P. 1
دکوراسیون1

دکوراسیون1

|Views: 11|Likes:
Published by rahmani bagher

More info:

Published by: rahmani bagher on Jul 09, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/20/2014

pdf

text

original

An ITP Business Publication | Licensed by Dubai Media City

August Vol.6 Issue 8

DE SIG ND UO
AN EX CL US IVE IN TE Bo T H ld n EL ew A
TE ST ’S

RV

IE W

BE

Le

ba I R U ne s T
DE

ba thr TR E
ND SU

WI

TH

an SI G N dm a RE V O rk s
LU T IO N

el

oo ms NC O
VE

ER

WA

NB

OU

RE

D

RO

UL

LE

C

CONTENTS

August 2010
VOLUME 6 ISSUE 8

05 11

DESIGN UPDATE INDUSTRY SPEAK
Has the economic slowdown left a glut of highly-skilled designers on the market, or is finding highquality staff as challenging as ever? CID finds out.

15

DESIGNER Q&A
An exclusive interview with Erwan Bouroullec, one half of design’s most famous duo.

05

15

22 28

22

FEATURE
Uncovering the eight most important trends currently impacting bathroom design.

28

CASE STUDY
The newly-renovated Sofitel Rabat Jardin des Roses is brimming with Moroccan motifs. CID takes a look inside.

34

DESTINATION FOCUS
The low-down on Lebanon’s interior design industry, including a look at Beirut’s latest design landmark, Le Gray Hotel.

39

KITCHEN SUPPLIERS YOU SHOULD KNOW
A handful of kitchen suppliers that you should know.

45

PRODUCTS
A showcase of new products, including Novecento, Noah, Pasha and Silhouette.

55

CONTRACTS
Your monthly guide to contract tenders in the region, provided by Ventures Middle East.

56

OPINION
The changing face of wallpaper, by Björn Nilsson.

www.constructionweekonline.com

Commercial Interior Design | AUGUST 2010

1

FORM FOLLOWS FLOW.
Lb3, design Ludovica+Roberto Palomba
Bathroom Culture since 1892 www.laufen.com
LAUFEN SHOWROOMS IN THE MIDDLE EAST Bahrain: Al Abbas Gallery +973 17741919 alabbas@batelco.com.bh Iran: Farbar +98 21 88 03 6364 sales@farbar.ir Jordan: Izzat Musa Marji & Sons Co. +962 65 52 02 84 info@marji.jo Kuwait: Arte Casa Trading Co. +965 4848 000 info@artecasa.bz Lebanon: Georges Nassr +961 1 482 462 georgesnasr@zahleh.com Oman: Ahmed Mohsin Trading L.L.C. +968 248 17 019 sware@amtoman.com Qatar: M.S.K Building Material +97 44 440 051 info@mskqatar.com Saudi Arabia: Articasa +96 6 2252 4402 (Jeddah), +96 6 1480 0720 (Riyadh) info@articasa.biz Syria: Uni Group +96 31 15 32 67 00 unigroup@net.sy United Arab Emirates: German Home for Bathrooms & Kitchens +971 4 268 9993 info@germanhome.net Yemen: Abu Al-Rejal Trading Corp. +967 1 272 519 sanitary@abualrejal.com

COMMENT

Registered at Dubai Media City PO Box 500024, Dubai, UAE Tel: 00 971 4 210 8000 Fax: 00 971 4 210 8080 Web: www.itp.com Offices in Dubai & London ITP BUSINESS PUBLISHING CEO Walid Akawi Managing Director Neil Davies Managing Director ITP Business Karam Awad Deputy Managing Director Matthew Southwell Editorial Director David Ingham EDITORIAL Senior Group Editor Stuart Matthews Editor Selina Denman Tel: +971 4 210 8502 email: selina.denman@itp.com ADVERTISING Sales Manager Leigh Roche Tel: +971 4 210 8679 email: leigh.roche@itp.com Business Development Manager, Saudi Arabia Rabih Naderi Tel: +966 1 2068697 email: rabih.naderi@itp.com STUDIO Group Art Editor Daniel Prescott Art Editor Simon Cobon PHOTOGRAPHY Director of Photography Sevag Davidian Senior Photographers Efraim Evidor, Jovana Obradovic Staff Photographers Isidora Bojovic, George Dipin, Murrindie Frew, Lyubov Galushko, Shruti Jagdesh, Mosh Lafuente, Ruel Pableo, Rajesh Raghav PRODUCTION & DISTRIBUTION Group Production Manager Kyle Smith Deputy Production Manager Matthew Grant Production Coordinator Nelly Pereira Managing Picture Editor Patrick Littlejohn Distribution Manager Karima Ashwell Distribution Executive Nada Al Alami CIRCULATION Head of Circulation & Database Gaurav Gulati MARKETING Head of Marketing Daniel Fewtrell Marketing Manager Annie Chinoy ITP DIGITAL Director Peter Conmy Internet Applications Manager Mohammed Affan Web Designer Meghna Rao ITP GROUP Chairman Andrew Neil Managing Director Robert Serafin Finance Director Toby Jay Spencer-Davies Board of Directors K M Jamieson, Mike Bayman, Walid Akawi, Neil Davies, Rob Corder, Mary Serafin Circulation Customer Service Tel: +971 4 210 8000 Certain images in this issue are available for purchase. Please contact itpimages@itp.com for further details or visit www.itpimages.com Printed by Emirates Printing Press L.L.C. Dubai Subscribe online at www.itp.com/subscriptions Audited by: BPA Worldwide Average Qualified Circulation: 6,944 (July - December 2009)
The publishers regret that they cannot accept liability for error or omissions contained in this publication, however caused. The opinions and views contained in this publication are not necessarily those of the publishers. Readers are advised to seek specialist advice before acting on information contained in this publication which is provided for general use and may not be appropriate for the reader’s particular circumstances. The ownership of trademarks is acknowledged. No part of this publication or any part of the contents thereof may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form without the permission of the publishers in writing. An exemption is hereby granted for extracts used for the purpose of fair review.

Consumer is king
or all its protestations, and all its efforts to become more sustainable, the design industry is inherently wasteful. Good design, as we all know, is design that lasts. It is durable enough to withstand the test of time; it is functional and intuitive; and it is aesthetically pleasing but independent of short-term fads. A truly well designed product is one you’ll want to keep for years. Nonetheless, there are still plenty of companies out there that purposefully produce sub-standard products with a limited lifespan, feeding into a frenzy of mass consumption. It’s what Philippe Starck, in his characteristically brash but poignant way, refers to as the Kleenex society: “Buy, put in the garbage, Buy, garbage. Buy, garbage.” For Erwan Bouroullec of the famed Bouroullec brothers, this is one of the greatest challenges facing the design world at present. CID met Bouroullec during the Middle East launch of the brothers’ latest creation, Axor Bouroullec, last month. “I think the design world is fighting against big manufacturers that make products that shouldn’t exist. I think that there are too many companies that make things that are not done very well,” he said. Electronic goods for the kitchen are a prime example. In many cases, they are of distinctly low quality, with a lifespan of only a year or two. They are designed badly on purpose, just to keep them cheap. It is time for the consumer to instigate change, Bouroullec insisted. “I think we really have to make people understand that it is important to buy the right product, because behind the act of buying lies a really important politic,” he said. “In France, some of the most interesting products for me are organic food products. When you buy organic vegetables or meat, I think there is a really good deal between the producer and the customer, and vice versa.” This is evident in the fact that the customer is happy to buy better vegetables, even though they might not all be the same shape and size, or perhaps haven’t been washed properly. The customer is even willing to accept that they might not get some produce whenever they want it. The point is that they know that they are getting quality, and that is what really counts. This attitude should be extended to all of the products that we buy – from coffee machines to of fice desks. The consumer is king after all, and should be using that power to great effect.

F

SELINA DENMAN, EDITOR selina.denman@itp.com

Published by and © 2010 ITP Business Publishing, a division of the ITP Publishing Group Ltd. Registered in the B.V.I. under Company number 1402846.

Receive Commercial Interior Design every month. To subscribe, please visit: www.itp.com/subscriptions

Cover image: Vegetal Chair, by Paul Tahon and R & E Bouroullec.

www.constructionweekonline.com

Commercial Interior Design | AUGUST 2010

3

DESIGN UPDATE

Material boy
CID SPE AKS TO DAVID COLLINS, A PIONEER OF MINIM ALIST LUXURY
UK : Courage, passion and a willingness to work are the greatest attributes that an interior designer can have, according to David Collins, founder of the David Collins Studio and designer of iconic projects such as The Claridges Bar, The Connaught Bar, The Blue Bar at the Berkeley Hotel and Restaurant Gordon Ramsay. “I am not afraid of any of these, especially hard work. That’s what people find surprising when they enter this industry, that it is very hard and requires great focus and tenacity,” he said. Collins started his career as an architect, before shifting his focus to interior architecture. His work is defined by intelligent use of materials, lateral thinking and attention to detail, he explained. “I think that one of the characteristics of my work, and the thing that people respond well to, is the choice of materials,” Collins continued. “People always say that I define luxury without making it vulgar, as well as paying great attention to detail. These are the things that are subliminally transmitted to the client and to the user,” he said. “My definition of minimalist luxury, which is a phrase I coined many years ago, is really letting a space and volume follow the dictates of the light and architecture. It’s also having a strong concept with attention to detail and a carefully balanced choice of colours. Every piece of furniture or art should be chosen because of its suitability.” Situated at the top end of the market, the David Collins Studio has remained largely unaffected by the economic slowdown, Collins explained. “We tend to work at the luxury end of the design market and so our work (which is of course always commerciallybased, and has to come in on time and on budget) is doing quite well. We are enjoying a surge of interest from overseas.” The Middle East is of particular interest, although Collins is focusing on a very specific segment of the market. “I was quite inspired by some of the work that I saw in the Middle East, and the scale of some of the projects is really amazing,” he said. “I think that, as with everything, time will tell which projects become iconic and associated with their location and size. “The Middle East is a market that is of interest to me, but I am working on a more focused and refined area in the Middle East – areas where luxury and originality are part of the scale of a project. I want to do things beautifully, and this means working on projects that aren’t too enormous.” Ultimately, it is this pursuit of beauty that drives and defines Collins’ creativity. “My dream project is to have somebody enthusiastically collaborate with me to create something really unique and beautiful. When working on projects, I can look at designs which seem very interesting, but I always ask myself: ‘Is it beautiful?’ That’s the test.”

