VALENTINO F.

ZUBIRI:
Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996
arts global impact

This book presents a comprehensive collection of Valentino Zubiri’s nudes done in 1995 and 1996. Artist’s crayons were used mostly on watercolor paper and some pastel paper. Some were painted using watercolor, pastel or oil. Between 1996 and the date of this publication (January 2008), the artist did not draw any other nudes and continued to refuse to sell any of his works.

This is an Evaluation Copy in PDF format. Not for print or sale.

VALENTINO F. ZUBIRI:
Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996

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ZUBIRI: Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 arts global impact .VALENTINO F.

including the images. both hardcover and paperback. and Pan-American Copyright Convention. unadulterated edition without financial gain. mechanical.O. Zubiri All rights reserved. or transmitted in any form. recording.valentinozubiri. Copyright under Berne Corporation. can be purchased. photocopying. No one is allowed to make changes without official written permission. Please refer to the websites above and at the last page of this copy for where the high-resolution printed edition of this book. has been set at 72 pixels per inch. You are allowed to share screen captures. IL 60611 www. The artist retains full copyright of the book and its contents and individual images for purposes that are commercial and otherwise. Chicago. stored in a retrieval system. It is illegal to use the book and its images.org Cover and Book Design by Valentino Zubiri Printed in the United States on the internet in its complete. by any means. for commercial purposes without the written permission of the publisher and the artist. or otherwise.copyright © 2008 Valentino F. in its entirety. allowed only to be shared . Universal Copyright Convention.artsglobalimpact. or in groups or individually.com www. This Internet Edition PDF File. No part of this book may be reproduced. Published by Arts Global Impact. P. with the purpose of promoting the download of the entire original book for personal viewing only. NOTE: This is an evaluation copy of the book. without prior written permission of the author and the publisher except in the case of reprints in the context of reviews. electronic.Box 11937.

To Mama & Papa .

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men and women. using onion skin. but I discovered other hobbies. It was like getting fat to the point where you could no longer cover it up. He increased my brother’s and my allowance when we got to high school. .INTRODUCTION These drawings did not just come instantly. we were middle class by Filipino standards. in the Philippines. Thanks to my interest in comic books. I was able to buy more. I first got into American comic books when I was a kid in the third grade. my family got introduced to a speed reading seminar. Sometimes. figures. My brother and I were the same grade level. my collection had become a box full. so we all got into reading. I got back to comic books. Thanks for your time. A book is a book. I did my best to make my drawings “perfect”—which meant drawing exactly like the comic books I had. I continued to buy and read comic books. Let me walk you through my years of getting into figure drawing. a booklet is a booklet. From speed reading came my early appreciation for publishing. and we read a lot. but I read fewer titles. my collection continued to grow into an additional box. I lied. but we read books. including arts and crafts. By the sixth grade. and then bought only a few when I can. My family was not rich. Around that time. My dad eventually discovered my stash. I had gotten better drawing. muscles and faces. Nevertheless. I began to draw By college. I started drawing comic book heroes. and threatened to throw all my comic books out! He said something about his money having been wasted by me. Allow me to explain how my mind worked and how I perceived this collection. I promised I would stop buying comic books. I borrowed comic books from friends to read. so I slowed down buying them anyway. I lightly traced the illustration. but I was going to school for a bachelors degree in biology. We read fast. being careful not to ruin any pages in my collection.

to read. I started to collect more than I bothered to read. This led me to regularly visit a nearby science fiction bookstore. no longer to collect. numerosity and quantity had weight. I came to the phrase. I started to collect the book covers because they had great. Once again. A toy has to meet “industry standard” to end up on the shelves of stores. As an adult. which had the teaser information of what the upcoming book was about. but as a pursuit. I discovered that publishers sent actual book covers to bookstores to announce their upcoming titles.” Merchandise. I also thought I had to come up with “perfect” art to be appreciated. Because I was also into art. but thanks to my speed reading skills. I called it a pursuit.” A book for example has to meet “industry standard” in order to get published and sell. because the covers included the front which had the cover art. In my mind. I started to collect non-sport trading cards by science fiction and . by pinning slick. they announced upcoming books. as the new book covers got posted. and the back. I would buy. I accumulated a huge box of book covers! This triggered another wave of compulsive behavior. but this time. Every month. Comic books were not exactly a thing of the past. It made sense. I collected books. The sci-fi bookstore had a huge corkboard. At this point. “industry standard. I got more into art. on the corkboard. not as a profession.That was how I thought. I got interested in science fiction—short stories and novels— my ”books” versus “booklets” perception of life. and they were free for the taking! In time. the previous ones got taken down and placed in a “Free” box that anyone can rummage through. I began collecting “stuff. and books about comic book and science fiction artists and art. but less than a profession. printed book covers sent by publishers. unbound. Art for me was now more than a hobby. I was no longer compulsively buying and collecting comic books. I also collected books on drawing and painting. unfolded. when I got to Chicago. There. I concluded that I had to meet “industry standards” to end up in a gallery. crisp art.

