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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Tuesday • July 9, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 279
EASTERN SPAN
LOCAL PAGE 5
COLON, A’S
WIN AGAIN
SPORTS PAGE 11
HELPING SENIORS TO
STAY IN THEIR HOMES
HEALTH PAGE 17
BAY BRIDGE OPENING DELAYED UNTIL AT LEAST
DECEMBER
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
One person died in the six-alarm
blaze that destroyed a Redwood City
apartment building and left nearly 100
people without a home, according to
police.
“There is nothing to indicate it was
an arson,” police Lt. Sean Hart told the
Daily Journal. The cause of the fire is
still being investigated, he said.
The building did not have sprinklers
but an internal fire hose that firefight-
ers did not use, Hart said.
The dead person is believed to be a
third-floor resident who was initially
unaccounted for after the building on
the 500 block of Woodside Road was
evacuated early Sunday morning. The
victim’s name will be released after
family is notified.
The 2 a.m. fire left about 100 people
homeless, many currently in the care
of the Red Cross at an emergency shel-
ter set up at the National Guard Armory
across from Red Morton Park.
Almost 40 hours after the fire was
first reported, fire crews were still in
the building knocking out windows
and attending to hot spots as police
diverted traffic away from the area.
Redwood City police, fire and offi-
cials with the Bureau of Alcohol,
Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives are
investigating the fire that has left the
72-unit Hallmark House Apartments
uninhabitable, Hart said.
Today, some first- and second-floor
residents will be able to access the
building briefly to get their belong-
ings, Hart said.
Third-floor residents, however, like-
One dead in six-alarm apartment blaze
By Lisa Leff and Paul Elias
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Amid the mar-
vel of nearly all aboard Asiana Flight
214 surviving a crash landing, author-
ities here are investigating an
unspeakable tragedy that may have
unfolded during the frantic rescue —
whether a teenage girl made it out of
the plane only to be run over by a res-
cue vehicle.
Federal and local officials on
Monday addressed the possibility that
the Chinese girl, who along with a
classmate comprised the crash’s two
fatalities, might have been killed acci-
dentally on the runway as the first fire-
fighters raced to the scene of a wrecked,
smoking airliner.
“One of our fire apparatus may have
Authorities investigating whether
girl was killed by rescue vehicle
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
Jacqueline Smith had to be rescued from her third-floor
apartment as flames engulfed the complex she lived in on
Woodside Road in Redwood City.
REUTERS
Asiana Airlines flight attendant Kim Ji-yeon, left, stands near
a runway with rescued passengers after flight 214 crash landed
at San Francisco International Airport July 6 in this handout
photo provided by passenger Eugene Anthony Rah.
SFO rescue’s awful question
Called into action
San Mateo County first responders’
training kicked in after SFO crash
By Sally Schilling
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Just minutes after hearing that an air-
plane had crash-landed and burst into
flames at San Francisco International
Airport Saturday, hundreds of San Mateo
County fire and emergency medical respon-
ders were called into action.
The county’s fire mutual aid leaders imme-
diately initiated a first-alarm response,
which is the typical response to an emer-
gency at SFO. After gauging the magnitude
of the disaster, the county fire departments
then activated a three-alarm response. Ron
Myers, fire chief for the North County Fire
Authority and Fire Mutual Aid coordinator,
couldn’t remember the last time there was a
REUTERS
San Francisco International Airport first responder Lt.Dave Monteverdi recounts his
experience of responding to Asiana flight 214, during a news conference at SFO.
By Sally Schilling
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
When a Boeing 777 crash-landed at
the San Francisco International
Airport late Saturday morning, travel-
ers grappled with what to do while
being stranded for an undetermined
length of time. Hundreds of these dis-
placed passengers were members of the
military traveling with their families.
The USO center at the San Francisco
International Airport — an affiliate of
the national nonprofit that serves mil-
itary families — typically serves
about 75 visitors per day. On the day
of the crash, the center — which pro-
Volunteers step up after crash
SALLY SCHILLING/DAILY JOURNAL
USO volunteers Mercedes Riofrio and Yolanda Bonilla help military members get
comfortable at the center in the San Francisco International Airport.
USO center lends a hand to
stranded military members
See page 5
See opinion
page 9
See page 19
Inside
• Blood center
seeks donations
in wake of SFO
crash
• Hotels offer
discount rates
for stranded
passengers
• Price-gouging
jerks
• Unusual
pattern of spine
injuries from jet
crash
See CRASH, Page 20 See USO, Page 18
See SFO, Page 20
See FIRE, Page 18
Deputies: Vandalism suspect
wore Spider-Man undies
CINCINNATI — Authorities in
Cincinnati have arrested a man who
they say was vandalizing a high school
while wearing only Spider-Man under-
wear.
The Cincinnati Enquirer reports that
it happened early Sunday when a sus-
pect used rocks to break several win-
dows at Moeller High School, crawled
in one of the windows and sprayed fire
extinguishers around the building.
Hamilton County sheriff’s deputies
say 23-year-old Thomas Williams was
wearing Spider-Man underwear when he
was arrested. The 6-foot-5, 295-pound
Kenwood man was charged with felony
vandalism and breaking and entering.
Police reports gave no explanation
for Williams’ attire.
Williams was still in jail Monday
morning. Online records didn’t indicate
if he had an attorney.
Four wallabies recaptured
after walkabout at Iowa zoo
DES MOINES, Iowa — Four red-
necked wallabies made a break for free-
dom after a gate was left open on the
Australia exhibit at a Des Moines zoo.
Officials at Blank Park Zoo say the
male wallabies, also known as
boomers, didn’t get very far during
their Sunday night walkabout. Three of
the kangaroo-like mammals were cap-
tured within hours and the fourth was
picked up Monday morning.
Several workers were needed to sur-
round and catch the marsupials whose
strong hind legs can catapult them
great distances at high speeds. They
never left the grounds of the zoo.
A zoo spokesman says none of the
wallabies were hurt during their adven-
ture.
Car drives several miles
with dog trapped by axle
DANIABEACH, Fla. — South Florida
firefighters came to the rescue of a dog
that traveled 5 miles while trapped
under the hood of a car.
The Broward Sheriff’s Office says fire-
fighters were called Thursday afternoon
to Dania Beach to free the dog. The ani-
mal had been trapped between the car’s
axle and steering mechanism.
Asheriff’s office spokesman says the
dog suffered no injuries, even though it
had been driven roughly 5 miles from
Hallandale Beach.
It wasn’t immediately clear how the
dog became trapped.
Similar shell malfunction
at two fireworks shows
SANTAANA— Afireworks company
behind the Southern California show
that sprayed the crowd and injured more
than three dozen people says it appears
to have had a similar shell malfunction
at another event.
Bay Fireworks chief executive
Dennis Brady Jr. says the problem in
Laguna Hills, Calif., however, did not
trigger the chain reaction that sent
shells flying toward the crowd at a Simi
Valley park on July 4.
Brady says both incidents appear to
have been caused by a shell malfunc-
tion but the Bethpage, N.Y.-based com-
pany is still waiting for official find-
ings to be released.
Laguna Hills City Manager Bruce
Channing says the city’s show was
shut down almost as soon as it started
by a fire marshal because one of the
mortars exploded at or near the ground,
damaging some of the wiring to the rest
of the fireworks that had yet to go off.
The city is seeking a refund.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Tuesday • July 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
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twitter.com/smdailyjournal facebook.com/smdailyjournal
Phone:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Football
Hall-of-Famer O.J.
Simpson is 66.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1943
During World War II, the Allies
launched Operation Husky, their inva-
sion of Sicily, with nighttime land-
ings of American and British troops; a
full-scale incursion by sea began in
the small hours of July 10.
“Invest in the human soul.Who
knows, it might be a diamond in the rough.”
— Mary McLeod Bethune, American reformer (1875-1955)
Actor Richard
Roundtree is 71.
Actor Tom Hanks
is 57.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A bull chasing revellers jumps into the sea during the ‘Bous a la Mar’ festival in the eastern Spanish coastal town of Denia.
Tuesday: Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog
in the morning. Highs in the mid 60s.
Southwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Tuesday night: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming mostly cloudy.
Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the
lower 50s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Wednesday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becom-
ing partly cloudy. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the
mid 60s. West winds around 5 mph.
Wednesday night: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog after mid-
night. Lows in the lower 50s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Thursday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming partly
cloudy. Patchy fog. Highs in the mid 60s.
Thursday night through Sunday: Mostly cloudy.
Local Weather Forecast
(Answers tomorrow)
HELIX SCOUT MIGHTY AZALEA
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The soccer match in Bangkok was —
A “THAI” GAME
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
PEELO
TEJCE
MATARU
GUNFEL
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
J
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m
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p
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in
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Print your answer here:
I n 1540, England’s King Henry VIII had his 6-month-old
marriage to his fourth wife, Anne of Cleves, annulled.
I n 1776, the Declaration of Independence was read aloud to
Gen. George Washington’s troops in New York.
I n 1816, Argentina declared independence from Spain.
I n 1850, the 12th president of the United States, Zachary
Taylor, died after serving only 16 months of his term. (He
was succeeded by Millard Fillmore.)
I n 1896, William Jennings Bryan delivered his famous
“cross of gold” speech at the Democratic national conven-
tion in Chicago.
I n 1918, 101 people were killed in a train collision in
Nashville, Tenn. The Distinguished Service Cross was
established by an Act of Congress.
I n 1938, Supreme Court Justice Benjamin Cardozo died in
Port Chester, N.Y., at age 68.
I n 1953, the MGM movie musical “The Band Wagon,”
starring Fred Astaire and Cyd Charisse, had its world pre-
miere at New York’s Radio City Music Hall.
I n 1962, pop artist Andy Warhol’s exhibit of 32 paintings
of Campbell’s soup cans opened at the Ferus Gallery in Los
Angeles.
I n 1974, former U.S. Chief Justice Earl Warren died in
Washington, D.C., at age 83.
I n 1986, the Attorney General’s Commission on
Pornography released the final draft of its report, which
linked hard-core porn to sex crimes.
I n 1992, Democrat Bill Clinton tapped Tennessee Sen. Al
Gore to be his running mate. Former CBS News commenta-
tor Eric Sevareid died in Washington at age 79.
Actor-singer Ed Ames is 86. Former Defense Secretary
Donald H. Rumsfeld is 81. Neurologist and author Oliver
Sacks is 80. Actor James Hampton is 77. Actor Brian
Dennehy is 75. Author Dean Koontz is 68. Actor Chris
Cooper is 62. TVpersonality John Tesh is 61. Country singer
David Ball is 60. Rhythm-and-blues singer Debbie Sledge
(Sister Sledge) is 59. Actor Jimmy Smits is 58. Actress Lisa
Banes is 58. Singer Marc Almond is 56. Actress Kelly
McGillis is 56. Rock singer Jim Kerr (Simple Minds) is 54.
Actress-rock singer Courtney Love is 49. Rock musician
Frank Bello (Anthrax) is 48. Actor David O’Hara is 48.