www.constructionweekonline.com

Commercial Interior Design | AUGUST 2010

5

DESIGN UPDATE

Light years ahead
DUBAI FEST IVAL CIT Y HOT EL S TO REPL ACE ALL LIGHT ING WIT H LED SOLUT IONS
UAE: InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG) properties at Dubai Festival City are in the process of replacing all of their interior lighting with LED solutions. A total of 35,000 light points – in hotel rooms, suites and public areas – will be replaced with sustainable alternatives. This is phase two of a project that has already seen the InterContinental and Crowne Plaza hotels replace all of their exterior façade lighting with LED solutions. The hotels are partnering with Philips to bring this project to fruition. As a result of this initiative, the hotels will reduce their carbon emissions by two million kg per year, and will minimise their energy costs by some 50%, explained Tom Lord, hotel manager, InterContinental Dubai Festival City. “We have done this for a number of reasons – one is to become a market leader in the field of green. Secondly, to be honest, the lighting that we had on the outside of the building was failing in certain areas and the existing lighting solution just didn’t have any longevity. But mainly, we did this because we thought it was the right thing to do. We are on a big drive to be a more responsible business and lighting was one area that we could really start with,” said Lord. This new endeavour is in line with existing green initiatives at the IHG Dubai Festival City properties, which include aggressive recycling of all hotel waste, the use of a Lexus LS600 hybrid car for guest transfers, and the annual Whatever Floats Your Boat competition, which raises money for local environmental charities. While the hospitality industry is becoming increasingly aware of its environmental responsibilities, large-scale initiatives such as those undertaken by IHG are still relatively rare, noted Louis Hakim, chairman, Philips Middle East and vice president, Royal Philips Electronics. “The hospitality industry is now more aware of the environment, whether on a local or global level. The Dubai Department of Tourism and Commerce Marketing is currently promoting various efforts to make sure that this segment is leading the way to green. “Philips is also active by conducting workshops and lighting audits in several hotels in Dubai, creating awareness, educating end users, and providing them with a wide variety of energy ef ficient lighting solutions to support their drive to be more sustainable enterprises. Having said that, so far very few have followed IHG’s footsteps and embarked on comprehensive programmes to become greener in their own right,” Hakim noted. Apart from anything else, being green makes good business sense, Lord explained. “If you are a hotel in the Middle East, or anywhere in the world, your clients now want you to be greener. Your clients want to be linked with hotels that are responsible in that way, so I think we will see a bigger shift. “The hotel industry is only going the same way as everybody else is. We are all moving towards awareness of the environment and the fact that there do need to be changes. But also, there are such fantastic solutions out there right now that you’d be crazy not to,” Lord pointed out. “When you can change a halogen for an LED bulb and it lasts you 14 times longer, why wouldn’t you? You don’t have to change your light bulbs as often and you don’t spend as much money. It just makes sense,” he concluded.

6

AUGUST 2010 | Commercial Interior Design

www.constructionweekonline.com

DESIGN UPDATE

Linked in
T HE ANDALUCIAN-T HEMED YA S LINKS GOLF COURSE CLUBHOUSE WA S INSPIRED BY T HE VERY OLDEST FORM OF GOLF
UAE: A links course, the very oldest form of golf course, is traditionally found in a costal setting, buried amid sand dunes. First developed in Scotland and Ireland, links courses tend to be characterised by uneven fairways, thick rough and small, deep bunkers, with few water hazards and even fewer trees. It was these original Celtic courses that inspired the design of Abu Dhabi’s Yas Links Golf Course – and, consequently, the Yas Links Golf Clubhouse. “We had a very flat piece of land; we dredged the channel and used the material from the channel for the rough earthworks of the golf course,” explained Chris White, general manager of the Yas Links Golf Course. “Our golf course architect Kyle Phillips, who is based in California, has specialised in designing links golf courses. We wanted to create a piece of Scottish or Irish coastline that replicated a links golf course, and that’s what we’ve done,” he continued. A course inspired by such traditional influences deserved a carefully-considered clubhouse. “It was very important that the clubhouse architecture aligned itself with the history of the golf course and links golf, so rather than having a really modern contemporary clubhouse, we went down the route of a sort of Andalucian villa,” White explained. “Of course, traditionally, that type of home had quite high ceilings and was very cooling, using lots of stone and natural products. It is purposefully not a massive clubhouse – it is 6,500m², which is quite small for a golf clubhouse. But what that has created is an intimate and warm and almost homelike feeling where you can sit and relax. If you are on your own you feel comfortable and if you’re in a group you feel comfortable.” The clubhouse started its life as a blank piece of paper in an LA meeting room in July 2008. “We literally put in a bar, restaurant, lockers, pro-shop and lobby, and we built the design around those facilities. Then the architect put his structural and aesthetic skill to it but, again, we’ve got what I believe to be a very functional space,” said White. Simon Black, an interior designer at Enigma Design, who was sub-contracted to work on the project, explained how the Andalucian theme extended into every aspect of the design, from furniture down to knick-knacks. For example, custom-made duck figurines capture the rural essence of links golf, while a classic chess board manufactured by Laing Joinery, with pieces from a market in Antalya, Turkey, creates a homely feel. “We found some bits and pieces in Granada in Spain and Indigo Living supplied the furniture. We had most of the furniture custom made, so we described what we wanted and they made it for us,” Black explained. Indigo Living was responsible for all FF&E and OS&E. This included the manufacture, supply and installation of all interior and outdoor furniture at the clubhouse, including artwork, accessories, rugs and soft furnishings. In addition, Indigo was responsible for the provision of everything from cutlery and crockery in the restaurants to staff uniforms.

8

AUGUST 2010 | Commercial Interior Design

www.constructionweekonline.com

KITCHENS CABINETRY WARDROBES BATHROOM VANITY SETS WOODEN DOORS SCHOOL FURNITURE

s KITCHENS CABINETRY IN MDF AND HPL / ALUMINIUM s AUTHORIZED DISTRIBUTORS OF TEKA GERMANY KITCHEN APPLIANCES s INTERNAL AND FIRE-RATED WOODEN DOORS AS PER CIVIL DEFENSE REQUIREMENTS s BATHROOM VANITY SETS IN MOISTURE RESISTANT MDF s SCHOOL FURNITURE, LOCKERS, CABINETRY, WALL PANELLING, RECEPTION COUNTERS, ETC. s FABRICATED IN UAE, AS PER UAE REQUIREMENTS

s FABRICATED COMPLETELY ON CNC MACHINES FROM GERMANY AND ITALY s COMPLETE “SUPPLY AND FIX” PACKAGE s OVER 30 YEAR’S WORK EXPERIENCE WITH KITCHENS, WARDROBES, DOORS AND SCHOOL FURNITURE IN GERMANY s TOTAL SOLUTIONS, IN LINE WITH YOUR SPECIFIC PROJECT REQUIREMENTS, AND AS PER UAE NORMS AND PRACTICES s PROFESSIONALIZED AND TIMELY DELIVERIES AND SERVICES

GERMAN TECHNOLOGY - MADE IN THE U.A.E
Khoie Industries L.L.C. | P.O. Box 14535 | Ras Al Khaimah, U.A.E. | Tel: +971 7 2444377 | Fax: +971 7 2444378 | Email: industries@khoie.com

VISIONARY? Yes.
That’s why we innovate.

WE USE ROCKET SCIENCE TO ELIMINATE MANUFACTURING WASTE.
Our products may be floor-based, but our ambitions are sky-high! By using NASA technology, we’ve developed an inventive new way to cut carpet tiles, which reduces waste by 80% and eliminates 310 tonnes of waste material each year.

w w w.i n t e r f a c e f l o r. e u / l e t s b e c l e a r

TM

INDUSTRY SPEAK

Recruiting right
HAS THE ECONOMIC SLOWDOWN LEFT A GLUT OF SKILLED DESIGNERS ON THE MARKET, OR IS FINDING HIGH-QUALIT Y STAFF AS CHALLENGING AS EVER? CID SPEAKS TO THE HEADS OF FOUR DUBAI-BASED DESIGN FIRMS TO FIND OUT.
ecruitment has long been a bugbear for Dubai-based interior design firms. When the market was booming, finding quality design staff was notoriously dif ficult; keeping them loyal was even more of a challenge. When the economic slowdown first hit, many companies were faced with the unsavoury task of slashing their workforce. Even those that didn’t have to downsize were forced to stop, take stock and consolidate, making for a decidedly stagnant employment market. Dubai-based design firm, Bluehaus, opted to take a cautious, long-term approach to the market, and hasn’t employed any new staff over the last six months. “As management we have a longevity responsibility to the business and our customers and as such have focused on working with the team that we have built up over ten years,” said Ben Corrigan, design principal, Bluehaus. However, with the first stirrings of renewed confidence being felt in the market, this is set to change. Bluehaus will be looking to recruit new team members in the final quarter of the year, as part of its 2015 growth plan. “We have always believed in hiring as part of a growth strategy, as opposed to knee-jerk during busy periods. Over 65% of our customers are repeat customers, and like the consistency in our team. It gives them confidence,” Corrigan explained. Meanwhile, Dubai-based Design Work Porfolio is currently looking to hire a document controller and a midlevel interior designer. This follows the hiring of seven new members of staff over the last six months. Global Design Interiors, part of the Al Reyami

1

R

2

3

Group, is also currently looking to fill a number of positions, with vacancies for a design director, senior designer, client relationship manager, project managers, business development people and general of fice assistants currently open. Edward Smith, director of Global Design Interiors, is looking for candidates with applicable experiences, excellent communication skills and the ability to “wear many hats”. “They must be motivated from within, not by the paycheck. And they must understand our commitment to the client and to the schedule,” Smith explained. According to Christian Merieau, managing director, Middle East, of Samuel Creations, potential recruits must obviously be intelligent, with a controlled creativity and the capacity to both listen and understand. “They should also be well travelled with a strong cultural and artistic background,” he said. As companies begin to jump-start their recruitment processes, they could be forgiven for expecting to find a glut of high-quality candidates on the market – a by-product of last year’s lay-offs and a depressed recruitment market. But that’s not necessarily the case, according to Martin Wojnowski, design principal, Design Work Porfolio. Highlevel candidates are still extremely hard to come by, he maintained. “Finding the right people to fill our vacancies is still a challenge. It seems like the best candidates have retained their positions throughout the economic slump and they are not considering a career move,” Wojnowski said. “In response to our job adverts we receive hundreds of CVs. Only a handful get shortlisted. Quite often the

1 Ben Corrigan. 2 Christian Merieau. 3 Martin Wojnowski.

www.constructionweekonline.com

Commercial Interior Design | AUGUST 2010

11

INDUSTRY SPEAK

selected ones do not make it through the probation period,” he said. Wojnowski looks for candidates with knowledge of local FF&E markets, good budgetary awareness, the ability to develop intricate design details, exceptional documentation ability, proficiency in graphic software and, above all, good design instincts. But finding employees that are experienced in high-end commercial work is notoriously dif ficult, he explained. “We are working on high-end, commercial interior design projects,” he said. “The specific character of the projects, as well as our clients, poses various recruitment challenges. Very few locally-available candidates understand the specific nature of contemporary international hotel design standards. They are not acquainted with the appropriate references.

factor between two equally strong candidates,” said Corrigan. “Expertise and experience are the key drivers, but we also look for strength of character and passion. I have always been a big believer that expertise and experience are underutilised commodities without character and passion,” he added. Getting the right mix of personalities is particularly crucial if you are trying to build up a coherent team, Global Design Interiors’ Smith noted. “The most challenging aspect is personality assessment, because everything else can be verified,” Merieau agreed. “Due to the strong mix of nationalities in Dubai it is crucial that each new employee is ready to make the necessary effort to communicate and understand others. Sheer creativity, if not communicated properly, is useless,” he said.