my compulsion to spend the money I earned from my office job around that time. So. the pastel pads. Meanwhile. Then it occurred to me to try to figure out how to use my most expensive paper. whatever it is. and I thought I would be able to do that using my more expensive paper. Do anything a hundred times. I realized I had to do art many times over to perfect my art. I later started to attend figure drawing classes organized by different people I came to know. There was an art supply store in downtown Chicago that was just a few blocks away from work. The store kept their doors open for months. but only for a short time. the drawing would have become perfect and acceptable. sometimes drawing paper pads. . but I compulsively bought a lot of art supplies. There are usually ninety trading cards to a set. also took me to art supply stores. like work in a factory. From collecting and the numbers game. The store announced that they were closing and going out of business. the watercolor blocks. for example. had accumulated enough artwork to warrant having trading cards of their works. I resolved to do a hundred drawings so that by the hundred and first. one would have become an expert. Since I had been painting using watercolor. In my case. I thought I was just being tricked into continuously buying their merchandise. Using ordinary paper was not right for me. as a joke. especially the watercolor blocks. skinning and deboning chicken. through their years of illustrating or painting. which they had on sale. This meant that the artists each had ninety (or more) acceptable art pieces that they had worked on through the years. that my magic number would be ninety. and by the hundred and first chicken. I started using ordinary paper.fantasy artists. in my mind. sometimes bond paper. and I kept on buying the watercolor blocks they had on their supposed “store closing” sale. I needed to “feel responsible” for my art. These artists. I walked in and bought watercolor blocks. I came to tell myself. rounded up to a hundred and first.

my money contribution to pay for the models and the venue. and reuse the paper. but I was not happy with the feel of the paper and I thought it was thin and can accidentally get folds and creases. In order to paint better. including the ones I didn’t like at all. I discovered a step-by-step way to keep myself inspired. I also had in mind to paint over my drawings later on. Comparing myself to my friends at the drawing sessions. After three hours of a figure drawing session. in order to get inspired doing the next stage after drawing—painting—the initial drawing should be inspiring enough. I kept my drawings.I also felt that I would just be wasting my time. I started using pastel paper. some of them were happy to leave. When I felt confident and happy with my drawing style. but I went from badly drawing figures to the style you now see in this book. So. The surface helped to “pixelate” my drawing crayons. The type of paper inspired me to draw better. I thought. with scribbles on just one sheet of paper. so I kept the ones which I thought were worthless. I discovered that I liked using watercolor paper for drawing because the surface was grainier or rougher than pastel or drawing paper. I immediately started using the watercolor blocks. including the ones which had a lot of mistakes. If I was to become serious about art. and paint better. it was easy to wash off the pigments using water. imperfect drawings. Without fixing the drawing crayons on the watercolor paper. I needed to meet industry standards! I don’t know what happened in my head. sometimes. I made sure that my drawing would inspire me to paint later. a lot of them could not draw at all. and the nudity of the models and their time by just drawing on cheap paper.” I can’t just be leaving with attempts! In time I collected a lot of drawings. or with rough sketches. They had three hours worth of “attempts. I had thought that I could easily erase and paint over the paper with the mistakes and ugly. I obviously quickly (but humbly) realized that I was better than most of them. which I stored in my portfolio. I did . They were mentally blocked.

