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Friday • July 5, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 276
ON LIFE SUPPORT
WORLD PAGE 8
SABINE LISICKI IN
WIMBLEDON FINAL
SPORTS PAGE 11
‘ME 2’ IS
ZANY FUN
WEEKEND PAGE 19
NELSON MANDELA’S CONDITION CALLED
‘PERILOUS’
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
856 N. Delaware Street San Mateo
650-348-3680
Rippin ’Tacos
Mondo Burritos
WOW!
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Dirty floors and animals drop-
pings are still pretty good red
flags a food establishment might
be turning customers’ stomachs
but San Mateo County health offi-
cials are now taking a more holis-
tic approach to food safety and
facility inspections.
Are sick employees allowed to
work? Is chicken thawed in a mop
sink? How are decisions made
whether to toss food at the end of
the night or let it stick around?
Does everybody wash their hands
— constantly?
In a move away from the his-
toric approach of visual inspec-
tions, San Mateo County
Environmental Health Services
now uses a risk-based system that
includes how the food is prepared
and that managers and workers are
properly educated on how to keep
illness at bay.
“We really like to follow the
path of the food from the back
door and watch or have its path
explained. How do they accept it?
Are temperatures and conditions
logged? Does it go into the cooler
immediately? It’s the chance to
identify and help the facility iden-
tify the possible links in that
chain of the food-borne process,”
said Environmental Health
Director Dean Peterson.
The county began looking at a
change about four to five years ago
with plans to reduce the number of
illnesses and about three years ago
in earnest started making actual
changes based on the Food and
Drug Administration’s own com-
prehensive risk-based approach.
The changes include placing
food establishments in one of
three risk categories which either
decreases or increases the number
of annual inspections, adjusts fees
for those inspections and give
inspectors the chance to form bet-
ter relationships with owners,
Peterson said.
The inspection fee adjustments
began Jan. 1. Previously, any of
the county’s 4,000-plus establish-
ments paid the same amount and
were slated for unannounced
inspections the same number of
times each year — a lofty three to
Food inspections revamped
Health officials taking a holistic approach to restaurant safety, cleanliness
See FOOD, Page 23
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Education in San Carlos in the
coming five years will include
changes ranging from spaces that
can easily allow classes to take the
lessons outside to project-based
learning that prepares students to
use technology while still sup-
porting teamwork.
The five-year strategic plan,
which was recently approved by
the San Carlos School District
Board of Trustees, is a guide for the
vision of educating students.
Since the district has mostly char-
ter schools, it can be more flexible
in how it meets state and federal
mandates. The updated plan covers
not only the vision for curriculum
but also support for teachers and
facilities.
“We can do more,” said board
President Beth Hunkapiller.
Hunkapiller stressed the flexi-
bility in the plan — in terms of
facilities and curriculum.
Flexibility means being able to
personalize lesson plans to
San Carlos OKs
five-year vision
By David A. Egan
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
An original Fiat Cinquecento
500 is on the car lift and a couple
of Mercedes 300SL roadsters are
parked in the front. A Jaguar
XK150 coupe is in the center —
making Burlingame Motors seem
like a vintage car museum.
From the 1960s Batmobile to
Steve McQueen’s 1972 300 SL,
many rare classic cars have passed
through the doors of Burlingame
Motors. Anyone walking into the
shop feels an “appreciation for the
craftsmanship of a bygone time,”
said Burlingame Motors manager
Rene Wiegand.
Wiegand, with the assistance of
the other mechanics, has helped
shape the repair shop into one of
the most successful classic car
maintenance and restoration
shops for the last 14 years.
Burlingame Motors is a family-run
shop that has been around since
1979 servicing some of the most
elegant vintage European cars on
the road. It is partnered with
California Classics located right
across the shop on Rollins Road
just north of Broadway, which
does all the metal and paint work
Repair shop is like a
vintage car museum
HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL
Two young boys, above, ride along in a miniature version of a classic car matching the one behind, which
carries state Sen. Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo, during the 75th annual Redwood City Fourth of July parade Thursday
morning. Bottom left, Members of the Redwood City Council wave to onlookers during the parade. . Clowns
and more, bottom right, entertained the crowd.
Independence on display
School district makes template
for future facilities, curriculum
See VISION, Page 23
See CLASSICS, Page 17
Father jailed for fiery deaths
The San Gregorio father who pleaded
no contest to involuntary manslaugh-
ter in the 2004 arson-related deaths of
his two young sons will serve approx-
imately seven months in prison
before being freed, it was announced
the week of July 5, 2008.
Charles Edward Schuttloffel, Sr. 37,
received a three-year sentence on
Thursday of that week on two counts of
involuntary manslaughter over his
attorney’s protestations
that he’d suffered and
served enough time already.
Despite the multi-year
term, Schuttloffel, Sr. ,
only had approximately seven months
left to serve. He became eligible for
parole after serving 50 percent of his
sentence and had accumulated substan-
tial credit since his March 2007 arrest.
Schuttloffel also received two years
prison for a methamphetamine pos-
session charge filed two years after the
fire.
School negotiations locked
Salary negotiations between teach-
ers and the Belmont-Redwood Shores
Elementary School District the week
of July 5, 2008 reached a complete
standstill — beginning the final
stages of contract negotiations.
After months of negotiations, the
administration and teachers reached a
stalemate on salary in April 2008. No
progress was made between the two
sides resulting in a call for fact finding
that week. This mediation process
brought in an outsider who examines
the district’s finances and considers
the claims of both sides before putting
forth a recommendation.
County Styrofoam ban begins
Styrofoam food
containers became a
thing of the past for
county-operated food
outlets the week of July 5,
2008 when an ordinance outlawing
polystyrene took effect.
The ordinance only governed opera-
tions under the county’s control — the
San Mateo Event Center, the San
Mateo Medical Center and associated
clinics and all government buildings.
The ordinance prohibited county
departments from buying and using
polystyrene foam and solid disposable
food service products. The ordinance
also required the use of “biodegrad-
able, compostable, reusable or recy-
clable food service ware.”
Trauma center talks arise
Before the Palo Alto Medical
Foundation builds its hospital in San
Carlos, a Belmont councilman the
week of July 5, 2008 wanted to make
sure it includes plans for the county’s
first trauma center.
Councilman Bill Dickenson asked
the rest of the Belmont City Council
to get behind his idea to push for a
trauma center at the new hospital.
San Mateo County, with four hospi-
tals, does not have a designated trau-
ma center for the severely injured.
Critical patients are instead rushed to
either Stanford Medical
Center or San Francisco
General Hospital.
Dickenson was not the
first to suggest San Mateo County
have its own trauma center. The idea
is raised every few years in various
cities, but county emergency medical
service officials contend there are
not enough annual trauma cases to
sustain such a center — and the
required personnel — within San
Mateo County.
San Francisco General Hospital
has served as the Level 1 Trauma
Center for the north county since
1998. Stanford Medical Center
serves as a Level 1 Trauma Center for
the south county. Nearly all critical-
ly injured patients in San Mateo
County are either rushed via ambu-
lance or airlifted to one of the two
hospitals.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Friday • July 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Rapper RZA is 44.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1687
Isaac Newton first published his
Principia Mathematica, a three-vol-
ume work setting out his mathemati-
cal principles of natural philosophy.
“Every year on your birthday, you
get a chance to start new.”
— Bay Area musician Sammy Hagar
Musician Huey
Lewis is 63.
Actor Jason Dolley
is 22.
Birthdays
REUTERS
U.S.soldiers in the 101st Airborne Screaming Eagles attend a naturalization ceremony while celebrating Fourth of July at Bagram
airbase, north of Kabul in Afghanistan Sunday.The soldiers are the Adopted Sons of San Mateo.
Friday: Mostly cloudy. Highs in the mid
60s. West winds 10 to 15 mph.
Friday night: Mostly cloudy. Lows in
the lower 50s. Southwest winds 10 to 15
mph.
Saturday: Mostly cloudy. Highs in the
mid 60s. South winds 10 to 20
mph...Becoming southwest 5 to 10 mph
in the afternoon.
Saturday night: Mostly cloudy. Lows in the lower 50s.
Southwest winds 5 to 15 mph.
Sunday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming
partly cloudy. Highs in the mid 60s.
Sunday night through Tuesday night: Partly cloudy.
Lows in the lower 50s. Highs in the mid 60s.
Wednesday through Thursday: Mostly cloudy.
Local Weather Forecast
(Answers tomorrow)
CRACK KAYAK UPROOT USEFUL
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The 4th of July caused sales at the fireworks
store to — SKYROCKET
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SKKOI
TGLIH
BUPATE
NICTEE
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
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here:
On this date:
In 1811, Venezuela became the first South American coun-
try to declare independence from Spain.
I n 1865, William Booth founded the Salvation Army in
London.
I n 1912, a collision between a passenger coach and a
freight train near Wilpen, Pa., claimed 26 lives.
I n 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the
National Labor Relations Act.
I n 1946, the bikini, created by Louis Reard (ray-AHRD’),
was worn by Micheline Bernardini during a poolside fashion
show in Paris.
I n 1947, Larry Doby made his debut with the Cleveland
Indians, becoming the first black player in the American
League.
In 1948, Britain’s National Health Service Act went into
effect, providing government-financed medical and dental care.
I n 1962, independence took effect in Algeria; the same
day, civilians of European descent, mostly French, came
under attack by extremists in the port city of Oran (reports
of the death toll vary from about a hundred to the thousands).
I n 1971, President Richard Nixon certified the 26th
Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which lowered the
minimum voting age from 21 to 18.
I n 1975, Arthur Ashe became the first black man to win a
Wimbledon singles title as he defeated Jimmy Connors.
I n 1984, the Supreme Court weakened the 70-year-old
“exclusionary rule,” deciding that evidence seized in good
faith with defective court warrants could be used against
defendants in criminal trials.
I n 1991, a worldwide financial scandal erupted as regulators
in eight countries shut down the Bank of Credit and
Commerce International.
Ten years ago: President George W. Bush telephoned
Afghan President Hamid Karzai to express condolences for
the deaths of Afghan civilians killed in a U.S. bombing four
days earlier.
Actress Shirley Knight is 77. Baseball Hall-of-Fame pitch-
er Rich “Goose” Gossage is 62. Country musician Charles
Ventre is 61. Singer-songwriter Marc Cohn is 54. Actor
Dorien Wilson is 51. Actress Edie Falco is 50. Actress
Kathryn Erbe is 48. Rhythm-and-blues singer Joe is 40. Rock
singer Jason Wade (Lifehouse) is 33. Actor Ryan Hansen is
32. Country musician Dave Haywood (Lady Antebellum) is
31. Rock musician Nick O’Malley (Arctic Monkeys) is 28.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Money Bags ,
No. 11, in first place; Gorgeous George, No. 8, in
second place; and Solid Gold, No. 10, in third
place.The race time was clocked at 1:43.37.
3 2 6
36 42 51 52 53 40
Mega number
July 2 Mega Millions
3 6 29 40 51 4
Powerball
July 3 Powerball
1 11 26 29 33
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
7 0 4 7
Daily Four
1 6 1
Daily three evening
14 35 36 40 47 6
Mega number
July 3 Super Lotto Plus
3
Friday • July 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
BELMONT
Suspi ci ous ci rcumst ances. A man
pulled up to a home and attempted to steal a
lawn mower on Ruth Avenue before 12:52
p.m. Monday, June 24.
Suspi ci ous person. Aman wearing a blue
hoodie and jeans was yelling profanities
while walking on El Camino Real before
8:43 a.m. Monday, June 24.
Suspi ci ous ci rcumstances. A man was
reportedly taking pictures of a person and
their mother at the intersection of Ralston
and Pullman avenues before 10:57 a.m.
Sunday, June 23.
Drug off ens e. Aman was arrested for drug
activity at the intersection of Ralston
Avenue and Old County Road before 12:29
a.m. Saturday, June 22.
FOSTER CITY
Suspi ci ous ci rcumst ances. Someone
reported hearing a pounding noise from near
his garage on Williams Lane before 11:23
p.m. Wednesday, June 26.
Warrant arre s t . Aman was arrested on two
no bail warrants for probation violation on
burglary charges at the intersection of
Beach Park Boulevard and Egret Street
before 10:59 p.m. Wednesday, June 26.
SAN CARLOS
Arre s t . Aman was arrested for being under
the influence of a controlled substance on
the 1100 block of El Camino Real before
2:03 p.m. Friday, June 28.
Drunk. Aperson was detained for being drunk
in public on the 1400 block of El Camino
Real before 12:40 a.m. Friday, June 28.
Drunk. A man was detained for public
intoxication on the 900 block of El Camino
Real before 1:51 p.m. Wednesday, June 26.
Ci t at i on. Aman was cited for driving with
a suspended license on Alameda de las
Pulgas and Howard Avenue before 8:09 p.m.
Tuesday, June 25.
Drunk in public. A person was detained
for being drunk in public on the 1200 block
of Eaton Avenue before 2:07 p.m. Tuesday,
June 25.
MENLO PARK
DUI. A man was arrested for driving under
the influence after a hit and run at the inter-
section of Marsh Road and Haven Avenue
before 9:58 p.m. Monday, June 24.
Attempted burglary. Someone attempted to
enter a parking structure on the first block of
Willow Road before 6:33 p.m. Sunday, June 23.
Drunk driver. Aman was arrested for driv-
ing drunk on the 300 block of Middlefield
Road before 12:48 a.m. Thursday, June 20.
REDWOOD CITY
Disturbance. People discharged fireworks
at a man’s house after he asked them to stop
lighting them on Nueva Avenue before
12:17 p.m. Saturday, June 29.
Disturbance. A woman was in a verbal
argument with someone she believed to
have stolen her prescription medication on
El Camino Real before 10:44 a.m. Saturday,
June 29.
Arre s t . A person was arrested for being
drunk and disorderly on Veterans Boulevard
before 6:28 a.m. Saturday, June 29.
Arre s t . A person was arrested for being
drunk and disorderly on Broadway before
1:59 a.m. Saturday, June 29.
Arre s t . Aperson was arrested for drinking
and being loud on Linden Street before
12:13 a.m. Saturday, June 29.
Disturbance. Aperson reported their loud
neighbors were lighting fireworks on
Greenwood Lane before 12:10 a.m.
Saturday, June 29.
Suspi ci ous ci rcumst ances. A man
attempted to get someone’s son into his
vehicle by offering him baseball cards
before being yelled away on Veterens
Boulevard before 11:34 p.m. Wednesday,
June 26.
Police reports
Bees, bees, bees!
A beekeeper was asked to remove a
swarm of bees on the 1200 block of
Donnelly Avenue in Burlingame before
12:20 p.m. Thursday, June 27.
GRACE YI
Maria Kushnareva celebrates the Fourth of July with a rock climb at Fun Day in San Mateo’s
Central Park.
Climbing on the Fourth
4
Friday • July 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
City government
• San Carl os Ci t y
Manager Jeff Mal t bi e
announced the appointment of
Chri st i ne Bol and t o
become the Parks and
Recreation director for the
city of San Carlos.
Boland was serving as the acting Parks and
Recreation director since February 2013 when Doug
Long, the city’s former Parks and Recreation direc-
tor retired from San Carlos after serving as director
for five years. Her starting annual salary as Parks and
Recreation director will be $141,684.
Boland started with the city of San Carlos as
assistant city clerk in June 1998 and was then
elected as city clerk in the following election.
Woman arrested in
B’game prostitution sting
In response to several citizen
complaints, Burlingame police
conducted an undercover sting
operation at a massage parlor on
Capuchino Avenue.
Wednesday, an undercover officer
posing as a customer entered the
Crystal Wave Spa and requested a
massage. During the massage, the
officer was propositioned to
engage in a sexual act for money
by a female masseuse working at
the establishment.
The woman, 48-year-old Shi Xiu
Yang out of San Francisco, was
arrested for disorderly conduct.
Armed robbery at
Palo Alto gas station
Palo Alto police are looking for
a masked man armed with a semi-
automatic pistol who allegedly
robbed a Shell gas station Tuesday
morning.
At about 11:15 a.m. the thief,
wearing a white handkerchief to
shield his face, demanded money
while pointing a pistol at three
clerks at the gas station at 1161
Embarcadero Road, police said.
Police said the suspect then
drove away in a newer gray Acura
MDX sport utility vehicle.
He was last seen entering the
southbound on-ramp to U.S.
Highway 101.
Surveillance photos show the
suspect as a black man standing
about 6 feet tall with a thin build.
He was wearing a black sweatshirt
with a hood over his head, dark
pants and a handkerchief over his
face.
The station clerks, a man in his
50s, and two women in their 30s
and 40s, handed over the cash in
the register.
Anyone with information about
the suspect or the incident is asked
to contact the Palo Alto Police
Department’s 24-hour dispatch
center at (650) 329-2413.
Firearms taken from man
banned from keeping guns
ASan Jose man prohibited from
having firearms surrendered a cache
of 29 pistols and rifles Wednesday,
including assault weapons, but was
not arrested, a San Jose police
spokesman said Thursday.
The Department of Justice had
added the man’s name to a list of
people convicted of a felony or
violent misdemeanor, placed under
a domestic violence restraining
order or determined to be mentally
unstable, Morales said.
Local briefs
By Terry Collins
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Striking San
Francisco Bay Area rail workers
and transit agency officials
returned to the bargaining table on
Thursday but failed to reach a deal
after workers walked off the job
Monday.
Joe Bomberger with the Service
Employees International Union
told reporters as he entered the
negotiating site in Oakland that
Bay Area Rapid Transit officials
were not “substantially address-
ing” any of the safety concerns
that the unions have for the public
and workers.
Those concerns include lighting
in tunnels and bullet-proof glass
for station agent booths.
Bomberger was then pulled away
by another union official. The two
sides have been told by a state
mediator not to speak to the
media.
The strike is in its fourth day,
though commuters got a reprieve
from crowded buses and gridlock
on the roads because of the Fourth
of July holiday. BART is the
nation’s fifth largest rail system
and carries about 400,000 com-
muters each weekday.
The two sides negotiated into
the night Wednesday. BARTissued
a statement, saying it was sorry
that the actions of the unions had
caused such a tremendous disrup-
tion.
The strike began early Monday
after talks broke off. Negotiations
resumed Tuesday as political pres-
sure and public pleas mounted.
Key issues in the labor dispute
include salaries, pensions, health
care and safety.
BART has said workers from the
two unions average about $71,000
in base salary and $11,000 in
overtime annually. The workers
also pay a flat $92 monthly fee for
health insurance.
The unions — which represent
nearly 2,400 train operators, sta-
tion agents, mechanics, mainte-
nance workers and professional
staff — want a 5 percent raise each
year over the next three years.
BARTsaid it is offering an 8 per-
cent salary increase over the next
four years as well as reducing the
amount of employee contributions
it originally requested for pension
and medical benefit s.
BART talks resume as strike goes on
5
Friday • July 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATION/STATE
FULLER, Alice “Bunny” Barrie
Died on June 21, 2013 in Belmont after
a long illness and with her family close
by. Born Alice Jean Barrie on January 25,
1926 in Bryn Mawr, PA. Bunny headed west
in 1952 to San Francisco, met her future
husband and lived almost continuously in
San Mateo.
Suddenly widowed in 1965, Bunny raised
her two children while working for the San
Mateo - Foster City School District. She
retired as the Confidential Secretary to the
Superintendent in 1991.
Bunny loved to travel the world and all over the USA. When at her home
of 44 years in San Mateo, she enjoyed many hobbies and volunteered at the
Peninsula Humane Society. But most of all she loved spending time with
her family and numerous friends.
She is preceded in death by her husband, Myron E. Fuller, Jr. and parents,
Elizabeth (Thornton) and Robert Barrie, Jr. She is survived by her son Bob
and his wife Ann of San Jose; daughter Beth of Duarte, CA; stepdaughter
Sherrie Dobbie of Lindenhurst, NY; sister and brother in law, Suzanne and
John Gromala of Medford, OR. She will be greatly missed by her grandchildren
Stephanie; Steven and his fiancée Tracy and her great granddaughter Jaslynn
and numerous friends and relatives across the country.
Funeral Services were private.
Obituary
By Nick Divito
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Joey Chestnut
downed 69 franks and devoured his
own record in the men’s Fourth of
July hot dog eating contest while
Sonya Thomas defended her title
in the women’s competition.
The San Jose man known as
Jaws ate one more wiener than his
previous record to capture the mus-
tard-yellow champion’s belt. He
said afterward that he was motivat-
ed by the prestige, not the
$10,000 prize money.
“I’d do this for nothing,” he
said.
Thomas, a 100-pound dynamo
known as the “Black Widow” of
competitive eating, wolfed down
nearly 37 wieners to narrowly eke
out her own victory.
Chestnut, 29, is a seven-time
winner who set the old record —
68 hot dogs and buns in 10 min-
utes — in 2009 and tied it last
year. Thomas, 45, powered
through 45 dogs to take the
women’s championship last year
and also won in 2011, the first
year women competed separately
Chestnut, who weighs 210
pounds, had said his pace was
uneven in the past, but “this year
I’m trying to eat a little more
gracefully, conserve my energy. ”
Second-place finisher was Matt
Stonie, who chomped down 51
hot dogs.
With this year’s victory,
Chestnut has now bested his for-
mer rival, Takeru Kobayashi, who
won six times. Kobayashi com-
peted in a different eating contest
Thursday.
Thomas went toe-to-toe with
Juliet Lee for the $5,000 women’s
prize. Thomas finished with 36
and three-quarters dogs; Lee ate 36
wieners.
Thomas said the challenge of
shoveling down dozens of franks
is actually “more mental than
physical.”
“I have to fight with myself, so
I’m going to try to really focus,”
said Thomas, of Alexandria, Va. ,
where she manages a fast-food
restaurant.
Now in its 98th year, the
Nathan’s Famous Fourth of July
International Hot Dog Eating
Contest draws crowds of thou-
sands to marvel at contestants
cramming frankfurters down their
throats.
Ginger Perry, 47, of Obion
County, Tenn., said she and her
family planned their New York
City vacation around the contest
after watching it on TV in past
years.
Perry was impressed that Coney
Island has recovered so well from
being slammed by Superstorm
Sandy last October. “It’s amazing
to be here and that they rebuilt so
quickly,” she said.
The hot dog contest took place
despite concerns about a swaying,
shuttered observation tower that
spurred the closure of parts of the
nearby amusement park.
The shutdown didn’t affect
Nathan’s, but Coney Island’s
famous Cyclone roller coaster and
other rides were closed, and work-
ers were using a crane to dismantle
the tower.
Chestnut wins 7th hot dog eating contest
REUTERS
Competitive eater Joey Chestnut holds his championship belt aloft as he arrives for the official weigh in for
Nathan’s Famous Fourth of July International Eating Contest held in New York yesterday.
By Sudhin Thanawala
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — One
moment 18-year-old Lizzie Moore
was eating pancakes and talking to
fellow staff at a summer camp near
Yosemite National Park. The next
she heard a cracking sound and
screams and looked up to see the
top of a tree coming crashing
toward her.
“If I hadn’t moved, I don’t think
I’d be able to speak to you right
now”’ Moore said on Thursday from
her hospital room in Modesto.
