she said. The
default judgment then authorizes the sheriff to
evict the tenants.
A lot of people who get an eviction notice
just throw up their hands and wait for the
sheriff because they don’t know what else to
do, said Bowman.
She checked her sign-up sheet to see how
many more clients needed to be seen for the
day.
To prepare an eviction notice can take about
an hour with a client. Sometimes, with 20
people hoping to be seen during the three-
hour weekly clinic, Bowman feels the
squeeze.
“There’s a lot of waiting that goes on which
I feel bad about,” she said.
But she’s thankful for the help she gets from
interns and volunteers.
“Sometimes it’s just me,” she said.
Limited clerk hours
add inconvenience
“You lose your right very quickly in an
eviction case, more so than in any other civil
legal proceeding,” said Shirley Gibson, direct-
ing attorney for the Legal Aid Society of San
Mateo County.
The Legal Aid Society holds the Landlord
and Tenant Clinic on Monday mornings at the
Superior Court, and has two other clinics for
tenants: one in Daly City at the Community
Services Center on Tuesday afternoons and
one on Fridays at the Fair Oaks Community
Center in Redwood City.
“We try to capture people before they
default,” said Gibson, adding that most people
need some help with understanding their
forms or the legal process.
While there are a few options for help with
an eviction response, the decreased hours at
the court clerk’s office make it increasingly
difficult to get help and file the response with
the court within the five days.
“The problems with the recent court cut-
backs [are that] we have one location where
people from all over the county come to file
their papers,” said Gibson.
No matter where you are in the county, you
must file your documents at the clerk’s office
in Redwood City, she said.
Due to budget cuts, the clerk’s office now
closes at 2 p.m. and has a document drop-box
available until 4 p.m.
For people traveling far distances to
Redwood City, these early closures can add to
the challenges of filing paperwork.
Gibson hopes that an electronic filing sys-
tem will one day alleviate these geographic
challenges, but knows that the court must first
deal with its immediate budget crisis before it
can begin exploring innovative projects.
One-stop shop could disappear
There are an average of 2,000 eviction cases
filed each year in the county, said Gibson.
That number has remained pretty consistent
over last three years, but the default rate has
been shrinking due to increased outreach.
According to Gibson, in 2007, the county
had a 56 percent eviction default rate. Last
year, that number was down to 35 percent.
“It’s still too much,” she said. “We do the
best we can.”
The Landlord Tenant Clinic at the Superior
Court allows for a one-stop shop for people
who need help with filling out their legal doc-
uments and need to file their paperwork with
the clerk. Unfortunately, the clinic could
cease to exist after this year.
The five-year grant from the California
State Bar Association for the clinic ends this
year, said Gibson. And continuing the clinic
without some added funding from the court is
highly unlikely.
“The idea was to provide something that
would be absorbed by the court but, in this
budget climate, I don’t think that’s going to
happen,” she said.
The two legal areas where the majority of
people are self-represented are family law and
housing cases, said Gibson. The court is
required to give legal assistance to people
with family law cases, but not housing, she
said.
Family Law Facilitator
In San Mateo County, 70 percent to 80 per-
cent of people in family law cases are self-
represented, said Self Help Center and Family
Law Facilitator Supervising Attorney Greg
Tanaka.
Enormous court budget cuts mean
resources for self-represented people are
stretched thin. Since 2009, the Self Help
Center has seen a 50 percent reduction in
staff, said Tanaka. Consequently, the center
has seen a 30 percent reduction in the number
of people they are able to see.
Those who are not getting legal assistance
are at risk of making errors or misfiling their
paperwork. They are then forced to return to
court, Tanaka said.
Many of these people end up seeking help
from the center eventually, he said.
Like the entire county court system, the Self
Help Center has tried to maintain its core
services in spite of the cuts, said Tanaka.
It has even increased operating hours by
opening at 8:30 a.m. instead of 9 a.m. The
center — operating on a first-come, first-
served basis — remains open through the
lunch hour. And attorneys and volunteers
work beyond the operating hours to get
through the daily sign-up sheet, he said. This
way, clients who have traveled for hours on
public transportation or taken a day off work
don’t have to come back for another day, said
Tanaka.
“It’s not uncommon for people to take a half
or full day off of work,” he said. “We know
the sacrifices people have to make to come
here to get help.”
State funding
This year, state lawmakers and Gov. Jerry
Brown are being praised for passing a budget
with a projected surplus. But the third branch
of government, the judiciary, is not feeling the
relief, said John Fitton, San Mateo County
executive court officer.
“The courts have been going through an
unprecedented reduction in resources,” he
said. “The good news is we got partial restora-
tion.”
The recently passed state budget will
restore a fraction of the cuts that the courts
have incurred since 2008, enabling the local
court to bring back one commissioner, eight
staffers and restore one courtroom. These
resources will add to the overall support net-
work available to self-represented people
needing help with housing and family law
cases, said Fitton.
Whether the court will be able to restore
clerk hours and maintain the Landlord Tenant
Clinic remains to be seen. Increasing service
hours and maintaining resources are contin-
gent upon lawmakers restoring more perma-
nent funding at the beginning of 2014, he
said.