Designers are usually disastrous managers. Staff feel insecure and pressured in a negative way. The atmosphere in the studio is often toxic.
“Their understanding of design in the commercial sense is limited as well. Applicants usually come from a contracting background or other design firms with no exposure to high-end international projects. Very few candidates are well oriented in the locally available materials, finishes, furniture or lighting,” Wojnowski maintained. While recruitment companies are a popular tool when it comes to finding new staff, this is still a market that relies heavily on word of mouth, networking and personal recommendation. Companies are now also capitalising on new, web-based recruitment channels, using sites such as Dubizzle to attract prospective employees. However, regardless of the chosen channel, finding the right people is still a tricky business. “Recruitment is not an exact science and regardless of how stringent your recruitment policy is, decisions need to be made and gut feeling is occasionally the deciding While effective recruitment is a universal challenge, there are aspects of the local market that make it even more dif ficult in this part of the world, Corrigan suggested. “Predominantly because we live in an incredibly transient part of the world and employ based on longterm strategy as opposed to short-term contracts. Long-term in the UAE can mean two years. Due to this, personal circumstances can play an important role in the decision making process.” However, for Merieau, the cultural diversity of the region more than makes up for its transient nature. “There is a wide variety of competencies and cultures. Most importantly, job seekers come here with the right attitude and an enormous appetite for success. The only dif ficulty is finding designers with a true knowledge of classic craftsmanship,” he maintained. “The general market we work in has attracted high-quality people over the years to the region, providing a

pool of reasonably-skilled designers and project managers,” Smith agreed. “However this is undermined by the transient tendencies of the workforce, so creating a high performance workforce is reasonable; keeping it together is the challenge.” Staff retention may be slightly easier when your competitors are no longer lining up at the door to poach your best talent – but that doesn’t mean that employers can afford to be complacent. After all, staff retention has little to do with economic conditions and much to do with how a firm is managed and run. “I feel that many design firms suffer from serious management issues,” said Wojnowski. “Designers are usually disastrous managers. Staff feel insecure and pressured in a negative way. The atmosphere in the studio is often toxic. Staff feel they have no clear direction. “I remember myself working for one such Dubai company. The management was disorganised and deeply arrogant at the same time. Eventually, they faced the challenge of staff and client retention,” he recalled. According to Merieau, effective employers should offer their staff absolute respect, honesty and fairness, as well as providing them with a sense of belonging, and giving them the opportunity to take charge, while being supported by the management. Bluehaus also prides itself on its staff retention record. “We are very proud of our team retention,” said Corrigan. “We believe this is a reflection of our corporate culture, based on strong core values. We look after our team, and they look after the Bluehaus brand and our customers. Transparency, trust, integrity and a good working environment are all fundamentally important to the wellbeing of your team; that’s why they stay.” But this represents an investment – of time, money and energy. “We have employed the services of a success and leadership coach for 2010, Mick Todd. Mick continues to work with each team member, across the hierarchy,” Corrigan detailed. “We are big believers in investing in training at all levels, particularly during dif ficult times.”

12

AUGUST 2010 | Commercial Interior Design

www.constructionweekonline.com

www.constructionweekonline.com

Brothers in arms
CID MEE T S ERWA N BOUROULLEC

Commercial Interior Design | AUGUST 2010

DESIGNER Q&A

15

Portrait Port rait by O Ora a Lind Lindal. al.

DESIGNER Q&A

2

16

AUGUST 2010 | Commercial Interior Design

www.constructionweekonline.com

DESIGNER Q&A

3

4

5

oftly-spoken and distinctly low-key, Erwan Bouroullec is one half of design’s most dynamic duo. Brothers Erwan and Ronan Bouroullec burst onto the scene in 1997, when their Disintegrated Kitchen debuted at Salon du Meuble in Paris and caught the attention of Giulio Capellini. Today, the brothers collaborate with some of the biggest names in the industry: Vitra, Kvadrat, Magis, Kartell, Established and Sons, Ligne Roset, and Issey Miyake, to name but a few. Voted Designers of the Year at Salon du Meuble in 2002, the Bouroullec brothers have garnered countless industry awards and accolades, including the Finn-Juhl Prize in 2008, and have
5

S

had numerous exhibitions and books dedicated to their work. CID caught up with Erwan Bouroullec in Istanbul last month, at the Middle East launch of Axor Bouroullec, the brothers’ latest creation. A collaboration with Axor, the designer arm of German bathroom manufacturer, Hansgrohe, the new collection took six years to develop and represents the Bouroullec brothers’ first real foray into bathroom design. The new collection is defined by a sense of freedom, with a total of 85 elements that can be configured in countless different ways. “The advano ce tage of the open system is that we force ey people to ask themselves what they g really want. This collection is going ed to be a catalyser of dialogue,” noted

Philippe Grohe, head of the Axor brand. “No longer do mixers only have to be placed in the centre of the rear rim of the washbasin.” Instead, fittings can be freely arranged almost anywhere within the washing area – on the integrated shelves, in front or next to the wash basin, or on the wall. The wide, sturdy, white shelves play a central role in the collection, forming a consistent element in terms of design, functionality, serviceability and convenience. Smooth, simple, organic shapes make this a warm,

2 Bouroullec Pelota, by Paul Tahon and R & E Bouroullec. 3& 5 Bouroullec Blossoming and Bouroullec Bell, by Paul Tahon. 4 A drawing by Erwan and Ronan Bouroullec. 5 The brothers, by Morgane Le Gall.

www.constructionweekonline.com

Commercial Interior Design | AUGUST 2010

17

DESIGNER Q&A

6 6&9 Axor Bouroullec is warm and organic. 7&8 The collection is characterised by its versatility. 10&11 It is made up of 85 elements. 12 (overleaf) Bouroullec Bells by Paul Tahon. 13&14 (overleaf) Bouroullec Clouds by Paul Tahon and R & E Bouroullec.

uncluttered and intuitive bathroom solution. “The collection is made of simple building blocks. It’s not a Ferrari, just something really well done. A certain poetry comes out of it as the different elements come together. The beauty is in the combination,” said Erwan Bouroullec. “I think sometimes the error in contemporary faucet design is that things are too complicated. If everything is over-designed, in the end you get a very noisy environment. We take a very different approach.” CID sat down with Bouroullec to find out more about this approach. How is designing a bathroom different to designing other products? We were really focused on the question of how to find a language that would bring quality to every element in the collection, without needing to reinvent the idea every time. Because of this, during the development, I think we probably designed three or four full collections but we kept having to change direction because we realised that while some elements were strong, some were very weak. It is very dif ficult to find a DNA that you can apply across an entire collection. Also, we were really obsessed with the idea that it should be designed well, with beautiful lines, but on the other hand we really wanted it to be quite sensual and warm. Design is sometimes too cold. And especially in the bathroom, where the

body is exposed, we really didn’t want to create a cold atmosphere. Were there things that you wanted to do but weren’t possible technically? Actually, it wasn’t technically that we had problems, it was more culturally. There are some things that are too wild for the market. Is the bathroom an area that you’d like to work in again? For now we need to let this collection live, and we need to understand people’s reactions. We have to see what works and what doesn’t. It might be that giving people so much choice is an error. They might not be interested in playing. But in principal, yes I would.
7

What other projects are you currently working on? There is a tableware collection that we designed for Alessi, which we will show in September or October, so we are just working on the very last details. There are some companies that we always work with, such as Magis, Vitra and Ligne Rosset. The other things are a bit more of a secret! Are there any companies that you haven’t worked with but would like to? I would love to work with Flos, the lighting company. Also, I would be quite interested in working in electronics but this is quite a conceptual interest because I know that the reality of this work is not easy.
8

18

AUGUST 2010 | Commercial Interior Design

www.constructionweekonline.com

DESIGNER Q&A

One of our qualities is being independent and we also have quite a small studio – seven people including me and Ronan – so we are not really in a position to do that kind of work. How dif ficult is it to stay independent and small? Actually, it is very simple. But you need to make your choices accordingly. For example, we are quite often asked to design hotels or things like that, which we more or less always refuse, because the scale is probably too big for us. We couldn’t control everything, so we prefer to say no. It’s not that we are not interested, it is more that we get the impression that it wouldn’t be the best working conditions for us. You refer to yourself as a control freak. Is that part of your success? Yes. Firstly we like to stay in control but also, we like to be responsible for shooting the products once they are ready. Nearly all our products are shot by us, as are our promotional videos. I spoke recently with someone who asked if it was normal for us to do everything and I said I think so; because at the end of the day, we are the ones that conceived the element so we are quite keen on trying to explain our point of view. Sometimes the concept, and the Axor Bouroullec collection is a good example, is not straightforward. It is not usual to encourage the consumer
9 10

Philippe Grohe, head of the Axor brand, on working with the Bouroullec brothers.
Why did you choose to partner with the Bouroullec brothers? They have a unique approach to design. This was the first time in ten years that I wasn’t addressing a product designer who was also involved in interior design and architecture. If you look at what the Bouroullec brothers have done over the last few years, you realise that with their product designs they influence spaces. If you look at the Alcove sofa, which they created with Vitra, you can say it’s a nice-looking sofa, and you either like it or you don’t. But if you put two of those together, you make a meeting room. You influence space. What sets Axor Bouroullec apart? We stopped the project twice. Once it was a mutual decision and the other time it was me; I didn’t feel comfortable. And we were right to do so because in the end they came up with something incredible. Axor Bouroullec is not a modular product. It is a product that can react to architecture; a product that can be customised to how the user wants to handle water. You can optimise your choice between functionality and aesthetics, or between functionality and originality. As Erwan says, the advantage of an open system is that you make people ask themselves questions about what they actually want. So they start thinking. And

that’s one of the best services we could offer them. Obviously, the freedom to compose is also the freedom to make mistakes so there are a lot of challenges with this, but you also know that it is real innovation. At Milan this year, you could see that there was a new seriousness. Function is becoming more important. Total craziness has totally disappeared. Something human, with meaning, is becoming important again. That is all evident in this collection. Is this level of customisation something that people are demanding? This has been one of the so-called mega trends for about two years now, but we recognised it six years ago when we first started working with Erwan and Ronan. People have been saying for 30 years that the consumer is king. Before industrialisation, products were made by craftsmen. And those craftsmen made your product, for you. This came at a very high price and at very uneven quality. It came with lots of problems but also produced fantastic results. Industrialisation gave us an enormous gain in quality and an enormous ef ficiency in price. This is why it worked so well and for so long, and obviously we needed it. But now, more and more, we are looking at (and this is what Ronan and Erwan are the first and the best at) how with industrial quality, you can give people the freedom and the choice to reinvent the product for themselves. Because then you have the best of both worlds.