Moore was pinned by a branch and
suffered five broken ribs and a frac-
tured elbow and vertebrae when
about 40 feet of a large, 53-inch
diameter black oak tree snapped off
on Wednesday morning at Camp
Tawonga near Groveland, Calif.
The falling tree top killed 21-
year-old camp art counselor Annais
Rittenberg and injured Moore and
three others.
Two of the injured adults were
treated and released. A third, Cara
Sheedy, was in good condition at
another hospital in Modesto, a
nursing supervisor said.
No children were harmed. They
were inside a nearby dining hall
having breakfast. The tree took
down power lines, but did not dam-
age any buildings.
Moore said she had heard shot-
guns in the distance at the camp
before, but nothing like the crack-
ing noise of the tree.
“At first I was really not sure at all
what was happening,” she said. “I
heard some commotion, some
screaming and then I ended up seeing
the top of the tree moving around a
lot, and then I saw it fall.”
She was knocked unconscious and
said she does not remember much of
what happened afterward.
The tree snapped about 32 feet
from the ground, according to
Tuolumne County Sheriff’s
spokesman Sgt. James Oliver.
Oliver said sheriff’s officials don’t
plan any further investigation into
what caused the tree to fall. Because
of the nearby power lines, authori-
ties said Pacific Gas & Electric Co.
was responsible for annual inspec-
tions of the oak tree.
PG&E officials who looked at the
tree’s stump on Wednesday said the
tree showed no obvious signs of rot-
ting or disease, Oliver said. Weather
also did not appear to be a factor.
PG&E last inspected the area
where the tree fell in December
2012, spokesman Brian Swanson
said. During such inspections, the
utility looks for tree limbs growing
close to power lines and obvious
signs of decay or defects in trees
around them.
Swanson said PG&E was still
inspecting the tree that fell.
Rittenberg was an environmen-
tal studies major at the University
of California, Santa Cruz, where
she was a popular college DJ who
served as world music director at
the school’s radio station, station
manager Alec Howard said. The
camp’s executive director, Ken
Kramarz, called Rittenberg a
“beloved member of our staff.”
“As our own hearts are still hurt-
ing, we send our sincerest condo-
lences to her family and loved
ones,” Kramarz said in an email
sent to campers’ parents. Moore,
who served as a lifeguard at the
camp and ran programs at the pool,
said she had only just gotten to
know Rittenberg days earlier.
Teen injured near Yosemite camp heard crack, screaming
6
Friday • July 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
STATE/NATION
Advertisment
By Tami Abdollah
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — County probation offi-
cials say they aren’t consistently getting
required notice about inmates being released
to their supervision, making it harder to
monitor felons and potentially endangering
the public.
The late notice puts additional pressure
on an overburdened criminal justice system
where county offices are underfunded and
understaffed. Officials worry convicted
felons are ending up on the streets without
anyone helping or keeping an eye on them.
“You can’t watch somebody if you don’t
know you have to be watching somebody, ”
said Karen Pank, executive director of the
Chief Probation Officers of California.
“Notice is really important, and logistical-
ly we need time to get that into the proba-
tion department and assign that case to
somebody. ”
The issue came to light when Los Angeles
County probation officials complained they
were given one-day notice in April before
the release of Dustin Kinnear, who’s now
accused of stabbing a woman to death on
Hollywood’s Walk of Fame.
Notification issues were apparently more
problematic immediately after the state’s
criminal justice realignment program, or
AB 109, took effect in October 2011 to
meet a federal court order to reduce
California’s prison population. The law
sends some criminals whose violations
weren’t serious, violent, or sexual to coun-
ty jail instead of state prisons and releases
those types of inmates on county probation
instead of state parole.
Because it can take probation officers
weeks to review the inmate’s criminal
background, mental health history and
prison records, the law requires the
Department of Corrections and
Rehabilitation to send counties a thorough
case file on each inmate at least 30 days
before their release.
Corrections spokesman Luis Patino said
delays can occur after a short prison sen-
tence, which makes it difficult to process
paperwork in time, or when county courts
haven’t sent enough information on offend-
ers to the state, which is what he said hap-
pened with Kinnear.
“We do everything we can to try to give
the counties as much lead time as we can,”
Patino said. “Sometimes it’s not just phys-
ically possible.”
The department used to give its own
parole agency at least 120 days to process
inmates before their release, and has aimed
to do the same for counties, Patino said.
But probation officials in the counties
that supervise the largest numbers of ex-
cons say they don’t always receive informa-
tion a month in advance.
Los Angeles estimates it gets 15 to 20
percent of its 500 inmate notifications late
each month; San Diego estimates 14 per-
cent of its 130 inmate notices are tardy; and
San Bernardino finds it happens in 5 percent
of its 150 cases, according to officials in
those counties.
In some instances, they receive notice
the day before an inmate’s release, the day
of their release, or once the convict is on
the streets.
In the case of Kinnear, 26, who’s charged
with murder in the killing of Christine
Calderon last month after she refused to pay
him for taking his photo panhandling, it’s
not clear that a lack of notice would have
made a difference.
He didn’t report to the county probation
office as required and then was in and out of
jail after several other arrests.
Patino said state prisons never got a com-
plete court file on Kinnear, so they didn’t
determine he was eligible for probation
until days before his release, delaying noti-
fication to the county.
Getting the information on time is the
first step in keeping an offender on the right
track, said Ryken Grattet, a researcher on
corrections policy for the Public Policy
Institute of California. Those first days after
release require consistent supervision.
Probation in the dark on some inmates
Probation officials in the counties that
supervise the largest numbers of ex-cons say
they don’t always receive information a
month in advance.
Ex-US border inspector
sentenced in bribery case
SAN DIEGO — A former U.S. border
inspector has been sentenced to 12 years in
prison for taking more than $50,000 to
wave drug-laden vehicles from Mexico
through his lane.
Oscar Osbaldo Ortiz Martinez was sen-
tenced Wednesday in a San Diego courtroom
and ordered to pay more than $20,000 in
fines. The 33-year-old was convicted late
last year on conspiracy and bribery charges.
Ortiz, who worked for Customs and Border
Protection, was assigned to a border cross-
ing in Calexico.
Prosecutors say Ortiz and an accomplice
worked with federal agents posing as drug
traffickers.
Authorities say Ortiz discussed smuggling
cocaine and methamphetamine through his
inspection lane.
Ortiz accepted $22,000 in bribes and was
arrested in 2010 when he showed up to col-
lect another $30,000 bribe from an inform-
ant.
By Bill Barrow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATLANTA — When the U.S. Supreme
Court gutted the Voting Rights act last
week, it handed Republicans tough ques-
tions with no easy answers over how, and
where, to attract voters even GOP leaders
say the party needs to stay nationally com-
petitive.
The decision caught Republicans between
newfound state autonomy that conserva-
tives covet and the law’s popularity among
minority, young and poor voters who tend
to align with Democrats. It’s those voters
that Republicans are eyeing to expand and
invigorate the GOP’s core of older, white
Americans.
National GOP Chairman Reince Priebus
began that effort well before the court’s
decision by promising, among other initia-
tives, to hire non-white party activists to
engage directly with black and Latino vot-
ers. Yet state and national Republicans
reacted to the Voting Rights Act decision
with a flurry of activity and comments that
may not fit neatly into the national party’s
vision.
Congressional leaders must decide
whether to try to rewrite the provision the
court struck, but it’s not clear how such an
effort would fare in the Democratic-led
Senate and the GOP-controlled House. And
at the state level, elected Republicans are
enacting tighter voting restrictions that
Democrats blast as harmful to their tradi-
tional base of supporters and groups the
Republicans say they want to attract.
States like North Carolina and Virginia
provide apt examples of the potential fall-
out.
An influx of non-whites have turned those
Republican strongholds into battlegrounds
in the last two presidential elections, and
minority voters helped President Barack
Obama win both states in 2008 and Virginia
again in 2012.
Nationally, Republican Mitt Romney
lost among African-Americans by about 85
percentage points and Latinos by about 44
percentage points, margins that virtually
ensure a Democratic victory.
GOP has hard choices
on Voting Rights Act
By Hannah Dreier
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PRESCOTT, Ariz. — They remembered
the Fourth, but also the 19.
At Bistro St. Michael on Whiskey Row in
this old West town, 19 candles burned beneath
red, white and blue bunting, one for each fire-
fighter killed last weekend battling a wildfire
not far from the place they called home.
In a quiet neighborhood near the high
school, which at least five of them attended,
19 miniature U.S. flags were planted in front
yards, each pole tied with the purple ribbon
that commemorates fallen firefighters.
At the makeshift memorial on the fence
that wrapped around the elite Hotshots fire-
fighting team’s headquarters, people left 19
potted plants, 19 pinwheels, 19 handwrit-
ten cards, 19 religious candles.
On a day meant to ponder the nation’s
birth, and those who built and defended it
over 237 years, Prescott’s residents had 19
of their neighbors, their friends, their rela-
tives to remember.
“I just wanted to thank them and let them
know that they’re heroes and that they’re
missed,” said Susan Reynolds, who hung a
piece of fabric with an expression of thanks
on a string of panels that hung like a prayer
flag on the fence.
Away from the celebrations, public
memorials and the fireworks planned for
later Thursday, some of the fallen firefight-
ers’ families were quietly trying to come to
terms with their own personal loss.
Occasionally, relatives would emerge to
speak about the fallen.
“There’s no celebration today,” said
Laurie McKee, whose 21-year-old nephew,
Grant McKee, died in the fire. “We’re doing
OK, but it’s still up and down.”
McKee’s father and aunt picked up items
recovered from his truck on Wednesday
night, and were comforted when the fire
chief told them that Grant McKee had been
part of “the Navy Seals of firefighting,” his
aunt said. His family was planning to spend
the day at home, visiting with relatives fly-
ing in for his funeral.
Arizona town remembers
the 4th, fallen firefighters
State brief
NATION 7
Friday • July 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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HAIRCUT (reg.$14)
By Colleen Long
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The Statue of Liberty
reopened on the Fourth of July, eight
months after Superstorm Sandy shuttered
the national symbol of freedom, as
Americans around the country celebrated
with fireworks and parades and President
Obama urged citizens to live up to the words
of the Declaration of Independence.
Hundreds lined up Thursday to be among
the first to board boats destined for Lady
Liberty, including New Yorker Heather
Leykam and her family.
“This, to us, Liberty Island, is really
about a rebirth,” said Leykam, whose moth-
er’s home was destroyed during the storm.
“It is a sense of renewal for the city and the
country. We wouldn’t have missed it for the
world.”
Nationwide, Boston prepared to host its
first large gathering since the marathon
bombing that killed three and injured hun-
dreds, and Philadelphia, Washington and
New Orleans geared up for large holiday
concerts. A Civil War reenactment com-
memorating the 150th anniversary of the
Battle of Gettysburg drew as many as
40,000 people to Pennsylvania. In
Arizona, sober tributes were planned for 19
firefighters who died this week battling a
blaze near Yarnell.
Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, speaking
at the reopening of the Statue of Liberty,
choked up as she told the crowd she was
wearing a purple ribbon in memory of the
fallen firefighters.
“Nineteen firefighters lost their lives in
the line of duty, and we as a nation stand
together,” she said through tears.
The island was decorated with star-span-
gled bunting, but portions remain blocked
off with large construction equipment, and
the main ferry dock was boarded up. Repairs
to brick walkways and docks were ongoing.
But much of the work has been completed
since Sandy swamped the 12-acre island in
New York Harbor, and visitors were
impressed.
“It’s stunning, it’s beautiful,” said
Elizabeth Bertero, 46, of California’s
Sonoma County. “They did a great job
rebuilding. You don’t really notice that any-
thing happened.”
The statue itself was unharmed, but the
land took a beating. Railings broke, docks
and paving stones were torn up and build-
ings were flooded. The storm destroyed elec-
trical systems, sewage pumps and boilers.
Hundreds of National Park Service workers
from as far away as California and Alaska
spent weeks cleaning mud and debris.
“It is one of the most enduring icons of
America, and we pulled it off — it’s open
today,” National Park Service Director
Jonathan Jarvis said. “Welcome.”
The statue was open for a single day last
year — Oct. 28, the day before Sandy
struck. It had been closed the previous year
for security upgrades. Neighboring Ellis
Island remains closed and there has been no
reopening date set.
In his weekly radio address from
Washington, Obama urged Americans to
work to secure liberty and opportunity for
their own children and future generations.
The first family was to host U.S. servicemen
and women at the White House for a cook-
out.
Atlanta and Alaska planned holiday runs
— thousands were racing up a 3,022-foot
peak in Seward. In New Orleans, the Essence
Festival celebrating black culture and music
kicked off along the riverfront.
The celebratory mood turned somber in
Oklahoma and Maine with fatal accidents
during parades. I
n Edmond, Okla., a boy died after being
run over by a float near the end of the town’s
LibertyFest parade. In Bangor, Maine, the
driver of a tractor in the parade was killed
after the vehicle was struck by an old fire
truck.
In Boston, attendance for the city’s cele-
bration appeared down, with crowds on the
Charles River Esplanade seeming smaller
than in recent years while a robust law
enforcement presence greeted revelers gath-
ering for a performance by the Boston Pops
and a fireworks display.
Among those at Boston’s festivities was
Carlos Arredondo, the cowboy hat-wearing
marathon attendee who became part of one
of the indelible images of the bombings’
aftermath: helping rush a badly wounded
man from the scene in a wheelchair, his legs
torn to pieces.
Statue of Liberty reopens as U.S. salutes 4th
REUTERS
The 3rd U.S. Infantry, traditionally known as “The Old Guard”, perform during a ceremony to
reopen the Statue of Liberty and Liberty Island to the public in New York yesterday.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — President
Barack Obama and his national
security team tread delicately
Thursday in the aftermath of the
ouster of Egyptian President
Mohammed Morsi, urging the
restive nation to quickly return
authority to a democratically elect-
ed civilian government and avoid
violence. The administration still
declined to take sides in the
volatile developments as Egypt’s
military installed an interim gov-
ernment leader.
Ahead of
Was hi ngt on’s
Fourth of July
f i r e w o r k s ,
Obama met
with his nation-
al security team
in the White
House situation
room for brief-
ings on their
calls to Egyptian leaders and other
partners in the region, National
Security Council spokeswoman
Bernadette Meehan said in a state-
ment.
The carefully worded messages
from the U.S. officials conveyed
“the importance of a quick and
responsible return of full authority
to a democratically elected civilian
government as soon as possible,”
Meehan said.
The series of calls by Secretary
of State John Kerry, Secretary of
Defense Chuck Hagel and national
security adviser Susan Rice went to
officials from Egypt, Israel, Qatar,
Turkey and Norway.
The U.S. officials also urged a
transparent political process in
Egypt and the avoidance of “any
arbitrary arrests of President Morsi
and his supporters,” Meehan said.
The delicate diplomacy high-
lights difficult policy choices for
the administration:
• Denounce the ouster of Morsi
outright, and the U.S. could be
accused of propping up a ruler
who’s lost the public’s support.
It’s a prospect with eerie echoes of
autocrat Hosni Mubarak, whom the
U.S. supported for decades before
the 2011 revolution that cleared
the path to power for Morsi and his
Muslim Brotherhood.
• Look the other way, and the
U.S. could be accused of fomenting
dissent or lose credibility on its
commitment to the democratic
process.
The administration is acting as
if it accepts what happened in
Egypt — and actually believes it
could turn out for the best with the
Islamist Morsi no longer in
charge. At the same time, officials
are attempting to keep their dis-
tance, laying down markers for
what they want to see in the long
term while leaving it up to the
military to make sure that hap-
pens.
U.S. officials approach tumult in Egypt with caution
Barack Obama
WORLD/LOCAL 8
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The Half Moon Bay Brewi ng Company won best
in show for session beers — low carbonation and low
alcohol — and a gold medal in the wood/smoke ale cate-
gory at the California State Fair Craft Beer
Compet i t i on June 21-23 in West Sacramento. The local
brewery competed against 82 other breweries and nearly
700 beers.
***
Recol ogy San Mateo County and RethinkWast e
handed out BizSMART@Work Awards to three multi-
family dwellings and 16 businesses for their dedication to
diverting waste from the landfill through recycling and
composting. Inflection, a Redwood City-based data tech-
nology company, also won the Rethinker’s Choice Award
picked by the general public. Inflection increased their
diversion from 50 percent to more than 90 percent after
implementing a composting program in October 2012.
***
Paul Mart i n’s American Grill will be opening at
the Hillsdale Shopping Center Monday, July 8. The
restaurant will sell American classics with a fresh twist —
using local and in-season ingredients.
***
Menlo Park has new reason to “like” Facebook. Since
the company moved there in late 2011, San Mateo
County has jumped to the highest paid in the United
States and wages are up $1,677 per week, according to the
federal Bureau of Labor Statistics. That figure — $3,240
per week or $168,00o per year — trumps second-place
Manhattan by more than $1,000.
***
Beannú to Aer Lingus! Now that the Irish carrier is
making plans to return to SFO next spring, you may want
to know the Gaelic terms for greetings. The airliner will
have five flights per week direct service from San
Francisco to Dublin. Other nonstop destinations in the
United States for Aer Lingus include Boston, New York,
Chicago and Orlando.
***
Congratulations to San Bruno veterinarian Donald
Conkl i ng, who was given a meritorious service award
from the Cal i forni a Veterinary Medi cal
Associ at i on for his years of donating services and also
his pro bono care for animals rescued by the Center for
Animal Protection and Education in Scotts Valley. His
dog, Sophie, was also inducted into the California
Animal Hall of Fame Award for her work as a therapy dog.
The reporters’ notebook is a weekly collection of facts culled from
the notebooks of the Daily Journal staff. It appears in the Friday edi-
tion.
Reporters’ notebook
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO — Egypt’s military
moved swiftly Thursday against
senior figures of the Muslim
Brotherhood, targeting the back-
bone of support for ousted President
Mohammed Morsi. In the most dra-
matic step, authorities arrested the
group’s revered leader from a seaside
villa and flew him by helicopter to
detention in the capital.
With a top judge newly sworn in
as interim president to replace
Morsi, the crackdown poses an
immediate test to the new army-
backed leadership’s promises to
guide Egypt to democracy: The
question of how to include the 83-
year-old fundamentalist group.
That question has long been at
the heart of democracy efforts in
Egypt. Hosni Mubarak and previ-
ous authoritarian regimes banned
the group, raising cries even from
pro-reform Brotherhood critics
that it must be allowed to partici-
pate if Egypt was to be free. After
Mubarak’s fall, the newly legal-
ized group vaulted to power in
elections, with its veteran mem-
ber Morsi becoming the country’s
first freely elected president.
Now the group is reeling under a
huge backlash from a public that
says the Brotherhood and its
Islamist allies abused their elec-
toral mandate. The military forced
Morsi out Wednesday after mil-
lions of Egyptians nationwide
turned out in four days of protests
demanding he be removed.
Adly Mansour, the head of the
Supreme Constititonal Court,
with which Morsi had repeated
confrontations, was sworn in as
interim president.
In his inaugural speech, broad-
cast nationwide, he said the anti-
Morsi protests that began June 30
had “corrected the path of the glo-
rious revolution of Jan. 25,” refer-
ring to the 2011 uprising that top-
pled Mubarak.
To cheers from his audience, he
also praised the army, police,
media and judiciary for standing
against the Brotherhood.
Islamists saw those institutions
as full of Mubarak loyalists trying
to thwart their rule.
Furious over what it calls a mili-
tary coup against democracy, the
Brotherhood said it would not
work with the new leadership. It
and harder-line Islamist allies
called for a wave of protests
Friday, dubbing it the “Friday of
Rage,” vowing to escalate if the
military does not back down.
There are widespread fears of
Islamist violence in retaliation
for Morsi’s ouster, and already
some former militant extremists
have vowed to fight .
Top Brotherhood figures seized in Egypt sweep
REUTERS
A member of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporter of ousted Egyptian
President Mohammed Morsi holds a poster of Morsi at the Raba El-Ad-
wyia mosque square in Cairo Sunday
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ISLAMABAD — Pakistan took a
major step toward averting an eco-
nomic crisis Thursday, reaching an
initial deal with the International
Monetary Fund on a bailout of at least
$5.3 billion to help shore up the coun-
try’s rapidly diminishing foreign
reserves.
The announcement should help calm
fears of financial instability in
Pakistan, a nuclear-armed nation of
180 million people that is also grap-
pling with rampant violence by
Islamic militants. But the deal man-
dates economic reforms that may be
unpopular with Pakistanis.
Pakistan is a vital ally of the United
States, the most powerful member of
the IMF, which relies on Islamabad’s
help to fight Taliban and al-Qaida mil-
itants and negotiate peace in neigh-
boring Afghanistan. Analysts predict-
ed U.S. pressure would be key to seal-
ing a deal.
The agreement comes less than six
years after Pakistan’s last IMF bailout,
and the driving need for the money
this time was to repay the institution
nearly $5 billion that Islamabad still
owes.
Pakistan’s previous government
failed to implement many of the
requirements of the last loan, includ-
ing reducing the deficit and improving
tax collection, and ended the program
early. That left the new government,
which took over at the beginning of
June, with the difficult task of con-
vincing the IMF that this time would
be different.
The IMF mission director in
Pakistan, Jeffrey Franks, acknowl-
edged Islamabad’s checkered history,
but said the institution would not pun-
ish the country for the failure of its
predecessors.
Pakistan, IMF agree to $5.3B bailout
Mandela on life support,
faces ‘impending death’
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JOHANNESBURG — Nelson Mandela is being kept alive
by a breathing machine and faces “impending death,” court
documents show.
The former president’s health is “per-
ilous,” according to documents filed in
the court case that resulted in the remains
of his three deceased children being
reburied Thursday in their original
graves.
“The anticipation of his impending
death is based on real and substantial
grounds,” the court filing said.
Mandela, who was hospitalized on
June 8, remains in critical but stable con-
dition, according to the office of
President Jacob Zuma, who visited the anti-apartheid leader
on Thursday. The president’s office also said doctors denied
reports that 94-year-old Mandela is in a “vegetative state.”
A younger person put on mechanical ventilation — life
support — can be weaned off the machine and recover, but
that it can be difficult or impossible for an older person.
Nelson
Mandela
OPINION 9
Friday • July 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
BART – Fairness to
taxpayers and riders?
Editor,
We as taxpayers and riders have
invested hundreds of billions of dol-
lars to build the BARTsystem. Our
motivations were varied but likely
included reduced use of our cars, inter-
nal combustion engines, reduction of
petroleum consumption, improved air
quality, relieve capacity constrictions
on our freeways and the cost of travel-
ing to our employment and entertain-
ment.
Press reports have observed that
those who drive the BARTtrains earn
in excess of $100,000 per year, sug-
gesting that we have invested in cre-
ating highly paid jobs. This for a
effort less than those who drive
empty buses, at least in San Mateo
County they are often empty. I say
less effort since a BARTdriver does
not need to steer due to the rails, nor
interface with riders as they do not
need to collect fares and there is no
other traffic in the rail system. This
before considering the restricted jani-
torial jobs that require two job
descriptions to clear debris from
BARTcars.
I support that reasonable employee
grievances need to be fairly
addressed. This can be addressed
through mediation or other non-
expropriation methods.