Continued from page 1
CUTS
park on Burlingame Avenue on the Free Fridays
will get two hours of free parking. Public Works
Director Syed Murtuza told the council Monday
that he’ll work with staff and local businesses to
roll out the new free parking offering quickly but
estimated it would take a week.
At the same meeting, the council voted 4-1,
with Councilwoman Cathy Baylock dissenting,
to enter into exclusive negotiations with
Grosvenor, an international property develop-
ment, investment and fund management group,
interested in creating a mixed-use project down-
town.
Burlingame previously requested proposals
for developing downtown parking lots. Among
the two which the council decided to continue
talks with was Grosvenor. The approved 18-
month agreement allows the two sides to flesh
out the possible Grosvenor proposal.
Grosvenor put forward a mixed-use project
using lot E, between Lorton Avenue and Park
Road. The concept, which encompasses the post
office land, includes an “urban village” with 100
residential units, 35,000 square feet of retail
and/or restaurant space and 125 residential park-
ing spaces.
Mayor Ann Keighran pointed out that the
focus is on the parking lot rather than the post
office, which is not yet on the market. While
Grosvenor hopes to purchase it at that time, any
plan for the site from any developer will need to
go through the normal planning process.
Keighran expressed her support for the down-
town housing and added it will add affordable
options in Burlingame.
Vice Mayor Michael Brownrigg said moving
forward will also allow for more public discus-
sions with the developer about the vision for
downtown as well as the real limitations. For
example, the Burlingame Main Post Office,
located at 220 Park Road, has been deemed his-
torically significant, which will need to be
addressed. If the post office stays put, that will
take away the option of downtown parking in
that area, he said. The community needs to
decide what downtown details are the most
important, he said.
At the same meeting, the council approved a
location for creating a community garden.
A portion of Bayside Park is still the proposed
location. However, the garden is now proposed
to be much smaller.
The city approved building 22 garden beds
located between the batting cages and storage
sheds at Bayside Fields, according to a staff
report by Parks and Recreation Director
Margaret Glomstad. The $20,000 plan will be
covered using the city’s capital improvement
budget.
To make this location work, three young red-
wood trees will be removed. Three new redwood
trees will be planted at Bayside Fields.
Additional fencing will be installed to manage
the garden. The Burlingame Community Garden
will be managed by the Parks and Recreation
Department but maintained by the members of
the garden. The proposed planter box fee is $65
per year. The fee is expected to cover the costs of
water, Glomstad wrote. That amount could
change after the first year when the actual cost of
water is known.
heather@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
FRIDAYS
WEDNESDAY, JULY3
Cosmebar Cosmetology/Barbering
Apprenticeship Program
Presentation. 10 a.m. Cosmebar, 500
Bragato Road, San Carlos. Welcome
inspired, trendy and stylish people age
16 years or older looking for a career in
the beauty industry. For more
information contact
cosmebarsancarlos@gmail.com.
“Dancing on the Edge” Exhibit
Opening.The Main Gallery, 1018 Main
St., Redwood City. This exhibit will run
through Aug. 4. On Saturday, July 13
from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. there will be an
opening reception. For more
information call 701-1018.
Music in the Park - Livewire.6 p.m. to
8 p.m. Stafford Park, corner of King
Street and Hopkins Avenue, Redwood
City. Free.
THURSDAY, JULY4
4th of July PancakeBreakfast. 8 a.m.
to 11:30 a.m. Leo J. Ryan Memorial Park,
Shell and Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City.
Proceeds will benefit the Foster City
Independence Day Fireworks Show.
Adults $10/Kids $5/Under 5 are free.
San Mateo County HistoryMuseum
Presents: ‘An Old-Fashioned Fourth
of July’ for Children. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
San Mateo County History Museum,
2200 Broadway, Redwood City. Children
will be invited to learn to hand-crank
homemade vanilla ice cream and then
take a taste. They will also make
traditional Independence Day crafts to
take home with them. Museum
admission will be half-price that day.
$2.50 for adults, $1.50 for seniors and
students, free for kids five and under.
For more information call 299-0104.
Free First FridaysProgram. 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. San Mateo County History
Museum, 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City. Admission is free the entire day,
and two programs are planned for the
public without any fees. At 11 a.m.,
preschool children will be invited to
learn about athletics. At 2 p.m., museum
docents will lead tours of the Museum
for adults. For more information call
299-0104.
AppleZ. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Central Park, 50
E 5th Ave., San Mateo. Come enjoy a
high energy Rock ‘n Roll band with an
authentic rock edge. For more
information visit ci.sanmateo.ca.us.
July Fourth BBQ and Fireworks. 6:30
p.m. to 10 p.m. 2560 Embarcadero
Road, Palo Alto.There will be dinner and
a fireworks show over the Baylands.
Space is limited. $12 for children and
$16 for adults. For more information or
to register call 493-8000, ext. 335.
Calendar
COMICS/GAMES
7-03-13
tuesday’s PuZZLe sOLVed
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Jumble Page 2 • La times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

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called cages, must combine using the given operation
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top-left corners.

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the top-left corner.
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16 Edible kernels
18 Ten years
20 Urges
21 Distinct period
22 Explosive letters
23 Head off
26 Bad atmosphere
29 Some vampires
30 Calligraphy supply
31 Suitable
33 Isaac Newton’s title
34 What Hamlet smelled (2
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35 Layer
36 Kind of gas
38 Warbucks, to Annie
39 Close a parka
40 Ad — committee
41 Pierre’s noggin
43 Rural
46 Discovered (2 wds.)
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10 Plays a role
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17 Talking birds (var.)