In other news ...
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Eureka, No. 7,
in first place; Solid Gold, No. 10, in second palce;
and Gold Rush,No.1,in third place.The race time
was clocked at 1:47.07.
5 5 4
2 23 41 47 54 42
Mega number
July 5 Mega Millions
2 13 35 36 52 11
Powerball
July 6 Powerball
2 7 18 20 33
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
1 7 0 4
Daily Four
8 2 4
Daily three evening
2 18 20 21 45 24
Mega number
July 6 Super Lotto Plus
3
Tuesday • July 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
SAN MATEO
Disturbance. A man attempted to fight
another person at a liquor store on the 2200
block of El Camino Real before 9:23 p.m.
Saturday, July 6.
Theft. Avehicle’s license plate was stolen
on the 200 block of Laurie Meadows Drive
before 1:55 p.m. Saturday, July 6.
Fraud. Aperson’s identity was fraudulently
used on the 200 block of 36th Avenue before
1:19 p.m. Saturday, July 6.
Disturbance. Aman attempted to break the
windshield of a woman’s car on the first
block of North B Street before 1:41 a.m.
Saturday, July 6.
Grand theft. A vehicle was stolen on the
300 block of South Ellsworth Avenue before
9:51 p.m. Friday, July 5.
Shopl i f t i ng. A person was caught
shoplifting at the Hillsdale Shopping
Center before 8:46 p.m. Friday, July 5.
Grand theft. Avehicle was stolen on East
Fourth Avenue before 7:11 p.m. Friday, July
5.
Shopl i f t i ng. A person was caught
shoplifting and having a warrant on the
1700 block of South Delaware Street before
3:26 p.m. Friday, July 5.
Theft. A pair of boots were stolen on the
600 block of Laurel Avenue before 9:29
a.m. Friday, July 5.
UNINCORPORATED
SAN MATEO COUNTY
Mi nor wi t h al cohol. An 18-year-old man
was cited for possession of alcohol on the
1100 block of Le Conte Avenue in Montara
before 10:06 p.m. Monday, July 1.
Petty theft. A bike was stolen from an
unsecured lock on Poplar Beach before 8
a.m. Wednesday, June 26.
Arre s t s. Two juveniles were arrested for
being in possession of a controlled sub-
stance on Princeton Avenue before 2:14
a.m. Sunday, June 23.
Arre s t s. Aman was taken to the ER after he
and two other men were arrested for being in
possession and under the influence of LSD at
Gray Whale Cove before 6:45 p.m.
Saturday, June 22.
MILLBRAE
Arre s t. A man was arrested for assault on
the 400 block of Richmond Drive before
6:42 a.m. Thursday, July 4.
Arre s t. Aman was arrested for public intox-
ication on the 400 block of El Camino Real
before 9:20 a.m. Tuesday, July 2.
Arre s t. Aman was arrested for driving under
the influence on Corte Dorado and Hillcrest
Boulevard before 2:15 a.m. Sunday, June
30.
Burglary. Avehicle was burglarized on El
Camino Real before 1:09 a.m. Sunday, June
30.
Publ i c i nt oxi cat i on. A person was
detained for being drunk in public on Linden
and Serra avenues before 4:32 p.m.
Saturday, June 29.
Arre s t. A man was arrested for being in
possession of a controlled substance on the
400 block of Lincoln Circle before 10:25
p.m. Friday, June 28.
Police reports
The bark is worse than their bite
Aperson received a threatening note on
their door concerning their dog barking
on the 1500 block of Burlingame
Avenue in Burlingame before 8:42 a.m.
Wednesday, July 3.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Mateo County is hosting five sites
where residents can participate in a historic
20-year cancer prevention study looking at
how factors like race, behavior and the envi-
ronment can cause or prevent the deadly dis-
ease.
Study participants can enroll at one of five
locations between July 22 and Aug. 5. The
commitment is an initial comprehensive
survey and 20- to 30-minute appointment at
which blood and waist circumference meas-
ures are taken followed by 45 minutes every
other year to update the research team on
health and habits, according to the
American Cancer Society.
The study seeks to enroll 300,000 men
and women between the ages of 30 and 65
who have never been diagnosed with cancer
and come from a variety of racial ethnic
backgrounds across the United States. The
goal is enrolling at least 25 percent minori-
ty individuals. In 2013, the society projects
more than 1.6 million people nationally
will be diagnosed with cancer and San Mateo
County is not immune — more than 3,545
of those individuals are local.
As a result, study organizers selected as
enrollment sites the Palo Alto Medical
Foundation Mills-Peninsula Division,
Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Peninsula
Chinese Alliance Church, Sobrato Center
for Nonprofits and the Martin Luther King
Jr. Community Center.
There are no other studies of this size and
focused on race and ethnicity currently
underway in the United States, according to
the American Cancer Society’s
Epidemiology Research Program.
The study’s longevity is also a key factor,
allowing researchers to track young adults
who tend to be more transient and individu-
als over 65 who would otherwise have to
recall past behavior and lifestyle informa-
tion which can challenge accuracy.
County officials hope to help drum up sup-
port.
On Tuesday, Board of Supervisors
President Don Horsley will introduce a reso-
lution proclaiming July 20123 as Cancer
Prevention Month in San Mateo County and
encouraging residents to take part in the
study.
Enrollment will happen at
the following times and places:
• Palo Alto Medical Foundation
Burlingame Center, Second Floor Clinic
Area, 1501 Trousdale Drive, Burlingame; 11
a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 24 and 2
p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 8.
• Stanford Medicine Outpatient Center,
Second Floor Conference Room, 450
Broadway, Redwood City; 9 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. Saturday, July 27.
• Martin Luther King Jr. Community
Center, Social Hall A, 725 Monte Diablo
Ave., San Mateo; 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Tuesday, July 30.
• Sobrato Center for Nonprofits, Bay
Rooms A and B, 330 Twin Dolphin Drive,
Redwood City; 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and 11
am. to 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 31.
• Peninsula Chinese Alliance Church,
Second Floor Recreation Room, 256 N. El
Camino Real, San Mateo; 9 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. Saturday, Aug. 3 and 9 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. Saturday, Aug. 30.
For more information on the study or to
make an enrollment appointment see
www.cancer. org/cps3 or call (888) 604-
5888.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
County to host cancer study sites
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
4
Tuesday • July 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Early-morning fire
damages Belmont’s Marvin Gardens
What appeared to be an electrical fire caused about
$100,000 in damage to Marvin Gardens Pub and Grill on the
1100 block of Old County Road in Belmont early Saturday
morning, according to fire officials.
At approximately 1:50 a.m., the Belmont Fire
Department responded to a report of a structure fire at the pub
and grill. Fire units from San Mateo, Foster City and the
Redwood City/San Carlos fire departments responded to
assist, according to fire officials. Firefighters were on scene
for about two hours and there were no injuries, according to
fire officials.
Pacifica brush fire that threatened
homes apparently sparked by fireworks
Firefighters put out a brush fire that threatened homes in
Pacifica on Sunday afternoon that fire officials believe was
caused by fireworks, according to the North County Fire
Authority.
The fire was reported around 3 p.m. in the area of 1111
Terra Nova Blvd., according to fire officials.
Crews arriving on the scene called for backup after finding
a large area of brush burning and threatening nearby homes.
Fire officials said the flames were difficult to access and
almost reached some buildings, but firefighters’ aggressive
attack contained the fire to about half an acre.
Crews were able to fully extinguish the fire, including
mopping up hot spots, in about two hours.
No homes or property was damaged and no injuries were
reported.
Fire officials said a preliminary investigation revealed
that fireworks caused the blaze.
The investigation is ongoing.
Cecilia Tara Boland Walsh
Cecilia Tara Boland Walsh, born
March 18, 1952, died July 4, 2013
quietly and sur-
rounded by the fami-
l y.
Born at
Children’s Hospital
in San Francisco the
day after St.
Patrick’s Day in
1952, Cici exem-
plified the teach-
ings of Ireland’s patron saint-love and
respect for one another. She was the
daughter of Beatrice Murphy Boland
and the late Thomas Francis Boland.
She is survived by her mother, hus-
band of 35 years, Michael Walsh,
daughters Bridget and Molly Walsh,
siblings Maureen Boland, Michael
Boland, Teresa Boland Brogan,
Patrick Boland and their spouses Ann
Boland, James Brogan and Christine
Boland. She is also survived by
numerous nieces, nephews, in-laws
and cousins.
Cici was a graduate of Mercy
Burlingame, San Francisco State
University and the College of Notre
Dame. She taught locally for 35 years
and was the founder of Highland
Montessori in San Mateo.
“She will be missed by all who had the
privilege of knowing her. ”
Friends are invited to attend a
memorial mass 11 a.m. Saturday, July
13 at Our Lady of Angels Church,
1721 Hillside Drive, Burlingame.
Pauline Kaldre
Pauline Kopli, born Nov. 11, 1911
in Haapsalu, Estonia died peacefully at
the age of 101 July
1, 2013 in the care
of the Williams’
family.
Pauline loved
embroidery and had
a small business
with several work-
ers in Estonia. In
1944, she immi-
grated to Germany and worked in a
Berlin post office. During the bomb-
ing of Berlin, she tried to escape by
train, but it was hit by bombs. She
fully recovered after hospitalization.
Soon after, she ended up in a DP
camp in Amberg. She worked as a maid
for an American military commander’s
family, which sponsored her reloca-
tion to the United States.
After completing her services to the
commander, she relocated to Canada
where many other Estonians immi-
grated after the war.
She married Roman in 1950 and
became a housewife. In 1963, Pauline
and Roman immigrated to the United
States to settle in the San Francisco
Bay Area. She traveled the world, was
very active in various Estonian clubs
and had many great friends.
Dennis Drew Williams
Dennis Drew Williams, born Feb.
24, 1948, died unexpectantly July 4,
2013.
Dennis was a life-
long Peninsula resi-
dent mostly in San
Carlos. Dennis
loved dogs and
enjoyed volunteer-
ing with Pets in
Need. He is survived
by his wife Judy,
his sons Dan and Mike and his grand-
son Johan.
“He will be greatly missed by all.”
As a public service, the Daily
Journal prints obituaries of approxi-
mately 200 words or less with a photo
one time on the date of the family’s
choosing. To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo
to news@smdailyjournal.com. Free
obituaries are edited for style, clarity,
length and grammar. If you would like
to have an obituary printed more than
once, longer than 200 words or with-
out editing, please submit an inquiry
to our advertising department at
ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Local briefs Obituaries
5
Tuesday • July 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
By Don Thompson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — The eastern
span of the San Francisco-
Oakland Bay Bridge will not open
as scheduled on Labor Day as it
will take contractors until at least
December to repair cracks in the
bridge’s seismic safety bolts, the
Toll Bridge Program Oversight
Committee announced Monday.
Anew opening date for the $6.4
billion crossing will be decided
after the retrofit of the failed bolts
is completed, which is estimated
to take until at least Dec. 10, the
committee said in a report.