11

www.constructionweekonline.com

Commercial Interior Design | AUGUST 2010

19

DESIGNER Q&A

to play with things, to move things around. And it’s really important to explain it properly because if you don’t, people can become a little afraid of it. I think it’s part of our success to offer a strong conceptual proposition, but at the same time Axor Bouroullec is still quite simple for people that are not highly interested in design. It’s not something complicated. My mother could work it out! What are the greatest challenges facing designers right now? I think the design world is fighting against big manufacturers that make products that shouldn’t exist. I think that there are too many companies that make things that are not done very well. For example, if you take electronic accessories for the kitchen, coffee machines and things like that, most of them are built to last for one or two years. They are not done well enough in terms of quality, and that’s just to reach a lower price point. I think we really have to make people understand that it is important to buy the right product because behind the act of buying lies a really important politic. When you buy something it is really quite a strong political act. In France, some of the most interesting products for me are organic food products. When you buy organic vegetables or meat, I think there is a really good deal between the producer and the customer, and vice versa. It shows in the fact that the customer is happy to buy better vegetables, but at the same time doesn’t mind that they are not all the same size, or maybe aren’t clean and will need to be washed, or that you can’t get tomatoes throughout the year. This is how things should be in the future. People should understand the reality behind a product and when they buy, they should do it consciously, so they know exactly what they are doing and why they are doing it. But doesn’t design essentially feed into mass consumerism? I think, on our side, that we have never really addressed mass consumerism

because we have never been asked to. I would quite like to. If I was asked to design something by Ikea or someone like that, I would with pleasure. What I find quite interesting in the world is that things can travel – pictures, concepts but also products. When we design, we think with a certain universality. At the same time, I know that there won’t ever be millions and millions of pieces produced. We don’t need one company making all of the world’s taps, after all. What’s your favourite interior space? It’s quite dif ficult to say. I think my favourite space is still my flat in Paris. Just because it belongs to me, and so I feel at ease. It’s my private place for myself and my wife and daughter. It’s for us. And I would do anything inside that space to build a better life for the three of us. But then, I definitely love spaces that have a connection with the landscape – water, for example. I think it is a great quality that you can also achieve in a city. In Istanbul, for example, where you have the Bosphorous, or in Copenhagen where the sea goes right into the city, you get a lot of perspectives and very wide spaces. I like those kinds of spaces. Where I live in Paris, unfortunately, I don’t have those kinds of qualities. What is the best thing about working with your brother… and the worst? I think one of the best things about working with each other is we challenge each other and we discuss things a lot. I think it’s quite dif ficult when you are alone to get distance from what you do. Because there are two of us we have this ability to question ourselves, which is more challenging but produces better results. One of the problems is that what we do is really important to Ronan and me. It’s a really big part of what we are so sometimes disagreements can be quite painful to live with. Maybe that’s part of being creative. If we had a company that dealt with truck logistics, perhaps I would be less engaged and it would impact my personal life less!

12

13

14

20

AUGUST 2010 | Commercial Interior Design

www.constructionweekonline.com

Discretion is the secret of good design.

A sanitary system with a concealed cistern.

Concealed systems from Geberit save space by integrating the cistern and pipes in the wall. This is not only more attractive, but also easier to clean. www.geberit.ae

Y&R GROUP

FEATURE: BATHROOMS

Top bathroom trends
CID HIGHLIGHTS T HE MOST IMPORTANT T RENDS CURRENT LY SHAPING BAT HROOM DESIGN
rom its humble beginnings as a purely utilitarian space, the bathroom has evolved into a personal retreat, a model of water ef ficiency, a testing ground for new materials, and a place where big-name designers can showcase

F

their creativity. A host of new and exciting trends continue to guide the transformation of the bathroom, placing it at the very forefront of intelligent, contemporary design. Over the next few pages, CID uncovers some of these trends.

1

22

AUGUST 2010 | Commercial Interior Design

www.constructionweekonline.com

FEATURE: BATHROOMS

2

Colour me happy
Bathrooms used to be characterised by their distinct lack of colour, but the tide has turned. Bold, bright hues are making their mark, replacing the muted, understated tones of old. In keeping with this trend, Roca has introduced Khroma, a collection of bathroom accessories available in passion red, street and silver grey, and oxygen blue. “Roca has brought colour back into the bathroom,” said Victor Schoone, country manager, Middle East, Roca. “We give people the opportunity to keep the sanitaryware white but to bring colour in, in the form of colourful toilet seats and covers and furniture.” No longer confined to just tiles and accessories, colour is also making a break for the sanitaryware. Villeroy & Boch recently extended its Loop & Friends washbasin line to include the trendy new shades of Espresso, a strong brown, and Cassis, a striking violet. When it comes to colour, black is experiencing a particular surge in popularity. Laufen identified this trend early on and responded by launching its Ilbagnoalessi Dot range in matte black ceramic. Created by Dutch architect Wiel Arets, the Ilbagnoalessi Dot bathroom is characterised by its clear, architectonic traits. Duravit also recently relaunched one of its most successful collections, Vero, in an eye-catching, high-gloss black. With its classically angular design, the collection is a pioneer of purist form. Also picking up on the monochromatic trend is Cosmic, which recently launched black and white gloss finishes for its Flow faucet collection.
1 Laufen has launched its Ilbagnoalessi Dot range in black. 2 Villeroy & Boch’s Loop & Friends collection is now available in Cassis, a striking violet.

3

Material gains
Bathroom manufacturers are also experimenting with a growing range of materials and textures. New Italian bathroom furnishings brand, Zaninelli Bagni, has launched a collection carved from natural stone. The CNC Collection was designed by Mr Smith Studio in Milan and includes single and double washbasins, countertops, built-in or floor standing basins, shower receptors and bathtubs. Meanwhile, Ceramica Cielo has extended its Jungle collection of decorated bathroom fittings with new iguana, pony and crocodile inspired products. Additions to the ten-strong collection include iguana in white, the black and piebald pony, Cocò Blanc, or white crocodile, and Cocò Retro, a vintage grey crocodile effect. Ceramico Cielo also recently launched the X-Tech finish, which is highly resistant to corrosion and abrasion. The finish can be used to coat the Jungle fittings, making them suitable for any kind of commercial setting.

3 Zaninelli Bagni has launched a collection in natural stone.

www.constructionweekonline.com

Commercial Interior Design | AUGUST 2010

23

FEATURE: BATHROOMS

4

High-profile par tnerships
A key trend currently sweeping through the bathroom sector are tie-ups between bathroom manufacturers and high-profile designers. This includes collaborations with leaders in architecture, interior and product design, but also with globally-renowned fashion designers. Roca, for example, recently announced that it was teaming up with Giorgio Armani to create a new bathroom concept. The Armani Roca bathroom will consist of an entire interior design solution, including not only furniture but lighting, wallcoverings and ceiling treatments. It will be available in exclusive stores as early as 2011. “This is a unique thing in the bathroom business, and a very exciting thing for Roca,” commented Schoone. Hansgrohe is another company that has always been happy to form strategic partnerships with design leaders, having worked with Patricia Urquiola, the Bouroullec Brothers and Antonio Citterio, among others. Meanwhile, Duravit recently partnered with Philippe Starck to create the Sensowash shower toilet. The discrete shower-toilet seat boasts an unusually slimline design, while technical components have been miniaturised so that the entire shower technology fits between the ceramic body and the seat. A stainless steel spray wand extends out from the seat when the bidet function is activated. Water temperature, water volume and spray wand position can all be individually adjusted, via a hand-held remote.

4 Starck’s Sensowash.

Sustainably sound
Arguably the most important trend to impact bathroom design is sustainability. Bathroom companies are placing sustainability at the forefront of their agendas and investing in developing products that are long lasting, efficient and environmentally friendly. Intelligent companies are taking a multi-pronged approach that involves lowering their footprint as a business, with more intelligent manufacturing processes and facilities; creating new and innovative products that contribute in lowering energy and water consumption; and using their global positioning to educate consumers on the importance of sustainability. Kohler recently launched its sustainable Vas ceramic faucet in the Middle East. The sculpted faucet uses nearly half the water of traditional faucets, and offers a return on investment in less than four years. It consumes just 5.68L of water per minute, compared to traditional faucets that consume an average 8.32L/min, reducing water consumption by approximately 45%. The base solid-colour model has a pitcher-like vitreous china spout that provides graceful water flow, and a sculpted, curved handle that resembles a drooping flower stem. The Vas is also available in three painted, high-design pieces, Cerana, Imperial Blue and Silkweave. “Kohler’s aim is to help its customers to act responsibly on behalf of the planet by offering ef ficient products designed to help consume only what is necessary – without sacrificing comfort, design or performance. Kohler’s dedication to the environment is comprehensive,” said Mohamed Nada, regional marketing manager for Kohler in the Middle East.

5 6

5&6 Kohler’s Vas faucet.

24

AUGUST 2010 | Commercial Interior Design

www.constructionweekonline.com

FEATURE: BATHROOMS

Extreme comfor t
Much has been written about the bathroom’s transformation into a personal haven. Distancing itself from its purely functional roots, the bathroom has blossomed into a personalised wellness retreat. This is particularly notable when it comes to the showering experience. Kohler recently launched Katalyst, a shower that simulates the large, heavy drops of a summer downpour. Constructed from solid brass, Katalyst spray technology utilises a unique air induction ball joint designed to generate large water droplets that provide users with an intense hydrotherapy experience. Also designed to offer a varied and indulgent showering experience is Kohler’s Flipside hand shower. Featuring Kohler’s innovative Flipstream technology, the Flipside sprayface rotates on an axis, with each of the four sides of the sprayface being dedicated to a different kind of spray. This allows for four totally unique experiences: Koverage, for a traditional, everyday shower with maximum water coverage; Kotton, a dense, enveloping downpour; Komotion, a drenching spray delivered in a circular pattern; and Kurrent, which provides a focused and invigorating massage spray. As the personal wellbeing trend becomes more and more prevalent, companies are coming up with increasingly creative ways to transform the bathroom into a private retreat. No matter what the space available, Effegibi can design and furnish a personal wellbeing area to meet individual needs. With a fully customised Turkish bath option now available, users can enjoy extreme relaxation in the comfort of their own home. Installable in any shower or Turkish bath, Effegibi’s latest creation is the Touch&Steam digital touch display, which lights the glass and lets the user choose from a variety of functions for steam, colourtherapy and hot air circulation. A more traditional option is the Finish-designed Sky Line sauna, which has a glass ceiling and front-decorated panel for a sleek, modern look. The home sauna can be fitted with custommade decorative laser-cut wood panels.