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28 Mimicked
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32 Make an effort
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37 Montezuma’s people
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49 Codgers’ queries
diLBert® CrOsswOrd PuZZLe
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wednesday, JuLy 3, 2013
CanCer (June 21-July 22) -- You’re the one who
can awaken enthusiasm in a friend who has been
down in the dumps, because your words will carry
more weight than you realize. Don’t hesitate to
speak up.
LeO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Once you’re certain that
you are on solid ground, devote all your efforts to an
ambitious project. Work hard and take things one
step at a time.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- You might get an
opportunity to teach a friend a valuable skill. However,
frst be sure that he or she is open to your suggestions.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- To be successful,
you won’t have to be bolder or stronger than your
competitors, just smarter. While most of them
are using their muscles, you should be using your
head.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- It’s important to keep
an open and receptive mind at all times. There’s a
good chance that a colleague could occasionally
have better ideas than yours.
saGittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Be reasonable
about the size of the returns you expect for
your efforts. What you accomplish might be
acknowledged in small ways, but not necessarily on
a grand scale.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Because you’ll
know how to put everyone at ease, you’ll be an
asset at any social gathering. Most assuredly, your
tactics will make you very popular.
aQuarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Your thoughtfulness
toward your family and friends will be apparent. All
the little things you do will show them that you really
care and have their best interests at heart.
PisCes (Feb. 20-March 20) -- For whatever reason,
you’ll be especially adept at endeavors that require
a creative and imaginative mind. Be sure to utilize
your skills to the fullest extent.
aries (March 21-April 19) -- Don’t be indifferent
to the suggestions of others when it comes to your
commercial dealings. By the same token, don’t
discount your own ideas, either. Consider everyone
and everything.
taurus (April 20-May 20) -- It would be best
not to employ an intermediary to pass on critical
information to associates. If there is something
important you need others to hear, communicate it
yourself.
GeMini (May 21-June 20) -- Many times, others’
tips about ways to make money are less than
reliable. Today, however, you are likely to receive
some inside info that is worthy of exploration.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Wednesday • July 3, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Wednesday • July 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CALL CENTER Positions - Internet Car
Parts, Adam McCoy, (415)999-9823
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
AUTMOTIVE -
NOW HIRING
SERVICE TECHNICIANS
OILSTOP DRIVE-THRU
OIL CHANGE
• Excellent benefits
• No experience necessary
• Complete training program
• Retirement program
• Advancement opportunities
• Competitive pay
APPLY IN PERSON AT
2009 El Camino Real, San Mateo
Monday-Saturday 8-6
For more info: www.oilstopinc.com
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
GREAT CLIPS
@ Sequoia Station
Redwood City
Now Hiring
Stylists & Managers.
Call Flo/Randy
408 247-8364 or 408 921-9994
Grand Opening Soon!
110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
HOTEL -
A Front Desk Agent, and A Maintenance
Person position available. Experience
preferred Fax resume: (650)589-7076. or
Email: ac@citigardenhotel.com
EXPERIENCED COOKS, Avanti Pizza. .
3536 Alameda, MENLO PARK, CA
(650)854-1222.
23 Wednesday • July 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
110 Employment
CUSTOMER SERVICE/
SEAMSTRESS -
YOU ARE INVITED
Are you:
Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have:
Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for emplployment benefits
Sewiing skills
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available for
Customer Service/Seamstress.
Call for appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo CA, 94402
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256306
The following person is doing business
as: Pho Vinh, 1065 Holly Street, #A, SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Pho Vinh, Inc.,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Kaitlin Ngan Nguyen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256234
The following person is doing business
as: Esoteric Cycles, 233 S. Maple St.,
#27, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Jameson D. Shaw 1499
Guerreso St. #5, San Francisco, CA
94110 and Stephen McAglan, 1458
Hayes St., San Francisco, CA 94117.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Jameson D. Shaw /
/s/ Stephen McAglan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/12/13, 06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13.)
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 521770
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Mason Wesley Bates & Jamie Geier
Bates
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Mason Wesley Bates & Jamie
Geier Bates filed a petition with this court
for a decree changing name as follows:
Present name: Toliver James Bates
Proposed name: Taliaferro James Bates
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on July 30,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 06/10/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 06/06/2013
(Published, 06/12/13, 06/19/13
06/26/2013, 07/03/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256217
The following person is doing business
as: KED Consulting, 1412 Crestwood
Ct., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner:
Kathleen T. Deffner, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 04/02/2013.
/s/ Kathleen T. Deffner /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/12/13, 06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256277
The following person is doing business
as: Bay Area Affiliate League, 157 Aca-
cia Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Daniel Alldridge, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Daniel Alldridge /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/12/13, 06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255974
The following person is doing business
as: Cafe De Casa, 1165 Airport Blvd.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Lucimar Rodrigues Canedo, 80 Ocean
Grove Ave., Daly City, CA 94015. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 01/15/2013.