trying different styles. I became the one to move and change vantage points. a few times. and drew to get better. The challenge was. it was the negative space as well. and even pink. It also turned out that watercolor paper was thicker. gray. I used dark sepia. I felt that a stable meeting point of lines should only consist of three lines. bulges.not want to show smooth. I wanted to be serious and professional about my art. for warming up. in my mind. 10 times. and then a final thirty-minute pose. like sixty seconds. then 15 minutes. easier to preserve. Time was money. I did not place a lot of emphasis on the hands and feet. The emphasis was on the torso. peaks and valleys of the human body. Then came another challenge. which usually lasted three hours. another “game” I had was avoiding the convergence of four or more lines to a single point. Aside from all this. and my materials were money. olive gray. However. Same thing with the hands. The paper was one flat surface. the group agreed to have the model pose for quick sketches. I don’t want to say that I probably had the most talent in those sessions. and it avoided accidental. and the poser posed longer than I cared to have. During the figure drawing sessions. like 5 minutes. unintentional folds and creases. I also added variety by using different colors from my collection of drawing crayons. I used serious paper. and then longer. If I . drawing the same subject with the same frozen pose from different angles and distances. We were just neighbors and/or friends passing the time artistically. Skin was also a single. as I saw it. light sepia. in foreshortening and shadowing to show the bumps. Later on. Because my friends drew slower than I did. continuous lines as much as I wanted to show coarse shadows and shadings. There were others in the group who spent their entire time attempting to draw the naked models’ faces! What the f--k? I resolved earlier on that drawing faces during figure drawing sessions served to slow me down. The sessions were never in an art school. My challenge was foreshortening and shadows. or mind game.

and possible pornography. I came to appreciate the spontaneity of the subjects. I came to appreciate the variety of body types in our figure drawing sessions. then I would use a point of four or more lines.wanted the eye of the viewer to move to an emphasized area. As you look at my work. not at the naked person who was in front of me for a brief moment. I got invited to a few group shows. but it is usually asked by those who are not in the art field at all. I don’t blame people who have asked me about any sort of awkwardness. or those whose religious beliefs have hindered their appreciation of art. in my eyes. but I call them my “Y’s” and “T’s. I experimented with colors and I also used oil paint. My challenge was to produce so people. My conscious challenge was to portray non-erotic naked figures. and what I was able to put on paper. Here is what could have been a challenge initially that never was. My art became the balance of what I saw. I have drawn what regular people might consider attractive. People would look at my works time and time again. My challenge was to avoid being pornographic. and I colored some of . I simply did not want to be erotic at all. My goal was to take the erotic element. I forget the correct art term to use.” I had also thought about coloring my drawings using watercolor. on watercolor paper and pastel paper. and I have also drawn not-so-attractive. erotic tension in the sessions and religious conflicts. notice that meeting points of lines result only from the meeting of three lines. myself included. Here’s a challenge that never was a challenge. I also tried pastel pigments on pastel paper after the initial use of drawing crayon. as naked art subjects. out. In a short time period. all of them became beautiful. men and women. It was not that I missed being erotic in the process. That was never a challenge. while it was even only in my mind. The latter should be reminded that even Rome and the Vatican has naked art. even before I started to place any pigment on the paper. would find the art in my works.

Some began to talk behind my back. I kept my fire going. Some were artists. I was disheartened. which had started to bulge. “Dishearten” and “discourage.my drawings for those shows. I placed all my drawings in my portfolio and forgot about them for a while. I thought others did as well. but I knew I had to find a way to bounce back. Thanks to massage. fashion people and other types of creative people. and the faces looked realistic and were just like the subjects. some were authors. and slowly. My address changed—I moved. Someone said I had quantity. . the first draft of which was finished in 2006. This was when massage came to my mind. I opened my portfolio and showed them what I had kept in my portfolio. which stretched to more than a decade. singers. because massage afforded me to move downtown. and discourage attacks the mind. I would touch the body. discouragements reached me. I became a masseur to discover the substance that my enemies claimed I lacked. I painted some portraits. some were involved in the sale of art. I drew the body from a distance. but it still affected me. They smiled perfectly. where most of my clients required me to be. I said it was to be my yin and yang. It was not like lost touch of my artistic abilities. actors. I appreciated my work. I was able to write a first full-length book. they did not smirk. Memoirs of an Artist as a Masseur. without drawing. With massage.” Dishearten attacks the heart. interior designers. They made me continue to pursue and dream. I met people. I did. Once in a while people who came to my place got a chance to view my works. but eventually hope to get better at drawing. I told everyone I was now a masseur to get back at my detractors. I got a little lazy. With figure drawing. Let me tell you two more words from my vocabulary. but I did not have substance and that I did not have my heart in my work. I think my portraits had acceptable hands. I want to say I laughed it off. but not necessarily discouraged. I continued other forms of art. near the hotels. I continued to design posters for a theater group where I volunteered.