If we are to invest in such high-cost
projects can we not insulate ourselves
from a strike that holds our invest-
ment hostage to well-paid employ-
ees? If our public sector cannot find a
way to preclude us from being held
hostage to union strikes (think civil
service and safety unions that are
restricted from striking) I will find it
increasingly difficult to support future
public works projects.
Bill Schwarz
Foster City
Letters to the editor
Guest perspective
By Linda Koelling
T
he results of global climate
change spawned myriad poli-
cies designed by powerful
political insiders and single-issue
groups to move forward with their
plan that will significantly change
the governance structure of the Bay
Area.
Nuance buzz phrases like “sustain-
ability,” “sustainable communities’
strategies” and “going green,” created
a new level of thinking in an effort to
convince us, the unsuspecting public
that we are protecting the environ-
ment and resources for future genera-
tions. Now let me make it very clear
that we absolutely have a responsibil-
ity to conserve and protect our
resources as stewards for future gener-
ations, however, there are those who
have used this opportunity to mask a
dangerous trend for the major metro-
politan areas in the state in the name
of environment, economics and equi-
t y.
“Plan Bay Area” is carefully pack-
aged with worthy goals and objec-
tives but with an underlying agenda. I
wonder how many residents know
about it, who devised it, what are its
impacts and its real purpose? These
are questions for local leaders to
answer. Outreach efforts by county
supervisors have been an admirable
attempt to educate residents about the
proposed plan for the entire Bay Area
inclusive of all nine counties.
However, I have met too many people
who are unaware of this plan to be
convinced this outreach effort has
been successful.
San Mateo County and its individ-
ual cities are working on sustainable
community plans, to conserve and
protect resources and create affordable
housing, so what is the purpose, or
for that matter, what is the need for a
Bay Area wide
plan? Who will be
overseeing this
elaborate plan, its
cost and where will
the funding come
from to sustain it?
More importantly,
who are the real
benefactors? The
plan is huge and is focused on trans-
portation opportunities, which is
why the Metropolitan Transportation
Commission will have so much
authority and control of the funds.
Looking at state Senate Bill 375
and the proposed bills currently mak-
ing their way in the state Legislature,
one could presume that developers
will benefit greatly, from a stream-
lined California Environmental
Quality Act process when building
near transit hubs.
This Plan Bay Area is so potentially
life changing that the public should
be voting on it and not allowing just
the few political power brokers to
serve up the “feel good” pieces of this
puzzle in an effort to determine what
life will be like in our area.
Over the years, the landscape
around our own county has been con-
stantly changing from a suburban
atmosphere to a more urban environ-
ment but, throughout its history, the
voters in each community have
designed their own destiny.
The marketing efforts displaying
the positive components of the plan
provides a surreal picture similar to
the movie “The Truman show” which
depicted a pleasing and controlled
environment. Let’s face it, no one
would dispute having transit close to
home, or the ability to walk or ride a
bike to work and have more affordable
housing. Public transportation, link-
ing the Bay Area more efficiently and
with some of the other parts of this
plan, I will attest that the bait on the
hook is tempting.
Beyond this facade is the real con-
cern, the loss of local control. It will
further distance the few in power from
the citizens whose lives they will
control. Aside from this plan’s
expense involving all nine Bay Area
counties, it will evolve into the even-
tual creation of a Bay Area wide gov-
ernance structure to make sure all
communities look and act alike.
The counties of San Mateo, Contra
Costa, Marin, Alameda, Sonoma,
Napa, Santa Clara, San Francisco and
Solano are all unique and provide a
variety of opportunities for those
who choose to live there but are being
forced to participate in this one-size-
fits-all plan.
When power is concentrated in the
hands of a few appointed individuals
to act on behalf of such a large popu-
lation, the people are further removed
from their ability to have a voice. At
that point we have relinquished all
control to a few.
I have touched on the tip of the ice-
berg. On the surface, there are some
reasonable goals but the concern lies
in the underlying agenda of this vast
and very expensive plan. Study the
plan, read Senate Bill 375, its genesis
and be better informed. There’s little
transparency, yet it moves steadily
forward. Call upon local political
leaders to explain all the pieces to
this complex puzzle and slow the
momentum until everyone in the Bay
Area is able to understand its full
impact. I believe that Plan Bay Area
is nothing more than a “Trojan
Horse.”
Linda Koelling is the former mayor of
Foster City.
Plan Bay Area — What is it, really?
And the
beat goes on
H
eather is breaking up the band. After seven years,
maybe eight — time flies when you’re having fun
and bemoaning lengthy city meetings together —
education expert and reporting whiz Heather Murtagh is
saying sayonara to the daily news grind and moving on to
other pastures. Or, to quote another coworker who might be
considered the bass player of the
ragtag Daily Journal garage crew,
she is breaking up the band.
You can’t toil away with some-
body in close proximity for so
many years and not think of them
as something other than a co-
worker. Even before you dance at
their wedding or play the “I got
this one, don’t worry about it”
game over coffee runs, you learn
the little quirks and routines that
only come with spending a hefty
amount of time together.
Adislike of cheesecake? Really?
But who am I to judge? She is the one always quick to offer
fruit around the news room with the caveat that she’d cer-
tainly pass the plate to my corner but, as they are my
abhorred strawberries, it kind of defeats the purpose.
On Heather’s computer, now stripped bare of photos and
notes in preparation for her replacement, she once had a
headline snipped from a landscaping article — “Heather
adds cheer — in moderation.” But for the Heather who held
court over school funding and Tom the Tree debacles with
equal aplomb, the cheer went far beyond moderation. To
paraphrase one of our common sources in the community,
Heather is the princess of happiness and light to balance
out my queen of darkness, cynicism and black-tinged heart.
When Heather told me of her likely leaving, my response
was quick. Would you still pick me up doorside at the paper
for joint assignments, coffee cup in tow and directions
already programmed into the GPS? She claims Caltrain
commuting in her future precludes her from the duty. Likely
story.
What I should have asked instead is will you still do all
the things I appreciate like beat me checking out the court
filings on some mornings or send me more column topic
ideas than I can possibly tackle or do justice to. School
spanking a few months back — that suggestion was all her.
Because I can’t think of anyone frankly who knows more
about the intricacies of schools than her and I also can’t
think of somebody else so willing to share in my sense of
the weird or thought-provoking. Following Florida Man on
Twitter? She completely understood why that was the best
idea ever.
Will somebody else set up betting pools on whether a
particular elected official notorious for tardiness will actual-
ly call back by deadline? And then there’s girl math — no
offense men of the news room but you just don’t understand
taking the price of an item and dividing it by the number of
wears to justify any exorbitant price tag.
Trivia, complete with Price is Right rules for anything
involving a number. Lamenting the lack of usable dry erase
board pens. Understanding the obligation to play Words
With Friends to while away the long council meeting hours.
And the shorthand of time. No matter the job or industry,
anyone who has worked a substantial stretch with another
understands the benefit of saying everything without actual-
ly needing many words. Remember that weird political
forum? Guess who just filed for council? Chloramine.
ACORN. San Bruno. Safeway. Always, Safeway.
Who else will send me the photos of the cutest dogs ever
and not judge me when I suggest my own furry companions
are occasionally jerks. When Ollie, all four pounds of beige
fur, first wiggled his way into my life, I brought him to the
news room. She pounced on taking him for a walk but
Oliver took a page from “The Jerk” and refused to budge.
She was sweet enough to be unhappy. That’s the kind of
person Heather is.
The fact she is leaving is not completely shocking. At
some point, all journalists contemplate a world where we
can take the crazy amount of knowledge we learn in this
industry and parlay that into a trade with banker’s hours,
wages that make Bay Area housing reachable and holidays
off. I imagine the new schedule will also better accommo-
date her other loves, her husband and Make-A-Wish.
But selfishly all this new job nonsense is not better for
me, the rest of the Daily Journal or the news beats which
Heather made her own. Her replacement will undoubtedly do
the same. We all have a first day somewhere, sometime. In
the meantime, though, all we can hope for is the Heather
Murtagh/Daily Journal reunion tour. I think I speak for
everybody here when I say we wish Heather the best in
everything. Really, though, what we really wish is that she
was sticking around.
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs twice a week.
She can be reached by email: michelle@smdailyjournal.com
or by phone (650) 344-5200 ext. 102. What do you think
of this column? Send a letter to the editor: letters@smdai-
lyjournal.com
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facebook.com/smdailyjournal
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those who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
By combining local news and sports coverage,
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By Tali Arbel
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — To see how a small busi-
ness can transform a neighborhood, just fol-
low the barrels.
About 30 years ago, beer lovers wanting
to create their own drinks started taking over
abandoned old buildings in rundown city
districts, refitted them with tanks, kettles
and casks, and started churning out beer. The
byproduct was a boom in craft beer drinkers:
Barrels shipped have more than doubled in
the past decade, according to trade publica-
tion Beer Marketer’s Insights. Craft beer
now makes up nearly 7 percent of the slow-
growing U.S. beer market.
But beer drinkers weren’t the only benefi-
ciaries. The arrival of a craft brewery was
also often one of the first signs that a neigh-
borhood was changing. From New England
to the West Coast, new businesses bubbled
up around breweries, drawing young people
and creating a vibrant community where
families could plant roots and small busi-
nesses could thrive.
It happened in Cleveland. Once an indus-
trial powerhouse, the Rust Belt city has
been losing residents since the 1950s.
Manufacturing jobs disappeared. The city
nearly went bankrupt in 1978.
Marred by abandoned buildings and board-
ed-up stores after several hard decades, the
downtown Ohio City neighborhood, just
west of the Cuyahoga River, which divides
Cleveland, was “perceived as dangerous and
blighted” into the 1980s, says Eric Wobser.
He works for Ohio City Inc., a nonprofit that
promotes residential and commercial devel-
opment while trying to preserve the neigh-
borhood’s older buildings.
Enter Great Lakes Brewing, which opened
in 1988. Over the years, it’s built a brewery
and a brewpub from structures that once
housed a feed store, a saloon and a livery sta-
ble.
“We resurrected all of them,” says Pat
Conway, who founded Great Lakes with his
brother, Daniel. “We’ve beautified the
neighborhood, provided a stunning restora-
tion.”
Other breweries and businesses — a pasta
maker, a bike shop, a tortilla factory, as well
as restaurants and bars — followed.
Newcomers are flocking to the neighbor-
hood, even though Cleveland’s overall pop-
ulation is still declining. The city repaved
the quiet street next to the brewery, Market
Ave., with cobblestones, and poured mil-
lions into renovating the West Side Market,
whose origins date back to the 19th century.
Today, more than 100 vendors sell produce,
meat, cheese and other foods there.
What’s going on in Cleveland is happen-
ing across the country. Trendy small busi-
nesses like breweries and younger residents
have been returning to downtown neighbor-
hoods in many cities across the U.S. The
biggest cities are growing faster than the
suburbs around them, according to Census
data.
Another benefit of the brewery boom:
Manufacturers like brewers typically pay
workers more than service businesses like
restaurants or shops do. That’s good for
local economies.
But for some, the bubbles are bursting. In
Brooklyn, N.Y., breweries are feeling the
heat from rising real estate costs.
When Brooklyn Brewery opened in the
Williamsburg section of the borough in
1996, its neighbors were mostly deserted
warehouses and factories. Today, Brooklyn
Brewery is surrounded by modern apartment
buildings, trendy bars, shops and restau-
rants. There’s still some graffiti, but that
hasn’t deterred the influx of new residents
willing to spend a lot of money to live
there. In the past decade, home values in the
Brewery’s neighborhood have more than
doubled — up 145 percent, according to real
estate appraiser Miller Samuel.
Rising prices might force Brooklyn
Brewery to exit the trendy scene it jump-
started. It has two buildings in
Williamsburg, the brewery and a building
across the street where it stores and ages its
beer. Leases are up in 2025, and Brooklyn
Brewery’s co-founder and president, Steve
Hindy, is already worried that the company
will get kicked out of its warehouse. Once an
iron foundry, the building, built in 1896,
has been bought by developers who Hindy
says won’t renew the lease. He suspects that
they want to convert the space into apart-
ments.
The landlord, Solomon Jacobs, says he
doesn’t yet know what’s going to happen
with the lease.
But Hindy is already scouting other,
cheaper neighborhoods in Brooklyn.
“We sowed the seeds of our own demise
here,” Hindy says.
Gentrification is pressuring at least one
other nearby brewer. Kelly Taylor, who
owns Kelso, is looking for new space in
Brooklyn or the Bronx because he thinks
his landlord won’t renew the lease in 2017.
In Kelso’s neighborhood, the Clinton Hill
section of Brooklyn, home prices have
almost doubled over the past 10 years,
according to Miller Samuel data.
“He’ll tear down and build something
more lucrative,” Taylor says speculatively
of his landlord.
However, the building’s manager, Fred
Sanders, says the lease was just renewed last
year for five more years, and he hasn’t had any
conversations with Kelso about the future.
BUSINESS 10
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Struggling Web
game maker Zynga gave new CEO Don
Mattrick a $5 million signing bonus and
stock awards valued at $40 million to lure
him away from his previous job oversee-
ing Microsoft’s Xbox console for video
games.
Mattrick’s compensation package also
includes a $1 million annual salary and a
guaranteed bonus of about $1 million this
year, according to a regulatory filing
made late Wednesday. Zynga Inc.
announced Mattrick would replace compa-
ny co-founder Mark Pincus as CEO earlier
this week, but didn’t detail how much its
new leader would be paid at that time.
Zynga is counting on
Mattrick, 49, to reverse
a steady string of losses
that has caused the com-
pany’s stock price to
plunge 66 percent from
its initial public offer-
ing price of $10 in late
2011.
The stock closed at
$3. 42 Wednesday. That
price is nearly 20 percent higher than
where the stock stood before the news
broke about Mattrick’s defection from
Microsoft Corp., a sign that at least some
investors think he can revive Zynga.
As Mattrick draws up the turnaround
strategy, he will still be working closely
with Pincus, who holds a controlling
stake in Zynga and will remain the San
Francisco company’s chairman and chief
product officer.
As with many CEOs, Mattrick’s pay
package could be worth a lot more or less,
depending on how his company’s stock
fares in the next few years.
Mattrick secured his lucrative deal with
Zynga just a few weeks after the company
laid off more than 500 employees, or
nearly one-fifth of its payroll, to save
money.
Zynga, the maker of once-popular
games such as “Farmville,” gave Mattrick
8.9 million shares of restricted stock ini-
tially valued at $25 million to make up for
the some of the compensation he surren-
dered by leaving Microsoft. Those shares
are already worth slightly more on paper,
but they won’t vest until July 2016,
according to Zynga’s regulatory filing.
Microsoft, which is based in Redmond,
Wash., didn’t disclose Mattrick’s compen-
sation in its most recent breakdown of its
top-paid executives.
As an additional enticement, Zynga is
giving Mattrick another 1.8 million
shares of its restricted stock valued at $5
million. Mattrick also gets 7.36 million
stock options valued at $10 million.
Zynga promised to enrich Mattrick even
further next year with another batch of
restricted stock valued at $7 million and a
cash bonus ranging from $2 million to $4
million.
Zynga gives new CEO millions to exit Microsoft
Don Mattrick
In urban revival beer creates small business hubs
By Mark Schmetzer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
.
CINCINNATI — A rainout at Great
American Ball Park did more than push
Homer Bailey’s next attempt at pitching
another no-hitter out of Cincinnati.
It also raised the possibility, San
Francisco manager Bruce Bochy mentioned,
of the Giants and Reds playing a makeup
game at a neutral site.
Thursday’s game never got started and was
called after a wait of nearly 2 1-2 hours.
No makeup date was announced. This was
the last day the Giants were scheduled to be in
Cincinnati this season. The Reds visit San
Francisco later this month.
Reds manager Dusty Baker said he would
keep his rotation intact. That would mean
Bailey, who beat the Giants by pitching his
second career no-hitter Tuesday night, would-
n’t start Sunday at home against Seattle.
Instead, Bailey would try to match Johnny
Vander Meer’s 1938 achievement of pitching
no-hitters in back-to-back starts on Monday
in Milwaukee.
Trying to find a makeup date for two teams
that might be in playoff contention could be
tricky.
The Reds and Giants are both off Aug. 29.
It would be the first day after the Reds finish a
stretch of 20 games in 20 days and the last
before they play 13 games in 13 days; it is
also San Francisco’s only day off between
stretches of playing on 16 and 17 consecu-
tive dates.
By Eric Olson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LINCOLN, Neb. — If all goes according to
Dennis Molfese’s plan, the day is coming
when a football player who takes a hit to the
head will come to the sideline, take off his
helmet and slip on an electrode-covered
mesh cap.
The team’s medical staff will analyze the
player’s brain waves on the spot and deter-
mine within minutes whether he can safely
return to the game or whether he has sus-
tained a concussion and, if so, how severe.
Putting the finishing touches on that
device is among the projects planned in the
University of Nebraska’s Center for Brain,
Biology and Behavior, which opens this
month in Memorial Stadium’s newly
expanded east side.
CB3, as it’s called, is housed in the same
$55 million structure that holds 38 luxury
suites and an additional 6,000 seats for the
football stadium. The center is one of a num-
ber of university-affiliated research centers
across the nation looking for better ways to
diagnose and treat traumatic head injuries
and make football and other sports safer.
“There has been great concussion research
that’s been going on for decades,” said
Molfese, the CB3 director. “It’s disconcert-
ing to realize just how little we really
know. ”
<< Oakland wins tight affair with Cubs, page 14
• Greipel wins Tour de France stage, page 12
Friday, July 5, 2013
MORE WIMBLEDON: AMERICAN BROTHERS REPRESENT THE U.S. WELL >> PAGE 13
Wimbledon women’s final set
REUTERS
Sabine Lisicki, left, and Marion Bartoli celebrate their respective victories during the Wimbledon championships at the All-England Club. Lisicki and Bartoli were seeded No. 23 and No. 15.
By Howard Fendrich
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON — Whether in a match, a set, a
game — or even within a single point —
Sabine Lisicki simply cannot be counted
out.
Especially at Wimbledon, where she is
one victory from becoming a Grand Slam
champion.
Fashioning the same sort of comeback
she used to eliminate defending titlist
Serena Williams at the All England Club,
the 23rd-seeded Lisicki reached her first
major final by edging No. 4 Agnieska
Radwanska of Poland 6-4, 2-6, 9-7 in a
compelling, back-and-forth match
Thursday.
“I just fought with all my heart,” said
Lisicki, who twice was two points away
from losing to 2012 runner-up Radwanska.
“I believed that I could still win, no matter
what the score was.”
On Saturday, Lisicki will face 15th-seeded
Marion Bartoli, who took a nap on a locker-
room couch before heading out to Centre
Court and earning a berth in her second
Wimbledon final with a 6-1, 6-2 victory
over No. 20 Kirsten Flipkens of Belgium.
It’s only the second time in the 45-year
Open era that two women who have never
won a Grand Slam trophy will play for the
championship at the grass-court tourna-
ment.
Germany’s Lisicki and France’s Bartoli
also form the second-lowest pair of seeded
women to meet for the Wimbledon title. In
2007, Bartoli was No. 18 when she lost to
No. 23 Venus Williams.
“In the beginning of the tournament, no
one, I think, (expected) those names in the
semis or in the finals,” Radwanska said.
That’s for sure.
In 11 of the past 13 years, one Williams
sister or the other — and sometimes both —
reached the final at the All England Club.
This year, five-time champion Venus sat out
because of a back injury, while five-time
champion Serena’s 34-match winning
streak ended with a loss to Lisicki in
Monday’s fourth round.
In that match, Lisicki won the first set,
dropped nine games in a row to fall behind
3-0 in the third, and eventually took the last
four games.
In the semifinals, Lisicki won the first
set, dropped nine of 11 games to fall behind
3-0 in the third, and eventually turned it
around.
“I thought, ‘I’ve done it against Serena,
so you can do it today as well. Just hang in
there,”’ Lisicki said. “It gave me so much
confidence.”
Some of that derives from a more daunting
recovery. In 2010, she badly injured her left
ankle and missed five months.
See TENNIS, Page 13
See GIANTS, Page 14 See CENTER, Page 14
Brand new Nebraska research
center to study concussions
Giants-Reds rained out, no
makeup date announced yet
Devils re-sign Elias;
Grabovski out in Toronto
Patrik Elias is staying in New
Jersey, while five players, includ-
ing Toronto’s Mikhail
Grabovski, are on the move after
their teams placed them on uncon-
ditional waivers Thursday.
The Devils re-signed Elias to a
three-year, $16.5 million con-
tract, locking up the franchise’s
career goals and points leader a
day before he was eligible to
become an unrestricted free agent.
New Jersey also re-signed veter-
an forward Dainius Zubrus to a
three-year, $9.3 million contract.
Elias’ agent, Allan Wal sh,
announced the terms of the deal on
Twitter.
A person familiar with Zubrus’
contract revealed the terms to the
Associated Press on the condition
of anonymity because the Devils
didn’t disclose those numbers.
The Maple Leafs announced
their intention to part ways with
Grabovski by placing him on
waivers with the intention of buy-
ing out the final four years of his
contract.
“It was not an easy decision to
make as Mikhail made numerous
contributions to our hockey
club,” Toronto general manager
Dave Nonis said. “This is a roster
move that will give us salary cap
flexibility moving forward.”
The Maple Leafs’ decision to
waive Grabovski came after they
signed him to a five-year, $27.5
million contract in March.
A person familiar with the
moves told the AP that New Jersey
goalie Johan Hedberg, Colorado
defenseman Greg Zanon,
Nashville defenseman Hal Gill
and Edmonton center Eric
Belanger were also placed on
unconditional waivers and are eli-
gible to have their contracts
bought out.
SPORTS 12
Friday • July 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
1. LOTTO’S LOTTERY: Thursday provided mixed fortunes
and emotions for the Lotto-Belisol squad. The morning
mood was despondent after teamleader Jurgen Van den
Broeck, fourth overall last year, pulled out because of a
crash injury to his knee a day earlier. Tough luck for the
Belgian: He had also dropped out in 2011 after a brutal
downhill spill that left him with broken ribs and a
fractured shoulder. But after a bus pep talk by team
manager Marc Sargeant and a skillful ride, Lotto shared
hugs of joy at the Stage 6 finish after burly German rider
Andre Greipel bulldozed his way to a sprint victory at the
end of a flat 110-mile ride fromAix-en-Provence to
Montpellier. Mused Greipel:“Sometimes happiness and
sadness can be so close together.”
———
2. MORE MISERY: Flat stages often elicit tense, high-
speed racing as riders jostle for position in the pack.
Thursday’s hot, windy conditions didn’t help —and a
lack of luck bore down on the Astana team. Its Slovenian
teamleader Janez Brajkovic, who won the Criteriumdu
Dauphine in 2010, dropped out after injuring his chin,
breaking a bone in his left hand and opening a deep
gash in his knee after crashing into a traffic island during
the stage. The spill left him dazed and seated on the road
asphalt before he got up to finish —but the damage
was done. His teammate Fredrik Kessiakoff of Sweden
also abandoned the race; he couldn’t keep up amid pain
frominjuries to his elbows, right forearm, chest and left
knee in a crash a day earlier. The teamfromKazakhstan
is down to six of its original nine riders: Andrey
Kashechkin dropped out earlier in the race.