/s/ Lucimar Rodrigues Canedo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/12/13, 06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255807
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: W&S Services, 193 87th St.,
Ste C, Daly City, CA 94015 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Wil-
liam Carvalho Silva, 2001 Wittman Wat
Apt., 6 and Sandro Ricardo Neris, 1200
E. Hillsdale Blvd., Apt. 215, Foster City,
CA 94404. The business is conducted by
a General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 02/01/2013.
/s/ William Carvalho Silva /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/12/13, 06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256231
The following person is doing business
as: Busy Bakers, 444 San Mateo Ave.,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Nicole Du-
dum, 2921 Irving St., San Francisco, CA
94122. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Nicole Dudum /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/12/13, 06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256288
The following person is doing business
as: Cesar’s A. Painting, 404 E. 40th Ave,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Cesar Au-
gusto Palma, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ Cesar Augusto Cesar /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/12/13, 06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256381
The following person is doing business
as: Plastic Jungle, 100 S. Ellsworth Ave.,
9th Floor, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Cardflo., Inc., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 05/28/13.
/s/ Daniel C. Rogers /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256316
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Dryfast, 642 Quarry Rd., Ste.
A, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Geor-
gi Georgiev Atanasov, same address
and Tsvetelina Mircheva, 1776 Camino
Verde #D, Walnut Creek, CA 94597.
The business is conducted by a Married
Couple. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Milena Ivanova /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256359
The following person is doing business
as: Advanced Aesthetics Concepts, 295
89th St., Ste. 101, DALY CITY, CA
94015 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Linda Hampton, 209 Melissa
Circle, Daly City, CA 94014. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 06/13/2013.
/s/ Linda Hampton /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256265
The following person is doing business
as: The Bankruptcy Law Firm, 475 14th
St., Ste. 260, OAKLAND, CA 94612 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Kostopoulos Law Group, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Anete Kostopoulos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256194
The following person is doing business
as: Bott & Associates, 1730 S. Amphlett
Blvd., Ste. 215, SAN MATEO, CA 94402
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Chhabra Associates, Inc., CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
07/01/2013.
/s/ Rajesh Kumar/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256408
The following person is doing business
as: Cal Pacific Hydronics, 655 Skyway
Rd., #122, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Dan S. Passanisi, 885 Laurel St., Bel-
mont, CA 94002. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Dan S. Passanisi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256203
The following person is doing business
as: Tony’s Hauling & Moving, 415 Mac
Arthur Avenue, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94063 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Anthony Souffront, 1289 Bal-
boa Ct., Apt. 244, Sunnyvale, CA 94086.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Anthony Souffront /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256424
The following person is doing business
as: Jack’s Car Wash, 3651 S. El Camino
Real, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: HD
Wash, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 05/29/2013.
/s/ Brad Peterson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256412
The following person is doing business
as: 8Z Real Estate, 330 Primrose Rd.,
Ste 412, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
CO Home Finder, Inc., CO. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 06/17/2013.
/s/ Abbie Higashi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256305
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Goodlife Co., 180 Sylvester
Road, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Leo Now, same address and
Gilbert Anthony Milam, Jr., 1767 42nd
St., San Francisco, CA 94122. The busi-
ness is conducted by a General Partner-
ship. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
06/13/2013.
/s/ Leo Nowi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256490
The following person is doing business
as: La Lacquerie, 262 Club Dr., SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered
by the following owner: La Lacquerie
Corporation, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Susan Aflak /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256356
The following person is doing business
as: Sierra Home Automation, 76 Mission
Dr., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Sha
Consulting, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
06/01/2013.
/s/ Patrick Hagerman /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256618
The following person is doing business
as: K & B Discount Store, 201 S. Del-
ware St. #A, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Eddy Mejia, 1900 S. Norfolk, #350, San
Mateo, CA 94403, Maria Sautizo, 1101
Tilton Ave., Apt. 11, San Mateo, CA
94401. The business is conducted by co-
partners. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Eddy Mejia /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/012013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256318
The following person is doing business
as: Bay Area Metro Group, 21 Airport
Blvd, Ste. H, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: New Metropolitan, Inc.,
CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
06/03/2013.
/s/ Leona Shum /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256545
The following person is doing business
as: Dylan’s Kids Cuts, 939 Edgewater
Blvd., FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Er-
landson & Associates, LLC, CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Lia-
bility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Marc Erlandson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256175
The following person is doing business
as: Sequoia Medical Group, 3400 Data
Dr., Second Floor, RANCHO CORDO-
VA, CA 95670 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Dingnity Health
Medical Foundation, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Thomas Lowry /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256429
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Stella Events, 794 Francisco
St., HALF MOON BAY, CA 94019 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Vanessa Stella, and Rick Stella Po Box
1383, El Granada, CA 94018. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Married Couple.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ Vanessa Stella /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256576
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Abeles and Associates, 2) Balance
Point Group, 624 Cuesta Ave., SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Alan M. Abeles,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/01/2009.
/s/ Alan M. Abeles /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256621
The following person is doing business
as: Park Center Company, 1120 Royal
Ln., SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Paul
Hoffman, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Paul Hoffman /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256452
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Mold Remedies, 2) 320 Vallejo Dr.
#41, BURLINGAME, CA 94011 is hereby
registered by the following owner:
RPRW, Inc, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 01/01/2003.