7 8

7 Kohler’s Katalyst. 8 Wellbeing solutions from Effegibi.

9

Technologically advanced
Another factor shaping bathroom design is technology. “We are seeing a move towards greater functionality as hi-tech conveniences which form part of daily life are emulated in the design and function of sanitary fixtures and fittings,” said Guy Wilson, head of the Gulf, Geberit international sales. As such, Roca will soon launch a hi-tech version of its Khroma collection, Khroma Robot. With electronics incorporated into the vitreous china of the sanitaryware, users can control the shower and bidet function, and open, close and even heat up the seat and cover.
9 Roca is launching a hi-tech version of its Khroma collection.

www.constructionweekonline.com

Commercial Interior Design | AUGUST 2010

25

FEATURE: BATHROOMS

Versatility
As customers become more designorientated, they are demanding greater flexibility and adaptability in the products they select. Increasingly challenging space plans are also putting pressure on bathroom manufacturers to create products that are flexible and easy to install. Geberit has responded with the Monolith. “The elegantly designed Geberit Monolith is a perfect alternative to toilets with visible cisterns. It is compact and flexible, opening up a nearly unlimited application range,” said Geberit’s Guy Wilson. “It can be combined with floorstanding or wall-hung toilets. It fits into any bathroom construction situation. Installation of the entire system is completed in a single operation, with the new installation ready for use within just a few hours.” Promoting a brushed aluminium and glass finish, Monolith is characterised by clear, simple lines. “With its slim profile, the Monolith can be fitted into almost any bathroom without impinging on space. It is ideal for the retro-fit market as it conceals marks from previous floor-standing pans and there is no need for any complex plumbing alterations.” Meanwhile, Laufen has extended its Living City series to include new basins, WCs and bidets. The collection, which is synonymous with geometric, minimalist lines, now includes a 60cm washbasin, with an additional 90cm easy-to-clean shelf to keep bottles, creams and soaps within easy reach. The ceramic shelf is available either on the right or the left hand side of the basin and can be cut to size at the factory, making it perfect for demanding layouts and niches. The collection also now includes, for the first time, a square WC and bidet.

10 11

Unashamed elegance
As the bathroom has moved away from a purely functional role, the aesthetic quality of fittings has increased radically. Manufacturers are focusing on creating finely-crafted, sculptural elements that introduce a touch of glamour. Zucchetti’s Bellagio series, available from Bagno Design, is inspired by an aristocratic, dolce vita style, crafted from chrome-plated brass with Satin, Tuscan and Platinum finishes. Traditional elegance is also at the heart of Bagno Design’s exclusive Sophia range of bathroom products. With soft flowing lines, this range comes with an option of lever or cross handles, and a full range of accessories to match. Tiles also create a dramatic addition to the bathroom setting. Glamour tiles by Kronos add a rich flavour to any space. Opulent tiles can be set against simply-designed bathrooms, such as the new KS collection by Italian company Karol. This bathroom furniture collection brings back retro simplicity and is available in a range of fresh colours.

10 Sophia, from Bagno Design. 11 Glamour tiles by Kronos. 12 Monolith by Geberit.

12

26

AUGUST 2010 | Commercial Interior Design

www.constructionweekonline.com

Universal Trading Co., member of Universal Group, was established in 1973 with a wide scope of
supply of both products and services, ranging from heavy equipment to electrical appliances. We have exclusive agencies of diơerent brands imported from all over the world mainly, Germany, Italy, and the United States of America. Our organization consists of three main divisions: • Domestic Appliances Division • Kitchen and Wardrobes Division • Heavy Equipment and Machinery Division

UNIVERSAL TRADING CO.
ABU DHABI , Istiqlal Street P.O.Box 4399 Tel: 02-6335331/6336252 • Fax: 02 6211957 AL AIN P.O.Box 1503 Tel: 03-7216660

UNIVERSAL ELECTRICAL EQUIP. Est.
DUBAI P.O.Box 6809 Tel: 04 2823443 • Fax: 04 2821634

CASE STUDY: SOFITEL RABAT

Moorish designs
T HE NE WLY-RENOVAT ED SOFIT EL R ABAT JARDIN DES ROSES IS BRIMMING WIT H T R ADIT IONAL MOROCC AN MOT IFS.

1

2

3

T
28

he intricate art of mashrabia lies at the heart of the recently-renovated Sofitel Rabat Jardin des Roses hotel. “Mashrabia is the centrepiece of this project, with 200 different versions within the hotel, a symbolic representation of Moroccan culture,” explained Didier Gomez, founder of Didier Gomez Interior Design, the French firm responsible for the property’s new look.

Located in the heart of the Moroccan capital, a few minutes from the Royal Palace, Sofitel Rabat Jardin des Roses features 229 rooms, including 37 suites, some of which span over 1,000ft². The property is surrounded by a sumptuous 20-acre Andalusian park, rose garden and eucalyptus forest, and is a short walk from the Oudaïas, Rabat’s little known kasbah. It also features an entire building dedicated to

wellbeing, encompassing 13,000ft² of spa and fitness facilities.

PALATIAL LUXURY
Gomez was intent on creating a palatial space that was luxurious and contemporary but still brimming with Moroccan references. Mashrabia was an obvious place to start. Other distinct elements, such as water, roses and amber, and a striking gold, black

AUGUST 2010 | Commercial Interior Design

www.constructionweekonline.com

CASE STUDY: SOFITEL RABAT

4

www.constructionweekonline.com

Commercial Interior Design | AUGUST 2010

29

CASE STUDY: SOFITEL RABAT

5 1, 3& 7 Mashrabia is a recurring theme. 2, 5&6 The property offers extensive wellness facilities. 4 The design is decidedly Moroccan.

and beige colour scheme, reappear throughout. However, it is the careful treatment of mashrabia motifs, and the subsequent interplay between what is seen and what is not, that defines the hotel. “I also used the idea of the garden and water as a centrepiece for the project. I used Moroccan materials but in a different way to the pastiche that is familiar from Marrakech,” said Gomez. Instead, the design drew on Rabat’s distinctive character. “Rabat is like Washington, a political city, elegant and different to the rest of the country,” Gomez explained. “The town is totally beige (the colour of the stone) and white, so I added black, which means luxury in the Occident, and gold, which is common in the culture.”

At the same time, it was necessary to bring in the French undertones inherent in the Sofitel brand. The idea was to craft a finely balanced interplay between French and Moroccan – or, more specifically, Rabati – elements. The tone is established from the outset. In the lobby, the element of water is introduced in an evocative combination of pools and black marble. Eclectic furniture pieces shrouded in the hotel’s dominant colours, black and gold, make an immediate impact, while mashrabia detailing works its way across the marble floor. “In the lobby entrance hall, the idea was to have water, as a symbol of an Arabic garden, going through the hall and ending up outside,” said Gomez.

“We used a very sophisticated mix of furniture – old, new, oversized and all different – as I would do for a house. The rest of the walls are in stone and all the floors are Moroccan marble imprinted with leaf-like designs.” Walls and floors are a subtle combination of beige and white, while a mirrored ceiling reflects the path of the water. Two Murano glass chandeliers reiterate a sense of lightness, and alcoves in white and beige silk create a sense of intimacy.

COLOURFUL CREATIONS
While the lobby revels in its monochromatic splendour, dining areas are striking in their use of colour. Red and black dominate in the El Patio restaurant,

6

7

30

AUGUST 2010 | Commercial Interior Design

www.constructionweekonline.com

SFA SANIFLO
An en-suite Bathroom? A basement or loft conversion? SANIFLO macerator pumping systems enable you to add facilities almost anywhere.

Don’t move… Improve!

www.bmdaly.ae

UAE

www.sfa.biz

pthoma@mepenterprises.com.qa

QATAR

CASE STUDY: SOFITEL RABAT

8

9

8 Plexiglass panels separate the rooms and bathrooms, and can be opened up to offer extensive views of the city. 9 Rooms feature vibrant colours. 10 Suites are designed to feel like a luxurious private home, Gomez explained.

which opens up onto the park. A Moroccan carpet custom-designed by Gomez boldly reiterates the colour scheme. Inspired by the 1930s and 40s, the space is highly geometric, with one wall entirely covered with a reproduction of a traditional design by Douanier Rousseau. All the while, an assembly of mirrors creates a sense of openness. “All of the furniture has been specially designed, with round sofas and five different kinds of chairs, all in red and white,” Gomez detailed. In the Moroccan restaurant, Al Warda, warm colours mingle with Moroccan-inspired lights and 1960s-style furniture. “We kept the antique ceilings and introduced painted aluminium to

add a touch of modernity. The floors are black, as are the big Moroccan doors, which have been lacquered in a shiny black. We then introduced the colours of spices,” Gomez said. An aura of intimacy is continued in the Amber Bar. “This is the most spectacular space for me, with the bar and the wall behind it all in lit alabaster. The ceiling is in copper and the walls are a patchwork of nine redesigned examples of mashrabia, in gold. The floor is made of Moroccan marble and all the furniture is black, white and bronze.” The mashrabia theme continues in the rooms and suites, where black sliding mashrabia panels made from plexiglass separate the bathroom from the

main room. The panels can be opened up to offer views of the gardens and the city, from the bathroom. In the larger suites, mashrabia plays an even more dominant role, with designs making their way on to the carpeting, onto wooden panels on the walls, and onto oversized art work. “Attention to detail, particularly when it comes to furniture, gives these suites the feel of a very luxurious private house, rather than a hotel,” said Gomez. “I love this project,” he added. “I like the way that from the lobby to the restaurants and to the rooms, there is a continuation of the same ideas, the same combinations and the same sense of luxury.”
10

32

AUGUST 2010 | Commercial Interior Design

www.constructionweekonline.com

DESTINATION FOCUS: LEBANON

Beirut bound
T HE REGION’S POWERHOUSE OF INT ERIOR DESIGN SHOWS NO SIGNS OF SLOWING

t a time when Middle Eastern economies are still reeling from the impact of the global financial crisis, and are grappling to regain lost ground, Lebanon’s interior design industry is experiencing unparalleled growth, with many designers claiming they have more work than they can handle. Businesses, whether restaurants, hotels, banks or pharmacies, are increasingly catering for consumers with a finely honed sense of aesthetics. “It’s about the mentality of the Lebanese

A

people,” explained Shady Bou Saba, whose company specialises in the burgeoning field of pharmacy design. “They all save money to buy a fancy car or clothes. The design of homes, hotels and restaurants follows that trend. You can see a Lebanese man, for example, wearing expensive clothes, living in an expensive house, but he’ll only have two dollars in his pocket.” Dany Ghanem of Dany Ghanem Interior Design has also seen an increase in commercial projects, especially restaurants, nightclubs and shopping

malls. “We have a lot of investment going on in Beirut, and the market is getting bigger by the day. Sometimes we have to refuse projects because we’re overloaded,” he said. To state that Lebanon boasts the most sophisticated interior design industry in the Middle East does not do the industry justice, claimed Bou Saba. “We are more advanced than America here. We are more like Italy. And the Lebanese people are becoming even more sophisticated; they need to see new things, new designs, all the time.”