———
3. HISTORICAL REVISIONISM: With its revisions, and
names and feats crossed out, the Tour’s official history
guide is starting to look like a kid’s homework book: a
complete mess. The reason? Doping. Organizers have
gone through the tome with a pen and ruler. Lance
Armstrong’s name and all seven of his wins from1999-
2005 have lines through them. So do 20 of his stage
wins. Lines have also been drawn through the names of
George Hincapie, Levi Leipheimer and David Zabriskie,
who testified to the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency that they
were involved in doping while riding with Armstrong.
Authors of the“historical guide” had already been forced
to rewrite history even before Armstrong was exposed
last year as a serial doper. There’s an asterisk next to the
name of Bjarne Riis. More than a decade after Riis won
the 1996 Tour —past the statute of limitations for
penalties —the Dane admitted to doping. Tour
historians’ erasers may soon be busy again: A French
Senate panel later this month is expected to name other
riders who doped in the 1998 Tour.
———
4. PEANUTS FOR PRIZE MONEY? The Tour can pay out
more in glory than in bank notes. Take the Orica
GreenEdge team. The payout they will get —for all nine
riders and support staffers —for winning Tuesday’s
teamtime trial is $12,900. Individual stage victories
bring just over $10,000 to the winner, $5,000 to the
second-place rider, etc. And riders do also cash in on
individual sprints and mountain climbs. The biggest prize
of all goes to the Tour winner. The man who takes home
the leader’s yellowjersey gets $581,000 along with it.
Daryl Impey of South Africa, who seized the yellowjersey
on Thursday, said he didn’t even knowhowmuch he was
owed for the Orica GreenEdge time-trial victory.“Money?
I don’t knowhowmuch it was, but we don’t do it for the
money, we do it for the pride, you know?”
———
5. MOUNTAIN HORIZONS: On Friday, the Tour continues its
westward swing, negotiating four moderate climbs that
will serve as an appetizer for far more severe ascents in
the Pyrenees, beginning Saturday. The riders start Friday
where they ended Thursday, in Montpellier, and ride
127.7 miles to Albi.
5 things to know
about the Tour
de France
By John Leicester
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MONTPELLIER, France — Stage
6 of the 100th Tour de France was a
textbook demonstration of team-
work.
Like playing pass the parcel, an
Australian deliberately handed
over the race lead to help a South
African teammate and friend
become the first rider from that
country to wear the famed yellow
jersey.
And Andre Greipel, who won the
stage with a fierce finishing
sprint, owed a debt of gratitude to
teammates who plied him with
drinks all afternoon, ferrying bot-
tles back and forth from cars at the
back of the race, so he didn’t melt
in the scorching sun.
“Room service,” the big German
said light-heartedly.
As the new leader of cycling’s
showcase race, Daryl Impey can
look forward to some first-class
treatment, too. Being the first
South African to wear the yellow
jersey “will definitely change my
life,” he said.
Rugby, cricket and, for the
majority black population, foot-
ball, are the big sports for South
Africans. Impey can shop in the
malls of Johannesburg, where he
trains and lives, without being
recognized, said his wife,
Alexandra.
But that was before his buddy on
the Orica GreenEdge team, Simon
Gerrans, passed him the race lead
at the Tour.
“Wearing the yellow jersey now
is definitely going to change
things for cycling, put it on the
map in South Africa,” said Impey.
“Hopefully people will start rec-
ognizing me, maybe.”
Gerrans knows the feeling. To
wear canary yellow at the Tour is
to be king for a day — or more
depending on how long the rider
keeps the lead.
Gerrans had it for two unforget-
table days. Fans clapped and
cheered when they saw him.
Reporters chased him. A particu-
larly boisterous crowd of Aussie
fans played air guitar for him.
The jersey also carries extra
responsibilities: news confer-
ences, podium ceremonies and
other distractions can eat into rest
and recovery — so important for
riders to survive the three-week
trek over 2,115 miles. Injuries
from crashes have already culled
seven of the 198 riders who started
in Corsica on June 29.
Impey worked for Gerrans earlier
at the Tour, helping him win Stage
3 and riding hard in the time trial
Orica won as a team in Stage 4.
Gerrans figured it was time for
some payback. So on Thursday he
rode in five seconds behind Impey
in Montpellier. That was enough
for the race lead to pass from one
to the other, because they started
the day with the exact same over-
all time, with Gerrans in first place
and Impey second.
“Daryl was a huge part of me get-
ting the jersey so I thought it was
a nice gesture to be able to pass it
on to him now. Hopefully for a few
days,” Gerrans said. “To have the
yellow jersey, it just really
changes your life as a cyclist.”
“I’ll have a bit more time to
myself now and pass all that extra
work on to Daryl,” Gerrans added.
“I don’t count it as losing the jer-
sey. I count it as passing it on to a
mate. It was the plan before the
stage and we were able to execute it
perfectly. ”
Impey’s father was a pro cyclist
in South Africa, said his wife. She
said Impey also used to train with
Burry Stander, a two-time Olympic
mountain biker killed Jan. 3 when
he was hit by a minibus taxi while
biking with his wife. Stander was
the second leading cyclist to be
killed in a road accident in South
Africa in recent years. Carla Swart
died in January 2011 when she was
hit by a truck while training.
Describing roads around
Johannesburg as “pretty scary, ”
Alexandra Impey said: “I feel more
relaxed when he’s training here in
Europe.”
Greipel’s sprint-finish victory
capped a hard day of riding for the
pack, across 110 miles of flat, sun-
kissed terrain from Aix-en-
Provence.
Anxious that the region’s
famous wind, the mistral, might
blow hard and split up the race,
teams cranked up the pace, reeling
in a breakaway rider and motoring
at high speed to make sure they
wouldn’t get left behind. This in
heat that turned tarmac sticky,
with temperatures above 90
degrees.
Bottles flew from the peloton as
riders emptied them and tossed
them aside. At the finish, French
rider Thibaut Pinot immediately
pulled up at a drinks station, pour-
ing a whole bottle of water over
his head and downing another in
huge gulps.
“We rode strong all day in poor
conditions,” said Mark
Cavendish, who won Stage 5 in a
sprint but crashed late in Stage 6
and expended too much energy
getting back into the race to chal-
lenge Greipel in the final dash.
Water-carrying is the job of so-
called “domestiques,” racers who
ride in support of leaders going
either for overall victory or stage
wins.
Greipel wins 6th stage, Impey leads Tour
REUTERS
Andre Greipel celebrates his Tour de France stage win across Montpellier.
Sports brief
SPORTS 13
Friday • July 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Not only did she fall outside the top 150 in the rankings,
but Lisicki says her rehabilitation felt like a course in how
to use that leg.
“I can still remember when the doctor told me that I have
to be on crutches the next six weeks. I was like, ‘OK, when
can I get back?’ That was my first question,” Lisicki recalled
Thursday. “That period made me such a much stronger per-
son and ... I know anything is possible after learning how
to walk again.”
She cited inspiration drawn from two injured athletes in
other sports, NFL quarterback Drew Brees and Alpine ski
racer Hermann Maier.
Brees tore his throwing shoulder in the last game of the
2005 regular season, and needed a complicated operation.
Let go by the San Diego Chargers, he wound up signing with
the New Orleans Saints and led that franchise to the Super
Bowl title in 2010. Maier, who won two Olympic gold
medals and four overall World Cup titles, nearly lost his
right leg — and his life — in a 2001 motorcycle accident.
Sidelined for two years, he returned to win the World Cup in
2004.
Lisicki also was motivated by a text message she said she
received before Thursday’s match from the last German
woman to play in a Grand Slam final, back in 1999, Steffi
Graf.
“She told me to go for it,” Lisicki said.
Lisicki’s formula against Radwanska was the same one
she employed while beating major champions Francesca
Schiavone in the first round, Sam Stosur in the third and
Williams: powerful serves, stinging returns and an uncanny
ability to get to balls that seem out of reach. On Thursday,
Lisicki smacked serves at up to 122 mph, including nine
aces, and hit eight return winners.
Her game clearly is built for grass. She is 19-4 at
Wimbledon, 16-15 at the other three major tournaments.
She’s 8-2 in three-setters at Wimbledon, 5-9 at the other
Slams.
Bartoli also has been most successful at what many play-
ers consider tennis’ most prestigious site. Her career win-
ning percentage at Wimbledon is .730; it’s .586 at the other
Slams. She is 2-0 in Wimbledon semifinals, 0-1 elsewhere.
“I had to play, I don’t know, 500 percent, I think, to beat
Marion today. She was just too good,” said Flipkens, who
fell face-down in the grass in the sixth game, landing on her
bandaged right knee, and later received treatment.
“I tried my slices. She didn’t have any problem with that.
I tried the drop shot. She got it,” added Flipkens, who never
had been past the fourth round at a major. “I tried a lob. I
tried everything, actually. ”
Hitting two-handed shots off both wings — like her idol,
Monica Seles — Bartoli took the first three games of each
set and never relented.
“Definitely,” said 2006 Wimbledon winner Amelie
Mauresmo, the French Fed Cup captain serving as an advis-
er to Bartoli, “the best match of the tournament for her.”
As always, Bartoli took practice cuts between most
points, pumped her fist after nearly every point she won,
and sprinted to the sideline at changeovers.
“It’s not like I want to annoy my opponent,” Bartoli said.
“It’s really me trying to be ready for the point that is com-
ing.”
She figures she’s much better equipped to handle a Grand
Slam final now than when she managed to win only five
games in the loss to Venus Williams six years ago.
“I’m just doing everything better, honestly,” said Bartoli,
who was only 22 when she made her major final debut.
Continued from page 11
TENNIS
By Eddie Pells
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON — All this talk about no
Americans left at Wimbledon strikes Mike
and Bob Bryan as sort of odd.
After their semifinal victory — on the
Fourth of July, no less — these 35-year-old
identical twins from California are one win
away from becoming the first team in the
history of Open-era tennis to hold all four
major titles at the same time.
“The Bryan Slam,” they’ll call it, but
don’t look for that news to knock baseball,
hot-dog-eating contests or Andy Murray out
of the headlines in either the United States
or Britain.
The Bryan brothers play doubles, and
despite their history making success, they
live in a world where their games aren’t fully
appreciated and fame is hard to come by.
“The hardcore tennis fan loves doubles,
but the casual sports fan doesn’t know
enough about it,” Mike Bryan said. “They
love stars. Doubles players aren’t stars.”
If their list of accomplishments belonged
to a singles player, they’d be considered
among the best of all time.
—Their 14 Grand Slam tournament titles
would tie them for second with Pete
Sampras.
—Their 310 weeks at No. 1 would be eight
more than Roger Federer’s record.
—Their 90 tournament titles would rank
third behind Jimmy Connors and Ivan
Lendl.
Instead, they must “settle” for holding the
record for doubles in all those categories.
They’ve raked in more than $20 million in
prize money over their 15 years as pros and
have gone 21-3 in Davis Cup matches — a
near sure thing for a country that, for the
first time in 101 years, didn’t have a male
singles player in the third round of
Wimbledon and also saw its last woman go
out Wednesday.
Quite a resume. Place them outside a ten-
nis tournament, however, and usually, they
can walk down the street in peace.
“It’s the names and the stars,” said Jack
Nicklaus, the 18-time major golf champi-
on, who was at Wimbledon this week and
watched the Bryans play.
“The singles players are really good, no
question about that. If the doubles players
were good enough, they’d be playing sin-
gles. To a large degree, I think that’s the
way most people look at it.”
Though it struggles for air time, doubles
can be plenty entertaining — the last bas-
tion of 21st-century tennis where a net
game, teamwork and a couple of reflex vol-
leys can still carry the day.
Nearly two-thirds of frequent recreational
players in the U.S. play doubles, according
to the most recent study by the U.S. Tennis
Association.
At the pro level, it can be quite an enter-
taining show, as was the brothers’ 6-7 (4),
6-4, 6-3, 5-7, 6-3 victory Thursday over the
newly formed team of India’s Rohan
Bopanna and France’s Edouard Roger-
Vasselin.
“I think they get overlooked and I think
the top current singles players very, very
seldom play doubles,” said Pam Shriver,
whose 8 1/2-year partnership with Martina
Navratilova produced 20 Grand Slam titles.
“I think doubles have always taken a back
seat since Open tennis and prize money set-
tled it all.”
(The lone exception: The Williams sis-
ters, who’ve combined to win 13 Grand
Slam doubles titles.)
In their semifinal victory Thursday, the
Bryans improved to 8-1 lifetime in
Wimbledon five-setters. Their success in the
close ones — and the not-so-close ones —
makes sense, considering they’ve been
together forever, literally, while other
teams come and go, sometimes changing
partners by the week.
The Bryans’ opponents in Saturday’s final
will be Croatia’s Ivan Dodig and Brazil’s
Marcelo Melo, yet another one of those
“honeymoon teams,” as the Bryans like to
call the new teams.
“The sibling relationship might not even
hold up under this amount of travel and
stress,” said Bob Bryan, who plays lefty,
while his brother plays right-handed.
“It’s maybe only the twin relationship
that can stand this kind of test of time. I def-
initely don’t think just a normal partner-
ship can hold up under this many years of
ups and downs and finger pointing.
Bryans strike blow for doubles and American tennis
SPORTS 14
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Tom Osborne, Nebraska’s retired football
coach and athletic director, said CB3 and the
adjoining Athletic Performance Lab fit his
vision for what he wanted to include in the
stadium expansion.
The project was one of Osborne’s major
initiatives in his five years as athletic direc-
tor. Osborne envisioned a collaboration of
the athletic and academic sides of the uni-
versity. So while athletes participate in
concussion studies, political science
researchers might use CB3’s brain-scan-
ning technology to see if they can figure out
why some people lean conservative and
others liberal.
Concussions have become one of the top
concerns in sports in recent years after
prominent brain injuries and disease in for-
mer NFL players, driven in part by some
high-profile suicides. Thousands of former
players are suing the league, saying that for
years the NFL did not do enough to protect
players from concussions. The NCAA also
is addressing the issue.
“There are a lot of things that are very
important with the NCAA as far as the
health and safety of the student-athlete,”
NCAA chief medical officer Brian Hainline
said, “and concussion is right up there as
first and foremost. It’s the elephant on the
table, and we, with everyone else, we have
to solve it.”
There are about 300,000 sports-related
concussions reported in the United States
annually, and hundreds of millions of dol-
lars have been funneled into research, with
much of the funding going to universities.
Nebraska recruited the 67-year-old
Molfese away from the University of
Louisville, giving him virtual carte blanche
in the design and equipping of CB3.
Molfese is among 14 experts serving on
the National Academy of Sciences Institute
of Medicine Committee on Sports-Related
Concussions in Youth, which will report to
Congress and President Barack Obama on
brain injuries in children and young adults.
He also heads a Big Ten-Ivy League partner-
ship studying brain injuries in sports.
Nebraska’s brain center is connected by a
100-foot skywalk to the new Athletic
Performance Lab, which will research,
among other things, injury prevention and
high-tech ways to maximize performance of
athletes. CB3 and the performance lab will
partner on some projects.
CB3’s main attraction is a type of mag-
netic resonance imaging machine — known
as a functional MRI — that tracks the
brain’s blood flow. It’s hoped the $3 mil-
lion scanner helps in the effort to better
define what is and is not a concussion.
“There’s no question it’s going to move
the dial forward,” the NCAA’s Hainline said.
“The big, hoped-for dream would be, let’s
have a biomarker in brain imaging. If
you’re to the left of that, you’re safe; if
you’re to the right of it, you’re not. That’s
probably a few years out. But functional
brain imaging and blood flow are going to
be a very important part of that.”
The MRI machine also can be used on
game days to assess injuries of all kinds.
Molfese said the sideline concussion
assessment tool would be the first of what
he hopes are many groundbreaking devel-
opments to come out of CB3. The device
would allow medical personnel to go
beyond the standard practice of asking the
injured athlete questions and judge, based
on his or her answers, whether it’s safe for
him or her to return to a game.
If a linebacker took a hit to the head, he
would come to the sideline and have an elec-
trode net placed over his head. Battery-pow-
ered brain-recording equipment would meas-
ure the player’s responses to stimuli.
“We can get an idea of what area of the
brain is being involved in the process,
whether the speed of processing is at the
rate it should be,” Molfese said. “The differ-
ent areas of the brain that normally inte-
grate information quickly stop doing that,
so that’s another way we should be able to
pick up whether there is an injury or not.”
Molfese said the device, which should be
ready for use within one to two years, even-
tually could be used in hospitals to screen
patients for head injuries.
“It would be routine,” he said, “and they’d
know within 10 minutes.”
Osborne said he’s fascinated by the possi-
bilities. He said suspected concussions were
dealt with the same way throughout his
football coaching career. The athletic train-
er would hold up two or three fingers in front
of the woozy player’s face as he came off
the field and ask him how many.
“If you could come close,” Osborne said,
“they’d put you back in. That wasn’t very
effective.”
Continued from page 11
CENTER
Major League Baseball rules prohibit
teams from playing more than 20 straight
days without permission from the players’
union.
Also, the Reds would be in the middle of a
road trip to St. Louis and Colorado. The
Giants would be in the middle of a trip to
Colorado and Arizona.
Could Coors Field in Denver be a conven-
ient place to meet?
“There are options they discussed for a
makeup,” Bochy said. “August 29 in
Colorado. September 30, the day after the
season, we would come here (Cincinnati).
They discussed a split doubleheader at our
place.”
Said Baker: “We’re kicking it around,
kicking it around about possible dates
which are optimal.”
“There are none. There’s only one date
when we’re both off, but that would make it
34 (straight) days for both,” he said.
This postponement was only the seventh
rainout in the 11-year history of Great
American Ball Park and the first since May
1, 2012, against the Cubs.
Even before the rain, Cincinnati’s Chris
Heisey figured it was a long shot that he
would play Thursday despite homering and
driving in two runs the previous day.
It became a sure thing for Heisey and
everyone else when the finale of the four-
game series was postponed by rain.
Heisey made his first start after spending
nearly two months on the disabled list with
a strained right hamstring, playing in
Wednesday night’s 3-2, 11-inning win.
Even if the rain had stopped in time for
Thursday’s game to be played, he figured
Baker’s caution would keep him on the
bench.
“(Baker) usually has a good idea of when
you can play and when you can’t, but I told
him that I’m feeling great, and I’m ready to
play whenever he needs me,” he said.
Sure enough, Heisey wasn’t in Baker’s
starting lineup, in part because right-hander
Matt Cain was San Francisco’s scheduled
starter. That wasn’t the only reason.
“I kept my eye on him. Usually, when you
get hurt is when you get fatigued,” Baker
said before the game was called.
Giants manager Bruce Bochy said Cain
will start the opener of a three-game series
against the Dodgers on Friday in San
Francisco.
“No changes right now,” Bochy said
about his rotation. “Cain goes (Friday).
(Madison) Bumgarner on Saturday. The plan
right now is (Chad) Gaudin on Sunday. ”
Gaudin has been on the disabled list since
June 24, retroactive to June 21, with a
bruised right elbow.
Continued from page 11
GIANTS
By Rick Eymer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Derek Norris scored on a
passed ball with two outs in the seventh
inning and the Oakland Athletics beat the
Chicago Cubs 1-0 on Thursday.
Dan Straily (5-2) gave up a hit over seven
innings after being recalled from Triple-A
Sacramento earlier in the day. He made the
start to allow a sore Jarrod Parker to get two
extra days of rest. Straily walked three and
struck out six.
Norris walked with two outs and went to
third on Seth Smith’s single. Matt Guerrier
(2-4), making his first appearance with the
Cubs since being acquired from the Los
Angeles Dodgers, threw a strike on the out-
side part of the plate. Pinch hitter Eric
Sogard swung at the pitch and Cubs catcher
Wellington Castillo had the ball glance off
his mitt, allowing Norris to score the
unearned run.
Cubs’ starter Travis Wood allowed three
hits over six innings. He walked one and
struck five in recording his third consecu-
tive no-decision. Alfonso Soriano got
Chicago’s lone hit off Straily.
Wood extend his winless stretch to six
starts despite an ERA of 2.58 over that
span.
Ryan Cook pitched the eighth and Grant
Balfour recorded the final three outs for his
21st save in as many chances.
In the fourth, Yoenis Cespedes threw out
Starlin Castro trying to score from second
on Soriano’s single to left field. Soriano
was later thrown out by Norris attempting
to steal second, ending the inning.
Castro walked to open the inning and
advanced when Nate Schierholtz grounded
out.
The A’s also had a potential run thrown out
on the bases.
Against Matt Guerrier, Chris Young sin-
gled with one out in the seventh but was
caught stealing by Castillo. Norris drew a
walk and went to third on Seth Smith’s sin-
gle prior to the passed ball.
Pedro Stroup also made his Cubs debut
with a scoreless ninth as the Cubs matched
their franchise record for players used before
the All-Star break with 41. The Cubs also
extended their franchise record by using 23
pitchers before the break.
NOTES: Cubs OF Brian Bogusevic left the
game after the top of third inning with left
hamstring tightness. ... The A’s optioned C
Stephen Vogt to Triple-A Sacramento to
make room for Straily. . . . The Cubs
announced that RHP Carlos Villanueva (2-4,
3.45) will start Sunday’s game against
Pittsburgh, filling the spot vacated when
RHP Scott Feldman was traded to the
Baltimore Orioles. Villanueva started the
year in the rotation, but went to the bullpen
when RHP Matt Garza came off the disabled
list. ... RHP Jeff Samardija (5-7, 3.34) will
take the mound Friday night against the
Pirates at Wrigley Field. He’s 4-2 with a
1.56 ERA against the Pirates all-time,
though just 1-2 against them this year.
Norris scores on passed ball in A’s 1-0 win
SPORTS 15
Friday • July 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
650-354-1100
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 49 35 .583 —
Washington 43 42 .506 6 1/2
Philadelphia 41 45 .477 9
New York 35 47 .427 13
Miami 31 52 .373 17 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Pittsburgh 52 32 .619 —
St. Louis 50 33 .602 1 1/2
Cincinnati 49 36 .576 3 1/2
Chicago 36 47 .434 15 1/2
Milwaukee 34 50 .405 18
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 44 41 .518 —
Colorado 41 44 .482 3
Los Angeles 40 43 .482 3
San Diego 40 46 .465 4 1/2
San Francisco 39 45 .464 4 1/2
Wednesday’s Games
Milwaukee 4, Washington 1
Pittsburgh 6, Philadelphia 5
Arizona 5, N.Y. Mets 3
Miami 6, Atlanta 3
Boston 2, San Diego 1
Cincinnati 3, San Francisco 2, 11 innings
L.A. Dodgers 10, Colorado 8
Chicago Cubs 3, Oakland 1
St. Louis 12, L.A. Angels 2
Thursday’s Games
Washington 8, Milwaukee 5
Arizona 5, N.Y. Mets 4, 15 innings
San Francisco at Cincinnati, ppd., rain
Philadelphia 6, Pittsburgh 4
Boston 8, San Diego 2
Oakland 1, Chicago Cubs 0
Miami at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, 8:10 p.m.