It will take that long to make
and install a steel saddle that will
perform the same function as the
failed bolts, Bay Area Tol l
Authority executive director Steve
Heminger said.
“You might look at it as, our
belt broke and we are putting on
some suspenders,” said Heminger,
who also is chairman of the three-
member oversight committee.
“We are sorry, we are very sorry for
this delay....We will be opening a
safe new bridge for (commuters) as
quickly as we are able to do so.”
It is unclear how long it will
take to manufacture the saddle, but
it will take up to two months to
install the saddle, he said. That
delay will create complications
because of worsening weather in
the fall and because transportation
officials had been counting on a
three-day Labor Day holiday to
finish their work. Engineers will
need to shut down the existing
bridge for four days as they make
final adjustments to divert traffic
onto the new span.
However, engineers’ review of
other bolts throughout the struc-
ture have not found further prob-
lems, easing concerns that they
could also have become brittle
from the exposure to hydrogen.
The other bolts have been in place
and under tension for three months
to four years without failing,
Heminger said.
Bay Bridge opening delayed until at least December
Race tight for governor
of key Mexico border state
MEXICO CITY — President
Enrique Pena Nieto sought to calm
t e n s i o n s
Monday over
the still-unde-
cided election
for governor of
the key
Mexican border
state of Baja
California after
both sides
claimed victory
and authorities said mistakes were
made in preliminary vote counts.
Complaints over the election in
Baja and other states have led the
conservative National Action Party
to suggest it could pull out of an
agreement known as the Pact for
Mexico that has become a center-
piece of Pena Nieto’s administra-
tion. “It is now up to all candidates
and political parties to abide by the
decision expressed by citizens at
the polls,” Pena Nieto said Monday,
adding that the vote “confirms the
strength and validity of our democ-
racy, but also makes clear there are
areas of opportunity to perfect the
system.”
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Two teens broke into the
Redwood City home of one’s ex-
girlfriend and demanded jewelry
from her mother while brandish-
ing a machete and handgun,
according to prosecutors who
charged both yesterday with resi-
dential burglary and home inva-
sion robbery with the use of dead-
ly weapons.
Juan Daniel Ceballos, 19, and
Cristian Joshua Estrada, 17, both
pleaded not guilty and return to
court July 19 for a preliminary
hearing. Although Estrada is a
minor, prosecutors charged him as
an adult. Athird suspect remains at
large and unidentified.
Estrada and the victim’s daugh-
ter once dated and had remained
friendly, said District Attorney
Steve Wagstaffe.
On the afternoon of Wednesday,
July 3, Estrada allegedly left the
Lanyard Drive home with the
daughter so Ceballos and other
male could break through the bed-
room window. Ceballos allegedly
had a machete and the other a
handgun when they encountered
the mother and asked her repeated-
l y, “Where’s the gold?”
After removing her jewelry and
taking a jewelry box from another
room, the teens took the crying
woman to the garage and ordered
her to open a safe, Wagstaffe said.
When her nerves prevented her
from doing so, the pair left and, a
few minutes later, Estrada and the
girl returned, Wagstaffe said.
A police interview of Estrada
turned up messages on his cell-
phone identifying Ceballos and
the plan but not the third suspect.
Asearch of Ceballo’s home and
car turned up the stolen property
and machete, Wagstaffe said.
Prosecutors do not believe the
daughter was involved.
Ceballos remains in custody in
lieu of $250,000 bail. Estrada is
held without bail.
Pair charged with robbing ex’s mom with machete
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
The Stanford Blood Center is
calling for more blood donations
following the deadly Asiana
Airlines Flight 214 crash that
killed two teenage girls and left as
many as 180 injured.
The center has an urgent need for
type O-positive and O-negative
blood and platelets.
The center is a main supplier to
Stanford Hospital and the Lucile
Packard Children’s Hospital where
55 crash survivors were taken fol-
lowing the Saturday morning inci-
dent.
According to the blood center,
the crash occurred when supplies
were already low following the
Fourth of July holiday.
All blood types will be accepted.
To schedule an appointment to
donate blood or platelets call the
center at (888) 723-7831. More
information is available at blood-
center.stanford.edu.
Blood center seeks donations
in wake of Flight 214 crash
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
San Francisco International
Airport passengers whose flights
have been delayed or canceled
because of the Asian Airlines
Flight 214 crash on Saturday are
being offered special rates at many
Bay Area hotels.
Travelers who need lodging
because of the incident can receive
special rates at certain hotels
through Thursday, according to the
San Francisco Travel Association
and SFO officials.
Some hotels offering discounted
accommodations include the
Fairmont San Francisco, the
Laurel Inn in the city’s Presidio
Heights and the Palace Hotel,
among others.
More information about avail-
ability and rates is available at
(800) 935-5995.
The San Mateo County/Silicon
Valley Convention and Visitors
Bureau is offering special rates to
stranded passengers at hotels
including the Hilton Garden Inn
San Mateo, the SFO Marriott
Waterfront, the Embassy Suites
Waterfront in Burlingame and the
Crowne Plaza Foster City.
Hotels offer discount rates for stranded passengers
Around the state
CALTRANS
Exposure to hydrogen was the root cause for why 32 seismic safety bolts
became brittle and cracked after they were tightened in March,according
to a regional report.The problem is considered a short-term phenomenon
that occurs in metals when certain conditions apply.
Enrique Nieto
6
Tuesday • July 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Peninsula Television
Serving San Mateo County since 1999
New Programs:
Special Edition
The Changing Landscape
of Local News Coverage
SUN/THU/SAT @ 9 PM
MON/FRI @ 9:30 AM
Make It In America
Manufacturing and Jobs
In Peninsula Newsmakers
TUE/THU/SAT @11:30 AM
TUE/THU/SAT @5:30 PM
Watch PenTV: Comcast 26 · Astound 27 · AT&T U-verse 99
Streaming Online at www.pentv.tv
Peninsula Television is a registered 501c3 organization.
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Working with integers — not exactly the
dream summer activity for most children.
Perhaps soon-to-be sixth-grader Daniel
doesn’t fit that norm. On a recent Thursday
morning, he sat in a classroom tackling the
math challenge. Going into the summer,
Daniel thought he understood integers but,
only four days into the Peninsula Bridge
Program, he noted that integers are easier
for him to understand.
“It’s great,” he said of the Peninsula
Bridge Program. “I like the activities we do
and how they make learning fun.”
Daniel is one of the many fifth and sixth
grade students who are getting a jump on the
academics that the middle school years
require through the Peninsula Bridge
Program at St. Matthew’s Episcopal Day
School.
The Peninsula Bridge Program offers a
five-week, tuition-free academic enrichment
program for students from lower income
areas who show academic potential.
Students can be with the program for four
years, beginning with the summer before
their fifth grade year. Over the years, stu-
dents will gain access to accelerated math
and language arts exercises while taking
part in art and science enrichment activi-
ties. This year was the fifth that St.
Matthew’s hosted students.
On Thursday, a tour was held for parents
and anyone interested in learning more
about the program.
Development Director Maureen Garrett
explained the group works with academical-
ly motivated students, who will be attend-
ing fifth through eighth grade in the fall.
Through the tours, she said, parents and the
community can truly understand what
Peninsula Bridge offers to local students in
terms of enriching education.
St. Matthew’s hosts a class of fifth and
sixth grade students. Each student receives
lessons in math and English in the morning
and enrichment activities in the afternoon.
Classes have a small ratio of students to
those who can help them by using teen
teachers’ assistants.
Nicki Williams, who will be starting col-
lege in the fall, was returning to Peninsula
Bridge for her second year. Teachers’ assis-
tants, she explained, not only help work
with the students but also offer inspiration
for students by sharing their own personal
strengths and goals.
Students are assessed at the beginning
and end of the program, said teachers’ assis-
tant Ted Catlin. This helps students know in
what areas they could use more help and how
they’ve improved over the five weeks at the
program.
Fifth-grader Chris welcomed the tour
group to his English class and explained
students had been reading a book called
“Bud, Not Buddy.” As a fan of reading, Chris
said he’s been enjoying the class. Inside the
classroom, students were brainstorming
settings for a story they would write over
the course of the program. Children were
asked to suggest locations that are impor-
tant to them as a starting point. Hands went
up and a variety of suggestions were col-
lected ranging from cities where the chil-
dren were born to the soccer field or the
classroom.
This year’s program is using the
America’s Cup as a theme. In addition to
regular academic lessons, students will also
participate in learning adventures that work
with the theme such as creating sailboats
that will compete in the rain gutter regatta.
Through the theme, students will not only
learn about sailing and be creative in
designing a boat powered by wind or fan-
ning, but also the physics of wind.
Executive Director Deirdre Marlowe
explained the most important years for stu-
dents are the ones in middle school.
Peninsula Bridge helps students be success-
ful during that period.
Each year, the program is serving more
than 400 students from San Mateo to
Mountain View. The students represent a
split of both boys and girls with 95 percent
of the students being ones of color, accord-
ing to the Peninsula Bridge Program.
To support the Peninsula Bridge Program
visit www.peninsulabridge.org.
I
n honor of I nt ernat i onal
Wome n’s Day, students of Not re
Dame Hi gh School , Bel mont
delivered donations of feminine hygiene
products to San Franci s co’s S t .
Ant hony Foundat i on in support of
the organi zat i on’s “Ts ani t ary
Tsunami ” drive. Representing NDB’s
St udent s In Ac t i on Cl ub, junior
Kael a Chavez, junior Andrea Li m and
senior Ana Mercado delivered 50 boxes
of sanitary products to St. Ant hony
Foundation, which had been donated by
members of the Notre Dame community
during the school’s drive held from
March 4 through March 8. The NDB com-
munity contributed 2,000 of the total
6,263 individual hygiene products col-
lected by the St. Anthony Foundation
and delivered approximately the same
a m o u n t
March 13.
“We had set
a goal of 100
boxes,” said
Chavez, “and
though we
didn’t meet
that goal, it
was great
that students
brought in
donations.”
Two of the students that coordinated the
drive, Chavez and Mercado, served in St.
Anthony’s Dining Room three days in
January 2013 and were very excited to
return and continue to respond to the needs
of those served.
***
Aragon Hi gh School is one of nine
California schools to be honored for its
commitment to an outstanding student
music program. The 2013 Support
Musi c Award was announced March 18
by the NAMM Foundation. According
to NAMM, Aragon, as one of the selected
schools (a total of 66 were chosen nation-
ally), was commended for “providing stu-
dents with access to comprehensive music
education.” NAMM, based in Carlsbad in
Southern California, is a nonprofit foun-
dation which seeks to promote and encour-
age music programs throughout the U.S.
For more information visit www.namm-
foundation.org.
***
The Upwind Summer Schol arshi p
Program 2013 winners are: Eri c
Dasmal chi of Half Moon Bay and Matt
Moropoul os of Belmont. Both of these
aspiring young aviators were awarded a
complete primary flight training program
that started with ground school in April
and continues with flight training once
the academic school year is completed.