/s/ Richard Wolf /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256627
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: The Shane Group, 2309 Woos-
ter, BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owners: 1) Hugo
Shane, Trustee Owner, 2309 Wooster,
BELMONT, CA 94002, 2) Karen Shane,
Trustee-Co, 2014 Mezes Ave., Belmont
CA 94002, 3) Robert Shane, Successor
Trustee, 126 14th ave. Kirkland, WA
98033, 4) Jo Ann Shane Trustee-Co,
6261 Collier Canyon Rd., Livermore, CA
94551. The business is conducted by a
Trust. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Karen Shane /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256173
The following person is doing business
as: Your Life Your Plate Nutrition Con-
sulting, 1600 E. 3rd Ave. SAN MATEO,
CA 94401 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Daniel Anthony Velarde
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Daniel A. Velarde /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256252
The following person is doing business
as: Carlmont Advisors, 751 Laurel St.,
Ste 423, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Flora M. Burke, 22 Club Dr., #A, San
Carlos, CA 94070. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Flora M. Burke /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: June 13, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
Just Food Inc.
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
209 Park Rd,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010-4205
Type of license applied for:
41-On-Sale Beer And Wine-Eating
Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
June 26, July 3,10, 2013
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254130
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Pet-
als Florist. The fictitious business name
referred to above was filed in County on
01/23/13 The business was conducted
by: Arcadia Lima
/s/ Arcadia Lima/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 06/05/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 06/12/13,
06/19/13, 06/26/2013, 07/03/2013).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252527
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Key-
la’s Dollar Store, 201 S. Delaware St.,
#A, SAN MATEO, CA 94401The fictitious
business name referred to above was
filed in County on 09/27/12 The business
was conducted by: Maria L. Santizo.
/s/ Maria L. Santizo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 07/01/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 07/03/13,
07/10/13, 07/17/2013, 07/24/2013).
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
294 Baby Stuff
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, $90.,
(650)610-9765
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIER 5200 BTU window air conditioner
- never used, in box, $95. obo, (650)591-
6842
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WEBER BRAND Patio Refrigerator,
round top load, for beer, soda, and wa-
ter. $30 obo (650)591-6842
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $90.,
(650)596-0513
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
67 USED United States (50) and Europe-
an (17) Postage Stamps. Most issued
before World War II. All different and de-
tached from envelopes. All for $4.00,
(650)787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MENORAH - Antique Jewish tree of life,
10”W x 30”H, $100., (650)348-6428
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria
650-873-8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
24
Wednesday • July 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Close one
4 Stout sellers
8 Archie Bunker’s
wife
13 Its members
employ
hygienists: Abbr.
14 Six-time All-Star
Moises
15 Transit systems in
Delhi and Paris
17 Campfire seat
18 What makes a
man a man
20 1988 Tony-
winning play
inspired by a
Puccini work
22 Parroted
23 Golf course
regular, often
24 Backpacked
beast
26 Hard water?
27 Fan mail encl.
28 Noisy bird
30 NATO alphabet
word after
November
32 Reef material
35 Sanctuary
sections
36 Disco-era group
known for the
starts of 18-, 20-,
54- and 57-
Across
39 Subject of the
sports film “42”
40 Nemo’s creator
41 Obviously
impressed
42 Just out of the
shower
43 You, to Yves
46 Scathing review
47 Tandoori bread
49 Get even for
52 Span. miss
54 Duracell R14’s
57 First of a planned
26-book mystery
series
59 NHL tiebreakers
60 Use a ring in a
crib
61 Devastated Asian
sea
62 “Are We Done
Yet?” actress
Long
63 Baseball features
64 Pulls in
65 Muddy home
DOWN
1 Where to find
dates
2 Pueblo homes
3 __ Beach:
Southern
California resort
4 Words before “the
order of”
5 Stress-related
ailment, possibly
6 Physics Nobelist
Niels
7 Wander online
8 Ed Asner has
seven
9 “Gloria in Excelsis
__”
10 “__ ripoff!”
11 Like many bright
aquarium fish
12 Post-hospital
recovery program
16 Matzo meals
19 Big name in facial
cleansers
21 Accessory with a
suit
25 Athenian lawgiver
28 Binge
29 Painkiller with an
Easy Open
Arthritis Cap
31 Heaven’s
gatekeeper
33 Designer Mary-
Kate or Ashley
34 Chrysler truck
35 __ Lingus
36 Unpredictable
occurrences
37 Complaint about
blocked vision
38 Four-footed friend
39 Knocks on
42 Minnesota Lynx
org.
44 Risotto ingredients
45 “That makes
sense”
48 Ranch
measures
49 Awaiting a pitch
50 Facial cover-ups
51 Swift work
53 Old Spice rival
55 King of comedy
56 Lose steam
58 Electrical unit
symbolized by
omega
By C.C. Burnikel
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
07/03/13
07/03/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
300 Toys
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $700 obo
(650)766-3024
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HARMON/KANDON SPEAKERS (2)
mint condition, great, for small
office/room or extra speakers, 4 1/2 in.
high, includes cords $8., SOLD!
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
303 Electronics
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center draw locks all comes with
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame SOLD!