St. Louis at L.A. Angels, 9:05 p.m.
Friday’s Games
Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 1:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Washington, 4:05 p.m.
Seattle at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Milwaukee, 5:10 p.m.
Miami at St. Louis, 5:15 p.m.
Colorado at Arizona, 6:40 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, 7:15 p.m
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 53 34 .609 —
Baltimore 48 38 .558 4 1/2
New York 46 39 .541 6
Tampa Bay 46 40 .535 6 1/2
Toronto 41 43 .488 10
1/2Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 45 38 .542 —
Cleveland 45 40 .529 1
Kansas City 40 42 .488 4 1/2
Minnesota 36 46 .439 8 1/2
Chicago 34 48 .415 10 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 50 36 .581 —
Texas 48 36 .571 1
Los Angeles 40 44 .476 9
Seattle 37 47 .440 12
Houston 31 55 .360 19
Thursday’sGames
Boston 8, San Diego 2
Chicago White Sox 3, Baltimore 2
Kansas City 10, Cleveland 7
N.Y.Yankees 9, Minnesota 5
Tampa Bay 7, Houston 5, 11 innings
Oakland 1, Chicago Cubs 0
Detroit at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Seattle at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
St. Louis at L.A. Angels, 9:05 p.m.
Friday’sGames
Baltimore at N.Y.Yankees, 4:05 p.m.
Detroit at Cleveland, 4:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Toronto, 4:07 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m.
Seattle at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m.
Houston at Texas, 5:05 p.m.
Oakland at Kansas City, 5:10 p.m.
Boston at L.A. Angels, 7:05 p.m
AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Montreal 9 4 3 30 30 24
New York 8 6 4 28 25 22
Philadelphia 7 5 6 27 29 28
Kansas City 7 5 6 27 24 18
Houston 6 6 5 23 19 18
New England 5 5 6 21 19 14
Chicago 6 7 3 21 18 23
Columbus 5 7 5 20 21 21
Toronto FC 2 8 7 13 17 24
D.C. 2 13 3 9 8 29
WESTERNCONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake 10 5 4 34 29 18
Portland 7 1 9 30 28 16
FC Dallas 8 3 6 30 27 22
Vancouver 7 5 5 26 27 25
Los Angeles 7 7 3 24 25 21
Seattle 7 5 3 24 21 17
Colorado 6 7 5 23 21 22
San Jose 5 8 6 21 20 30
Chivas USA 3 10 3 12 15 31
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
———
Wednesday’s Games
Toronto FC 3, Montreal 3, tie
Chicago 3, San Jose 2
Sporting Kansas City 1, Vancouver 1, tie
Real Salt Lake 2, Philadelphia 2, tie
Seattle FC 2, D.C. United 0
Thursday’s Games
MLS GLANCE
@Chicago
5:30p.m.
CSN-PLUS
7/3
@NERev
4:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/6
vs.Seattle
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/13
@Reds
4:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/3
@Reds
4:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/2
@Reds
10:10a.m.
CSN-BAY
7/4
vs.Dodgers
4:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/6
vs.Dodgers
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/5
vs.Dodgers
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/7
vs.Mets
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/8
@Royals
11:10a.m.
CSN-BAY
7/6
@Royals
5:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/5
@Royals
11:10a.m.
CSN-BAY
7/7
@Pirates
4:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/8
vs. Cubs
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/4
vs. Cubs
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/2
vs. Cubs
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/3
vs.Norwich
City
7:30p.m.
7/20
vs.Portland
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/27
vs. Chivas
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/4
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
BOSTON RED SOX — Assigned RHP Clayton
Mortensen outright to Pawtucket (IL).
CLEVELAND INDIANS — Sent RHP Blake Wood
to Columbus (IL) for a rehab assignment.
DETROIT TIGERS — Agreed to terms with RHP
Daryl Norris on a minor league contract.
NEWYORKYANKEES— Sent INF Eduardo Nunez
to Trenton (EL) for a rehab assignment. Agreed to
terms with RHP Jose Mesa on a minor league con-
tract.
OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Optioned C Stephen
Vogt to Sacramento (PCL).Recalled RHP Dan Straily
from Sacramento.
TEXAS RANGERS — Sent RHP Joakim Soria to
Frisco (TL) for a rehab assignment.
National League
ATLANTABRAVES — Placed OF Jordan Schafer
on the 15-day DL.Selected the contract of OF Joey
Terdoslavich from Gwinnett (IL).
MIAMI MARLINS — Designated C Miguel Olivo
for assignment.Sent 2BChrisValaikatoJupiter (FSL)
for arehabassignment.OptionedRHPTomKoehler
to New Orleans (PCL). Reinstated RHP Henderson
Alvarez from the 60-day DL. Transferred OF Matt
Diaz to the 60-day DL.
SANDIEGOPADRES— Agreed to terms with LHP
Clay Zavada on a minor league contract.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Optioned C
Jhonatan Solano to Syracuse (IL).Reinstated C Wil-
son Ramos from the 15-day DL.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
BOSTONCELTICS— Named Brad Stevens coach.
HOCKEY
National HockeyLeague
DALLASSTARS — Traded LW Loui Eriksson, RWs
Reilly Smith and Matt Fraser and D Joe Morrow to
Boston for Cs Tyler Seguin and Rich Peverley and D
Ryan Button.
LOSANGELESKINGS — Agreed to terms with D
Keaton Ellerby on a one-year contract.
MONTREAL CANADIENS — Named Stephane
Waite goaltending coach. Agreed to terms with F
Danny Briere on a two-year contract.
NEWJERSEYDEVILS — Re-signed Fs Patrik Elias
and Dainius Zubrus.
OTTAWA SENATORS — Signed coach Paul
MacLean to a three-year contract extension.
WINNIPEG JETS — Agreed to terms with G Al
Montoya.
TRANSACTIONS
NATIONALLEAGUE
BATTING—YMolina, St. Louis, .352; Cuddyer, Col-
orado, .339; MCarpenter, St. Louis, .324; Segura,
Milwaukee, .323; Votto, Cincinnati, .323; Craig, St.
Louis, .323; FFreeman, Atlanta, .313.
RUNS—CGonzalez, Colorado, 64; MCarpenter, St.
Louis,63; Holliday,St.Louis,59;Votto,Cincinnati,58;
Choo, Cincinnati, 55; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 54;
SMarte, Pittsburgh, 54.
RBI—Goldschmidt, Arizona, 69; Craig, St. Louis, 63;
Phillips, Cincinnati, 63; CGonzalez, Colorado, 61;
DBrown, Philadelphia, 60; PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 56;
Bruce, Cincinnati, 56.
HITS—Segura, Milwaukee, 108; YMolina, St. Louis,
105; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 104; Votto, Cincinnati,
103; Craig, St. Louis, 100; GParra, Arizona, 98; CGon-
zalez, Colorado, 96.
DOUBLES—YMolina,St.Louis,26; Bruce,Cincinnati,
25;MCarpenter,St.Louis,25;McCutchen,Pittsburgh,
24;GParra,Arizona,24;Rizzo,Chicago,24;Posey,San
Francisco, 23.
TRIPLES—CGomez, Milwaukee, 9; SMarte, Pitts-
burgh, 8; Segura, Milwaukee, 8; Span,Washington,
7; CGonzalez, Colorado, 6; Hechavarria, Miami, 5;
DWright, New York, 5.
HOME RUNS—CGonzalez, Colorado, 23; DBrown,
Philadelphia, 22; PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 21; Gold-
schmidt, Arizona, 20; Beltran, St. Louis, 19; Bruce,
Cincinnati, 18;Tulowitzki, Colorado, 16.
STOLEN BASES—ECabrera, San Diego, 31; Segura,
Milwaukee, 26; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 23; Revere,
Philadelphia, 20; Pierre, Miami, 18; CGomez, Mil-
waukee, 17; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 17.
PITCHING—Zimmermann,Washington,12-3;Wain-
wright, St. Louis, 11-5; Lynn, St. Louis, 10-3; Corbin,
Arizona, 9-1; Lee, Philadelphia, 9-2; Marquis, San
Diego, 9-4; SMiller, St. Louis, 9-6; Maholm, Atlanta,
9-6.
STRIKEOUTS—Harvey,New York,141; Kershaw,Los
Angeles,126;Samardzija,Chicago,120;Lee,Philadel-
phia, 115; Wainwright, St. Louis, 114;
NL LEADERS
By Ann M. Job
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
American Audi fans finally can
get their hands on a few — just a
few — Audi RS 5 Coupes and
Cabriolets.
Sold in Europe for a few years,
the highest-performance versions of
the Audi A5 started to arrive on U.S.
soil for the first time this model
year.
With just about everything stan-
dard, these 450-horsepower, V-8-
powered, two-door, handsomely
crafted cars will be rare. Just 1,500
are slated for the U.S.
The exclusivity, the RS image that
offers Americans a new alternative
to BMW’s M and Mercedes-Benz’s
AMG brands, and the lustful per-
formance of zero to 60 miles per
hour in about 4 seconds from a
hand-built engine are designed to
position Audi at a new level.
Certainly, the powerful and
impeccably handling RS 5s, which
come standard with Audi’s quattro
all-wheel drive system, build on
Audi’s winning race heritage. It was
just last month that Audi celebrated
its 12th win in 13 years at the
famous Le Mans 24 Hours race in
France.
The RS 5s also build upon Audi’s
somewhat “cult luxury car brand”
reputation in the United States.
For example, only Audi aficiona-
dos seemed to notice the 2013 RS 5
Coupe test car. But these Audi
lovers were admiring and smitten
right away and thrilled to see an RS
5 in something other than a photo-
graph.
T h e
2013 Audi
RS 5s are
up there
in price,
but not as
much as
expected. While a base 2013 Audi
A5 Coupe has a starting manufac-
turer’s suggested retail price,
including destination charge, of
$38,745, the starting retail price for
a 2013 Audi RS 5 Coupe is $69,795,
or nearly $32,000 more.
Of course, the base A5 Coupe
comes with a 211-horsepower, tur-
bocharged four cylinder and lacks
the torque-vectoring rear differen-
tial, the twin-clutch, seven-speed
transmission or Audi’s Drive Select
that’s in an RS 5.
A 2013 RS 5 Cabriolet is priced
higher, with a starting MSRP,
including destination charge, of
$78,795.
Still, in contrast to some luxury
performance competitors, an RS 5
doesn’t trigger the U.S. govern-
ment’s gas-guzzler tax. Indeed, the
estimated fuel-economy ratings by
the federal government for an RS 5
are 16 miles per gallon in city driv-
ing and 22 mpg or 23 mpg on high-
ways.
This compares with the major
competitors who are pegged at 13
mpg or 14 mpg in city driving and
19 mpg or 20 mpg on highways.
The RS 5s also are relatively
competitively priced. The 2013
Mercedes C63 AMG Coupe has a
starting retail price, including desti-
nation charge, of $63,235 with 451-
horsepower V-8 generating 443
foot-pounds of torque at a high
5,000 rpm, and a displacement of
6.2 liters. That compares with the
4.2 liters of the Audi RS 5’s natural-
ly aspirated V-8 that produces 317
foot-pounds of torque at a lower
4,000 rpm.
The V-8-powered, 2013 BMW
M3 Coupe starts at $62,325, includ-
ing gas-guzzler tax, and generates
414 horses and 295 foot-pounds at
3,900 rpm.
The RS 5 Coupe test car had an
unusual, darker blue color called
Sepang Blue that attractively cam-
ouflaged the spirited nature of the
car. From the front, though, there’s
no missing the wide stance of an RS
5 and the massive, black grille.
The test RS 5 Coupe started up
melodiously, with awesomely deep
engine sounds. The test car had the
$1,000 optional sport exhaust that
definitely was worth having for its
showoff value.
A push on the accelerator brought
instant response, though the car
moved with a heaviness and solidity
that seemed more Mercedes than
Audi.
To be sure, the RS 5 Coupe
weighs more than 4,000 pounds
with standard 19-inch tires, and the
test car had the optional-for-$1,000
20-inchers.
Despite being a sporty two-door,
the RS 5 Coupe is not a lightweight
sports car.
The heft did not impair the RS 5
Coupe’s handling, however. The
car’s crisp motions through sweep-
ing curves and around corners were
balanced by a sense that this coupe
moved as one solidly built piece.
Better yet, the RS 5 Coupe’s
immediate steering response, its sta-
bility and its well-crafted interior
with Nappa leather provided an
almost Zen-like backdrop for enthu-
siastic driving.
While all-wheel drive is standard,
the RS 5 has a 40 percent/60 percent
baseline power bias toward the rear
wheels, and optional summer tires
on the tester provided tangible,
amazing grip.
The torque-vectoring rear differ-
ential sophisticatedly dials in power
to the correct wheels to help an
16
Friday • July 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
AUTO
S.A.M S A M
1940 Lesl i e St. , San Mateo, CA 94403
Sam
Tsang
Grand Opening!
92
101
Hillsdale
Shopping
Center
Hillsdale
Caltrain
Station
We are Here!
S El Camino Real
West
East
South North by
Special:
4 Speakers
Audi RS 5 comes to America, finally
2013 Audi RS 5 Coupe has a base price of $68,900.
See AUDI, Page 17
By Ann M. Job
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
American Audi fans finally can
get their hands on a few — just a
few — Audi RS 5 Coupes and
Cabriolets.
Sold in Europe for a few years,
the highest-performance versions
of the Audi A5 started to arrive on
U.S. soil for the first time this
model year.
With just about everything stan-
dard, these 450-horsepower, V-8-
powered, two-door, handsomely
crafted cars will be rare. Just 1,500
are slated for the U.S.
The exclusivity, the RS image
that offers Americans a new alter-
native to BMW’s M and Mercedes-
Benz’s AMG brands, and the lust-
ful performance of zero to 60
miles per hour in about 4 seconds
from a hand-built engine are
designed to position Audi at a new
level.
Certainly, the powerful and
impeccably handling RS 5s,
which come standard with Audi’s
quattro all-wheel drive system,
build on Audi’s winning race her-
itage. It was just last month that
Audi celebrated its 12th win in 13
years at the famous Le Mans 24
Hours race in France.
The RS 5s also build upon Audi’s
somewhat “cult luxury car brand”
reputation in the United States.
For example, only Audi afi-
cionados seemed to notice the
2013 RS 5 Coupe test car. But
these Audi lovers were admiring
and smitten right away and thrilled
to see an RS 5 in something other
than a
p h o t o -
graph.
T h e
2 0 1 3
Audi RS
5s are up
there in price, but not as much as
expected. While a base 2013 Audi
A5 Coupe has a starting manufac-
turer’s suggested retail price,
including destination charge, of
$38,745, the starting retail price
for a 2013 Audi RS 5 Coupe is
$69,795, or nearly $32,000
more.
Of course, the base A5 Coupe
comes with a 211-horsepower, tur-
bocharged four cylinder and lacks
the torque-vectoring rear differen-
tial, the twin-clutch, seven-speed
transmission or Audi’s Drive
Select that’s in an RS 5.
A2013 RS 5 Cabriolet is priced
higher, with a starting MSRP,
including destination charge, of
$78,795.
Still, in contrast to some luxury
performance competitors, an RS 5
doesn’t trigger the U.S. govern-
ment’s gas-guzzler tax. Indeed, the
estimated fuel-economy ratings
by the federal government for an
RS 5 are 16 miles per gallon in
city driving and 22 mpg or 23
mpg on highways.
This compares with the major
competitors who are pegged at 13
mpg or 14 mpg in city driving and
19 mpg or 20 mpg on highways.
The RS 5s also are relatively
competitively priced. The 2013
Mercedes C63 AMG Coupe has a
starting retail price, including
destination charge, of $63,235
with 451-horsepower V-8 generat-
ing 443 foot-pounds of torque at a
high 5,000 rpm, and a displace-
ment of 6.2 liters. That compares
with the 4.2 liters of the Audi RS
5’s naturally aspirated V-8 that
produces 317 foot-pounds of
torque at a lower 4,000 rpm.
The V-8-powered, 2013 BMW
M3 Coupe starts at $62,325,
including gas-guzzler tax, and
generates 414 horses and 295
foot-pounds at 3,900 rpm.
The RS 5 Coupe test car had an
unusual, darker blue color called
Sepang Blue that attractively cam-
ouflaged the spirited nature of the
car. From the front, though,
there’s no missing the wide stance
of an RS 5 and the massive, black
grille.
The test RS 5 Coupe started up
melodiously, with awesomely
deep engine sounds. The test car
had the $1,000 optional sport
exhaust that definitely was worth
having for its showoff value.
A push on the accelerator
brought instant response, though
the car moved with a heaviness
and solidity that seemed more
Mercedes than Audi.
To be sure, the RS 5 Coupe
weighs more than 4,000 pounds
with standard 19-inch tires, and
the test car had the optional-for-
$1,000 20-inchers.
Despite being a sporty two-
door, the RS 5 Coupe is not a
lightweight sports car.
The heft did not impair the RS 5
Coupe’s handling, however. The
car’s crisp motions through
sweeping curves and around cor-
ners were balanced by a sense that
this coupe moved as one solidly
built piece.
Better yet, the RS 5 Coupe’s
immediate steering response, its
stability and its well-crafted inte-
rior with Nappa leather provided
an almost Zen-like backdrop for
enthusiastic driving.
While all-wheel drive is stan-
dard, the RS 5 has a 40 percent/60
percent baseline power bias
toward the rear wheels, and
optional summer tires on the
16
Friday • July 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
AUTO
S.A.M S A M
1940 Lesl i e St. , San Mateo, CA 94403
Sam
Tsang
Grand Opening!
92
101
Hillsdale
Shopping
Center
Hillsdale
Caltrain
Station
We are Here!
S El Camino Real
West
East
South North by
Special:
4 Speakers
Audi RS 5 comes to America, finally
2013 Audi RS 5 Coupe has a base price of $68,900.
See AUDI, Page 17
AUTO 17
Friday • July 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
tester provided tangible, amazing grip.
The torque-vectoring rear differential sophisticatedly
dials in power to the correct wheels to help an experienced
enthusiast move around corners quickly.
The Audi engine, built by hand at a plant in Hungary,
delivers awesome power smoothly via a seven-speed S
tronic transmission whose lightning-fast shifts felt nearly
seamless in the test car.
The RS 5 Coupe was an easy driver for everyday city traf-
fic, too, when pedal-to-the-metal situations were few and
far between.
The more than 12-cubic-foot trunk was generously sized
for a sports coupe, though there is a considerable liftover
to get heavy suitcases inside.
The uplevel Bang & Olufsen audio system filled the inte-
rior with crystal clear sounds, and seat ergonomics were ter-
rific, though rear seats are best left to youngsters.
2013 Audi RS 5 Coupe
• Base pri ce: $68,900
• Price as tested: $75,820
• Type: Front-engine, all-wheel drive, four-passenger,
subcompact coupe
• Engine: 4.2-liter, double overhead cam, direct-injected V-
8
• Mi l eage: 16 mpg (city), 23 mpg (highway)
• Length: 183 inches
• Wheel base: 108.3 inches
• Opt i ons: Audi MMI navigation plus package (includes
Bang & Olufsen sound system, navigation with voice con-
trols, Bluetooth streaming audio, parking system with
rearview camera) $3,550;
Continued from page 16
AUDI
for Burlingame Motors.
The auto repair shop was the
brainchild of Walter Baumgartner,
an immigrant from Switzerland
with aspirations of opening a fac-
tory-certified repair shop. His
dream was fully realized in 1979
with the opening of Burlingame
Motors, an independent Mercedes-
Benz repair shop. Baumgartner’s
shop flourished under his tutelage
until his 1999 death. Wiegand
assumed the reins after
Baumgartner’s wife handed the
shop to him, because “she wanted
the business to go on as a family-
run shop,” said Wiegand.
As a child, Wiegand always
enjoyed tinkering with bicycles
and mopeds.
“In Switzerland, you have to
make a decision at an early age
what you want to do with your life,”
said Wiegand.
High school graduates in
Switzerland either go to an appren-
ticeship, vocational school or uni-
versity.
“Eighty percent of young people
attend vocational training or
apprenticeship, while 20 percent
attend a university,” Wiegand said.
Wiegand already knew what his
niche was so he attended an appren-
ticeship with Mercedes-Benz. After
a four year apprenticeship in
Switzerland, Wiegand learned
through a friend of an exchange pro-
gram from Switzerland to the United
States. Through that program he
met Baumgartner and his family.
“I met his daughter Nicole and we
fell in love and one thing led to
another, so I just stayed in the
United States versus moving back
to Switzerland,” Wiegand said.
Since working with Burlingame
Motors in 1991, Wiegand has
helped expand the shop with high-
end repairs across a range of clas-
sics from Mercedes to Ferrari.
But how does the process work?
The process starts when clients
bring in their cars and the mechan-
ics do an evaluation.
“We then give an estimate and,
depending on what the client
wants, we then proceed,” said
Wiegand.
The mechanics will either do a
full or partial job depending on the
client’s preference.
“You can bring us a steering
wheel and we can build a car around
it,” Wiegand said.
Unlike other auto repair shops,
Burlingame Motors will take care
of classic European cars.
“Older European cars are a lot
trickier to repair, because they are
complicated and you need to be
careful with the parts,” he said.
Atypical auto repair shop’s busi-
ness model is a nice flow of com-
merce such as a multitude of oil
changes, brake jobs and tire
changes in a day. For Burlingame
Motors, “this is the regular daily
flow in terms of interaction with
the customers.” Ayounger mechan-
ic will focus on the newer models as
well as the regular maintenance,
while the older mechanics are more
involved with the older models.
Handling long-term projects is
not quick business for a typical
auto repair shop, but Burlingame
Motors is not your typical factory-
certified repair shop.
“Here clientele want to have their
cars taken care of because to them
it’s an investment,” said Wiegand.
“Clients appreciate a mechanic that
values these cars the way they do
by working careful on these classic
vehicles.”
Continued from page 1
CLASSICS
PHOTO COURTESY OF RENE WIEGAND
Burlingame Motors manager Rene Wiegand looks over a a 1960 Mercedes
220SE convertible in his Burlingame shop.The shop sees it share of both
rare and classic cars.
By Thomas Adamson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PARIS — “It’s all cinema, it’s all from
film,” said Jean Paul Gaultier, summing up
haute couture.
Paris’ enfant terrible seemed to have a
point, speaking on the last day of fall-win-
ter shows that have seen spectators trans-
ported from apocalyptic opera houses to
the circus and flung across the four corners
of the globe.
Gaultier’s feline-infused couture collec-
tion - Wednesday’s highlight - took for
inspiration Italian filmmaker Federico
Fellini and “The Pink Panther. ”
The references merged with theatrical
panache to produce once of his best shows
in seasons.
But the cinema continued throughout
Wednesday. In Valentino’s encyclopedic
show, continents and eras were merged and
had Baz Luhrmann in delight.
“Haute couture, like cinema, is unreal.
It’s theatre - a romantic aspiration that’s
more beautiful, more extraordinary than
reality,” said the burlesque “Moulin
Rouge” director who sat on the coveted
front row.
JEAN PAUL GAULTIER
With a delicious purr, Gaultier pounced
back into top form with a feisty couture
collection, proving that despite a couple
of off seasons, he still has a lot of tricks
up his embroidered sleeve.