Upwind Program Direct or Mi chael
Vowl es said: “We are very excited to
award our first scholarships this year to
Eric and Matt. The Upwind Summer
Scholarship Program provides a unique
opportunity for high school students to
receive their pilot’s license, giving them
a foundation upon which to build their
careers in aviation.”
Class notes is a column dedicated to school
news. It is compiled by education reporter
Heather Murtagh. You can contact her at (650)
344-5200, ext. 105 or at heather@smdailyjour-
nal.com.
Offering an educational bridge
HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL
Sixth grade student Daniel practices integers during the Peninsula Bride Program at St.
Matthew’s Episcopal Day School on a recent Thursday morning.
NATION 7
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White House projects
smaller budget deficit
By Andrew Taylor and Jim Kuhnhenn
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The White House said Monday that the
federal budget deficit for the current fiscal year will shrink to
$759 billion. That’s more than $200 billion less than the
administration predicted just three months ago.
The new figures reflect additional revenues generated by the
improving economy and take into account automatic, across-
the-board spending cuts that the White House had hoped to
avert. The White House projected that economic growth
would be slightly slower in the coming years than it forecast
in April. The report said the automatic spending cuts that
kicked in during March will slow down economic growth this
year from the 2.6 percent increase it forecast for the fourth
quarter of this year to a 2.4 percent increase.
But the White House sees a slightly rosier jobs picture. It
projects that unemployment will average 7 percent next year
and reach 6.8 percent in the final quarter of 2014. That’s an
improvement over the 7.2 percent unemployment it forecast
in April as an average for 2014.
The 2013 budget year ending Sept. 30 will be the first one
of Obama’s presidency in which the deficit won’t exceed $1
trillion. Obama inherited a struggling economy and record
deficits. A 2011 deficit-cutting deal with Republicans has
pared deficits somewhat, as did a tax hike enacted earlier this
year on upper-bracket earners.
REUTERS
Barack Obama delivers a statement on his management
agenda in the State Dining room of the White House.
By Will Weissert
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN ANTONIO — Gov. Rick Perry
was a champion of fiercely conserva-
tive social activism long before the
tea party was born. He oversaw the
“Texas Miracle” job-creation boom
and became the state’s most powerful
governor since Reconstruction.
But nationally, Perry is better
known for his ‘oops’ presidential
debate brain freeze or for not opposing
forcefully enough the notion that
Texas could secede from the union. For
many outside the Lone Star State, he’s
a political punchline on par with Dan
Quayle — if he’s known at all.
Now, the longest-
serving governor in
Texas history is quit-
ting his day job.
Perry announced
Monday that he
won’t seek a fourth
full term in office
next year, but
notably didn’t say
whether another run
for the White House in 2016 could be
next.
“The time has come to pass on the
mantle of leadership. Today I’m
announcing I will not seek re-election
as governor of Texas,” Perry said
Monday. “I will spend the next 18
months working to create more jobs,
opportunity and innovation. I will
actively lead this great state. And I’ll
also pray and reflect and work to deter-
mine my own future.”
But for that future to include another
run for president, Perry will first need
to concentrate on rebuilding his tat-
tered image outside of Texas.
“He’s starting behind the eight
ball,” said South Carolina-based
Republican operative Hogan Gidley,
an adviser to former Pennsylvania
Sen. Rick Santorum and ex-Arkansas
Gov. Mike Huckabee — both unsuc-
cessful presidential hopefuls who have
remained national conservative
forces.
Perry will not seek re-election
Rick Perry
By Erica Werner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Landmark immi-
gration legislation passed by the
Senate would remake America’s work-
force from the highest rungs to the
lowest and bring many more immi-
grants into the economy, from elite
technology companies to restaurant
kitchens and rural fields.
In place of the unauthorized workers
now commonly found laboring in
lower-skilled jobs in the agriculture
or service industries, many of these
workers would be legal, some of them
permanent-resident green card holders
or even citizens.
Illegal immigration across the bor-
der with Mexico would slow, but legal
immigration would increase marked-
l y.
That’s the portrait that emerges
from recent analyses of the far-reach-
ing bill passed last month by the
Senate with the backing of the White
House. Although the bill aims to
secure the borders, track people over-
staying their visas and deny employ-
ers the ability to hire workers here
illegally, it by no means seeks to
choke off immigration. Indeed, the
U.S. population over the next two
decades would be likely to increase by
15 million people above the probable
level if no changes were made to
immigration laws, according to the
Congressional Budget Office.
Senate immigration bill would remake economy
By Jennifer Peltz
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — First, Anthony
Weiner vaulted back from an embar-
rassing sexting scandal to become a
top mayoral contender. Now, Eliot
Spitzer has sprinted onto the come-
back campaign trail in New York City,
where this fall’s races are turning into
a mini-Olympics of political redemp-
tion.
So Weiner, just two years after a
tweeted underwear photo spelled the
end of his congressional career, jumps
into the race for the nation’s biggest
mayoral job less than two months
before the deadline to get on the bal-
lot? Well, Spitzer embarked Monday
on something just as audacious, if not
more so: Only four days before the
deadline, he launched a bid to become
city comptroller, asking voters to
look past the prostitution scandal that
cost him the governor’s mansion five
years ago in one of politics’ steepest
falls from power.
Spitzer, Weiner make NYC political comeback city
NATION/WORLD 8
Tuesday • July 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Sarah El Deeb and Maggie Michael
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO — Egypt was rocked Monday by
the deadliest day since its Islamist president
was toppled by the military, with more than
50 of his supporters killed by security
forces as the country’s top Muslim cleric
raised the specter of civil war.
The military found itself on the defensive
after the bloodshed, but the interim presi-
dent drove ahead with the army’s political
plan. He issued a swift timetable for the
process of amending the Islamist-backed
constitution and set parliamentary and pres-
idential elections for early 2014.
The killings further entrenched the battle
lines between supporters and opponents of
ousted President Mohammed Morsi, who
was removed by the military July 3 after a
year in office following mass demonstra-
tions by millions of Egyptians.
Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood called for an
uprising, accusing troops of gunning down
protesters, while the military blamed armed
Islamists for provoking its forces.
The shootings began
during a protest by about
1,000 Islamists outside
the Republican Guard
headquarters where
Morsi, Egypt’s first
freely elected leader, was
detained last week.
Demonstrators and mem-
bers of Morsi’s Muslim
Brotherhood said troops
descended on them and
opened fire unprovoked
as they finished dawn prayers.
“I was in the last row praying. They were
firing from the left and right,” said Nashat
Mohammed, who had come from southern
Egypt to join the sit-in and was wounded in
the knee. “We said, ‘Stop, we’re your broth-
ers.’ They shot at us from every direction.”
After a battle lasting about three hours, at
least 51 protesters were killed and 435
wounded, most from live ammunition and
birdshot, emergency services chief
Mohammed Sultan told to the state news
agency.
Clashes by Egypt army, protesters kill at least 54
By Matthew Lee
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Obama adminis-
tration signaled Monday that U.S. nation-
al security interests will trump its promo-
tion of Egypt’s budding democracy,
stressing the importance of continued aid
to the Egyptian military, which overthrew
the elected president last week.
As violence blazed between security
forces and supporters of ousted Islamist
President Mohammed Morsi, the White
House and State Department both urged the
military to exercise
“maximum restraint.”
They also said the mili-
tary would not be pun-
ished with a cutoff of its
$1.3 billion in annual
U.S. aid for toppling
Morsi.
But if the American
government makes a
legal determination that
the removal was done through a coup d’e-
tat, U.S. law would require ending all non-
humanitarian aid to Egypt, the vast major-
ity of which goes to the military.
Administration officials said lawyers
were still reviewing developments to
make that ruling. However, the absence of
a coup determination, coupled with the
administration’s refusal to condemn
Morsi’s ouster, sent an implicit message
of U.S. approval to the military.
And officials said the White House had
made clear in U.S. inter-agency discus-
sions — as recently as a Monday morning
conference call — that continued aid to
Egypt’s military was a priority for
America’s national security, Israel’s safe-
ty and broader stability in the turbulent
Middle East that should not be jeopard-
ized.
“It would not be in the best interests of
the United States to immediately change
our assistance program to Egypt,” White
House press secretary Jay Carney said. He
stressed that more elements — notably
what the United States deems best for
itself, its Mideast allies and the larger
region — than just the physical removal
from office of a democratically elected
leader would be considered in the legal
review.
No cutoff in U.S. aid to Egyptian military — for now
REUTERS
Members of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of deposed Egyptian President
Mohammed Morsi shout slogans against army after clashes near Republican Guard
headquarters around the Raba El-Adwyia mosque square in Nasr City, Egypt.
Mohammed
Morsi
Barack Obama
OPINION 9
Tuesday • July 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Something is
wrong with this picture
Editor,
It seems to me that another waste of
money has occurred. Two years ago,
the underpasses at Poplar Street and
Santa Inez, Monte Diablo and Tilton
avenues had the foundations rebuilt
(2011) at a cost of $2.4 million.
Now, having wasted that money,
Caltrain wants to start all over again
(“Bridges to be replaced” in the July 4
edition of the Daily Journal).
Why didn’t they do the job right
the first time? I can’t believe all this
wasn’t in the future plans when the
previous project was started. So the
tab on this one will run approximate-
ly $31.2 million, give or take a cou-
ple million but two years after the
completion will something else hap-
pen that will cause another restructur-
ing of bridges.
Richard Bortolin
Burlingame
Israeli lobby
Editor,
Letter writer Mike Caggiano calls
the Israeli lobby in our government a
“scary monster,” and I agree (“Israel
and our independence day” in the July
4 edition of the Daily Journal).
This foreign group has great influ-
ence in our government. Their force
is so strong that our government is
considering a joint attack with Israel
on the sovereign nation of Iran. Such
an attack could lead to a third world
war. Russia, India and China are com-
mitted to joining Iran, if they are
attacked. It is not in the interests of
our nation to get involved in yet
another war.
Ron Kramer calls Israel our nation’s
“only true friend.” I disagree with
this. The state of Israel attacked the
American ship “Liberty” with
unmarked planes and attempted to kill
all of our sailors, even shooting at
those who went overboard in life
rafts. They say it was “just a mis-
take.” This was not a friendly action.
All nations should afford all citizens
equal rights and responsibilities.
Israel in an apartheid nation. I disap-
prove of our government giving
funds to the military forces of Israel. I
believe these “gifts” are the result of
the campaign finance funds that the
Israeli lobby gives to our elected offi-
cials. The majority of people in this
nation want our tax funds to be used
to serve the needs of the people of
this nation. When Congress does not
heed the voice of the people they
demonstrate a serious level of corrup-
tion.