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3 MEDAL base kitchen cabinets with
drawers and wood doors $99
(650)347-8061
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR (2), with arms, Italian 1988 Cha-
teau D'Ax, solid, perfect condition. $50
each or $85 for both. (650)591-0063
304 Furniture
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COPENHAGEN TEAK dining table with
dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions. 48/88"
long x 32" wide x 30" high. $95.00
(650)637-0930
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
COUCH. GREEN Cloth with end reclin-
ers on both sides. Beverage holder in the
middle, $50 (650)572-2864
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 draw dresser 61" wide,
31" high, & 18" deep $50., (650)592-
2648
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
GLASS DINING Table 41” x 45” Round-
ed rectangle clear glass top and base
$85 (650)888-0129
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
LIGHT WOOD Rocking Chair & Has-
sock, gold cushions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
304 Furniture
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
RECLINER ROCKER - Like new, brown,
vinyl, $99., SOLD!
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR with wood carving,
armrest, rollers, and it swivels $99.,
(650)592-2648
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEAK TV stand, wheels, rotational, glass
doors, drawer, 5 shelves. 31" wide x 26"
high X 18" deep. $75.00 (650)637-0930
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
WICKER ENTERTAINMENT CABINET -
H 78” x 43” x 16”, almost new, $89.,
(650)347-9920
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
3 PIECE fireplace set with screen $25
(650)322-2814
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, (650)578-9208
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TWO 21 quart cooking pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
1/2 HORSE power 8" worm drive skill
saw $40 OBO (650)315-5902
10" BAN Saw $75.00 (650) 347-8367
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
BLACK & DECKER CORDLESS 18 volt
combo drill, vacuum, saw, sander, two
batteries & charger, brand new, $95.
obo, SOLD!
BLACK AND Decker, 10” trimmer/edger
, rechargeable, brand new, $50
(650)871-7200
BOB VILLA rolling tool box & organizer -
brand new with misc. tools, $40. obo,
(650)591-6842
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
308 Tools
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTMANS PROFESSIONAL car buf-
fer with case $40 OBO (650)315-5902
CRAFTSMAN 14.4 VOLT DRILL - bat-
tery & charger, never used, $35. obo,
SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 3/8” 16.8 volt drill & vac-
uum combo, brand new, with charger,
$45. obo, SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DEWALT 18 volt battery drill with 2 bat-
tery & charger $45 OBO SOLD!
DREMEL HIGH SPEED ROTARY TOOL
- all attachments, never used, $25. obo
SOLD!
ELECTRIC HEDGE trimmer good condi-
tion (Black Decker) $40 (650)342-6345
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LADDER - 24' aluminum 2 section ladder
$20., SOLD
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 21” Belt Sander with long cord,
$35 (650)315-5902
MILLWAUKEE SAWSALL in case with
blades (like new) $50 OBO SOLD!
NEW DRILL DRIVER - 18V + battery &
charger, $30., (650)595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SANDER, MAKITA finishing sander, 4.5
x 4.5"' used once. Complete with dust
bag and hard shell case. $35.00 SOLD!
SMALL ROTETILLER 115 Volt Works
well $99.00 (650)355-2996
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
TORO ELECTRIC POWER SWEEPER
blower - never used, in box, $35. obo,
(650)591-6842
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $65 (650)341-8342
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
3 LARGE old brown mixing bowls $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History,
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
5 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $9. for all
(650)347-5104
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEO 75 with jackets 75 with-
out $100 for all, SOLD!
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99., (650)580-
3316
310 Misc. For Sale
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASTRONOMY BOOKS (2) Hard Cover
Cambridge Encyclopedia of Astronomy,
World of Discovery, $12., (650)578-9208
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14., (650)578-9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, $40,
(650)347-5104
BAY BRIDGE Framed 50th anniversary
poster (by Bechtel corp) $50
(650)873-4030
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection SOLD!
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY Jake AB Scissor Exercise Ma-
chine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
(650)578-9208
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOOD HEALTH FACT BOOK - un-
used, answers to get/stay healthy, hard
cover, 480 pages, $8., (650)578-9208
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HABACHI BBQ Grill heavy iron 22" high
15" wide $25 (650)593-8880
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
KELTY SUPER TIOGA BACKPACK -
$40., (650)552-9436
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model", $250., (650)637-0930
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LAUNDRY SORTER - on wheels, triple
section, laundry sorter - $19., (650)347-
9920
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12” L x
5”W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, (650)341-1861
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW COWBOY BOOTS - 9D, Unworn,
black, fancy, only $85., (650)595-3933
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., (650)578-9208
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
25 Wednesday • July 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
310 Misc. For Sale
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. White Rotary
sewing machine similar age, cabinet
style. $85 both. (650)574-4439
SLIDE PROJECTOR - Airequipt Super-
ba 66A slide projector and screen.
$50.00 for all. (650)345-3840
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STAINED GLASS panels multi colors
beautiful work 35" long 111/2" wide $79
OBO (650)349-6059
STAINED GLASS,
28”x30” Japanese geisha motif, multi
colored, beautiful. $200 (650)520-9366
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TENT - one man packable tent - $20.,
(650)552-9436
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, (650)341-1861
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLKSWAGON NEW Beatle hub cap,
3, $70 for All SOLD!
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WEBER GO ANYWHERE GAS BARBE-
QUE - never used, in box, $40., SOLD!