This fall-winter’s muse was the female
panther, which inspired a slew of fresh
ideas, including plenty of new ways to
wear leopard and how to dress in feathers to
look like a cat.
If it sounds eccentric, it was.
Leopard print featured cheekily on tights
below one stylish all-black crepe dress,
and there were several incredible couture
coats. At first glance they looked like fur
but were made entirely of feathers, speck-
led like a big cat pelt and with white feath-
ers at the edges to resemble skin.
Gaultier, ever the showman, ensured the
wackiness infused the show’s presentation
as well.
Forty-three looks filed by to the infec-
tious theme of “The Pink Panther,” show-
cased on models who clawed as they
walked. Guests looked on from stalls divid-
ed into lionesses, panthers, lynx and leop-
ards. Sometimes they applauded, some-
times they simply laughed.
But aside from all the fun, there was some
serious couture at work here.
Inspired by clown costumes, Gaultier
showed flair with a new silhouette produced
by dramatic 1980s-style ice-cream cone-
shaped chaps.
It was fresh and engaging, and it seemed
to say one of the big cats of Paris is back.
VALENTINO
As guests arrived at Valentino’s show,
they glanced inquisitively at the zebra
heads and gold-rimmed fisheye mirrors
mounted on the walls of the “Hotel de
Rothschild,” transforming the 19th centu-
ry mansion into a vintage-style cabinet of
curiosities.
“Enchanting, encyclopedic couture,” the
program notes promised revelers.
When the first tight gown swept by with
the image of orange rhinoceros on 3-D bed
of myriad earth brown lacing, apparently
inspired by a painting of Elizabeth I, it was
clear the show would follow through on the
promise.
Designers Maria Grazia Chiuri and
Pierpaolo Piccioli, in the process, seemed
to have pulled off their most eccentric and
imaginative show to date.
Oriental motifs and arabesque patterns
fused with Scottish herringbone tweeds and
Renaissance capes were thrown into the
creative cauldron. This appeared alongside
embroideries of lion’s heads, bees, beetles
and dragonflies, often to luxurious effect.
That’s not to say all the looks worked.
Some were too austere, and on the more
elaborate silhouettes the patterning at
times came across as busy.
VIKTOR & ROLF
Returning to the couture stage after a 13-
year hiatus, Viktor Horsting and Rolf
Snoeren used a raked Japanese garden as the
vehicle for their shadowy, minimalist cre-
ations.
In an unusual presentation, the Dutch
design duo meditated back-to-back in the
lotus position before the collection show-
cased the 20 black, architectural creations.
(Twenty represented the amount of years
they’ve been in the fashion industry. )
Sluggishly from the backstage darkness,
the dresses appeared in stiff technical silk
with Oriental, almost organic silhouettes.
They cut some beautiful and contemplative
shapes.
The models then dropped to the floor one
by one and the designers molded the dress-
es with their hands into various abstract
forms. It produced a striking visual land-
scape: An interlocking mound of black
with model piled upon model in several
heaps of black fabric.
ELIE SAAB
Lebanese designer Elie Saab unabashedly
celebrated the glitz of the red carpet in a
couture show which used the exact color the
A-listers tread.
The first series of sweeping embroidered
silk gowns brushed the red-colored catwalk
as they filed by, merging with it in a
“trompe l’oeil” effect.
It could be said that Saab - famed for
dressing royalty and celebrities for the red
carpet - is finally embracing the color that
made his name.
Pearlized hues followed, with delicately
cinched waists and glittering with thou-
sands of embroidered sequins - as is the
Saab signature.
Several looks in rarely used jade green
were the highest point in the show, cutting
a striking image against the red of the run-
way.
However, a series of gowns in ultrama-
rine were so bold they might be hard for
mere mortals to pull off. Perhaps it was a
reminder: This show is not for mortals;
this is haute couture.
18
Friday • July 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FASHION
Gaultier claws back on top, Valentino dazzles
REUTERS
Models present creations by French designer Jean Paul Gaultier as part of his Haute
Couture Fall Winter 2013/2014 fashion show in Paris Saturday.
Shakespeare
and more in
Ashland, Ore.
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
O
ver the course of more than eight
months starting in mid-February,
the Oregon Shakespeare Festival in
Ashland stages a total of 11 plays in its
three theaters. During the summer, it’s pos-
sible to see nine or even 10 of them during
a week’s stay.
The current playbill lists Shakespeare’s
“Cymbeline” and “A Midsummer’s Night
Dream” along with the U.S. premiere of
David Farr’s “The Heart of Robin Hood” in
the outdoor Elizabethan Stage.
The indoor Bowmer Theatre is featuring
Shakespeare’s “The Taming of the Shrew, ”
Lerner and Loewe’s “My Fair Lady, ”
Tennessee Williams’ “A Streetcar Named
Desire” and August Wilson’s “Two Trains
Running.” The latter will close July 7 to be
replaced by the world premiere of Tanya
Saracho’s “The Tenth Muse.”
Onstage in the smaller indoor Thomas
Theatre (formerly New Theatre) are
Shakespeare’s “King Lear” and the world
premiere of “The Unfortunates” by Jon
Beavers, Casey Hurt, Ian Merrigan and
Ramiz Monsef. The world premiere of
Naomi Wallace’s “The Liquid Plain” opens
July 6.
The complete schedule and other details
are available by calling (800) 219-8161 or
visiting www.osfashland.org.
The following are capsule reviews from a
recent visit.
“My Fair Lady”: “My Fair Lady” was the
clear standout during that visit. With music
by Frederick Loewe and book and lyrics by
Alan Jay Lerner, this musical version of
George Bernard Shaw’s “Pygmalion” was a
Broadway smash when it opened in 1956. It
starred Julie Andrews as Cockney flower girl
Eliza Doolittle and Rex Harrison as crotch-
ety phonetics professor Henry Higgins,
who tries to teach her how to speak like a
lady.
The success of this brilliant Ashland pro-
duction comes from several factors, starting
with the show itself and its music, a non-
stop string of hits like “Get Me to the
Church on Time,” “On the Street Where You
Live,” “I Could Have Danced All Night,”
“I’ve Grown Accustomed to Her Face” and
others.
Then there’s the cast, with Rachael
Warren as Eliza and Jonathan Haugen as
Higgins. They have a chemistry not often
seen in other productions.
Adding to the enjoyment are David Kelly
as Colonel Pickering, Higgins’ colleague;
Anthony Heald as Alfred P. Doolittle,
Eliza’s father; Miriam A. Laube as Mrs.
Gotta see ‘um
Whale museum
inspires visitors to
be caretakers of
the planet
SEE PAGE 21
See ASHLAND, Page 22
See XXX, Page XXX
By Michael Rechtshaffen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Stealing the
moon can be a tough act to follow, as
reformed criminal mastermind Gru
and the creative team behind the
$540-million-grossing 2010 smash
“Despicable Me” discovered when it
was time to dream up an encore.
After all, it was no mean feat to suc-
cessfully juggle all that lunar lunacy
with a delightful companion plot
involving a trio of orphaned girls who,
in turn, steal Gru’s heart. While the new
edition doesn’t quite catch that inspired
spark, there’s still plenty to enjoy here
courtesy of those zippy visuals and a
pitch-perfect voice cast led by the
innately animated Steve Carell.
Expect the movie’s minions to once
again turn up in droves in what is cer-
tain to be a stellar Fourth of July hol-
iday weekend.
“Despicable Me 2” finds Carell’s
Gru more or less embracing his
newly domesticated life after adopt-
ing Margo (Miranda Cosgrove),
Edith (Dana Gaier) and little Agnes
(Elsie Fisher), even swapping his
more nefarious activities for a
startup jelly-and-jam-making
operation. But he soon finds him-
self in a stickier situation when
he’s dispatched by the top-secret
Anti-Villain League to track down
the perpetrator of a fresh heist
involving a ginormous electromag-
net.
Setting up an undercover opera-
tion in a mall cupcake shop, Gru is
reunited with fresh AVL recruit
Lucy Wilde (Kristen Wiig, for-
merly the proprietor of Miss
Hattie’s Home for Girls), with his
suspicions set on the gregarious
owner of a Mexican restaurant (a
terrific Benjamin Bratt), who
bears a nagging resemblance to
El Macho, a notorious villain
believed to have perished while
riding a shark into a volcano
with 250 pounds of TNT
strapped to his chest.
It’s those sort of details
that lend the “Despicable
Me” franchise an irre-
sistible Looney Tunes-
style nuttiness — one
even more prevalent
this time around in the
absence of a more substan-
Another zany
escapade
See ME2, Page 22
20
Friday • July 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EXPIRES: July 31, 2013
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WEEKEND JOURNAL 21
Friday • July 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
856 North Delaware St. San Mateo, CA 94401
DailySpecials
Double Punch Monday
Two-Fer Tuesday $6.50
Wet N' Wild Wednesday $6.50
Baja Thursday $7
Fish Taco Friday $6
Super Saturday $5.50
Family Day Sunday
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
PROMOTING STEWARD-
SHIP OF THE SEA: FRIDAY
HARBOR’S WHALE MUSEUM
INSPIRES VISITORS TO BE
CARETAKERS OF THE PLAN-
ET. It is estimated that more than
500,000 people go whale watching
annually on commercial boats in the
waters between Washington state
and British Columbia. The large
numbers are easy to understand:
these exhilarating excursions give
visitors an opportunity to see the
famed killer whales, the orcas, in
one of the most dramatic settings in
the world. The experience also is a
chance for travelers to gain knowl-
edge about the whales and the other
marine wildlife in the region.
Helping in this education process is
The Whale Museum in Friday
Harbor on San Juan Island, the first
museum of its kind in the United
States dedicated to whales living in
the wild. The museum works close-
ly with marine researchers who
study wild whales in their Salish
Sea natural habitat.
The Whale Museum Executive
Director Jenny L. Atkinson said,
“We hope visitors will come see the
new exhibit on [orca] Sooke (L-
112) and get to know the endan-
gered Southern Resident orcas as
well as the other inhabitants of the
Salish Sea. Through exhibits, films,
stories and activities, The Whale
Museum aims to highlight the area’s
wonderful marine environment and
instill a sense of stewardship in all
who visit. Our mission is to promote
stewardship of whales and the
Salish Sea ecosystem through edu-
cation and research.”
The Whale Museum is located in
the historic Odd Fellows Hall at 62
N. First St. Friday Harbor, Wash.,
within walking distance of the
Washington State Ferry Terminal.
360-378-4710 or www.whalemuse-
um.org.
OH, AND DID YOU KNOW?
The Salish Sea (say-lish) is the net-
work of coastal waterways between
the southwestern tip of the
Canadian province of British
Columbia and the northwestern tip
of Washington state. Its major bod-
ies of water are the Strait of
Georgia, the Strait of Juan de Fuca
and Puget Sound. The inland water-
ways of the Salish Sea are partially
separated from the open Pacific
Ocean by Vancouver Island and the
Olympic Peninsula, and are thus
somewhat shielded from Pacific
Ocean storms. Major port cities on
the Salish Sea include Seattle,
Vancouver, Tacoma, Bellingham
and Victoria.
WHALE-WATCHING IN THE
PUGET SOUND. For thousands of
years, the inland waters of the
Pacific Northwest have been the
summer feeding grounds for killer
whales and no trip to the San Juan
Islands would be complete without
a trip out to look for these wonder-
ful animals. The whale-watching
vessels are a close-knit community
and share sightings in real time;
when one boat spots a group of
whales, known as a pod, the word is
spread so that all boats can gather,
working together to respect the laws
requiring that vessels stay several
hundred yards from marine mam-
mals. One of the most senior of the
whale watch mariners is Captain
Jim Maya, who guides his comfort-
able six-passenger boat the
Peregrine out of Mitchell Bay on
San Juan Island’s northwest shore.
Maya is a lifelong naturalist and
avid photographer who shares his
love of the area with humor and
enthusiasm. Maya’s Westside
Whale Watch Charters. 360-378-
7996 or captjim@interisland.net.
ADOPT AN ORCA. Each orca
can be identified by the shape and
size of the fin on its back (dorsal fin)
and the gray and white markings
beneath and behind the fin (saddle
patch). Each animal has been given
a pod identification number as well
as a common name that reflects a bit
of its heritage, personality or cir-
cumstances of its discovery. There
are currently more than 80 whales
available for adoption through The
Whale Museum’s Orca Adoption
Program, including baby orca
Ti’lem I’nges (J-49), named by the
Samish Indian Nation on June 29 in
a traditional Potlatch Naming
Ceremony. The funds raised
through this adoption program sup-
port ongoing research on the orcas
and other marine mammals in the
area.
ORCAS IN ART. Indian artwork
from the Pacific Northwest fre-
quently incorporates images of the
native animals, including the orca.
The Arctic Raven Gallery, just a few
blocks from The Whale Museum,
represents artists from the Coast
Salish, Kwaguilth and Makah
nations as well as from the more
northern Haida, Tlingit and
Tsimshian. Pieces include masks,
woodcarvings and prints. The arctic
raven, logo of the gallery, is the only
bird that remains in the far north
throughout the winter and thus has
become a symbol of the resilience
of the northern Native cultures. 130
S. First St. Friday Harbor, Wash.
360-378-3433 or arcticraven-
galleryfridayharbor.com.
Susan Cohn can be reached at
susan@smdailyjournal.com or
www.twitter.com/susancityscene.
MUSEUM GOTTA SEE ‘UM
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WHALE MUSEUM
The Whale Museum on San Juan Island in Washington is the first museum in the United States dedicated to the
whales that live in the wild.The museum’s Gallery of Whales has exhibits, artwork, models, and artifacts, includ-
ing real whale skeletons,and a family tree of the resident orcas.The Whale Phone Booth lets visitors listen to the
“songs”of various species of whales.
WEEKEND JOURNAL
22
Friday • July 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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tial plotline.
Still, returning directors Pierre Coffin and
Chris Renaud and the returning writing team
of Ken Daurio and Cinco Paul again main-
tain the energy at a brisk, buoyant clip,
while Carell and the rest of cast add an extra
layer of dimension to those expressively
drawn characters.
Also amusingly returning to the fold is
Russell Brand as rickety resident mad scien-
tist Dr. Nefario, Steve Coogan as AVL head
honcho Silas Ramsbottom and Ken Jeong
as Floyd Eagle-san, now the owner of a wig
store.
Back again to imbue the production with a
pleasing visual and aural snap are produc-
tion designer Yarrow Cheney and on-a-roll
Pharrell Williams, whose springy songs
blend nicely with Heitor Pereira’s bright
score.
Those who foolishly opt to leave at the
start of the end credits will be missing out
on another entertaining 3D demonstration
again led by a handful of those wacky
Minions.
“Despicable Me 2,” a Universal release, is
rated PG for, according to the Motion Picture
Association of America, “rude humor and
mild action.” Running time: 98 minutes.
Continued from page 19
ME2
Pearce, Higgins’ housekeeper; and Ken
Robinson as Freddy Eynsford-Hill, Eliza’s
would-be suitor. Mrs. Higgins, Henry’s
mother, is usually played by Chavez
Ravine, but understudy Kate Mulligan ably
filled in.
Several of these actors have worked
together at the festival for years and have
developed a strong rapport that comes
across on the stage.
However, what makes this production
stand out from so many others over the
years is the inventive direction by Amanda
Dehnert, who also serves as musical direc-
tor. Kudos go to choreographer Jaclyn
Miller, too.
Just one example of Dehnert’s creativity
comes in the Ascot scene when the actors’
hats, which have been suspended above the
stage, descend directly onto each person’s
head.
Not-to-be-missed
Other clever touches create a thoroughly
enjoyable, not-to-be-missed theatrical
experience.
“A Streetcar Named Desire”: Although
Marlon Brando’s performance as Stanley
Kowalski in the film version of “A
Streetcar Named Desire” has become icon-
ic, Danforth Comins puts his own touch on
the role in Tennessee Williams’ classic
tragedy.
Comins has a boyish quality that might
explain why his wife, Stella (Nell
Geisslinger), was attracted to a man who
can be crude and domineering.
Stanley’s more negative qualities really
come to the fore when the ladylike Blanche
DuBois (Kate Mulligan), Stella’s elder sis-
ter, comes to their cramped New Orleans
apartment after the longtime DuBois plan-
tation was lost to creditors.
Stanley’s instinctive distrust of Blanche
leads him to investigate her background
and find that she wasn’t being truthful.
His discoveries dissolve her psycholog-
ical defenses, revealing her mental insta-
bility and leading to a wrenching conclu-
sion.
Director Christopher Liam Moore and
his talented cast have a solid grasp of the
play’s emotional undertones. It’s an out-
standing production.
“Two Trains Running”: The late August
Wilson created an epic series of 10 plays
highlighting aspects of the African-
American experience in each decade of the
20th century. “Two Trains Running” takes
place in 1969 in Pittsburgh, the setting for
most of the plays.
Memphis (Terry Bellamy) owns a neigh-
borhood restaurant patronized by Wolf
(Kenajuan Bentley), a numbers runner;
Holloway (Josiah Phillips), an older, wiser
man; West (Jerome Preston Bates), an
undertaker; and the mentally disturbed
Hambone (Tyrone Wilson).
Another patron, the younger Sterling
(Kevin Kenerly), has returned to the neigh-
borhood after five years in prison. The
only other character is the aloof, slow-
moving waitress, Risa (Bakesta King).
The restaurant is slated for demolition as
part of urban renewal, but Memphis wor-
ries that he won’t get a fair price. Sterling
needs money to turn his life around. He’s
also trying to woo the reluctant Risa.
As directed by Lou Bellamy, each charac-
ter embodies aspects of the culture as well
as the time and place. As is Wilson’s wont,
i t ’s talky, but there’s poetry in those
speeches along with some humor. It con-
veys a strong sense of what the characters
are experiencing in that time and place.
“The Taming of the Shrew”: William
Shakespeare’s “The Taming of the Shrew”
can be difficult for today’s audiences
because it involves a macho man trying to
subdue a strong-willed woman he wants to
marry for money.
True, Kate (Nell Geisslinger) has a nasty
temper, but perhaps it’s because her
younger sister, the pretty but vacuous
Bianca (Royer Bockus) is hotly pursued by
men and favored by their father, Baptista
(Robert Vincent Frank). However, Baptista
won’t allow Bianca to marry until Kate has
a husband.
Wooing scene
No man is interested until Petruchio (Ted
Deasy) comes from Verona “to wive it
wealthily in Padua.” After a tempestuous
wooing scene, he gets her to the altar, but
their “honeymoon” is hardly idyllic as he
treats her cruelly in the guise of kindness.
She finally bends to his will, but has she
really given in to him or does she relent
just to have some peace? As directed by
David Ivers, it appears that she might be
getting Petruchio to do her will.
Scenic designer Jo Winiarski has given
this version a boardwalk setting with mod-
ern costumes by Meg Neville. However,
director Ivers overdoes some of the updat-
ing with raucous rock music (by sound
designer Paul James Prendergast) and a
preening rock star persona for Petruchio.
Overall, though, it’s quite well acted,
especially by Geisslinger and a strong sup-
porting cast. However, as measured against
some other “Shrew” productions seen at
Ashland and elsewhere, as well as the other
three shows reviewed this time, it doesn’t
stand out.
Continued from page 19
ASHLAND
LOCAL 23
Friday • July 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FRIDAY,JULY5
Discover the Dinosaurs. San Mateo
County Events Center, 1346 Saratoga
Drive, San Mateo. Interactive dinosaur
exhibit for the whole family. Adults $17,
Kids ages 2 to 12 years old $12, Seniors
$15.Parkingis$10.Exhibit continuesuntil
July 7. For more information visit
discoverthedinosaurs.com.
FreeFirst Fridays. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. San
Mateo County History Museum, 2200
BroadwaySt.,RedwoodCity.Special event
at 11a.m.for preschool children.Museum
tours at 2 p.m. for adults. Free. For more
information call 299-0104 or go to
www.historysmc.org.
Free Wine or Beer Tasting. 4 p.m. to 6
p.m. New Leaf Community Market, 150
San Mateo Road,Half Moon Bay.Free.For
more information got to
www.newleaf.com or call 726-3110.
Cash Tribute: Johnny Cash Tribute. 6
p.m. to 8 p.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Free. For more
information call 780-7311.
First Friday Flicks: The Croods. 7 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas,Belmont.IntheCroods,acaveman
family must trek through an unfamiliar
fantastical world with the help of an
inventiveboyaftertheircaveisdestroyed.
PG,98minutes.For moreinformationcall
591-8286.
SouthSanFranciscoOpenMic.7p.m.to
11 p.m. 116 El Campo Drive, South San
Francisco. Free. For more
information call 451-2450.
SATURDAY,JULY6
Walk with a Doc. Red Morton
Community Park, 1120 Roosevelt Ave.,
Redwood City.A free program of the San
Mateo County Medical Association’s
Community Service Foundation that
encourages healthy physical activity for
countyresidentsof all ages.Walkersenjoy
one-hourwalkswithphysicianvolunteers
and can ask questions about general
health topics along the way. Free.To sign
up visit www.smcma.org.
AlanMcGee’s“AWalkintheWoods—
LandscapeasMetaphor”Reception. 1
p.m.to 4p.m.PortolaArt Gallery at Allied
ArtsGuild,75Arbor Road,MenloPark.The
exhibition is open July 1-31 and features
a collection of images by photographer
Alan McGee of Portola Valley. Free. For
more information email
frances.freyberg@gmail.com.
SUNDAY,JULY7
Sunday Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. San Mateo Avenue between
JeneveinandSylvanavenues,SanBruno.
For more information go to
www.westcoastfarmersmarkets.org.
Summer Concert. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Washington Park, Burlingame, on the
Recreation Center Patio. Free
entertainment and fitness demos.
ThePlastic Onion. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.Twin
PinesMeadow,Belmont. Thisisthefourth
concertof theBelmontSummerConcerts.
The music played will celebrate the
Beatles. Admission is free and
refreshments will be sold. For more
information call 595-7441.
First Sunday Line Dance with Tina
Beare&JeanetteFeinberg. 1 p.m. to 4
p.m.SanBrunoSeniorCenter,1555Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno. $5. For more
information call 616-7150.
MONDAY,JULY8
SummerEnrichmentSeries: ArtWeek.
2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
AlamedadelasPulgas,Belmont.Free.This
event will rununtil July10.Registrationis
required. For more information and to
register call 591-8286.
What’sthebuzz?3p.m.SanMateoPublic
Library, Hillsdale branch, 205 W. Hillsdale
Blvd., San Mateo. Learn all about
honeybees and beekeeping from
beekeeper Kendal Sager. Free. For more
information call 522-7848.
Self-healingtechniqueclass.5:45 p.m.
to6:45p.m.SanCarlosAdult Community
Center, 601 Chestnut St., San Carlos.
StephanieCapodanno,CHTP,will leadself-
healingtechniquesthat relievestress.The
lessons will take place over four classes.
$43 for San Carlos resident and $50 for
non-residentsfor all four classes.For more
informationandtoregister call 802-4382
or go to www.RecConnect.net.