Patricia Gray
Burlingame
The history of the ‘green line’
Editor,
Mike Caggiano in his letter, “Israel
and our independence day” in the July
4 edition of the Daily Journal, got his
history wrong. The green line has
never been “internationally recog-
nized as Israel’s border. ”
After Israel declared independence
in 1948, five Arab states invaded to
“liberate Palestine.” The war ended
with a ceasefire, not peace. The Arabs
refused to accept the “green line”
marking the front on a U.N. map as a
border, since they intended to renew
the fight .
During the war, Transjordan cap-
tured territory west of the Jordan
River. They took part of Jerusalem,
splitting the city for the first time in
history. They expelled all Jews from
towns, farms and eastern Jerusalem,
including the ancient Jewish Quarter
of the Old City. King Abdullah did not
give the territory, now called the
“West Bank,” to the Palestinians, but
annexed it and renamed his kingdom
“Jordan.”
Egypt attacked from Sinai north
toward Tel Avi v, but at the ceasefire
occupied only a thin strip of land
around the city of Gaza. Egypt also
did not give this “Gaza Strip” to the
Palestinians.
In 1967, Jordan joined Egypt and
Syria in attacking Israel, attempting
to encircle western Jerusalem. The
counterattack threw them back across
the river. Israel’s offer of “land for
peace” was met with the Arab
League’s “no peace, no negotiation,
no recognition.” Only after this loss
did the Arabs start calling the green
line a border and insist that the West
Bank and Gaza should be given to the
Palestinians.
Alan Fisher
Atherton
Letters to the editor
Riverside Press-Enterprise
C
alifornia’s system of measur-
ing school performance
should not give secondary
status to college readiness. But the
state’s current approach obscures the
glaring mismatch between K-12 poli-
cy and college expectations. The state
needs to bridge that gap, and part of
that task includes providing stronger
incentives for schools to focus on
college preparation.
The reality is that for all the talk
about encouraging college atten-
dance, the state’s accountability sys-
tem stresses other goals. The empha-
sis is on improving the performance
of low-achieving students — the 43
percent of pupils who scored less than
proficient in English-language arts in
2012 and the 49 percent who did the
same in math. But the system concen-
trates on that vital objective at the
expense of another key issue: readi-
ness for college.
Consider, for example, the fact that
more than 60 percent of the freshmen
entering the California State
University system require remedial
courses in English, math or both — a
trend which adds to both student and
taxpayer costs for higher education.
Yet these are students who took all the
required college preparatory courses
and graduated high school with at
least a B average. So why do appar-
ently capable high school graduates
struggle with college work?
As it turns out, a score of proficient
on the state standards test is no indi-
cator of college readiness, as
Riverside County Superintendent of
Schools Kenneth Young points out.
Young’s careful analysis of 2012 test
data offers the disturbing conclusion
that far fewer high school students are
prepared for college than the state’s
testing regime might suggest.
The state is now in the middle of
shifting to new academic standards
and creating new tests to match the
standards. And state education offi-
cials are in the process of revamping
the Academic Performance Index, as
well. The state should use that oppor-
tunity to refocus accountability meas-
ures to include stronger incentives for
college preparation, besides aiding
low-achievers.
But that step is only the first phase;
the state also needs to better align the
coursework and achievement expecta-
tions for high schools and colleges.
California does not need a false
sense of complacency about college
readiness. The state should advance
policy that provides a coherent educa-
tional approach from kindergarten
through college, not a disjointed sys-
tem with uncoordinated objectives.
College prep: Close gap between rhetoric, reality
Price-gouging jerks
T
he courage and selfishness of first responders,
airline staff and everybody else who sprang to
help after Saturday’s deadly airline crash at San
Francisco International Airport?
Absolutely priceless.
The stories of a San Francisco police officer rushing
inside the smoking plane without protective gear? The
crew who freed a trapped flight attendant and passengers
who carried out others? The checking and double-check-
ing that everybody was out?
No way to ever put a price tag
on that type of bravery, train-
ing and sheer adrenaline.
But offering shelter to the
shaken and frightened passen-
gers unexpectedly needing a
place to stay?
Apparently, that is one thing
whose value carries a dollar
sign — multiple dollar signs,
that is.
San Francisco hotel rates are
never anything to cheer about
and the slightest of popular events breezing through a
summer weekend can cause immediate spikes. Pride.
Giants, even when they’re losing and certainly when it’s
the Dodgers. America’s Cup. Oracle OpenWorld. Outside
Lands. Fleet Week.
Somehow, deadly tragedy doesn’t really sound like it
fits the same criteria.
Yet, at least one news outlet reported that rooms nor-
mally bringing in $100 or $200 a night were being
hawked for as much as $1,200 Saturday night. The
rumors of price gouging could be hearsay. In the wake of
the reports, at least one South San Francisco outlet
called its $999 price an error that has since been correct-
ed. The spirit of caution hasn’t stopped an immediate
denouncement by elected leaders of the alleged practice.
The airport and San Francisco Travel Association were
also quick to announce establishments offering discount-
ed lodging to those affected.
On a different note, shouldn’t they also be asking why
Asiana Airlines isn’t coughing up some dough to get
these people a roof for a night or two. Airline-provided
accommodations are notoriously underwhelming but it
sure beats topping off the trauma and possible injury of a
crash landing with a hotel bill.
Even if the gouging rumors are true, the sharp rate
climb could also be nothing more than the financially
painful reality of supply and demand. Capitalism is king
and nobody ever said the monarchy is required to be
benevolent, especially in an area already known as a
pricey destination.
It just sounds so shady. When disaster strikes, we want
to hear stories of heroes with helping hands not greedy
operators with open hands.
Yet, time and time again, an already frustrating or
painful incident has salt poured on the wound.
Last week, as BART workers cried for salary increases,
many of the Bay Area’s other working stiffs found them-
selves often having to drive into San Francisco where
parking was in short supply and the available spaces
came at a steep price. Some called the increased rates
“New Year’s Eve” prices. All called the cost — up to $60
a day at some garages — ridiculous and mean-spirited.
The draw for drivers isn’t even something as special as
the World Series; instead it is a job — a job that the
employee undoubtedly wishes paid more and had better
benefits — which probably explains a little bit about
why the unions aren’t finding much love for their plight.
Of course, in many cities it would be cheaper to swal-
low the cost of parking ticket instead. Not so in the city
with the highest parking meter ticket in the nation at
$74.
Stories like this makes us unfortunately look like a
nation of looters, a community of squatters, a society in
which people asking for help can sometimes fall victim
all over again, a place where prioritizing numero uno can
come at the expense of those in every other position.
At least with the BART parking some, albeit not all,
motorists have a choice between paying the exorbitant
amount and finding an alternative such as Caltrain,
telecommuting or finding themselves spontaneously ill.
The passengers of Asiana Flight 214 and those immedi-
ately connected to their arrival can’t quite say the same
so lining one’s pockets on their back is in poor taste.
Success in a market economy is gaining an advantage
over the competition. The mark of a business worth
patronizing is one that doesn’t take advantage.
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs every
Tuesday and Thursday. She can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone (650) 344-
5200 ext. 102. What do you think of this column? Send a
letter to the editor: letters@smdailyjournal.com.
Other voices
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BUSINESS 10
Tuesday • July 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 15,224.69 +88.85 10-Yr Bond 2.645 -0.07
Nasdaq3,484.83 5.45 Oil (per barrel) 102.96
S&P 500 1,640.46 +8.57 Gold +0.0051
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Monday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
The Gap Inc., up 50 cents at $43.65
Shares of the clothing company hit a 52-week high Monday. Analysts
expect the retailer to post a rise in monthly sales later this week.
Nasdaq
Dell Inc., up 41 cents at $13.44
A top proxy advisory firm recommended that the computer maker’s
shareholders vote in favor of the company’s founder taking it private.
Zumiez Inc., up 53 cents at $29.84
A Wedbush analyst reiterated her “Outperform”rating on the teen retailer,
saying that she expects that sales rose last month.
Natus Medical Inc., down $1.89 at $12.40
The maker of medical devices for newborn care said that its revenue fell
late in the second quarter and will be lower than it expected.
ClickSoftware Technologies Ltd., down 85 cents at $7.56
The business software maker issued a disappointing outlook for the
second-quarter and cut its revenue prediction for the full year.
Lululemon Athletica Inc., up $2.38 at $65.93
A Canaccord analyst reiterated his “Buy”rating on the yoga-wear maker
saying that the company’s troubles may be behind it.
Luna Innovations Inc., up 53 cents at $1.83
The molecular and sensing technologies maker announced a new supply
contract with robotic surgery system maker Intuitive Surgical Inc.
Flir Systems Inc., up 57 cents at $28.48
Shares of the thermal imaging company hit a 52-week high as a Sterne
Agee analyst raised his price target on the stock $7 to $37.
Big movers
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Cautious optimism
about corporate earnings sent the stock
market higher Monday.
U.S. companies start reporting their
second-quarter results this week, led by
aluminum producer Alcoa. Other major
companies that will report include
JPMorgan and Wells Fargo.
Analysts predict that earnings
growth for companies in the Standard &
Poor’s 500 index will come in at 3 per-
cent in the second quarter. While that
rate would be down from 5 percent in
the first quarter, earnings are still
expected to reach record levels.
Investors and traders will search for
evidence that companies are increasing
revenues, not just cutting costs to
boost profits. Sales growth is predicted
to fall 0.3 percent in the second quarter.
“We’ll be looking to see where rev-
enue comes in,” said Jim Dunigan, an
executive vice president of investments
at PNC.
The Dow rose 88.85 points, or 0.6
percent, to close at 15,224.69. The
Standard & Poor’s 500 index gained
8.57 points, or 0.5 percent, to end at
1,640.46.
Dell was among the big gainers in the
S&P 500 index. An advisory firm rec-
ommended that company shareholders
support a plan to take the computer
company private. Founder Michael Dell
and Silver Lake Partners have offered to
buy Dell for $24.4 billion, or $13.65 a
share. Dell rose 41 cents, or 3.1 per-
cent, to $13.44.
The Russell 2000 index, an index of
small-company stocks, closed at an all-
time high 1,009.25. The index past the
1,000 mark for the first time Friday and
has gained 19 percent this year, a sign
that investors are more willing to take
on risk. The gains have outpaced those
of the Dow and S&P 500, which are up
16 percent and 15 percent, respective-
l y.
In other trading, the Nasdaq compos-
ite rose 5.45, or 0.2 percent, to
3,484.83, the smallest gain of the
major indexes.
The index was weighed down by a
slump in Intel. The chipmaker fell after
a Citigroup analyst wrote that weak PC
sales and waning demand for smart-
phones would stunt the company’s
growth. Intel, which makes up 2.2 per-
cent of the Nasdaq, fell 88 cents, or 3.6
percent, to $23.18.
Other chipmakers also declined.
Qualcomm dropped 96 cents, or 1.6 per-
cent, to $59.99.
In government bond trading, the
yield on the 10-year government note
pulled back from a two-year high of
2.74 Friday. It fell to 2.64 percent on
Monday.