thanks to my constant visits to these people and their galleries and studios. You can go to my websites or to the end of this book (this internet edition) for links to my gallery friends. I had had experience. I will write about my adventure with them as well. as expected. years ago. I went through a period of undiagnosed depression. In 2006. you will see a series of works by a single artist. I also started to visit other artists in Chicago. It is called Starbucks Saturdays. Here’s a thought that struck me.m. especially the higher end ones in the River North area. a gallery representative would meet them to take them to four galleries. was the same feeling. If you go to a gallery. Time came when the gallerists began to recognize my face and I made friends with a lot of them. . you will see all of the artist’s works through a longer span of time. I felt I had to move on. editing and laying out a monthly Filipino magazine in Chicago. where at 11 a. you will see a single work by an artist. because the visitors met at the nearby Starbucks. a gallery walk in Chicago that happened every Saturday. There was.After feeling that I had finished writing a book. Each gallery would give a short talk of what they were currently showing. From the theater group. I made a conscious decision to visit the Chicago galleries on a regular basis. the show would have usually changed. I had experience going through the process of designing and printing posters and souvenir programs. If you go to an artist’s studio. The book was done. One of these days. I felt that my mission of being a masseur was over. I felt like I had given birth to a giant baby. I’ll let you know when you get older. Back to the idea of my nudes in this book.. Because there were more than thirty galleries involved. by the time the walk comes back to the same gallery. and continues to be. made within a certain span of time. If you go to a museum. What I had felt. so I stopped being a masseur and became something else. but a full-length book about myself was so much more personal. maybe through his or her entire life.

which I myself could not believe were done by me—my “perfect. I did my best not to throw away my mistakes because of my compulsion to keep and collect. After all these years. earlier. I came back to look at my drawings and paintings from a decade ago. I also have works which I thought were perfect. and other people in the art field. I don’t want to sound narcissistic. duplicated nor repeated. and the later “realizations” and lessons I had gotten from galleries. and consider them like fingerprints. I realized that even the works which I had haphazardly done also tell a story of the moment I did them. that even the smudges which were accidental are important. . like the dedication of other artists who made at least ninety works. A drawing with “x” marks or smudges or a deliberate line that indicated that I saw the mistake that needed to be corrected. when I felt proud of my good works and when I wanted to trash the bad ones. industry standard” works. I still know the nude drawings that I didn’t like around the time I produced them—the ones which I thought had mistakes and were imperfect. By 2007. They are individuals. from two different points in time. whose trading cards I collected. This later time of reviewing my past works. They cannot be faked. or the best representation of an artist’s work. when all of them have become more valuable and told stories of a time in my life that had long passed.I also came to realize that the works displayed by museums and galleries do not necessarily have to be perfect. more than a decade later. Look at the grain of my drawings produced by the random coarseness of my materials. I appreciated them just as well. because I know my flaws. seemed to even be more memorable than the better ones. and now. other artists. I had the assumption that. The gallerists have taught me to look for stories in the pictures. that if I made a hundred works. or a bad drawing of hands and feet. my hundred and first would be perfect. It was a great experience to perceive my own works twice.

Other artists who had shown their works to me in their studios also taught me that I will not always come up with a perfect image, but it’s all a matter of perception. You will notice that a good number of the painted ones had been dated 1995. I painted some to show in 1995. I signed the rest 1996 when I decided not to paint on any drawings anymore. There’s one last thing, a confession, that I have to make. It’s 2008. In my upcoming book, Memoirs of an Artist as a Masseur, I became a masseur in my hopes of becoming better with figures. However, I also said in the book that I tended to procrastinate “creatively,” pursuing other creative endeavors to postpone drawing and painting. The last serious nude I remember drawing was in 1996. Maybe this year, 2008, I will begin to draw nudes again. Wish me luck. So consider this book, not as a collection of perfectly drawn nudes, but as a collection of works from a portfolio. From a slice in time. As you look at the images, please remember the elements and stories from this introduction. Finally, to those who tried to detract me, I do have substance, even right from the start. Thanks for your time! Valentino F. Zubiri January 2008

VALENTINO F. ZUBIRI:
Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996

. 24” x wd. 18” crayon on watercolor paper.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 19 ht.