TUESDAY,JULY9
FreeForumforCaregivers.5:30 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. Senior Focus Center, 1720 El
CaminoReal,Suite10,Burlingame.Space
is limited.The forum will cover an update
ondementiacareandmindful moments
in caregiving. The event is not for
professional caregivers. Free. For more
informationandtoregister call 696-3660.
Mime Troupe: Oil andWater. Music at
6:30 p.m., show at 7 p.m. Mitchell Park,
South Field, 600 East Meadow Drive and
Cowper St., Palo Alto. Free. For more
information go to sfmt.org.
WEDNESDAY,JULY10
JVS Orientation and Enrollment
Session.1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Peninsula JCC,
800 Foster City Blvd., Foster City. We will
provide you with an overview of the
services,programsandresourcesthat will
support you in your job search. We can
help you with finding a job, making a
resume,interviewing,networking,staying
motivatedandwritingyour summaryfor
LinkedIn. We work with people from all
backgroundsandall levelsof experience
andexpertise.Free.For moreinformation
email jcowan@jvs.org.
DW Wilson Magic Show. 2 p.m. San
MateoPublicLibraryMarinabranch,1530
Susan Court, San Mateo. DW Wilson’s
ultimatemagicshowcombinesaudience
participation, comedy and real live
animals. Free. For more information call
522-7838.
MusicinthePark-BundyBrowneand
theEspressoRhythmSection. 6p.m.to
8 p.m.StaffordPark,corner of King Street
andHopkinsAvenue,RedwoodCity.Free.
TheLoudestManonEarth— Preview.
8 p.m. Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305
MiddlefieldRoad,PaloAlto.Theshowwill
run until Aug. 4. Tickets start at $19 for
ages 30 and under. Savings available for
educators, seniors and patrons 30 and
under. A $5 convenience fee will be
assessedfor onlineandtelephoneorders.
For moreinformationcall 463-1960or go
to theatreworks.org.
THURSDAY,JULY11
FreeLectureonConservatorship.Noon.
San Mateo County Law Library, 710
HamiltonSt.,RedwoodCity.Free.Formore
information call 363-4913 or go to
www.smclawlibrary.org.
Movies for School AgeChildren: Willy
WonkaandtheChocolateFactory.3:30
p.m.SanMateoPublicLibrary-OakRoom,
55W.ThirdAve.,SanMateo.Free.For more
information call 533-7838.
TheCottontails.6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Central
Park,50E5thAve.,SanMateo.Comeenjoy
a band that can belt out some old gin-
house blues, riff on a Charlie Parker tune,
androckoutonaSmokeyRobinsonsong,
all in a single set. For more information
visit ci.sanmateo.ca.us.
Melissa Peabody’s newfilm — San
Francisco: Still Wildat Heart. 6:30 p.m.
South San Francisco Municipal Services
Building, 33 Arroyo Drive, South San
Francisco. Following the showing,
Peabodywill talkabout howmakingthis
filmcameaboutandwhatimpactherfilm
hasmade.Free.For moreinformationcall
829-3876.
TheLoudestManonEarth— Preview.
7:30 p.m. Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305
MiddlefieldRoad,PaloAlto.Theshowwill
run until Aug. 4. Tickets start at $19 for
ages 30 and under. Savings available for
educators, seniors and patrons 30 and
under. A $5 convenience fee will be
assessedfor onlineandtelephoneorders.
For moreinformationcall 463-1960or go
to theatreworks.org.
FRIDAY,JULY12
PresentationonPreservationofFamily
Photos.1p.m.SanMateoCountyHistory
Museum,2200Broadway,RedwoodCity.
PhotographConservator GawainWeaver
makes a presentation on preserving
family photographs. Weaver will discuss
types of photographs found in family
collections, clues to dating them and
procedurestopreservingthem.Freewith
prices of admission. Admission $5 for
adults, $3 for students and seniors. For
more information call 299-0104.
Members’ Exhibit and Taking Digital
Art to the Streets. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Pacific Art League, 227 Forest Ave., Palo
Alto. The PAL will host an opening
reception for two new exhibitions which
will be on display from July 1 to July 25.
Free.For more information call 321-3891
or go to www.pacificartleague.org.
SurfinSafari:BeachBoysTribute. 6p.m.
to 8 p.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Free. For more
information call 780-7311.
SouthSanFranciscoOpenMic. 7p.m.to
11 p.m. 116 El Campo Drive, South San
Francisco.Free.For more information call
451-2450.
Becky’sNewCar opens at theDragon
Theatre.8p.m.TheDragonTheatre,2120
Broadway, Redwood City. Ticket prices
range from $15 to $35.The show will run
throughAug.4.For moreinformationand
for tickets go to
dragonproductions.net/activities/2013se
ason/beckysnewcar.html.
BroadwayBytheBaypresentsOliver!
8p.m.FoxTheatre,2215BroadwayStreet,
Redwood City. Come enjoy the
performancethat bringsCharlesDickens’
timeless classic of the young boy who
asked for more to life. $35 to $55.Tickets
may be purchased at the box office
locatedat 2219Broadway,RedwoodCity.
For more information call 369-7770.
TheLoudestManonEarth— Preview.
8 p.m. Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305
MiddlefieldRoad,PaloAlto.Theshowwill
run until Aug. 4. Tickets start at $19 for
ages 30 and under. Savings available for
educators, seniors and patrons 30 and
under. A $5 convenience fee will be
assessedfor onlineandtelephoneorders.
For moreinformationcall 463-1960or go
to theatreworks.org.
Movies on the Square: Life of Pi. 8:45
p.m.CourthouseSquare,2200Broadway,
RedwoodCity.Free.For moreinformation
call 780-7311 or go to
www.redwoodcity.org/events/movies.ht
ml.
SATURDAY,JULY13
Electronic Recycling at Saint Peter
Catholic Church. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 700
Oddstad Blvd., Pacifica. For more
information call 359-6313.
BonnieLockhart- Feast of Song.10:30
a.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de
las Pulgas, Belmont. Singing is local,
international andverytastywhenBonnie
Lockhard brings us ‘A Feast of Song!’ For
more information call 591-8286.
SanCarlosHistoricWalkingTour.10:30
a.m.to Noon.City Hall Park,corner of San
CarlosAvenueandElmStreet,SanCarlos.
Tour historic locations in downtown San
Carlos with the San Carlos Heritage
Association. There will be activities for
youngchildrenandfreemilk,cookies,and
chrysanthemum ice tea for all. Free. For
more information call 592-5822.
My Homeland in Colors or The
Photography As a Passion. 11 a.m.
Menlo Park City Council Chambers, 701
Laurel Street, Menlo Park. Author and
photographer Guillermo Rivas presents
his beautiful photos of Peru, his native
country. Free For more info go to
rlroth@menlopark.org or call 330-2512.
PresentationonPreservationofFamily
Photos. 1 p.m. The San Mateo County
History Museum, 2200 Broadway,
RedwoodCity.Freewithadmissiontothe
museum. For more information go to
www.historysmc.org.
SUNDAY,JULY14
Devil’sSlideCoastHike. 10a.m.to1p.m.
Rancho Corral de Tierra. Join Committee
for Green Foothills and the National Park
Service for a hike led by Ranger George
DurgerlanandNatural ResourceSpecialist
SusieBennett.Registrationisrequired.For
more information and to register go to
http://devilsslidecoasthike.eventbrite.com
/.
Sunday Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. San Mateo Avenue between
JeneveinandSylvanavenues,SanBruno.
For more information go to
www.westcoastfarmersmarkets.org.
Summer Concert. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Washington Park, Burlingame, on the
Recreation Center Patio. Free
entertainment and fitness demos.
‘Muze’ Belmont Summer Concert. 1
p.m. to 4 p.m. Twin Pines Meadow,
Belmont. Concert will feature vocal pop.
Admission is free and refreshments will
be sold. For more information call 595-
7441.
Walk4Water.1 p.m.Open Door Church,
4150 Piccadilly Lane, San Mateo. Join the
one-mile walk designed to simulate the
experience of villagers in rural Africa and
ODCSM will donate $25 toward clean
water projects.For moreinformationcall
329-7424.
Meet theAuthorSaharDelijani.2 p.m.
San Mateo Main Library, 55 W.ThirdAve.,
San Mateo.This events features Delijani’s
book,Childrenof theJacarandaTree.Free
parkinginundergroundgarage.Formore
information call 522-7845.
Galaviz Cancer Fight Pasta Feed
Fundraiser. 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. American
Legion Hall, 757 San Mateo Ave., San
Bruno. $15. For more information go to
www.EverythingSouthCity.com/Galaviz
or call 301-2221.
Rupa&TheAprilFishes.5p.m.PJCC,800
Foster City Blvd., Foster City. Come enjoy
this multicultural band that plays music
that ranges from punk and indie rock to
reggae and “rockabolly.” Prizes will be
awarded to those who bike to the event
or pedal during the performance to help
power the sound. Bring a picnic or
purchase food onsite. For more
information visit pjcc.org.
MONDAY,JULY15
RussellBedeSchoolTour.442TurnerTer,
San Mateo. Russell Bede School, which
has been serving children with learning
differencesfor 30years,will offer atour of
its facility for interested families. Free. For
more information and to reserve spots
call 579-4400.
Summer Enrichment Series: LEGO
Week. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Belmont Library,
1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Free. This event will run until July 17.
Registration is required. For more
informationandtoregister call 591-8286.
Calendar
engage students regardless of how they
learn. It also will encourage the use of tech-
nology but in a way that creates engage-
ment with others, not just students individ-
ually working with a screen, she explained.
For students, the plan calls for supporting
children academically as well as socially
and emotionally. It asks that critical think-
ing and problem-solving skills to be
emphasized in lessons along with the use of
technology and real-world situations. A
group of teachers are being trained this sum-
mer to lead curriculum changes, said
Superintendent Craig Baker. That sort of
training will continue in the coming years
to reach all the district’s educators. As a
result, there will be lots of pilot programs,
Baker added.
The plan is open-ended about who can be
a teacher. Lessons, for example, could come
from local business owners sharing real-life
experiences or people who can take part in
virtual field trips using video conferencing
software. Virtual field trips are also part of
the plan to extend where learning happens,
said Baker.
Implementing the changes is easier for
the district since almost all of its schools,
aside from Central Middle School, are char-
ters. Central will soon be a charter, howev-
er.
Where the impact of the new strategic
plan will be first visible will be in the new
schools being built to teach fourth and fifth
grade students. Aplan to build two such cam-
puses using land at the district’s middle
schools — Central and Tierra Linda — was
developed to help alleviate growing enroll-
ment. Once complete, the smaller transition
schools that will share facilities with
Central and Tierra Linda will also draw one
grade of students from the existing San
Carlos schools to free up space. The first of
these schools, which will be located at
Central, is expected to open in 2016.
Direction for the design includes building
classrooms with moveable walls so that two
classrooms can work together or a group of
students can take their lesson outside, Baker
said.
“Building new schools gives us the
opportunity to support the type of learning
we want to do,” said Baker who will now
start working with a design team to create a
plan for the facility.
It’s not just about changing thoughts
about how to reach students. Baker sees this
as a way to also involve students in owning
their own educational goals — like know-
ing in which areas they could use help and
acknowledging the successful movement
toward reaching those milestones.
To read the full strategic plan visit
www.sancarlos.k12.ca.us/strategic-plan/.
Continued from page 1
VISION
four which Peterson said was hard to meet.
Now, it depends.
Acategory one establishment is the low-
est risk like convenience stores, coffee
shops and sellers of prepackaged foods like
muffins that don’t require cooking and can
sit at room temperature. The FDA recom-
mends visiting only once a year unless
there are concerns and that fee is now $459.
Category 2 could be a retail store or
school where food preparation involves
reheating rather than cooking raw ingredi-
ents and temperature is the primary concern.
Visits are recommended twice a year. The
inspection fee for such a site with 10 or less
seats is $612.
Category three is the highest risk for full-
service restaurants involving more com-
plex preparation from raw to cooked which
requires correct processes, cooling and heat-
ing. The guidelines recommend three visits
a year and inspection costs for a category 3
facility with 10 or fewer seats is $1,071.
San Mateo County is among the first in
the state to use the risk-based approach,
Peterson said.
The biggest thing Peterson said the sys-
tem is seeing is that inspectors can spend
more time at a facility and managers and
staff become more comfortable asking ques-
tions or working to fix problems. Peterson
said the goal is not just enforcement but
also providing education for “teachable
moments.”
Every person or business involved in the
food chain from farmers to consumers has
some responsibility for food safety but it’s
also critical for the county’s food establish-
ments to maintain their own safety sys-
tems, said county Health Officer Dr. Scott
Morrow.
The new assessment guidelines do not
include food trucks which are a separate cat-
egory and inspected at least once a year
when they come in for permits. However,
Peterson said, the trucks come in empty
rather than while preparing food and the
health officials are working on ways to bet-
ter inspect them in the field.
The county is also working on color-
coded placards in future years to alert cus-
tomers to inspection grades. Restaurants are
currently mandated to post the latest inspec-
tion report but compliance is only about 50
percent, Peterson said.
Those with concerns or complaints
should call Environmental Health directly at
373-6200 for the most immediate response.
Complaints can also be filed online at
www.smchealth.org/food where visitors can
also sign up for email notification of viola-
tions each Thursday.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
FOOD
COMICS/GAMES
7-05-13
Thursday’s PuZZLE sOLVEd
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Want More Fun
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Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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1 Common amphibians
6 Ring
11 Righted a wrong
13 Laughed heartily
14 Apply more asphalt
15 Cays
16 Spider’s quarters
17 Plunging neckline
18 Rain slicker
21 Weathercaster Al —
23 Dems’ foe
26 Ecol. watchdog
27 Monogram pt.
28 Like before
29 False move
31 Disinterested
32 Eccentric, slangily
33 Dappled, as a horse
35 Perry’s creator
36 Comes down with
37 Toothpaste type
38 Deli loaf
39 Maurice’s thanks
40 Summer in Cannes
41 A pox upon thee!
42 Laugh syllable
44 Give homework
47 Way out
51 Mrs. Washington
52 Relating to teeth
53 Contort
54 Lure
dOwn
1 Partner of wide
2 AAA suggestion
3 Caveman from Moo
4 Munch
5 Harshness
6 Stumper
7 Comet — -Bopp
8 Sourdough’s fnd
9 Mesh
10 Journal VIPs
12 Fillet
13 Girder insert
18 Club joiner
19 Drone’s home
20 Chess piece
22 Smoked herring
23 Auto repair shop
24 Brunch favorite
25 Sell
28 Cry
30 Sault — Marie
31 Under attack
34 Had poison ivy
36 Actress Davis
39 Strength
41 Temper tantrums
43 Ocean fier
44 Qty.
45 Noticed
46 Delhi honorifc
48 Handy abbr.
49 — Paulo
50 Conniving
diLBErT® CrOsswOrd PuZZLE
fuTurE shOCk®
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GET fuZZy®
friday, JuLy 5, 2013
CanCEr (June 21-July 22) -- A friend is anxious to
talk about a personal issue, but is hesitant to do so.
It might be up to you to put your pal at ease.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Although you might not be
too lucky with intangible involvements, all the good
will you’re able to generate will end up being more
valuable than money.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- It’ll be important
to be flexible where your important objectives
are concerned. Circumstances are likely to
necessitate changing your tactics at a moment’s
notice.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Your best ideas are
apt to come when reviewing situations that you
successfully handled in past, which are similar to
what you’re facing now. Trade on experience.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- A couple of rewarding
situations could develop from two separate
involvements. Both will involve distinctly different
groups or organizations.
saGiTTarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- You shouldn’t
have too much trouble fnding several solutions to
a critical issue. The only problem you might have is
deciding which one to use.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Try to use your
free time as productively as possible. If you don’t,
you might end up writing today off as wasted.
aQuarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- It’s OK to enjoy
yourself as much as possible, but be sure to seek
both mental and physical stimulation. Relax and
have fun while improving your mind and body.
PisCEs (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Do your best to keep
your priorities in good order. First, attend to your
important obligations so that they’re not hanging
over your head the entire day.
ariEs (March 21-April 19) -- You might be surprised
by what you can learn simply by spending some
quality time with a few bright pals. Additionally, it
would be smart to ask a lot of questions.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -- Don’t hesitate to
spend some time with a friend who has been
indebted to you for some time. You could be in for a
pleasant surprise when he or she picks up the tab.
GEMini (May 21-June 20) -- This is likely to be
an extremely busy day in which you might have
to handle several problems simultaneously.
Fortunately, you’ll be able do so with grace and
aplomb.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
24 Friday • July 5, 2013
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Friday • July 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CALL CENTER Positions - Internet Car
Parts, Adam McCoy, (415)999-9823
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
AUTMOTIVE -
NOW HIRING
SERVICE TECHNICIANS
OILSTOP DRIVE-THRU
OIL CHANGE
• Excellent benefits
• No experience necessary
• Complete training program
• Retirement program
• Advancement opportunities
• Competitive pay
APPLY IN PERSON AT
2009 El Camino Real, San Mateo
Monday-Saturday 8-6
For more info: www.oilstopinc.com
26 Friday • July 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
BURLINGAME SCHOOL DISTRICT
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS AND PROPOSALS (RFQ/P)
ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES
Measure “D” Bond Program
The Burlingame School District is requesting qualified persons, firms, partnerships, corpora-
tions, associations, or professional organizations to provide full architectural planning, program-
ming, and design services for the modernization, renovation, and expansion of six (6) elementa-
ry schools and one (1) middle school under the $56 million dollar Measure “D” Bond Program.
A pool of qualified firms will be selected for future consideration to provide architectural services
for certain Projects under the Program. Additionally, at this time the District is requesting qualifi-
cations and proposals from respondents interested in being considered for two of the Projects
under the Program.
Respondents to this Request for Qualifications and Proposals (“RFQ/P”) should mail or deliver
Seven (7) bound copies, One (1) unbound copy and One (1) electronic copy on CD or flash
drive of their Statement of Qualifications (“SOQ”) or Statement of Qualifications and Statement
of Proposals (“SOQ/P”), as further described herein, to:
Robert Clark, Ed.D.
Assistant Superintendent/Chief Business Official
Burlingame School District
1825 Trousdale Drive
Burlingame, CA 94010
All responses are due by 2:00 p.m., on July 29, 2013.
FAX OR EMAIL RESPONSES WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
To obtain a copy of the Request for Statement of Qualifications and Proposal, interested firms
may visit the Burlingame School District website at www.bsd.k12.ca.us or stop by the District
Office at the address above to pick up a paper document.
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, June 29, July 5, and July 12, 2013
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CUSTOMER SERVICE/
SEAMSTRESS -
YOU ARE INVITED
Are you:
Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have:
Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for emplployment benefits
Sewiing skills
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available for
Customer Service/Seamstress.
Call for appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo CA, 94402
GREAT CLIPS
@ Sequoia Station
Redwood City
Now Hiring
Stylists & Managers.
Call Flo/Randy
408 247-8364 or 408 921-9994
Grand Opening Soon!
110 Employment
ENGINEERING
PHILIPS Electronics North America Cor-
poration has the following job opportunity
available in Foster City, CA :
Systems Engineer (SE04-CA) - Provide
technical support in sales presentations,
product demonstrations, installation and
maintenance of company products to en-
sure that the system is functioning ac-
cording to specifications. Position may
require travel to various, unanticipated
locations.
Submit resume by mail to: Philips People
Services, International Mobility, 200 Min-
uteman Rd, MS 5302, Andover, MA
01810. Must reference job title and job
code SE04-CA.
EXPERIENCED COOKS, Avanti Pizza. .
3536 Alameda, MENLO PARK, CA
(650)854-1222.
110 Employment
HOTEL -
A Front Desk Agent, and A Maintenance
Person position available. Experience
preferred Fax resume: (650)589-7076. or
Email: ac@citigardenhotel.com
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256137
The following person is doing business
as: Daly City Self Storage, 307 87th St.,
DALY CITY, CA 94015 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Muir Sta-
tion Associates, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Partner-
ship. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Robert Dailey /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/14/13, 06/21/13, 06/28/13, 07/05/13.)
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 521347
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Princess Siryna Adams
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Princess Siryna Adams filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Princess Siryna Adams
Proposed name: Princess Siryna Adams
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on July 24,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 06/07/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 06/06/2013
(Published, 06/21/13, 06/28/13
07/05/2013, 07/12/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256219
The following person is doing business
as: Maid Perfect, 340 Lake Merced Blvd.,
#6, DALY CITY, CA 94015 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: GLV
Group, INC., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 06/01/2013.
/s/ Gregorio L. Velarde /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/14/13, 06/21/13, 06/28/13, 07/05/13.)
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 521930
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Cho Cho Ma
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner,Cho Cho Ma filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
a) Present name: Cho Cho Ma
a) Proposed name: Dianne Ong
b) Present name: Naing Aung Lwin
b) Proposed name: Aaron Justus Lu
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on July 30,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 06/11/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 06/10/2013
(Published, 06/14/13, 06/21/13
06/28/2013, 07/05/2013)
27 Friday • July 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
BURLINGAME SCHOOL DISTRICT
REQUEST FOR STATEMENT OF QUALIFICATIONS AND PROPOSAL
FOR
BEFORE AND AFTER SCHOOL CHILD CARE SUPERVISION SERVICES
The Burlingame School District is requesting the submission of a statement of qualifications and
proposals from firms interested in providing before and after school child care and supervision
services at six (6) District elementary school sites.
Interested firms must submit a Proposal as described, with one (1) original and nine (9) copies
of requested materials to:
Burlingame School District Office
1825 Trousdale Drive
Burlingame, CA 94010
ATTN: Assistant Superintendent / Chief Business Official
FAX OR EMAIL RESPONSES WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
All Statements of Qualifications and Proposals must be received at the District Office at
the address above on or before August 9, 2013, no later than 2:00 p.m.
To obtain a copy of the Request for Statement of Qualifications and Proposal, interested firms
may visit the Burlingame School District website at www.bsd.k12.ca.us or stop by the District
Office at the address above to pick up a paper document.
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, July 5, 12, and 19, 2013
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256267
The following person is doing business
as: Diana Gomez, MFT, 439 Grand Ave.,
Ste. 206, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Diana Gomez, 1572 New-
bridge Ave., San Mateo, CA 94401. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 06/15/2013.
/s/ Diana Gomez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/14/13, 06/21/13, 06/28/13, 07/05/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256219
The following individual is doing business
as: 1) MARSHALL EDWARD MIKELS, 2)
MARSHALL E. MIKELS, 3) MARSHALL
MIKELS, 4) EDWARD M. MIKELS, 5)
EDWARD MIKELS, 6) MIKELS MAR-
SHALL E. 7) MIKELS MARSHALL ED-
WARD is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: MARSHALL EDWARD MI-
KELS 115 15TH Avenue San Mateo, CA
94402 and Marshall Edward Mikels 1625
Grant Road, Mount Shasta, California,
The business is conducted by an individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
10/21/1946. Ref: FBN-003002684-
F58739417-549628951-06/13/13
/s/ Marshall Edward Mikels /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/14/13, 06/21/13, 06/28/13, 07/05/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256460
The following person is doing business
as: Wild Beautiful Clothing, 343 Wood-
row, DALY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby
registered by the following owner: David
Louis Klein, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ David Klein /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/21/13, 06/28/13, 07/05/13, 07/12/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256464
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: White & Baldanzi Partnership,
3 Sara Lane, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070
is hereby registered by the following
owners: William White, same address &
Joseph Baldanzi, 9144 Quail Terrace Ct.,
Elk Grove, CA 95624. The business is
conducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ William White /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/21/13, 06/28/13, 07/05/13, 07/12/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256471
The following person is doing business
as: Sunrise Massage Center, 121 El Ca-
mino Real, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Sunrise Therapetic Massage Center,
LLC, CA. The business is conducted by
a Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Ying Wang/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/21/13, 06/28/13, 07/05/13, 07/12/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256033
The following person is doing business
as: Green Thumb For Hire, 2255 Capital
Ave., EAST PALO ALTO, CA 94303 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Amelia Uhila, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 04/01/2002.