34

AUGUST 2010 | Commercial Interior Design

www.constructionweekonline.com

DESTINATION FOCUS: LEBANON

1

Elie Traboulsi, general manager of home furniture at Lebanon headquartered Obegi Better Home, agreed. “We’re much closer to Europe than to the Middle East. For other countries in the region, we’ve always been a window to what’s happening in Europe. Instead of going to Italy, France or Germany, people from the region come to Lebanon to see what the latest trends are.” With a keen eye for style and a natural love of aesthetics, many Lebanese are prepared to pay for high-quality materials and services. “Our fees are

very expensive,” said Ghassan Kabbara, managing director of Harmouch Design, a company with more than 50 years’ experience in Lebanon, which counts the Al Bustan Hotel, Hilton Hotel and Bank Audi amongst its many high-profile clients. “Companies come to us because they know the quality of our work. They pay money for our experience and ideas, and because they know we have a good reputation,” he said. As demand for good interior design increases, so does the market’s need for professional contractors to carry out the

work. “It’s dif ficult to find good people to execute the projects,” noted Kabbara. “Professionals who know new materials from around the world, who know about the different kinds of wood, who have experience – those people are rare.” Qualified contractors are often overworked, and cannot take on many projects at the same time, thus decreasing the amount of work that can be done. Although Lebanon was relatively untouched by the global financial crisis, its volatile political situation has given many international investors cause for concern. This uncertainty makes it difficult to formulate long-term plans, said Traboulsi. “Politicians come and tell us that we’re going to have a good summer, or a prosperous year ahead, but this is not what we want. We want to plan for the coming years; we want to know that the next five, 10, 15 or 20 years are going to be stable.” Obegi Better Home’s Jal El Dib showroom features high-end designer brands from Italy, and deals extensively with interior designers. And although Lebanese clients appreciate and are prepared to pay for high-quality designer furniture, Traboulsi believes that the 30% customs tax imposed by the government prices many more potential clients out of the market. “Taking the tax and cost of transportation into account, our prices here are 30% to 40% more than in Europe. This is our main challenge, to explain to our customers why our prices are they way they are,” he said. “We try to compensate with the service and the choice,” he continued. “If people see something on the internet, they can only look at the picture, but we carry the stock. They can come and have a look, they can try it and touch it. It is very important to us that we can provide this service.” Lebanese clients demand a more hands-on role in the design and execution of their projects than their GCC counterparts, Traboulsi suggested. “In the Gulf, clients come to you, they give you the plan and let you do the whole job from A to Z. In Lebanon, clients know exactly what they want. They are grateful for the help, but they like to have their own touch.”

1 Beirut.

www.constructionweekonline.com

Commercial Interior Design | AUGUST 2010

35

DESTINATION FOCUS: LEBANON

1

Refined design
LEBANON’S L AT EST L ANDM ARK, LE GR AY HOT EL BEIRUT, IS SE T T ING NE W STANDARDS FOR HOT EL INT ERIORS IN T HE REGION, SAYS FIDA SL AYM AN

2

3

36

AUGUST 2010 | Commercial Interior Design

www.constructionweekonline.com

DESTINATION FOCUS: LEBANON

he new Le Gray Hotel Beirut has only been open for nine months, yet so perfectly does the building complement its surroundings that one has the feeling that it has always been there. Framed by the Blue Mosque, Martyr’s Square and the refurbished Ottoman buildings of Downtown Beirut, the striking sevenstorey hotel offers views of Lebanon’s famous snow-capped mountains on one side, and the azure waters of the Mediterranean Sea on the other. The hotel is the fourth property to bear the Campbell Gray name, and marks the company’s first foray into the Middle East. “It’s not so much the Middle East I’m interested in,” said Gordon Campbell Gray, chairman of Campbell Gray Hotels, “but Beirut.” When Campbell Gray speaks of Beirut, it is almost how one would speak of a lover; in his eyes, the city is sexy, voluptuous, sumptuous. And like a lover with gifts, Campbell Gray has lavished on the city what he believes to be his sexiest hotel yet. Designed with renowned interior designer Mary Fox Linton, the hotel has 87 rooms, including 62 executive suites of 60m², 10 corner suites of 90m², and two presidential suites measuring 170m² and 220m². More than 500 pieces of art, sourced personally by Campbell Gray from Cuba and the Middle East, adorn the walls. “We have a fantastic art collection,” he said. “It’s about the rooms having two or

T

three pieces of art that have been considered, and I think that’s what makes our design shine out as being lovely.” The hotel’s interiors reflect Lebanon’s love affair with wood. Cedar features strongly and timber adds to the richness of the design. The custom-made furniture, original to Le Gray Beirut, is all made of walnut. Stone floors, timber ceilings, natural slate and granite underpin the design, and are complemented by handmade silk, wool and cotton fabrics. Clean, clutter-free surfaces give a final soothing touch to the hotel’s restrained style. The pool and bar area embody the sensuality and hedonism that has come to symbolise Beirut. The rooftop purple-glass infinity pool is flanked by sunloungers and tables in blood red, “the last colour you’d expect to put in the heat”, according to Campbell Gray. “I think we’ve gotten sexier with this hotel than we’ve ever done before and maybe it’s given us a taste to do it again in other places,” he said. Along with Fox Linton, Campbell Gray sourced and engaged international artisans to produce the fabrics, lighting and furniture used in the hotel. “We wanted lamps which look like indoor standard lamps for the rooftop terrace, but they just don’t exist,” he explained. “We scoured the world and finally found somebody who could make them.” A signature design piece of Le Gray Beirut is the backlit metal wall exhibited

in the lobby. Decorated with cut-out butter flies and flowers, the wall stands as a “traf fic-stopping piece of design”, said Campbell Gray. “The woman we found to do it just did lampshades – it’s really about finding the right artisans and asking them to go a little further.” Yet all the design in the hotel, Campbell Grey claimed, would be meaningless if it were not also comfortable. “I’d say that a lot of contemporary design has started to get very into its own selfimportance, and doesn’t really serve a purpose. I think the new wave of hotels have almost become a cliché of their own modernity and silliness.” A piece of furniture which is not comfortable cannot be an example of good design, he said. The definition of luxury, he continued, relating an anecdote, “is coming home and having somewhere to put my keys”. “In reality it’s about sitting at a desk and the reading light being perfect, and the bedside table being the right size – just being layers and layers of thinking it through, so that when you sit down in the chair it doesn’t only look beautiful but it’s also super comfortable.” The curtains completely block out the light, the bed, sheets and pillows are of the highest quality, and all the lamps in the room can be turned on and off easily. “It’s so simplistic, but staying in fabulous hotels around the world as I do, it really is amazing how uncomfortable they can be.”

1 The hotel features “traf fic-stopping” design features, says Campbell Gray. 2 The property is set in the heart of downtown Beirut. 3 The atrium seating area. 4 Rooms contain carefully-considered pieces of art. 5 Gordon’s Cafe. 6 The pool lounge.

4

5

6

www.constructionweekonline.com

Commercial Interior Design | AUGUST 2010

37

SUPPLIERS YOU SHOULD KNOW

KITCHEN SUPPLIERS YOU SHOULD KNOW
he kitchen has evolved into the heart of the home. Where food preparation used to be confined to a separate space away from the rest of the house, it has now become a key social activity – and kitchen design has responded accordingly. Befitting its newfound status as the hub of the home, the kitchen is becoming bigger and more design orientated. Current trends favour curves, islands and high-gloss finishes, according to Tony Lamb, managing director, Under One Roof. “Curves are currently extremely popular to create a flow to the scheme, often in contrasting colours to the main kitchen for added interest,” he noted.

T

Islands, meanwhile, are “an invaluable place for storage, food preparation and cooking. Simply position some stools and you can dine, read, chat or simply chill out,” he said. Cherry, maple and white alder remain popular choices when it comes to cabinetry, but there is a growing trend towards combining colours in the kitchen space, agreed Mohammed Junaid, head of sales at Palmonade. “Mixing and matching colours is also very much in vogue, for instance designing a kitchen in dark oak veneer with high-gloss white lacquer doors,” Junaid explained. With sleek and streamlined kitchens proving popular, the trend is also towards intelligent design and

gadgetry. Recessed handles, pull-out larders, swing corner cabinets and glass bottom drawers are all becoming increasingly prevalent. Sustainability is also having a notable impact in the kitchen. “Energysaving light fi xtures have made great strides, as seen in CFL and LED fi xtures. Water-saving faucets are in vogue with the standard ones phasing out and the pullout and pot-filler faucets stealing the limelight,” noted Mohd Omar Shareef, assistant manager, sales and operations, of Mac Al Gurg. Over the next few pages, Commercial Interior Design speaks to leading kitchen suppliers about these trends and asks them to unveil some of their latest offerings.
Commercial Interior Design | AUGUST 2010

www.constructionweekonline.com www.constructionweekonline.com

39

SUPPLIERS YOU SHOULD KNOW

Obegi Home

CID speaks to Julia Dickerson, interior designer, Obegi Home.

Tell us about your company.
Established in 1973 in Lebanon, Obegi Home has been a cornerstone of design for over four decades. Since opening its Dubai showroom in 2007, Obegi has forged a unique reputation, partnering with the world’s leading manufacturers and designers of quality contemporary and classical/contemporary furniture for the home, as well as kitchens, wardrobes, lighting and outdoor furniture. Obegi Home is committed to only working with manufacturers that produce an all-encompassing level of quality and design, providing the highest levels of comfort and durability over time. These brands include Baker from the US and Giorgetti and Poliform from Italy.

happened completely independently of the family, to now where we see the open plan kitchen taking hold. It is the hub of the home, a place for all to gather, where cooking and food preparation is an event for the whole family. Varenna offers the range, selection and flexibility to create a kitchen that not only functions for the unique needs of individuals but features materials that truly reflect personal styles.

What’s new?
One of the latest additions to the Varenna family is Twelve, designed by leading international architect Carlo Colombo. This new solution from Varenna is a unique design that features a 12mm thick worktop, including glass top, and components, pioneering the slick slimline trend in kitchens. Moving away from the traditionally chunky kitchen, Twelve’s essential concept boasts minimal horizontal thicknesses and maximum width of surfaces. With a notable absence of handles, Twelve functions with an intelligent electronic sensory opening system.

What kitchen products do you offer?
The 100% made-in-Italy Varenna kitchen collection by Poliform comprises six different contemporary styles and, within this, a plethora of finishes, colours and materials. It offers a freedom of composition and personalised solutions for different lifestyles.

How do we contact you?
Visit our showroom on Umm Al Sheif Road, off Jumeirah Beach Road, Umm Suqeim 1, Dubai. Tel: +971 (0)4 394 8161; email: dubai@obegihome.com; website: www.obegihome.com.

Latest trends?
The kitchen is an ever-evolving part of the home – from the era of being outside the house, where food preparation

40

AUGUST 2010 | Commercial Interior Design

www.constructionweekonline.com

SUPPLIERS YOU SHOULD KNOW
Catching up with Mohammed Junaid, head of sales at Palmonade.

Any recent developments?
We launched Palmonade, Dubai’s first kitchen emporium, in November last year, and it has been an enormous success. Footfall has been excellent and customer feedback has been very encouraging. We are already identifying new emerging markets to launch our next branch in.