The yield had jumped after the gov-
ernment reported strong U.S. hiring for
June on Friday. Investors believe that
the improving jobs market will prompt
the Federal Reserve to ease back on its
bond-buying program. The Fed is buy-
ing $85 billion in bonds each month to
keep interest rates low and spur borrow-
ing and investing.
For the first five months of the year
stocks moved higher, supported by the
backdrop of low interest rates, a recov-
ering housing market and increased hir-
ing. The S&P 500 index gained 17 per-
cent by May 21 and stood at a record
1,669.
But the stock market pulled back
when Fed chairman Ben Bernanke said
that the central bank might consider
easing its stimulus.
The S&P500 dropped as low as 1,573
on June 24, about 5.7 percent below its
record close.
Since then stocks have gradually
recouped losses as investors appear to
be getting more comfortable with high-
er interest rates. The S&P 500 is now
2.2 percent below its May record.
“Interest rates, even though they’ve
risen, are still incredibly low,” said
Brent Schutte, a market strategist at
BMO Private Bank. “Right now,
increases in rates are a good thing
because it means the economy is doing
a little bit better.”
The rising rates are still making bond
investors nervous though.
Stocks rise as earnings kick off
By Christopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Hiring is exploding in
the one corner of the U.S. economy where
few want to be hired: Temporary work.
From Wal-Mart to General Motors to
PepsiCo, companies are increasingly turn-
ing to temps and to a much larger universe
of freelancers, contract workers and con-
sultants. Combined, these workers number
nearly 17 million people who have only
tenuous ties to the companies that pay them
— about 12 percent of everyone with a job.
Hiring is always healthy for an economy.
Yet the rise in temp and contract work
shows that many employers aren’t willing
to hire for the long run.
The number of temps has jumped more
than 50 percent since the recession ended
four years ago to nearly 2.7 million — the
most on government records dating to
1990. In no other sector has hiring come
close.
Driving the trend are lingering uncertain-
ty about the economy and employers’ desire
for more flexibility in matching their pay-
rolls to their revenue. Some employers
have also sought to sidestep the new health
care law’s rule that they provide medical
coverage for permanent workers. Last week,
though, the Obama administration delayed
that provision of the law for a year.
The use of temps has extended into sec-
tors that seldom used them in the past —
professional services, for example, which
include lawyers, doctors and information
technology specialists.
Temps typically receive low pay, few ben-
efits and scant job security. That makes
them less likely to spend freely, so temp
jobs don’t tend to boost the economy the
way permanent jobs do. More temps and
contract workers also help explain why pay
has barely outpaced inflation since the
recession ended.
Beyond economic uncertainty, Ethan
Harris, global economist at Bank of
America Merrill Lynch, thinks more lasting
changes are taking root.
“There’s been a generational shift toward
a less committed relationship between the
firm and the worker,” Harris says.
An Associated Press survey of 37 econo-
mists in May found that three-quarters
thought the increased use of temps and con-
tract workers represented a long-standing
trend.
Typical of that trend is Latrese Carr, who
was hired by a Wal-Mart in Glenwood, Ill.,
two months ago on a 90-day contract. She
works 10 p.m. to 7 a.m., helping unload
trucks and restocking shelves. Her pay is
$9.45 an hour. There’s no health insurance
or other benefit s.
Carr, 20, didn’t particularly want the
overnight shift.
“I needed a job,” she says.
The store managers have said some temps
will be kept on permanently, Carr says,
depending on their performance.
Carr isn’t counting on it.
The trend toward contract workers was
intensified by the depth of the recession and
the tepid pace of the recovery. A heavy
investment in long-term employment isn’t
a cost all companies want to bear anymore.
“There’s much more appreciation of the
importance of having flexibility in the
workforce,” says Barry Asin of Staffing
Industry Analysts, a consulting firm.
Susan Houseman, an economist at the
Upjohn Institute of Employment Research,
says companies want to avoid having too
many employees during a downturn, just as
manufacturers want to avoid having too
much inventory if demand slows.
Temporary jobs becoming a permanent fixture in U.S.
CalPERS to post 500,000
pensioners’ data online
SACRAMENTO — The nation’s largest
public pension fund announced Monday that
it will post data online about nearly half a
million pensioners in an effort to be trans-
parent.
The California Public Employees’
Retirement System will launch a searchable
pension database with information that is
deemed public, such as a retiree’s name,
monthly gross pension payment and some
employment history, said spokeswoman
Amy Norris.
The database is expected to go live next
week.
CalPERS recently sent a notice to retiree
organizations saying the fund already fills
many requests for public information. It said
an online database would allow it to meet
legal requirements for public disclosure while
protecting the “integrity of our retirees’ pub-
lic pension data.”
“In recent years, interest in public pen-
sions has increased,” the fund said. “CalPERS
receives and fills many requests for public
information, including comprehensive
inquiries from news organizations that liter-
ally seek information about every retiree in
the system.”
The fund acknowledged that such disclosure
would stir privacy concerns from retirees.
Business brief
By Matthew Pennington
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — U.S. and Chinese offi-
cials began formal discussions on cyberse-
curity Monday, kicking off four days of
talks to build cooperation and broach issues
that divide the two world powers.
Washington is increasingly concerned
about the Chinese theft of American intel-
lectual property, but has put been on the
defensive by the revelations about U.S. sur-
veillance by NSAleaker Edward Snowden.
Abilateral working group on cyber issues
that was announced in April held its first
meeting Monday at the State Department,
with both civilians and military taking
part. The U.S. side was led by coordinator
for cyber issues, Christopher Painter;
China’s by senior Foreign Ministry offi-
cial, Dai Bing.
It’s a prelude to annual, ministerial-level
talks on security and the economy that start
Wednesday, a month after a path-finding
summit in California between President
Barack Obama and new Chinese leader Xi
Jinping that aimed to improve collabora-
tion between the powers whose strategic
rivalry belies deep economic inter-depend-
ence.
This year’s edition of the dialogue at least
begins in less fraught circumstances than
last year’s in Beijing, which was overshad-
owed by the escape of dissident lawyer Chen
Guangcheng from house arrest to the U.S.
Embassy in the Chinese capital. Chen later
moved to the U.S. where he’s proved a
staunch critic of Beijing.
But the weeks since Obama-Xi summit
have brought a new complication in the
relationship. Authorities in the semi-
autonomous Chinese territory of Hong
Kong refused to extradite Snowden — a
move which U.S. officials implied that
Beijing had a hand in.
U.S., China discuss cybersecurity
By Barbara Ortutay
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Once up on a time, there
was a popular search engine called AltaVista.
It lives no more.
On Monday, its owner Yahoo Inc. sent
AltaVista.com to the Internet graveyard to
rest alongside order-almost-anything ven-
ture Kozmo.com and the butler from Ask
Jeeves.
Palo Alto, Calif.-based AltaVista was
introduced in 1995, three years before
Google Inc. was founded. Eclipsed by
Google in the early 2000s, AltaVista’s star
had already faded by the time Yahoo acquired
it as part of its $1.7 billion purchase of
Overture Services Inc. in July 2003.
Overture had bought AltaVista earlier that
year from Massachusetts-based CMGI Inc.
Yahoo announced AltaVista’s fate on its
Tumblr page late last month. Search industry
expert Danny Sullivan likened AltaVista to a
bright child neglected by its parents.
“You were loved. You really were,”
Sullivan wrote in a blog post eulogizing the
site. “People did not want to leave you. But
despite adding new features, some of which
Google copied, you couldn’t keep up with
the pace and innovation of that company,
which decided against becoming a portal
like your corporate masters ordered for you.”
Indeed, AltaVista’s decline began after it
expanded to become more like Yahoo, offer-
ing a bevy of online services instead of
sticking solely with search.
Yahoo shuts down Internet relic AltaVista
<< Judge forces NFL, retired player to negotiate, page 15
• Warriors keep making moves, page 12
Tuesday, July 9, 2013
YOUTH SOFTBALL UPDATE: WICKED, SAN MATEO AND FORCE MOVING FORWARD >> PAGE 13
Colon brilliant once again in A’s victory
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PITTSBURGH — Bartolo Colon
allowed one run over seven
innings and the Oakland Athletics
won for the ninth time in their
past 12 games, beating the
Pittsburgh Pirates 2-1 on Monday
night.
The 40-year-old Colon (12-3)
shook off a tough-luck 3-1 defeat
in his previous start to win for the
ninth time in his last 10 outings.
He outdueled Jeff Locke, who had a
personal eight-game winning
streak snapped. Locke (8-2) lost
for the first time since his first
start of the season April 10.
Colon moved into a tie for sec-
ond in the majors in victories, and
has the second-most wins by a 40-
year-old in A’s history. He allowed
seven hits and one walk with five
strikeouts.
Coco Crisp made a diving catch
in left-center to preserve
Oakland’s lead in the seventh off a
hard-hit sinking liner from
Andrew McCutchen with two men
on and two outs.
That was the final batter Colon
would face. The Pirates got runners
on second and third with two outs
against Ryan Cook in the eighth,
but Clint Barmes lined out to left.
Grant Balfour remained perfect
in 23 save opportunities when he
worked a perfect ninth.
Jed Lowrie had two of Oakland’s
three hits and one of its runs. The
A’s (53-37) improved to a season-
high 16 games over .500 and held
on to first place in the American
League West.
Jose Tabata, Pedro Alvarez and
Barmes each had two hits for the
Pirates (53-35), who have lost five
of seven to lose their grip on the
majors’ best record — and on first
place in the NL Central. They trail
the St. Louis Cardinals by a half-
game.
Locke faced one more than the
See A’s, Page 13
District 52 heads toward
the championship stretch
A
glance at the list of
men’s singles cham-
pions at Wimbledon
the last dozen years reveals
plenty of pleasant-enough
looking chaps, though not a
single slam-dunk male model
in the bunch.
No matter. Each one was
instantly fawned over the
moment he held the trophy
aloft, celebrated for tough-
ness, smarts and the kind of
devotion that knows no quit.
Marion Bartoli displayed all
of those qualities — and more
— on the way to winning
Wimbledon in this most
tumultuous of
years. But
because she’s
a woman, at
least one man
behind a
microphone
couldn’t stop
there.
His name is
John
Inverdale, and
even as Bartoli headed toward
the spectator’s box where the
father who taught her to play
tennis sat, Inverdale’s listen-
ers on BBC Radio were treated
to some musings about how
she came to possess a cham-
pion’s ability.
“Do you think Bartoli’s dad
told her when she was little,
‘You’re never going to be a
looker? You’ll never be a
Sharapova, so you have to be
scrappy and fight.”’
Inverdale has apologized, of
course, though that hardly
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Two of the three District 52
championship games have their
participants; meaning we could
have two new champions as early
as Tuesday.
Over in the Minors 9-10 brack-
et, Foster City got the best kind of
revenge en route to securing their
place in the District 52 champi-
onship.
Less than a week after falling to
Hillsborough by a rough 9-0 mar-
gin, Foster City rode a complete-
game shutout to a 6-0 win over the
same team. With the win, San
Mateo National now knows
they’ll be playing against their
neighbors at 5:30 p.m. The bout
takes place at Burgess Field No. 2
in Menlo Park.