20 Valentino F. 24” x wd. Zubiri: ht. 18” crayon on pastel paper. .

Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 21 ht. . 24” x wd. 18” crayon on pastel paper.

. 24” x wd. 18” crayon on pastel paper. Zubiri: ht.22 Valentino F.

Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 23 ht. . 18” crayon on watercolor paper. 24” x wd.

24” x wd. Zubiri: ht. 18” crayon on watercolor paper. .24 Valentino F.

24” x wd. 18” crayon on watercolor paper.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 25 ht. .

. 18” crayon on pastel paper. Zubiri: ht. 24” x wd.26 Valentino F.

Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 27 ht. . 24” x wd. 18” crayon on pastel paper.

Zubiri: ht. . 24” x wd.28 Valentino F. 18” crayon on pastel paper.

Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 29 ht. 24” x wd. . 18” crayon on watercolor paper.

. Zubiri: ht. 24” x wd. 18” crayon on watercolor paper.30 Valentino F.

24” x wd.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 31 ht. 18” crayon on watercolor paper. .

24” x wd. Zubiri: ht.32 Valentino F. 18” crayon on pastel paper. .

18” crayon on watercolor paper.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 33 ht. . 24” x wd.

34 Valentino F. . 18” crayon on watercolor paper. Zubiri: ht. 24” x wd.

18” crayon on watercolor paper. .Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 35 ht. 24” x wd.

Zubiri: ht. 24” x wd. .36 Valentino F. 18” crayon on watercolor paper.

Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 37 ht. . 24” x wd. 18” crayon on watercolor paper.

. 18” crayon on watercolor paper. 24” x wd. Zubiri: ht.38 Valentino F.

24” x wd. 18” crayon on watercolor paper. .Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 39 ht.

24” x wd.40 Valentino F. 18” crayon on watercolor paper. . Zubiri: ht.

Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 41 ht. 18” crayon on watercolor paper. . 24” x wd.

42 Valentino F. Zubiri: ht. 24” x wd. . 18” crayon on watercolor paper.

Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996

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ht. 24” x wd. 18” crayon on watercolor paper.

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Valentino F. Zubiri:

ht. 24” x wd. 18” crayon on pastel paper.

Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996

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ht. 24” x wd. 18” crayon on watercolor paper.

Zubiri: ht. 24” x wd. .46 Valentino F. 18” crayon on watercolor paper.

. 18” crayon on watercolor paper. 24” x wd.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 47 ht.

24” x wd.48 Valentino F. Zubiri: ht. 18” crayon on watercolor paper. .

24” x wd. . 18” crayon on watercolor paper.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 49 ht.

18” crayon on watercolor paper. 24” x wd.50 Valentino F. Zubiri: ht. .

Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 51 ht. 18” crayon on pastel paper. . 24” x wd.

18” crayon on pastel paper. .52 Valentino F. Zubiri: ht. 24” x wd.

Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 53 ht. . 24” x wd. 18” crayon on watercolor paper.

24” x wd.54 Valentino F. . 18” crayon on watercolor paper. Zubiri: ht.

24” x wd. .Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 55 ht. 18” crayon on pastel paper.

24” x wd. . Zubiri: ht. 18” crayon on watercolor paper.56 Valentino F.

18” crayon on watercolor paper. .Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 57 ht. 24” x wd.

18” crayon on watercolor paper. . 24” x wd. Zubiri: ht.58 Valentino F.

. 24” x wd.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 59 ht. 18” crayon on watercolor paper.

24” x wd.60 Valentino F. Zubiri: ht. . 18” crayon on pastel paper.

24” x wd. 18” crayon on pastel paper.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 61 ht. .

Zubiri: ht. .62 Valentino F. 24” x wd. 18” crayon on pastel paper.

Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 63 ht. 18” crayon on pastel paper. . 24” x wd.

24” x wd. 18” crayon on pastel paper. Zubiri: ht.64 Valentino F. .