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
MARTIN D-18S 1971 Guitar $1500.
Great sound. Great Condition
(650)522-8322
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
ATTRACTIVE LADIES trench coat red,
weather proof size 6/8 $35
(650)345-3277
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
IONIC BREEZE quadra, Sharper Image,
3 level silent air purifier. 27”h, energy
saver, original box with video. Excellent
condition. $77. (650)347-5104
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
316 Clothes
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS JACKET - size XXL, Beautiful
cond., med., $35., (650)595-3933
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW! OLD NAVY Coat: Boy/Gril, fleece-
lined, hooded $15 (415)585-3622
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
brand new, never worn for $25
(650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
150 COPPER spades for #6 strand.
Copper wire. $50.00 for all.
(650)345-3840
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
PVC SCHEDULE 80 connectors and
coupling. 100 pieces in all. $30.00 for all
(650)345-3840
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 AIR rifles, shoots .177 pelets. $50 ea
Obo (650)591-6842
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$25.(650)368-0748.
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
BIKE TRAINER Ascent fluid $85
(650)375-8021
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
FOR SALE medium size wet suit $95
call for info (650)851-0878
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BAG with 15 clubs $35. SOLD.
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels, $85.
obo, (650)223-7187
ROWING MACHINE. $30.00
(650)637-0930
SCHWINN STATIONARY RECUMBENT
BIKE, $45., SOLD!
STATIONARY EXERCISE BICYCLE -
Compact, excellent condition, $40. obo,
(650)834-2583
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL EXERCISE- Pro Form 415
Crosswalk, very good condition $200 call
(650)266-8025
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40.,
(408)764-6142
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
SLEEP APNEA breathing machine com-
plete in box helps you breathe, costs $$$
sacrifice for $75, (650)995-0012
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
515 Office Space
SAN MATEO DRIVE beautiful Medical
Office space for rent only $75/day.
Paulsurinder1@yahoo.com
620 Automobiles
004 INFINITI g35 x with 62k miles. All
wheel drive luxury sport sedan loaded
with all options (no navigations).#4508
come with warranty reduced price of
$12995.00 plus fees. (650)637-3900
2001 AUDI a6 Avanti wagon with 79k
miles in excellent conditions and fully
loaded, this is the best priced on internet.
#5050 reduced price at $8500.00 plus
fees.. (650)637-3900
2001 BMW 330 ci coupe with 108k miles
black on black automatic sports and pre-
mium package #5041 in great conditions,
clean car fax offerd at $8995.00 plus
fees. (650)637-3900
2002 CHRYSLER PT Cruiser Limited
with 121k miles; she is fully optioned and
in excellent driving conditions clean Car
Fax. #4515 sale price $4995.00 plus
fees. (650)637-3900
2003 FORD Mustang convertible with
102k miles. gt package with all power
group and power top. Ready for
summer.clean car fax#5031 on sale
for $7995.00 plus fees. (650)637-3900
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
620 Automobiles
2003 JEEP grand Cherokee Limited with
100k miles great looking suv one owner
clean Car fax fully loaded with
options.#4520.sale price $8995.00 plus
fees (650)637-3900
2004 CHEVY Malibu classic with 87k
miles. Clean Car Fax and 3 moths war-
ranty.automatic with all power package.
#4437 runs and looks great very roomy,
priced at $5850.00 plus fees. (650)637-
3900
2004 FORD Explorer Eddie bauer with
146k miles. third row seat all all other op-
tions clean Car fax #4330. This nice suv
has a very very low price of $7995.00
plus fees.. (650)637-3900
2004 HONDA Civic lx 4 door automatic
with 154k miles. Looks and drives very
nice; hard to find. #4517. Clean car and
3000 miles warranty. On sale
for $5995.00 plus fees. (650)637-3900
2008 HYUNDAI Accent gls 4 door auto-
matic with49k miles. Looks great and
runs excellent, awesome on gas and
very low miles. clean Car Fax. Priced at
$7995.00 plus fees. (650)637-3900
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
ACCURA 1997 3.0 CL CP Black, Auto-
matic $3300, (650)630-3216
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBIL”79Royal Delta 88, 122k
Miles, in excelleny Condition $1,800
(650)342-8510
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,400.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo Rob SOLD!
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
HONDA 1983 ASCOT VT 500 Motorcy-
cle, looks like 2012, must see. $1100,
obo, SOLD!
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $50. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
NEW MOTORCYCLE HELMET - Modu-
lar, dual visor, $69., (650)595-3933
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. SOLD!
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $60 for all
(650)588-7005
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPEAR tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Four steel
13in rims. Factory Hub Caps. $150. San
Bruno. SOLD!
670 Auto Parts
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Bath
TUBZ
Over 400 Tubs on display!
World’s Largest “Hands-On, Feet-In”
Showroom
4840 Davenport Place
Fremont, CA 94538
(510)770-8686
www.tubz.net
Asphalt/Paving
AIM CONSTRUCTION
John Peterson
• Paving • Grading
• Slurry Sealing • Paving Stones
• Concrete • Patching
We AIM to please!
(650)468-6750
(408)422-7695
Lic.# 916680
Cabinetry
Contractors
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Concrete, decks, retaining
walls, fences, bricks, roof,
gutters, & drains.