Tell us about your company.
Palmonade is Dubai’s first kitchen emporium. It is the first company in Dubai to bring three famous European brands under one roof: Valcucine and Ernestomeda, which are both Italian, and Keller from Holland. Palmonade is not just a kitchen company, it is the UAE’s foremost kitchen specialist, and going forward we aspire to be the region’s foremost kitchen specialist. We offer a full circle service, from home survey, design and planning to final home check upon completion. Palmonade has an ever-growing reputation for its customer service and this is unmatched in the market.

Latest trends?
The latest trend is minimalist kitchens that are sleek and streamlined. Mixing and matching colours is also very much in vogue. Handle-less kitchens, or recessed handles, are also liked by many customers. A kitchen user always loves gadgets like pull-out larders with chrome baskets, pull and swing corner cabinets, glass bottom drawers and glass worktops.

Best-selling products?
Since we have the three brands, which were chosen strategically to cater to any price point, we can offer a kitchen to pretty much fit any sensible, decent budget. Prospective clients looking for a new kitchen do not have to look any further.

How do we contact you?
Palmonade is on Jumeirah Beach Road. You can download a location map from our website: www. palmonade.com. Tel: +971 (0)4 3488140 or +971 (0)55 2245631; email: info@palmonade.com.

Palmonade
CID talks to Arturo Manso, managing director, Middle East and UAE.

Tell us about your company.
TEKA Küchentechnik is a German brand that offers a fully integrated range of high-quality built-in kitchen appliances, including ovens, hobs, hoods, microwaves, refrigerators, washing machines and dishwashers, along with kitchen sinks and mixers. It has 33 subsidiaries worldwide and 34 factories. The company covers all different product ranges, in terms of category and price, from the most innovative, modern and sophisticated products to models with basic features. Teka is the manufacturer; therefore it provides logistical and commercial support, without any agent or intermediate, through its regional of fices and of ficial dealers.

options and variety across models than other brands, providing a seamless blend of design and function. Within the cooking range, Teka’s 90cm ovens and microwaves have the biggest capacity in the market, and its range of cooker hoods have a bigger exhaust capacity, with lower noise levels as well.

TEKA Küchentechnik

Any recent developments?
Teka has recently implemented a green line strategy to promote a healthy environmental attitude throughout the organisation. This process has involved all value-added activities in all our production processes and systems. These initiatives have come together to form the TECOS plan (Teka Environmental Commitment & Sustainability). See www.ecoteka.org. The TECOS commitment is not only an internal policy, as it extends to end users, partners and suppliers alike.

Best-selling products?
Teka’s best-selling products come from the cooking line, as well as sinks, since we are the world’s second largest sink manufacturer. As specialists in that particular field, we offer more

How do we contact you?
Call toll free 800 TEKA, or contact Teka through its website: www.teka.com or via email: uaeteka@emirates.net.ae.
Commercial Interior Design | AUGUST 2010

www.constructionweekonline.com

41

SUPPLIERS YOU SHOULD KNOW
By Tony Lamb, managing director. advice and service, and a single point of contact for our customers.

Tell us about your company.
We began with a product called Permaglaze, which is a proprietary glaze that we have exclusive rights to in the Middle East. This product can reglaze a wide variety of items quickly and costeffectively in a wide range of colours and finishes, including baths, tiles, kitchen cupboards, interior doors and skirting boards, and window frames. As we grew, our customers asked us to undertake more and more work because they told us they wanted to get everything they needed to improve their property under one roof – hence the name and the concept was born! We provide a comprehensive service in that we have access to a group of professionals, business partners and exclusive suppliers who can address all property requirements, all from our showroom near Times Square. From internal and external painting work, structural renovations, bathroom makeovers, tiling or designing and installing your dream kitchen, Under One Roof offers excellent standards of

Recent developments?
We are increasingly working with interior designers on their projects as we make their life easier. And as the exclusive Metris dealer in the UAE, we are also delighted that the Metris Wave Curve has won the prestigious 2010 Grand Designs best kitchen award.

Latest trends?
Curves, islands and high-gloss finishes. Curved worktop profiles and curved ends to the unit create an organic look that’s more child-friendly. The trend to open-plan living is raising the profile of the island unit, and it’s becoming the hub of the kitchen, both socially and functionally. Gloss is a leading theme and is now the most popular finish in the contemporary scene.

How do we contact you?
We can be found in showroom 21, Street 8, Al Quoz 3, Dubai. Tel: +971 (0)4 323 2722. For more information, visit www.underoneroof.ae

Under One Roof
By Mohd. Omar Shareef, assistant manager, sales and operations.

Recent developments?
We recently formed an association with Aran kitchens, a leader in Italian exports. Keeping up with the MAC fervour, we are also planning to venture into the retail business exclusively for kitchens and sanitaryware, with a new showroom planned for Dubai.

Tell us about your company.
Mac Al Gurg is a part of the Easa Saleh Al Gurg Group. From our inception in 1974, we have been a leader in the construction industry. With a head of fice in Dubai and branches in Abu Dhabi, Al Ain and Muscat, Mac Al Gurg boasts a diversified product range encompassing Yorkshire copper tubes and fittings, sanitaryware from Armitage Shanks, kitchens, Ductile iron manhole covers and frames, drainage solutions from Blucher and Frost, and pipe joint systems from Viking Johnson. The kitchens division of Mac Al Gurg represents the best kitchen brands from the UK and Italy, and is aggressively involved in project and retail business.

Latest trends?
Traditional designs will continue, with contemporary following closely behind, while the shaker style is witnessing a surprisingly strong resurgence. An open floorplan design concept is in demand and the social urge has made kitchen islands larger. Cherry remains the most popular colour for kitchen cabinetry, followed closely by maple and white alder. Colours and textures which do not match but blend very well are getting a closer look. Environmental awareness has had an impact on kitchen design as well.

What are your best-selling kitchens?
Our best-selling kitchen models are Softec Cherry, Shaker Walnut and Character Oak. Other than the brands we represent, we also have our own brand, Mac Kitchens, which caters to budget kitchen options.

How do we contact you?
Tel: +971 (0)4 2661291; web: www. macalgurg.com; email: mcalgurg@ emirates.net.ae or omar@macuae.ae.

Mac Al Gurg
www.constructionweekonline.com

42

AUGUST 2010 | Commercial Interior Design

PRODUCTS

New on the market
HEXA
Arturo Alvarez has unveiled Hexa, a wall/ceiling lamp that combines geometry and light to create an infinite number of combinations. Mesh is mixed with silicone to create a product that is flexible, washable, malleable and pleated to provide a warm, all-encompassing light.
ARTURO ALVAREZ +34 981 814600 www.arturo-alvarez.com

www.constructionweekonline.com

Commercial Interior Design | AUGUST 2010

45

PRODUCTS

MOSAICO
Ofis has unveiled the latest addition to its extensive product portfolio. Mosaico, a range of of fice desks from Spanish company, Coinma, answers calls for practical yet stylish workplace solutions. It combines C-shaped legs, a wooden top and an effective wire management system to create a lightweight, sculptural element. The contemporary desking solution was designed by up-and-coming Spanish designer, Mario Ruiz. “We gave him 100% freedom to create something different,” said Inazio Eguskiza, Coinma’s export manager. “The end result is light, fresh and different – a breakthrough in of fice furniture”.
OFIS +971 (0)4 330 9290 www.ofisdubai.com

TWO ALARM
John Hutton Textiles has teamed up with master technicians in Germany to present a hot new fabric, Two Alarm. Made of 100% Trevira CS, it meets the strictest fire codes for demanding contract applications. For use as a black-out drapery, with no lining needed, or as an upholstery fabric, Two Alarm offers seven reversible colourways: Hot Chocolate, Hot Fudge, Black Out, Hot Flash, Hot Shot, Hot Springs or Hotsy Totsy.
JOHN HUTTON TEXTILES +1 972 823 2322 www.johnhuttontextiles.com

NOVECENTO
Natuzzi has introduced Novecento, a modular wall unit collection that can be fully customised. The collection features a variety of separate pieces, including a sideboard, wall shelves, benches, drawers, cabinets and TV elements.
NATUZZI +971 (0)4 338 0777 www.natuzzi.com

46

AUGUST 2010 | Commercial Interior Design

www.constructionweekonline.com

GEZE Middle East | P.O. Box 17903 | Jebel Ali Free Zone | Dubai U.A.E. | Tel: +971 4 8833112 | Fax:+971 4 8833240 | geze@emirates.net.ae | www.geze.com

SURPREME BUILDING TECHNOLOGY

GEZE Automatic Door Systems - Unlimited options for your door solutions
The Slimdrive sliding door range: Reduction and perfection are close friends. The very low construction height enables almost invisible integration into the facade. GEZE is a German manufacturer with a prestigious heritage of innovative systems for door and window technology. GEZE was founded in year 1863 and is a family owned company.

Door Technology | Automatic Door Systems | RWA and Ventilation Systems | Safety Technology | Glass Systems

BEWEGUNG MIT SYSTEM

INTERIOR DESIGN SHOW 2010

BE AN

E

HIBITIONIST
A NEW DECADE OF DESIGN
INDEX DESIGN SHOW
8–11 NOVEMBER 2010 DUBAI WORLD TRADE CENTRE
Book your stand now by calling +971 (0)4 438 0355 or email rebeccalockwood@dmgevents.com www.indexexhibition.com

Official Media Partner:

Co-located with:

ACCESSORIES

ART

FLOORING

FURNITURE

INTERIOR DESIGN SERVICES

KITCHENS & BATHROOMS

LIGHTING

TEXTILES & UPHOLSTERY FABRICS

PRODUCTS

COAST
Coast is a comfortable, informal sofa designed by Francesco Rota for Arketipo. An unbroken line links the back and arms, and surrounds a big, comfortable seat. The metal structure grants the sofa with solidity, while the seat padding is made of a sumptuous quilted cotton cover filled with goose down.
ARKETIPO +39 055 887 6248 www.arketipo.com

SHANTUNG COUTURE
J+J/Invision has launched Shantung Couture, the latest addition to its Second Nature collection. Second Nature plays on the variations of thick and thin, lustre and matte, and smooth and textured. Shantung Couture features 22 new colourways, along with three existing colourways taken from its sister product, Shantung. The new colourways were selected to have global appeal, with an overall palette that is both harmonious and alluring. Shantung Couture is standard as broadloom, but available optionally as Nexusmodular.
J+J/INVISION +1 800 241 4585 www.jj-invision.com

SHALLIMAR
Part of the Medley Collection from Ronald Redding Designs, the hand-painted Shallimar mural is inspired by a century-old Japanese painting. The mural consists of six panels that measure 3.96m wide by 3.65m high. They can be installed to make a statement on one wall or be combined with other murals.
YORK WALLCOVERINGS +1 717 846 4456 www.ronaldreddingdesigns.com

www.constructionweekonline.com

Commercial Interior Design | AUGUST 2010

49

PRODUCTS

PASHA
New from Pedrali, Pasha is an elegant and stylish take on the classic armchair. Made in injection moulded polycarbonate, it is available in a white and black glossy finish, as well as a transparent version. It is suitable both for indoor and outdoor areas.
PEDRALI + 39 0358 3588 www.pedrali.it