18” crayon on pastel paper.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 65 ht. . 24” x wd.

Zubiri: ht. 24” x wd.66 Valentino F. . 18” crayon on watercolor paper.

.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 67 ht. 24” x wd. 18” crayon on watercolor paper.

24” x wd. 18” crayon on watercolor paper. Zubiri: ht. .68 Valentino F.

Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 69 ht. 24” x wd. 18” crayon on watercolor paper. .

18” crayon on watercolor paper. . 24” x wd. Zubiri: ht.70 Valentino F.

. 18” crayon on watercolor paper. 24” x wd.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 71 ht.

24” x wd. . 18” crayon on watercolor paper.72 Valentino F. Zubiri: ht.

. 24” x wd. 18” crayon on watercolor paper.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 73 ht.

74 Valentino F. . 24” x wd. Zubiri: ht. 18” crayon on watercolor paper.

24” x wd.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 75 ht. 18” crayon on watercolor paper. .

Zubiri: ht.76 Valentino F. 24” x wd. . 18” crayon on watercolor paper.

18” crayon on watercolor paper.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 77 ht. 24” x wd. .

. 24” x wd.78 Valentino F. Zubiri: ht. 18” crayon on watercolor paper.

Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 ht. 79 . 24” dark sepia drawing crayon on watercolor paper. 18” x wd.

80 Valentino F. . Zubiri: ht. 18” x wd. 24” crayon on watercolor paper.

18” x wd. 24” crayon on watercolor paper. .Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 81 ht.

Zubiri: ht.82 Valentino F. 18” x wd. 24” crayon on pastel paper. .

24” crayon on watercolor paper.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 83 ht. 18” x wd. .

84 Valentino F. 24” crayon on watercolor paper. 18” x wd. . Zubiri: ht.

.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 85 ht. 24” crayon on watercolor paper. 18” x wd.

24” crayon on watercolor paper.86 Valentino F. Zubiri: ht. 18” x wd. .

24” crayon on watercolor paper.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 87 ht. . 18” x wd.

24” crayon on pastel paper.88 Valentino F. 18” x wd. Zubiri: ht. .

Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 89 ht. . 18” x wd. 24” crayon on pastel paper.

Zubiri: ht. . 24” crayon on pastel paper. 18” x wd.90 Valentino F.

18” x wd. . 24” crayon on pastel paper.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 91 ht.

24” crayon on watercolor paper.92 Valentino F. . Zubiri: ht. 18” x wd.

. 18” x wd.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 93 ht. 24” crayon on pastel paper.

Zubiri: ht. 24” crayon on watercolor paper. . 18” x wd.94 Valentino F.

Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 95 ht. 18” x wd. 24” crayon on watercolor paper. .

Zubiri: ht. 18” x wd. .96 Valentino F. 24” crayon on watercolor paper.

18” x wd. 24” crayon on watercolor paper. .Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 97 ht.

24” crayon on pastel paper. 18” x wd. Zubiri: ht.98 Valentino F. .

18” x wd. .Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 99 ht. 24” crayon on pastel paper.

Zubiri: ht. . 18” x wd.100 Valentino F. 24” crayon on watercolor paper.

Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 101 ht. 18” x wd. . 24” crayon on watercolor paper.

102 Valentino F. 24” crayon on watercolor paper. . Zubiri: ht. 18” x wd.

. 24” crayon on watercolor paper.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 103 ht. 18” x wd.

Zubiri: ht. 24” x wd. .104 Valentino F. 18” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper.

. 18” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper. 24” x wd.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 105 ht.

18” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper.106 Valentino F. . Zubiri: ht. 24” x wd.

18” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 107 ht. . 24” x wd.

. Zubiri: ht. 18” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper.108 Valentino F. 24” x wd.

24” x wd. 18” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper. .Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 109 ht.

. 18” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper.110 Valentino F. Zubiri: ht. 24” x wd.

. 24” x wd.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 111 ht. 18” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper.

112 Valentino F. 24” x wd. . 18” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper. Zubiri: ht.

Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 113 ht. . 18” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper. 24” x wd.

24” x wd. 18” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper.114 Valentino F. . Zubiri: ht.

18” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper. 24” x wd. .Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 115 ht.

18” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper.116 Valentino F. Zubiri: ht. . 24” x wd.

Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 117 ht. . 18” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper. 24” x wd.

118 Valentino F. 18” watercolor and crayon on pastel paper. Zubiri: ht. . 24” x wd.

18” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper. 24” x wd. .Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 119 ht.

120 Valentino F. 18” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper. . 24” x wd. Zubiri: ht.

18” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper. .Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 121 ht. 24” x wd.

122

Valentino F. Zubiri:

ht. 24” x wd. 18” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper.

Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996

123

ht. 24” x wd. 18” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper.

124

Valentino F. Zubiri:

ht. 24” x wd. 18” oil and crayon on pastel paper.

Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 125 ht. 18” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper. 24” x wd. .

. 24” x wd. Zubiri: ht. 18” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper.126 Valentino F.

Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 ht. 18” x wd. 127 . 24” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper.

. 24” crayon and oil on pastel paper. Zubiri: ht. 18” x wd.128 Valentino F.

129 . 18” x wd. 24” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 ht.

Zubiri: ht. . 18” x wd.130 Valentino F. 24” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper.

24” pastel and crayon on pastel paper.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 ht. 131 . 18” x wd.

10” crayon on watercolor paper.132 Valentino F. . Zubiri: ht. 14” x wd.

14” x wd. . 10” crayon on watercolor paper.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 133 ht.

. Zubiri: ht.134 Valentino F. 14” x wd. 10” crayon on watercolor paper.

14” x wd. 10” crayon on watercolor paper.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 135 ht. .

Zubiri: ht. .136 Valentino F. 14” x wd. 10” crayon on watercolor paper.

. 14” x wd.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 137 ht. 10” crayon on watercolor paper.

10” x wd. 14” crayon on watercolor paper.138 Valentino F. Zubiri: ht. .

Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 139 ht. 14” crayon on watercolor paper. . 10” x wd.

. 14” crayon on watercolor paper.140 Valentino F. Zubiri: ht. 10” x wd.

14” crayon on watercolor paper. 10” x wd. .Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 141 ht.

.142 Valentino F. 14” crayon on watercolor paper. Zubiri: ht. 10” x wd.

10” x wd. 14” crayon and pencil on watercolor paper. 143 .Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 ht.

. 14” pencil on watercolor paper. Zubiri: ht. 10” x wd.144 Valentino F.

.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 145 ht. 10” x wd. 14” pencil on watercolor paper.

146 Valentino F. 10” x wd. 14” crayon on watercolor paper. . Zubiri: ht.

147 . 10” x wd. 14” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper.Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 ht.

148

Valentino F. Zubiri:

ht. 10” x wd. 14” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper.

Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996

ht. 10” x wd. 14” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper.

149

150

Valentino F. Zubiri:

ht. 10” x wd. 14” watercolor and crayon on watercolor paper.

.

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Zubiri: Memoirs of an Artist as a Masseur .ValentinoZubiri. including “$2. has not reached Chicago in a big way.com. . You must be aware that the art bubble.4M” (The Goal) t-shirts and wall clocks www.Spring 2008 Lessons from a Psychic Surgeon.CafePress. Zubiri: Memoirs of an Artist as a Lab Rat. Memoirs of an Artist as a Masseur .com and other cellphone / numeric keypad websites If You are Looking to Collect Art from Chicago Galleries and Artists: Please go to www. which I took from my digital camera.com www.-) .com www. Zubiri: Nude Drawings and Paintings from 1995 to 1996 . but my joke is that I hope to be the first one represented by all.com .org www. www.com for a list of Chicago-based galleries and artists which I endorse and plan to write about soon. The Seven Incredible Healing Chapters from the Book. if there is one. None of them represent me. The Second Book from the Memoirs of an Artist Series More Works by Valentino F.a0d0.ChicagoArtMovement.ArtsGlobalImpact. www. Zubiri Chicago Galleries and their Artists Chicago Artists Who Dared Websites: www.Books by Valentino F.MassagePeople.a site with videos of art talks from some Chicago Galleries.org and www.ChicagoArtMovement. A lot of works are affordable and definitely collectible.Spring 2008 Coming Soon by Valentino F.ArtsGlobalImpact.ValentinoZubiri.com/BananaQ You can buy stuff here.Spring 2008 Valentino F.

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