/s/ Amelia Uhila /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/24/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/21/13, 06/28/13, 07/05/13, 07/12/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256296
The following person is doing business
as: MS Wireless & Audio, 1456 E. 3rd
Ave, San Mateo CA 94401 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Annas Al-
kanawi, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Annas Alkanawi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/21/13, 06/28/13, 07/05/13, 07/12/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256228
The following person is doing business
as: Gigi’s Boutique, 1365 Broadway,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Regina
Francis and William Francis, 529 28th
Ave. San Mateo, CA 94403. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Married Couple.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Regina Francis /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/28/13, 07/05/13, 07/12/13, 07/19/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256260
The following person is doing business
as: Bioffinity Research, 1900 S. Norfolk
St., Ste 350, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Dermeso, Inc, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Stephanie Sanchez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/28/13, 07/05/13, 07/12/13, 07/19/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256455
The following person is doing business
as: Destira, Inc, 116 El Camino Real,
San Carlos, CA 94070 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Destira,
Inc, CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
01/01/2013.
/s/ Jen Atkinson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/28/13, 07/05/13, 07/12/13, 07/19/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256627
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: The Shane Group, 2309 Woos-
ter, BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owners: 1) Hugo
Shane, Trustee Owner, 2309 Wooster,
BELMONT, CA 94002, 2) Karen Shane,
Trustee-Co, 2014 Mezes Ave., Belmont
CA 94002, 3) Robert Shane, Successor
Trustee, 126 14th ave. Kirkland, WA
98033, 4) Jo Ann Shane Trustee-Co,
6261 Collier Canyon Rd., Livermore, CA
94551. The business is conducted by a
Trust. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Karen Shane /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256642
The following person is doing business
as: Miss Chan Chan Kitchen, 179 Santa
Barbara, DALY CITY, CA 94014 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Wai
Yu Shirley Chan, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Wai Yu Shirley Chan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/05/13, 07/12/13, 07/19/13, 07/26/13.)
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Michael Gus Geraldi
Case Number: 123469
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Michael Gus Geraldi. A
Petition for Probate has been filed by
Marie J. Cohn in the Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo. The
Petition for Probate requests that Marie
J. Cohn be appointed as personal repre-
sentative to administer the estate of the
decedent.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: July 31, 2013 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28,, Room , Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo,
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. If you object to the granting of the
petition, you should appear at the hear-
ing and state your objections or file writ-
ten objections with the court before the
hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within four months from the date of first
issuance of letters as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 9100. The time for fil-
ing claims will not expire before four
months from the hearing date noticed
above. You may examine the file kept by
the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court
a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Harry Pedigo
120 N. El Camino
SAN MATEO, CA 94401
(650)344-7641
Dated: June 26, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on June 28, July 5, 12, 2013.
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #M-251022
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Hel-
en’s Nails, 3213 Oak Knoll Drive, RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94062. The fictitious
business name referred to above was
filed in County on 06/20/13 The business
was conducted by: Helen Vo Reilly.
/s/ Helen Vo Reilly /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 05/21/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 06/21/13,
06/28/13, 07/05/2013, 07/12/2013).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #M-246147
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: No-
vus Opti Lab, 3215 Dublin Dr., SOUTH
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080. The ficti-
tious business name referred to above
was filed in County on 08/09/11 The
business was conducted by: Gina E.
Tamayo.
/s/ Gina E. Tamayo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 06/17/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 06/21/13,
06/28/13, 07/05/2013, 07/12/2013).
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
210 Lost & Found
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, $90.,
(650)610-9765
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIER 5200 BTU window air conditioner
- never used, in box, $95. obo, (650)591-
6842
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WEBER BRAND Patio Refrigerator,
round top load, for beer, soda, and wa-
ter. $30 obo (650)591-6842
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $90.,
(650)596-0513
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
67 USED United States (50) and Europe-
an (17) Postage Stamps. Most issued
before World War II. All different and de-
tached from envelopes. All for $4.00,
(650)787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MENORAH - Antique Jewish tree of life,
10”W x 30”H, $100., (650)348-6428
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
298 Collectibles
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria
650-873-8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $700 obo
(650)766-3024
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HARMON/KANDON SPEAKERS (2)
mint condition, great, for small
office/room or extra speakers, 4 1/2 in.
high, includes cords $8., SOLD!
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center draw locks all comes with
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame SOLD!
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3 MEDAL base kitchen cabinets with
drawers and wood doors $99
(650)347-8061
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR (2), with arms, Italian 1988 Cha-
teau D'Ax, solid, perfect condition. $50
each or $85 for both. (650)591-0063
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
304 Furniture
COPENHAGEN TEAK dining table with
dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions. 48/88"
long x 32" wide x 30" high. $95.00
(650)637-0930
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
COUCH. GREEN Cloth with end reclin-
ers on both sides. Beverage holder in the
middle, $50 (650)572-2864
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 draw dresser 61" wide,
31" high, & 18" deep $50., (650)592-
2648
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
GLASS DINING Table 41” x 45” Round-
ed rectangle clear glass top and base
$85 (650)888-0129
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
LIGHT WOOD Rocking Chair & Has-
sock, gold cushions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
RECLINER ROCKER - Like new, brown,
vinyl, $99., SOLD!
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR with wood carving,
armrest, rollers, and it swivels $99.,
(650)592-2648
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEAK TV stand, wheels, rotational, glass
doors, drawer, 5 shelves. 31" wide x 26"
high X 18" deep. $75.00 (650)637-0930
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
WICKER ENTERTAINMENT CABINET -
H 78” x 43” x 16”, almost new, $89.,
(650)347-9920
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
3 PIECE fireplace set with screen $25
(650)322-2814
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, (650)578-9208
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
28 Friday • July 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Break the rules
6 “__ difference”
10 Apothecary’s
measure
14 Refuse
15 Buck
16 Quite
17 Update,
perhaps
18 Ingredient from
the garden
19 “Copacabana”
guy who “went a
bit too far”
20 Key
23 Eye-catching
wrap
25 __-tzu
26 Exorcism
targets
27 Key
31 Keep happening
32 Some tributes
33 Gus __, subject
of the 1951
biopic “I’ll See
You in My
Dreams”
34 Touch type?
36 Treaters of
boxers
40 __ novel
41 Three-time NFL
MVP
42 Key
47 Joseph
Kennedy’s
middle
daughter
48 Mark
Thackeray, to
his students, in
a 1967 film
49 Fleur-de-__
50 Key
54 Hip bones
55 Calamine target
56 Went a-courting
59 Period of
sacrifice
60 War god
61 __ football
62 Feminine suffix
63 6-Down rooms
64 Golf scorecard
word
DOWN
1 Lee side: Abbr.
2 Seuss title food
3 44-Down
accessory
4 Wintour of fashion
5 One prone to
falling
6 Hogwarts, e.g.
7 Smart __
8 A, ideally
9 Personifies
10 “The Sound of
Music” song
11 Large-horned
mammals
12 Trip up
13 Othello et al.
21 Flee
22 Push-up targets
23 Lab output?
24 Most fit for duty
28 Fifth-century
invader
29 Feature of
bluegrass
singing
30 Nutritional stat
34 Hodgepodge
35 Calvin of
comics, for one
36 Large vessel
37 Superhero’s
nemesis
38 Metal-measure
word
39 D.C. bigwigs
40 Prefix with liter
41 Like some
unfocused
looks
42 Popular ’80s-
’90s do
43 Consecrate, in a
way
44 3-Down wearer
45 Take stock of
46 Zip
47 System used for
most returns
51 Well-ventilated
52 Two stars, maybe
53 Asta’s “mom”
57 English fin
58 Court VIPs
By Robyn Weintraub
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
07/05/13
07/05/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
306 Housewares
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
1/2 HORSE power 8" worm drive skill
saw $40 OBO (650)315-5902
10" BAN Saw $75.00 (650) 347-8367
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
BLACK & DECKER CORDLESS 18 volt
combo drill, vacuum, saw, sander, two
batteries & charger, brand new, $95.
obo, SOLD!
BLACK AND Decker, 10” trimmer/edger
, rechargeable, brand new, $50
(650)871-7200
BOB VILLA rolling tool box & organizer -
brand new with misc. tools, $40. obo,
(650)591-6842
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTMANS PROFESSIONAL car buf-
fer with case $40 OBO (650)315-5902
308 Tools
CRAFTSMAN 14.4 VOLT DRILL - bat-
tery & charger, never used, $35. obo,
SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 3/8” 16.8 volt drill & vac-
uum combo, brand new, with charger,
$45. obo, SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DEWALT 18 volt battery drill with 2 bat-
tery & charger $45 OBO SOLD!
DREMEL HIGH SPEED ROTARY TOOL
- all attachments, never used, $25. obo
SOLD!
ELECTRIC HEDGE trimmer good condi-
tion (Black Decker) $40 (650)342-6345
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LADDER - 24' aluminum 2 section ladder
$20., SOLD
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 21” Belt Sander with long cord,
$35 (650)315-5902
MILLWAUKEE SAWSALL in case with
blades (like new) $50 OBO SOLD!
NEW DRILL DRIVER - 18V + battery &
charger, $30., (650)595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SANDER, MAKITA finishing sander, 4.5
x 4.5"' used once. Complete with dust
bag and hard shell case. $35.00 SOLD!
SMALL ROTETILLER 115 Volt Works
well $99.00 (650)355-2996
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
308 Tools
TORO ELECTRIC POWER SWEEPER
blower - never used, in box, $35. obo,
(650)591-6842
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $65 (650)341-8342
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
3 LARGE old brown mixing bowls $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History,
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
5 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $9. for all
(650)347-5104
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEO 75 with jackets 75 with-
out $100 for all, SOLD!
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
310 Misc. For Sale
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99., (650)580-
3316
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASTRONOMY BOOKS (2) Hard Cover
Cambridge Encyclopedia of Astronomy,
World of Discovery, $12., (650)578-9208
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14., (650)578-9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, $40,
(650)347-5104
BAY BRIDGE Framed 50th anniversary
poster (by Bechtel corp) $50
(650)873-4030
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection SOLD!
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY Jake AB Scissor Exercise Ma-
chine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
(650)578-9208
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOOD HEALTH FACT BOOK - un-
used, answers to get/stay healthy, hard
cover, 480 pages, $8., (650)578-9208
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HABACHI BBQ Grill heavy iron 22" high
15" wide $25 (650)593-8880
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model", $250., (650)637-0930
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LAUNDRY SORTER - on wheels, triple
section, laundry sorter - $19., (650)347-
9920
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12” L x
5”W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, (650)341-1861
310 Misc. For Sale
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW COWBOY BOOTS - 9D, Unworn,
black, fancy, only $85., (650)595-3933
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., (650)578-9208
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. White Rotary
sewing machine similar age, cabinet
style. $85 both. (650)574-4439
SLIDE PROJECTOR - Airequipt Super-
ba 66A slide projector and screen.
$50.00 for all. (650)345-3840
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STAINED GLASS panels multi colors
beautiful work 35" long 111/2" wide $79
OBO (650)349-6059
STAINED GLASS,
28”x30” Japanese geisha motif, multi
colored, beautiful. $200 (650)520-9366
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, (650)341-1861
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLKSWAGON NEW Beatle hub cap,
3, $70 for All SOLD!
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WEBER GO ANYWHERE GAS BARBE-
QUE - never used, in box, $40., SOLD!
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
311 Musical Instruments
GUITAR FOR sale. Fender Accoustic,
with case. $89.00 (415)971-7555
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
MARTIN D-18S 1971 Guitar $1500.
Great sound. Great Condition
(650)522-8322
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
ATTRACTIVE LADIES trench coat red,
weather proof size 6/8 $35
(650)345-3277
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
IONIC BREEZE quadra, Sharper Image,
3 level silent air purifier. 27”h, energy
saver, original box with video. Excellent
condition. $77. (650)347-5104
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS JACKET - size XXL, Beautiful
cond., med., $35., (650)595-3933
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW! OLD NAVY Coat: Boy/Gril, fleece-
lined, hooded $15 (415)585-3622
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
brand new, never worn for $25
(650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
150 COPPER spades for #6 strand.
Copper wire. $50.00 for all.
(650)345-3840
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
PVC SCHEDULE 80 connectors and
coupling. 100 pieces in all. $30.00 for all
(650)345-3840
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 AIR rifles, shoots .177 pelets. $50 ea
Obo (650)591-6842
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$25.(650)368-0748.
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
BIKE TRAINER Ascent fluid $85
(650)375-8021
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
29 Friday • July 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
318 Sports Equipment
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FOR SALE medium size wet suit $95
call for info (650)851-0878
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BAG with 15 clubs $35. SOLD.
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
KELTY SUPER TIOGA BACKPACK -
$40., (650)552-9436
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels, $85.
obo, (650)223-7187
ROWING MACHINE. $30.00
(650)637-0930
SCHWINN STATIONARY RECUMBENT
BIKE, $45., SOLD!
STATIONARY EXERCISE BICYCLE -
Compact, excellent condition, $40. obo,
(650)834-2583
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
TENT - one man packable tent - $20.,
(650)552-9436
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL EXERCISE- Pro Form 415
Crosswalk, very good condition $200 call
(650)266-8025
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40.,
(408)764-6142
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
SLEEP APNEA breathing machine com-
plete in box helps you breathe, costs $$$
sacrifice for $75, (650)995-0012
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
515 Office Space
SAN MATEO DRIVE beautiful Medical
Office space for rent only $75/day.
Paulsurinder1@yahoo.com
620 Automobiles
1996 FORD MUSTANG convertible
coupe automatic with 118k miles,looks
and drives excellent great summer car
#5002 on sale for low price of 4995.00
plus fees. (650)637-3900
1997 LEXUS LX 450 full size SUV with
152k miles 4x4 automatic with all power
& convenient options and 3rd row seat
clean Car Fax in excellent shape
#5011on sale for 8500.00 plus fees.
(650)637-3900
620 Automobiles
1998 JEEP Grand Cherokee limited 4x4
automatic with164k miles in new condi-
tions,fully loaded clean Car Fax #4507
on sale for only 4750.00 plus normal
fees. (650)637-3900
2000 DODGE Durango SUV slt 4x4 with
156k miles. In great conditions with 3rd
row seat, nice family SUV #5034 on sale
for 3995.00 plus fees. (650)637-3900
2001 TOYOTA Camry LE automatic se-
dan with 101k miles, lots of recent serv-
ices done, all power package clean Car
Fax #4516 sale price 4950.00 plus fees.
(650)637-3900
2001 MBZ ML320 mid size SUV with
133k miles all wheel drive with 3rd row
seat, black on black leather loaded v6
auto #4430 priced to sell quick 6995.00
plus fees (650)637-3900
2001 VW JETTA GLS Turbo stick shift 5
speed manual with 120k miles comes
with lots of safety and power options
#4504 on sale for 4500.00 plus fees.
(650)637-3900
2002 HONDA Civic EX coupe two door
automatic with 161k miles.clean car and
clean Car Fax . Loaded with
options#5047 priced at 5750.00 plus
fees. (650)637-3900
2002 VOLVO S80 sedan 4 door auto-
matic with 107k miles. Safe, roomy with
luxry.great conditions and lots of conven-
ient options #5040 on low price sale of
5995.00 plus fees. (650)637-3900
2004 SATURN Ion 3 sedan with 94k
miles.she comes with stick shift standard
transmission 4 door all power package
and great on gas, clean Car Fax #4521
on sale for 5850.00 plus fees. (650)637-
3900
AUTO REVIEW
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Automotive Section.
Every Friday
Look for it in today’s paper to find
information on new cars,
used cars, services, and anything
else having to do
with vehicles.
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
ACCURA 1997 3.0 CL CP Black, Auto-
matic $3300, (650)630-3216
620 Automobiles
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBIL”79Royal Delta 88, 122k
Miles, in excelleny Condition $1,800
(650)342-8510
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo Rob SOLD!
HONDA 1983 ASCOT VT 500 Motorcy-
cle, looks like 2012, must see. $1100,
obo, SOLD!
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $50. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
NEW MOTORCYCLE HELMET - Modu-
lar, dual visor, $69., (650)595-3933
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. SOLD!
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $60 for all
(650)588-7005
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPEAR tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Four steel
13in rims. Factory Hub Caps. $150. San
Bruno. SOLD!
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
670 Auto Parts
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Bath
TUBZ
Over 400 Tubs on display!
World’s Largest “Hands-On, Feet-In”
Showroom
4840 Davenport Place
Fremont, CA 94538
(510)770-8686
www.tubz.net
Asphalt/Paving
AIM CONSTRUCTION
John Peterson
• Paving • Grading
• Slurry Sealing • Paving Stones
• Concrete • Patching
We AIM to please!
(650)468-6750
(408)422-7695
Lic.# 916680
Cabinetry
Contractors
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Home repairs &
Foundation work
Retaining wall • Decks • Fences
No job too small
Gary Afu
(650)207-2400
Lic# 904960
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning Concrete
CHETNER CONCRETE
Lic #706952
Driveways - Walkways
- Pool Decks - Patios - Stairs
- Exposed Aggregate - Masonry
- Retaining Walls - Drainage
- Foundation/Slabs
Free Estimates
(650)271-1442 Mike
Construction Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
30 Friday • July 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Solas
Electric
Best Rates
On all electrical work
7 days a week
Free Estimates
(650) 302-7906
CA License 950866
Bonded and Insured
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
JOSE’S
COMPLETE GARDENING
Complete gardening &
Landscaping
Commercial & Residential
Licensed
Free Estimates
(650)315-4011
Gardening
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
Painting
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets,
Also, Electrical, Hauling
Carpet, Tile & Stucco
(650)461-0326
Lic# 983312
HAMZEH PLUMBING
5 stars on Yelp!
$25 OFF First Time Customers
All plumbing services
24 hour emergency service
(415)690-6540
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Cemetery
CRIPPEN & FLYNN FUNERAL
CHAPELS
Family owned & operated
Established 1949
Personalized cremation &
funeral services
Serving all faiths & traditions
Woodside chapel: (650)369-4103
FD 879
Carlmont chapel: (650)595-4103
FD 1825
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
Food
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
Food
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
LOCAL 31
Friday • July 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)868-0082
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
Health & Medical
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
Insurance
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
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By Juan Karita
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
COCHABAMBA, Bolivia —
President Evo Morales warned on
Thursday that he could close the
U.S. Embassy in Bolivia, as South
America’s leftist leaders rallied to
support him after his presidential
plane was rerouted amid suspi-
cions that NSA leaker Edward
Snowden was on board.
Morales again blamed
Washington for pressuring
European countries to refuse to
allow his plane to fly through
their airspace on Tuesday, forcing
it to land in Vienna, Austria, in
what he called a violation of inter-
national law. He had been return-
ing from a summit in Russia dur-
ing which he had suggested he
would be willing to consider a
request from Snowden for asylum.
Morales made his announce-
ment as the leaders of Venezuela,
Ecuador, Argentina, Uruguay and
Suriname joined him in the
Bolivian city of Cochabamba on
Thursday for a special meeting to
address the diplomatic row.
In a joint statement read after
the summit, the presidents
demanded an
e x p l a n a t i o n
and an apology
from France,
Italy, Portugal
and Spain. They
also said they
would back
Bolivia’s offi-
cial complaint
with the U.N.
Human Rights
Commission.
Latin American leaders were out-
raged by the incident, calling it a
violation of national sovereignty
and a slap in the face for a region
that has suffered through humilia-
tions by Europe and several U.S.-
backed military coups.
“United we will defeat American
imperialism. We met with the
leaders of my party and they asked
us for several measures and if nec-
essary, we will close the embassy
of the United States,” Morales said
in the city where he started his
political career as a leader of coca
leaf farmers. “We do not need the
embassy of the United States.”
Morales’ government has had a
conflictive relationship with
Washington.
It expelled the U.S. ambassador
and agents of the U.S. Drug
Enforcement Administration in
2008 for allegedly inciting the
opposition. The Andean nation
restored full diplomatic ties with
the U.S. in 2011. But relations
soured again amid mutual distrust
on drug war politics and hit an
especially low point after
Secretary of State John Kerry
referred to Latin America as
Washington’s “backyard” in April
2013.
Morales expelled the U.S.
Agency for International
Development in May for allegedly
seeking to undermine his govern-
ment.
Ecuadorean President Rafael
Correa said Thursday that he and
other leaders were offering full
support to Morales following the
rerouting of the plane, calling it
an aggression against the
Americas.
“We’re not going to accept that
in the 21st century there’s first,
second and third rate countries,”
Correa said.
“The leaders and authorities in
Europe have to take a lesson in
history and understand that we’re
not 500 years behind. This Latin
America of the 21st century is
independent, dignified and sover-
eign.”
Venezuelan President Nicolas
Maduro protested alleged attempts
by Spanish officials to search the
Bolivian presidential plane.
Argentine President Cristina
Fernandez said Latin Americans
treasured freedom after fighting for
their independence from Europe in
the 19th century and then surviv-
ing Washington’s 20th-century
history of backing repressive
regimes in the Americas.
She then demanded an apology
for the plane ordeal.
“I’m asking those who violated
the law in calm but serious man-
ner, to take responsibility for the
errors made, it’s the least they can
do,” Fernandez said. “To apolo-
gize for once in their life, to say
they’re sorry for what they’ve
done.”
Morales has said that while the
plane was parked in Vienna, the
Spanish ambassador to Austria
arrived with two embassy person-
nel and they asked to search the
plane. He said he denied them per-
mission.
“Who takes the decision to
attack the president of a South
American nation?” Maduro asked.
Spanish Prime Minister Mariano
“Rajoy has been abusive by trying
to search Morales’ plane in Spain.
He has no right to breach interna-
tional law. ”
Morales, long a fierce critic of
U.S. policy toward Latin America,
received a hero’s welcome in an
airport in the Bolivian capital of
La Paz late Wednesday night. His
return followed the dramatic,
unplanned 14-hour layover in
Vienna.
Bolivia’s government said
France, Spain and Portugal refused
to let the president’s plane
through their airspace because of
suspicions that Snowden was with
Morales.
Ahead of the meeting, Morales
had said that his ordeal was part of
a plot by the U.S. to intimidate
him and other Latin American
leaders.
He urged European nations to
“free themselves” from the United
States. “The United States is using
its agent (Snowden) and the presi-
dent (of Bolivia) to intimidate the
whole region,” he said.
Bolivia may close U.S. Embassy over Snowden spat
Edward
Snowden
32 Friday • July 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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