CUBO 2010
The UAE’s online furniture and lifestyle store, Filini, has unveiled the latest addition to its growing catalogue of products, the Sonoro Audio Cubo 2010. Designed and crafted by Germany’s Sonoro Audio, the Cubo 2010 is a sleek and stylish CD/MP3 player, clock radio and iPod dock. The product offers a smooth, curved-corner design, available in four different shades, and is also fitted with a full-range speaker integrated with a bassreflex tube.
FILINI +971 (0)4 323 3636 www.filini.com

NOAH
Indigo Living is launching a new range of children’s furniture in the UAE. The Noah collection is built with youngsters in mind: rounded edges, big handles and no gaps for hands to get stuck in! For parents’ additional peace of mind, the collection also conforms to rigorous European health and safety standards. It comprises eight individual ivory-white bedroom furniture pieces.
INDIGO LIVING +971 (0)4 339 7705 www.indigo-living.com

50

AUGUST 2010 | Commercial Interior Design

www.constructionweekonline.com

WWW.HOTELIERMIDDLEEAST.COM/CONFERENCES

THE GREAT GM DEBATE
WEDNESDAY 29 SEPTEMBER 2010 - JUMEIRAH BEACH HOTEL, DUBAI
126 HO GMS A TEL LR CONFI EADY RM TO ATT ED END

HOTELIER MIDDLE EAST:

FEATURING PRESENTATIONS AND WORKSHOPS FROM:
› › › › › ;K:D 8Yl;_XY`Kfli`jd8lk_fi`kp B\iqe\i@ek\ieXk`feXc IfkXeX <dXXi?fk\cjXe[I\jfikj
ASSOCIATE SPONSORS

› › › › ›

Gi\d`\i@ee?fk\cj 8idXe`?fk\c CXe[dXib>iflg J\m\eK`[\j?fjg`kXc`kp 8ZZfi?fjg`kXc`kp

› › › › ›

Dm\eg`Zb?fk\cjXe[I\jfikj =X`idfek?fk\cjXe[I\jfikj Ald\`iX_>iflg CXp`X?fjg`kXc`kp A`eXe?fk\cjXe[I\jfikj
EXHIBITORS

› M`XY`c`kp?fjg`kXc`kp:fejlckXekj › :`kpdXo?fk\cj › ID8C?fjg`kXc`kp › TRI?fjg`kXc`kp:fejlck`e^ › IfpX@ek\ieXk`feXc
EXCLUSIVE WATER SPONSOR COFFEE SPONSOR

MEDIA PARTNERS

FOR SPONSORSHIP ENQUIRIES PLEASE CONTACT DIARMUID OMALLEY ON +9714 2108568 OR diarmuid.omalley@itp.com SARAH WORTH ON +9714 2108595 OR sarah.worth@itp.com

PRODUCTS

INDIAN COIR
One of the hottest selling Indian goods in the world economy, Indian coir is hitting the market in a diverse array of products, ranging from mats to pith and carpets to geotextiles. Coir is a highly natural fibre with all the advantages of being eco-friendly. It is biodegradable and can be utilised in a large number of ways. When it comes to mats, mattings, rugs, carpets and mattresses, Indian coir assumes various shapes. With great absorbency and excellent scraping properties, coir products are ideal in both indoor and outdoor applications. They also come in all price ranges. Meanwhile, coir ply has been found to be a useful substitute to traditional wood. Made from coir that is impregnated with phenolic resin and pre-treated plantation timber veneers, coir ply can be used to build cupboards, wardrobes, kitchen cabinets, cots, study units, wall panelling, false ceilings, partitions, display panels and roofing.
COIR BOARD OF INDIA +91 484 235 1807 www.coirboard.nic.in

52

AUGUST 2010 | Commercial Interior Design

www.constructionweekonline.com

CONTRACTS

Project Focus
COMMERCIAL INT ERIOR DESIGN IS COMMIT T ED TO HELPING ITS RE ADERS GROW T HEIR BUSINESSES, SO WE HAVE T E A MED UP WIT H VENT URES MIDDLE E A ST TO BRING YOU T HE L AT EST T ENDERS FROM AROUND T HE REGION ON A MONT HLY BA SIS.

O M A N P R O J EC T S D ATA B A S E
PROJECT TITLE World of Salalah Renovation of InterContinental Hotel in Muscat Dhofar University in Salalah - Pack 1 New Television Studio Complex M.E.D.C Headof fice at Azaiba Development of Jabal Al Akhdar Resort Hotel Fairmont Hotel Crowne Plaza Duqum Hotel Hospital in South Salalah Psychiatric Hospital at Al Amerat Renovation of Sheraton Oman Hotel The Malkai at Barka Musandam Airport Bone Marrow Transplant Unit Block Commercial Building in Saham International Maritime College Oman National Cardiology Centre at Royal Hospital Redevelopment of the Crowne Plaza Resort Salalah Court Complex at Al-Buraimi Natural History Museum in Muscat Headquarters Building for Occidental Oman CLIENT Ministry of Tourism / United Real Estate Company Omran Of fice Dhofar University Ministry of Information Muscat Electricity Distribution Company Omran Of fice Fairmont Hotel & Resorts/The Wave Muscat Omran Of fice/Inter Continental Hotel Group Ministry of Defence Ministry of Health Al Hasher Group Al Maeen Real Estate Services Company Ministry of Transport & Communication Sultan Qaboos University Hospital Mr. Rashid Al Kalbani Ministry of Manpower Ministry of Health Ministry of Tourism Ministry of Justice Ministry of Heritage & Culture Occidental Oman CONSULTANT Option One MAIN CONTR ACTOR Wara Construction Company VALUE / VALUE RANGE (US$. MN) 101 - 250 31 - 100 21 33 2.5 - 15 31 - 100 101 - 250 251 - 500 16 - 30 107 25 250 101 - 250 16 - 30 6 35 21 31 - 100 PROJECT STATUS PROJECT T YPE Project under construction Project under design Project under construction Project under construction Project under design Project under design Project under design Project under design Project under construction Project under construction Project under construction Project under design Shopping Centre Hotel Educational Facilities Others Commercial Buildings Hotel Hotel Hotel Hospital Hospital Hotel Mixed Use

Pentago Spowers International Not Appointed National Engineering Of fice Austro Consult Al-Hashemi & Al-Rawas Company Bahwan Contracting Company

Abdullah Mukadam & Partners Not Appointed AW2 Echo Designer Consultants KEO International Ibn Khaldun Khatib and Alami Atkins Triad Oman/AW2 Not Appointed Gulf Engineering Consultancy Not Appointed Not Appointed Not Appointed International Contractors Company Bahwan Contracting Company Zubair Furnishing Not Appointed Not Appointed Not Appointed

Award awaited for the Airport consultancy contract Project under design Project under construction Project under construction Project under construction Project under design Project under construction Project under design Project under design Hospital Commercial Buildings Educational Facilities Hospital Hotel Others Recreational Facilities Commercial Buildings

Abdullah Mukadam & Partners Century Harwes Trading and Contracting Gulf Engineering Consultancy Asi Etudes Consulting Engineering Services Sundaram Architects Consulting Engineering Services National Engineering Of fice Al Khalili United Enterprises Galfar Engineering & Contracting Not Appointed

Al Adrak Trading & Contracting 15 Not Appointed Not Appointed 16 - 30 2.5 - 15

Note: The above information is the sole property of Ventures Middle East LLC and cannot be published without the expressed permission of Ventures Middle East LLC, Abu Dhabi, UAE

www 86 arabianbusiness C i l I tcom/construction i D i O t b 2007
www.constructionweekonline.com

Commercial Interior Design 2007 bi November b i / t 101 ti
Commercial Interior Design | AUGUST 2010

55

OPINION

The changing face of wallpaper
BY BJÖRN NIL SSON

W

allpaper is undergoing a transformation at the moment, in terms of the public’s understanding of what it can do for a space. No longer is wallpaper just an alternative to paint – it is now being used as an extension of designers’ canvases, whether it be fashion or art. Technological developments in wallpaper, ranging from self-cleaning to scented (both general and ‘scratch and sniff’) are also making it much more than just decoration for the home or office. Wallpaper once knew its place. Its role as a quiet, decorative backdrop was universally acknowledged. Occasionally, it played a more prominent role as a bold feature wall. Now, however, technological advances and aesthetic development have turned the medium into a powerfully expressive and creative force. Of course, interior designers no longer talk about wallpaper – it’s wallcoverings – as the concept of wallpaper has developed away from just paper with the use of new materials. Technology has stepped in and created products with compounds that make them washable, pre-pasted, long lasting and bespoke, allowing people to reproduce any style from any period. Wallpaper can also play an important role in changing the features of a room. Few know of the unique features that can be obtained with wallpaper, and how it can transform a space – for example,

stick with neutral colours to give the illusion that walls are further away than they really are or, to create a higher ceiling effect, use wallpaper with narrow stripes of soft pastel colours and white. Fashion designers have also moved from the catwalk to the wall. Vivienne Westwood has recently realised that a flat surface is just as good a canvas as a body for her art. Westwood’s range, for all the rebellious attitude of her fashion collections, is surprisingly demure and the majority of her prints translate beautifully from body to wall. Wallcoverings are also receiving international acclaim through awards such as the Elle Decoration Design Award – which Eco-Boråstapeter won last year for its London design. Recently, the first major UK exhibition of artists’ wallpapers, with work by over 30 artists including Andy Warhol, Sarah Lucas and Damien Hirst, went on display in Manchester, England. Kitsch ideas of home decoration were turned upside down as artists subverted stereotypes of wallpaper by expressing messages about warfare, racism, cultural conflicts and gender. The paper in the exhibition provided an unprecedented insight into this bold and progressive contemporary art form. Wallpaper has long been thought of as a backdrop to the main event, yet with design expanding into this area of the industry, and with so many prominent designers and artists using the medium as

their primary method of expression, this exhibition provided a sincere exploration of the possibilities and power of print. An Eco-Boråstapeter wallpaper is characterised by being distinctive without being too extreme, which is very timely and appropriate for the market. The key words are young, individual and trendy. The hottest trends right now are smaller patterns and the mixing of mini and maxi designs. Turquoise meets pastels, but also the white-like and black-like, which is to say whites and blacks that absorb other colours. So the agreed consensus is that wallcoverings are developing into more than just a backdrop. They are more economical, last longer and have much more purpose in the home and commercial space than just a form of interior decoration. They are also a way of communication by expressing strong messages through art, a way to change a space and a way to display one’s personality through design and colour choice. With regards to the development of wallpaper in the Middle East, it is undoubtedly growing, in line with construction development. Where there are walls, there will be wallcoverings. Björn Nilsson is design manager at Eco-Boråstapeter, available from Kollektion General Trading, Dubai. Tel: +971 (0)4 3306899; email: info@the kollektion.com; www.thekollektion.com.

56

AUGUST 2010 | Commercial Interior Design

www.constructionweekonline.com

www. bafco.com

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->