Foster City had to defeat Half
Moon Bay and Belmont-Redwood
Shores just to get another chance
at Hillsborough.
Over in the Minors 10-11 tour-
nament, Belmont-Redwood
Shores knew they would have to
play flawless baseball after losing
to San Mateo American early on in
the tourney. And it appears
they’ve done just that.
By virtue of its 6-5 win over
Hillsborough, Belmont-Redwood
Shores is headed to the champi-
onship game where they’ll face off
against Pacifica America. The two
See LITKE, Page 14
JIM LITKE
See D52, Page 13
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Five Stanford football players
— Ben Gardner, Trent Murphy and
Shayne Skov — were named to
the watch list for the Bednarik
Award while two players — Kevin
Hogan and David Yankey — were
named to the Maxwell Award
Watch List.
The Maxwell Award, named in
honor of Robert W. “Tiny”
Maxwell, has been given to
America’s College Player of the
Year since 1937. Maxwell’s con-
tributions to the game of football
were extensive, including as a
player, a sportswriter and an offi-
cial. The Bednarik Award has been
presented to the College
Defensive Player of the Year since
1995. Chuck Bednarik, former
standout at Penn and with the
Philadelphia Eagles, is a member
of both the College Football Hall
of Fame’s Class of ‘69 and the NFL
Hall of Fame’s Class of ‘67.
Semifinalists for the Maxwell
and Bednarik Awards will be
announced Oct. 29, while the three
finalists for each award will be
unveiled Nov. 25. The winners of
the 2013 Maxwell and Bednarik
Awards will be announced as part
of the Home Depot College
Football Awards Show held on
See AWARD, Page 14
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — The hits
keep coming for the San Francisco
Giants everywhere but on the field
right now.
The Giants placed infielder
Joaquin Arias on the 15-day dis-
abled list Monday with appendici-
tis. Nick Noonan was recalled
from Triple-A Fresno to fill Arias’
spot before San Francisco opened
a three-game series against the
New York Mets.
Giants manager Bruce Bochy
said Arias had an emergency
appendectomy after becoming ill
Sunday night. Arias will be out at
least two weeks, he said.
Arias also had strained his ham-
string at Dodger Stadium on June
24 and missed the next eight
games before returning last week.
San Francisco had lost 11 of 13
entering Monday night’s game.
“It’s tough news again,” Bochy
said. “Really feel for him. He was
swinging the bat well. We have to
get by without him for a couple
weeks.”
Arias is batting .282 with 10
RBIs in 60 games this season. He
See LIST, Page 13
Handful of Cardinal
on early watch lists
Giants place Joaquin Arias on
disabled list with appendicitis
SPORTS 12
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Nuggets to get Foye
in the Iguodala deal
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — The Denver Nuggets will
get something back for Andre Iguodala after
all.
The Nuggets have agreed to separate sign-
and-trade deals that will land them guard
Randy Foye from the Utah Jazz and send
Iguodala to the Golden State Warriors, a per-
son familiar with the decision said Monday.
The Warriors had planned to sign Iguodala
to a four-year, $48 million deal as a free
agent last week.
Instead, the restructured deal will give
Golden State more salary cap flexibility,
deliver Denver a $9 million trade exception
and help Utah build for the future with expir-
ing contracts and draft picks.
The person, who spoke on condition of
anonymity to the Associated Press on
Monday because teams are not allowed to
confirm moves until the new league year
begins Wednesday, said the original
Warriors-Jazz deal remains intact.
The Warriors will clear more than $24 mil-
lion by sending Richard Jefferson, Andris
Biedrins and Brandon Rush to the Jazz along
with the package of draft picks. All three are
in the last year of their deals.
Golden State is only taking back Kevin
Murphy and his non-guaranteed $788,000
deal from Utah.
Yahoo Sports, which first reported the
new deal, said Foye will sign a three-year
contract worth $9 million.
Utah will receive multiple draft picks from
Golden State, including its 2014 and 2017
first-round picks.
By signing Iguodala first and then sending
him to the Warriors, Denver will get a trade
exception worth about $9 million that it can
use anytime within the next year. And in the
meantime, it softens the blow left by
Iguodala’s departure.
The Warriors will also get some roster
flexibility to sign other free agents through
other exceptions in the NBA’s complicated
salary cap system.
The 6-foot-4, 213-pound Foye, who will
turn 30 on Sept. 24, is primarily an off-
guard but can also play point guard. He aver-
aged 10.8 points and two assists while play-
ing all 82 games for the Jazz last season.
Foye has shot 40.9 percent for his career,
including 37.7 percent from 3-point range.
He was drafted seventh overall out Villanova
in 2006 by the Boston Celtics, who imme-
diately traded him to Portland, which moved
him to Minnesota.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — The Golden State Warriors
and Marreese Speights have reached an
agreement on a free agent contract, a person
with knowledge of the deal said Monday.
The person spoke to The Associated Press
on condition of anonymity because teams
can’t announce moves until the new league
year begins Wednesday. Terms of the deal
weren’t immediately known.
Speights should help fill the void left by
power forward Carl Landry, who agreed to a
four-year, $26 million deal with the
Sacramento Kings on Saturday. Speights
averaged 10.2 points and 5.1 rebounds in
the final 39 games with Cleveland after
coming over in a trade from Memphis last
season.
He will likely come off the bench for the
Warriors at both power forward and center.
The 25-year-Speights was drafted 16th
overall out of Florida by Philadelphia in
2008. He has averaged 7.8 points and 4.4
rebounds in his first five NBAseasons.
Speights gives the Warriors another
option inside off the bench who can be used
in pick-and-pop situations the way Landry
was so effective last season. The 6-foot-10,
255-pound Speights also can play sparing-
ly at center, which is the biggest need
remaining for the Warriors in free agency.
With Andrew Bogut’s ankle injuries last
season, finding a reliable backup has
become a more pressing need in recent
weeks. Festus Ezeli will be sidelined a min-
imum of six to nine months after right knee
surgery last month, and Andris Biedrins was
traded to Utah as part of a salary-slashing
move to make room for Andre Iguodala’s
acquisition.
A’s call up former
first-round pick Green
PITTSBURGH — The Oakland Athletics
recalled former first-round pick Grant Green
on Monday, and the second baseman was in
the lineup for the game against the
Pittsburgh Pirates.
Green was the No. 13 overall pick of the
2009 draft out of USC and was rated as the
A’s top prospect by Baseball America as
recently as 2011.
He had yet to appear in a major-league
game prior to Monday but was called up after
batting .318 with 11 home runs and 49 RBIs
in 81 games with Triple-ASacramento.
Infielder Adam Rosales was designated for
assignment after hitting .200 with four
home runs and eight RBIs in 48 games with
Oakland.
Manager Bob Melvin said the A’s were
hopeful to keep Rosales within the organi-
zation if he is not claimed on waivers.
Melvin said the intention is for Green to
play every day. The 25-year-old was tied for
second in the Pacific Coast League in runs
(61) and hits (112). He batted .372 in June.
Warriors to sign Marreesse Speights
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAINT-NAZAIRE, France — The manager
of Chris Froome’s team promises that his
star rider will never again be left exposed in
his bid to win the Tour de France.
Froome kept the yellow jersey on a fero-
ciously tough mountain stage Sunday. The
British rider will wear it when the race
resumes Tuesday with Stage 10 following
Monday’s rest day.
That Froome had to defend the jersey
alone in the ninth stage — because all his
Sky teammates had been left behind —
offers hope to rivals like two-time champi-
on Alberto Contador and Andy Schleck. If
they can again isolate Froome later in the
race, perhaps he will be too tired to respond.
“We’ve learnt some lessons, valuable les-
sons, to take into the rest of the race,” Sky
manager Dave Brailsford said Monday. “But
I’m not going to spell it out. I’m not going
to go into the details of the changes we’re
going to make.”
Froome’s key teammate is Richie Porte,
an Australian who won the Paris-Nice stage
race in March. He was unable to help
Froome on Stage 9 and wants to make
amends.
“Am I going to have another bad day like
that? I hope not,” he said.
Contador, the Tour winner in 2007 and ‘09
who was stripped of his title the following
year for doping, is looking forward to get-
ting another shot at Froome in the moun-
tains Sunday.
“I will try and do something,” Contador
said. “If you don’t think you can succeed
then you never will. So we have to take a
few risks.”
Sunday’s 15th stage is the next big climb-
ing trek and features a 12.9-mile ascent to
Mont Ventoux. Afew days later, riders face
three straight days of arduous mountain
climbing in the high Alps.
“Throughout my career I’ve found my best
form in the third week,” Contador said.
The 30-year-old Spaniard takes heart from
winning the Spanish Vuelta last year, a race
in which Froome finished about 10 minutes
behind in fourth place.
“People can speculate and look at my pre-
vious performances however they like, but I
look at that Vuelta in that I was running on
fumes. I was in survival mode,” Froome
said. “If people want to make comparisons
that’s up to them, but I don’t feel I was at my
best.”
Tuesday’s stage is a 122-mile route from
Saint-Gildas-des-Bois to Saint-Malo and is
made for sprinters. On Wednesday, Contador
could face trouble in the 20.5-mile time
trial.
“It’s a very flat time trial and that is a dis-
advantage for me,” he said.
Froome finished second to Tour winner
Bradley Wiggins in the time trial last year
and is considerably faster than Contador.
The Spaniard may be able to limit the time
gaps this time because the dash from
Avranches to Mont-Saint-Michel is rela-
tively short.
Given the way Froome is riding, he can
take a big step toward winning the Tour if he
extends his overall advantage after the time
trial.
Spain’s Alejandro Valverde is 1 minute, 25
seconds behind Froome. Contador is 1:51
behind in sixth, while Schleck is four min-
utes back in 15th place, and Evans trails by
4:36 in 16th place.
None will be consoled by last year’s race.
Valverde was a massive 7:20 slower than
Froome in last year’s 33.2-mile time trial;
Evans was 4:28 slower. They again face the
prospect of losing significant time to
Froome.
This is the 100th edition of the Tour and
the first since Lance Armstrong was stripped
of his seven straight titles from 1999-2005
for serial doping.
Froome has said twice during the race that
he is riding clean. Contador again repeated
that he has never doped, even though he
tested positive for the banned drug clen-
buterol.
Froome to be offered more protection
Co-defendant in
Hernandez case ordered held
ATTLEBORO, Mass. — A man
facing an accessory to murder
charge in the case involving for-
mer New England Patriots tight
end Aaron Hernandez was ordered
held without bail on Monday, and
a judge ruled that search warrants
that had earlier been sealed may be
released.
Ernest Wallace pleaded not
guilty in District Court in
Attleboro, Mass. The Miramar,
Fla. man will be held without bail
until another hearing on July 22,
under an agreement between his
attorney and prosecutors.
Details of the charge against
Wallace — accessory to murder
after the fact — were not released
during the brief proceeding.