Call David
(650)270-9586
Lic# 914544 Bonded & Insured
Contractors
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Home repairs &
Foundation work
Retaining wall • Decks • Fences
No job too small
Gary Afu
(650)207-2400
Lic# 904960
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
26
Wednesday • July 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Cleaning
Concrete
CHETNER CONCRETE
Lic #706952
Driveways - Walkways
- Pool Decks - Patios - Stairs
- Exposed Aggregate - Masonry
- Retaining Walls - Drainage
- Foundation/Slabs
Free Estimates
(650)271-1442 Mike
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Solas
Electric
Best Rates
On all electrical work
7 days a week
Free Estimates
(650) 302-7906
CA License 950866
Bonded and Insured
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
JOSE’S
COMPLETE GARDENING
Complete gardening &
Landscaping
Commercial & Residential
Licensed
Free Estimates
(650)315-4011
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Landscaping
ASP LANDSCAPING
• All kinds of Concrete • Stamp
• Retaining Wall • Tree Service
• Brick • Roofing • Fencing
• New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435
(650)834-4495
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
VICTOR’S FENCES
House Painting
•Interior •Exterior
Power Wash
•Driveways •Sidewalk •Houses
Free Estimates
(650)583-1270
or (650)808-5833
Lic. # 106767
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets,
Also, Electrical, Hauling
Carpet, Tile & Stucco
(650)461-0326
Lic# 983312
Plumbing
HAMZEH PLUMBING
5 stars on Yelp!
$25 OFF First Time Customers
All plumbing services
24 hour emergency service
(415)690-6540
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
27 Wednesday • July 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Cemetery
CRIPPEN & FLYNN FUNERAL
CHAPELS
Family owned & operated
Established 1949
Personalized cremation &
funeral services
Serving all faiths & traditions
Woodside chapel: (650)369-4103
FD 879
Carlmont chapel: (650)595-4103
FD 1825
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)868-0082
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Home Care
MY ERRAND SERVICES
Help is on the way
• New Mother Assistance
• Senior Assistance • General Errands
• House & Pet Sitting • Event Help
• House Keeping • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
(650)201-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
Massage Therapy
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
UNION SPA & SALON
Grand Opening
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT
SENIOR LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
Video
ADULT VIDEOS $99 (415)298-0645
WORLD 28
Wednesday • July 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BAGHDAD — Insurgents unleashed a new
wave of attacks on Tuesday in Iraq, killing at
least 49 people, officials said, the latest in a
surge in violence across the country that has
raised concerns over a return to sectarian blood-
shed. Also, seven militants were killed.
There was no claim of responsibility for the
attacks, mostly car bombs in Shiite areas. Al-
Qaida’s Iraq branch, which has been gaining
strength in recent months, frequently targets
Shiites, security forces and civil servants in an
effort to undermine the Shiite-led government
in Baghdad.
Iraq is weathering its deadliest outburst of
violence since 2008, with more than 2,000 peo-
ple killed since the start of April. The bloodshed
appears to be largely the work of resurgent
Sunni militants such as al-Qaida, feeding off
Sunni discontent with the Shiite-led govern-
ment.
In Baghdad’s northern Shaab neighborhood,
two parked car bombs targeted car dealers and a
commercial area, killing nine people, including
a policeman, a police officer said. He said 24
others were wounded.
In the Shula neighborhood, a bomb exploded
in an open-air market, followed by a second
blast after rescuers rushed to the scene, killing
10 civilians and two policemen, a police officer
said. Twenty-seven people were wounded.
Five civilians were killed and 16 wounded in
a car bomb explosion in a market in Baghdad’s
eastern suburb of Kamaliya. A car bomb ripped
through a commercial area in the capital’s
southern Dora neighborhood, killing four and
wounding 15, police said.
In the predominantly Sunni neighborhood of
Amiriyah, two civilians were killed and 12
wounded in a car bomb explosion in a commer-
cial area. Three others were killed and 13
wounded in another car bomb explosion in the
northern Hurriyah neighborhood.
Also Tuesday, clashes erupted at dawn
between security forces and militants in Baaj, a
remote northwestern town near the Syrian bor-
der, and left four policemen dead and five
wounded. Police said seven militants were
killed.
Bombs, clashes kill at least 56 in Iraq
REUTERS
Iraqi security forces inspect the site of a car bomb attack in Basra, southeast of Baghdad. At
least 45 people were killed in bomb attacks across Iraq on Tuesday, most of them in busy
markets and commercial areas of the capital Baghdad.
U.S. drone attack kills 4 militants in Pakistan
PESHAWAR, Pakistan — Pakistani intelligence officials say
unmanned U.S. aircraft fired four missiles at a house in north-
west Pakistan, killing four militants.
The officials say the militants were members of the Haqqani
network. Two militants were wounded.
The drone strike was early Wednesday near the Dande Darpa
Khel area of the North Waziristan tribal region.
The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they
were not authorized to talk to reporters.
U.S. officials consider the Haqqani network to be one of the
most dangerous militant factions fighting American troops in
neighboring Afghanistan. The leadership of the Haqqani net-
work pledges allegiance to Taliban chief Mullah Omar but
operates fairly independently.
U.S. officials rarely provide details publicly about the covert
CIA drone program in Pakistan.
World in brief

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