Bristol County District Attorney
C. Samuel Sutter declined com-
ment on the specific allegations
outside the courthouse, citing the
ongoing investigation into the
death of Odin Lloyd.
Lloyd, a semi-pro football play-
er, was found slain on June 17 at
an industrial park in North
Attleborough not far from
Hernandez’s home. The 27-year-
old Lloyd’s relatives say he was
dating the sister of Hernandez’s
fiancee and that the two men were
friends.
Prosecutors say Wallace, 41, and
another man, Carlos Ortiz, were
with Hernandez when they drove
with Lloyd to the industrial park.
SPORTS 13
Tuesday • July 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
has played third base, first base
and shortstop and shuffled
throughout the batting order to
give others a rest or fill-in because
of an injury.
Noonan has played 48 games
with the Giants this year, batting
.212 with four RBIs and playing
every infield position but first
base. He batted .311 with eight
RBIs in 11 games for Fresno.
Next week’s All-Star game
should slice a few days off the
amount of playing time Arias will
miss. However, his absence will
be sorely felt in the lineup in the
final seven games before the
break.
With Arias sidelined again, it
will be harder for the Giants to
give shortstop Brandon Crawford
and third baseman Pablo Sandoval
a break. Sandoval entered Monday
night’s game 3 for his past 42
since coming back from a left foot
strain, and Crawford played
through two sprained fingers
recently.
Bochy juggled his starting line-
up slightly against the Mets by
inserting first baseman Brandon
Belt into the third spot for the first
time in his three-year career.
Buster Posey was fourth and
Sandoval fifth. Both had flip-
flopped in the third and fourth
spots in the lineup most of the
season.
“This is a case where sometimes
you break it up to break it up,”
Bochy said. “Keep doing what
you’re doing, you keep getting
what you’re getting type of thing,
which we’ve talked about a few
times. That’s why he’s in the
three-hole. We’ll take a look at it.”
Continued from page 11
LIST
minimum through six innings.
Oakland’s first run came on Josh
Donaldson’s sacrifice fly in the
fourth. Lowrie had the Athletics’
first hit of the game, a double off
the wall in right-center. He
advanced to third on a wild pitch
— catcher Russell Martin’s throw
beat him, but Alvarez’s tag swiped
through too early.
The A’s took a 2-0 lead when
Locke walked Derek Norris with
the bases loaded in the seventh.
The Pirates’ only run came in the
bottom of the inning when
Barmes scored on a two-out infield
single by Tabata. McCutchen —
an All-Star selection who earlier
extended his hitting streak to 10
games — came up and hit the ball
hard into the gap, but Crisp
thwarted Pittsburgh’s chance to tie
or take the lead.
NOTES: Oakland is 10-0 all-
time against Pittsburgh — the
only team in the majors to have
never lost to another team in the
majors. ... Pirates 2B Neil Walker
sat out his second consecutive
game since leaving Saturday’s
game because of discomfort in his
right side. He worked out during
batting practice. ... Before the
game, the A’s recalled 2B Grant
Green from Triple-A Sacramento.
The 2009 first-round pick went 0
for 3 with two strikeouts in his
major-league debut.
Continued from page 11
A’s
teams will do battle for the
District 52 crown at 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday at Kiwanis Field in
Redwood City.
After that loss to San Mateo,
Belmont-Redwood Shores went on
a complete tear. They beat
Redwood City West, Palo Alto
American, Foster City and Menlo-
Atherton before taking down
Hillsborough. In the first four
games, they outscored their oppo-
nents 35-1.
In the Majors bracket, the
machine that is Belmont-Redwood
Shores still awaits its champi-
onship game opponent. They’ll
face either Redwood City East and
Pacifica American.
YOUTH SOFTBALL
Elsewhere in the youth sports
world, the always formidable
Redwood City Wicked continues
its winning ways.
The 12C team qualified for the
California State Junior Olympic
Games in San Diego. Because of
the tournament’s size, only the
top five teams in each C division
bracket qualify for the Junior
Olympics. The Wicked girls qual-
ified second out of 23 teams in the
12C bracket for Northern
California. The girls from
Redwood City take off for San
Diego July 10 with the games
scheduled for July 12 to 14.
In the six-year history of
Redwood City Girls’ Softball
League and the summer Wicked
program, the 12C’s finish at
NorCal is the highest finish ever
by a Redwood City Wicked team.
Like the Wicked, the San Mateo
Girls’ Fastpitch softball team is
making some considerable noise.
San Mateo was recently crowned
Nor Cal champions at the Twin
Creeks Sports Complex qualify-
ing the tean for Western Nationals
in Peoria, Ariz. They won four
straight games against very tough
opponents throughout the week-
end: Sunnyvale, Belmont,
Almaden and Half Moon Bay.
Great defense, hot bats and fan-
tastic spirit contributed to their
success.
And lastly, the local San Carlos
Force 10C girls’ softball team was
invited to the 2013 Cal State
Games in San Diego coming July
11. The Force is using the internet
to crowd-fund its way to the games
and cover expenses. For more,
visithttp://sancarlosforce.mydag
site.com
Those looking to support the
Wicked and the 12C team can make
a tax deductible donation to:
RCGSL, Attention: 12C Wicked,
P.O. Box 717, Redwood City, CA
94064. Checks can be made
payable to "RCGSL" and be sure to
reference “12C Wicked San Diego”
in the memo line to ensure it gets
credited to the team.
Continued from page 11
D52
Sports brief
DEBBIE FUNG
Matty Fung pitched a complete
game for Foster City, leading them
to the District 52 championship
game
SPORTS 14
Tuesday • July 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
S.A.M S A M
1940 Lesl i e St. , San Mateo, CA 94403
Sam
Tsang
Grand Opening!
92
101
Hillsdale
Shopping
Center
Hillsdale
Caltrain
Station
We are Here!
S El Camino Real
West
East
South North
came off better than his original remark.
The BBC did, too, before reporting that
nearly 700 viewers called in as of Monday
night to complain. It’s kicked up a row in
print, on the airwaves and across social
media over in Britain similar to the one
that buzzed briefly over here when Brent
Musburger awkwardly rambled on about
Alabama quarterback A.J. McCarron’s girl-
friend during the broadcast of the college
football national championship.
The principals who find themselves the
subjects of such remarks rarely make it out
of the ensuing media circus gracefully, but
the Bartolis are proving themselves rare
exceptions.
For her part, Bartoli showed up for the
champion’s dinner looking like a model —
“her dark hair down in a loose wave ... fig-
ure-hugging black dress ... sky-high ankle
boots,” as one British newspaper breath-
lessly reported — and then said, “I invite
this journalist to come and see me this
evening in ball gown and heels, and in my
opinion he could change his mind.”
When her father, Dr. Walther Bartoli, was
asked about Inverdale’s comments, he sim-
ply said, “I am not angry. She is my beauti-
ful daughter. The relationship between
Marion and me has always been unbeliev-
able, so I don’t know what this reporter is
talking about.”
Neither did Inverdale at the time — and
that’s the real shame in this whole mess.
There actually is a long, very tender and
very complicated backstory behind the lat-
est Wimbledon champion and her father
that has nothing to do with her “looks.”
Walther Bertoli was Marion’s first coach,
largely reponsible for her jarring style.
She plays aggressively, but isn’t very fast.
She hits two-handed off both sides, a strat-
egy Walther Bartoli insisted she master
after watching Monica Seles rise to the top
of the heap nearly 20 years ago. His guid-
ance was important enough that only last
summer, Bartoli reportedly turned down a
chance to represent France at the London
Olympics because of national federation
rules about having private coaching at a
previous event.
But this past February, Bartoli arrived at
the same crossroad that a number of great
athletes and their parents-as-coaches often
do. She and her father parted ways, and
after some shopping around Bartoli wound
up settling on former Wimbeldon champi-
on and countrywoman Amelie Mauresmo.
And indeed, she got fitter and more mobile.
Bartoli didn’t drop a set throughout the
past fortnight, an impressive feat when
you consider how all the top seeds stum-
bled, including Maria Sharapova, who actu-
ally works in her spare time as a model.
Bartoli was beset by plenty of the same
nerves that felled the rest. Watching her
hop back and forth awaiting serves can
make you twitchy, but it’s one of those
things Bartoli relied on since she was
young to help cope with the pressure.
Old habits are hard to break, which also
explains why she looked often in her
father’s direction during her win over
Sabine Lisicki in what was a mistake-filled
final. Bartoli had been in Lisicki’s sneak-
ers in 2007, when she lost the title match
to Venus Williams. No one likely under-
stood better the distance she had traveled
since that day than Walther.
No doubt he told her, from the time
Bartoli was small, that she’d have to “be
scrappy and fight.” Inverdale got that part
right. Plenty of athletes have heard the
same thing from one parent or another
over and over throughout their careers.
But the other part, the part about how she
was “never going to be a looker” is not
just cruel, it’s stupid. Because if it were
true, we’d have precious few champions to
fawn over — man or woman — in the first
place.
Dec. 12. The formal presentations of these
awards will be made at the Maxwell Football
Club Awards Gala hosted by Harrah’s
Entertainment Atlantic City on March 7,
2014.
The watch list candidates have been cho-
sen by the Maxwell Football Club’s selec-
tion committee, which analyzes both past
performance and future potential. The club
reserves the right to make additions and
deletions to these lists as the 2013 season
unfolds. All members of the Maxwell
Football Club, NCAA sports information
directors, FBS head coaches and selected
national media are eligible to vote for the
awards.
Gardner, a two-time All-Pac-12 selection,
started all 14 games at defensive end in
2012 and helped lead one of the nation’s top
defenses, Gardner tied for second on the
team in both tackles for a loss (14.5) and
sacks (7.5).
Murphy, an AP third team All-American
and Butkus Award semifinalist was a frequent
visitor in the backfield last season, when
the senior outside linebacker led the
Cardinal with 10.0 sacks and 18.0 TFL.
Skov returned to the lineup in 2012 after
major knee surgery and returned to dominant
form by season’s end. Set to return for his
fifth year with the Cardinal, Skov totaled a
team-leading 82 tackles (43 solo) with 7.5
for loss and 2.5 sacks from the inside line-
backer spot.
Yankey, one of the most dominant and
versatile offensive linemen in the nation,
goes into his senior campaign as a presea-
son candidate for many awards including the
Outland Trophy. Yankey will move to left
guard in 2013 after starting 14 games at left
tackle in 2012, where he was named All-
America first team by the American Football
Coaches Association and Sporting News,
and copped second-team honors by the
Associated Press. The 2012 Morris Trophy
winner as the outstanding offensive line-
man in the Pac-12, Yankey has started 27
career games and been an impact performer
since his freshman season.
Continued from page 11
LITKE
Continued from page 11
AWARD
Sports brief
Ex-Bengals cheerleader
libel suit retrial begins
COVINGTON, Ky. — Aformer Cincinnati
Bengals cheerleader who is suing a gossip
website for alleged defamation wiped tears
from her eyes Monday as she testified that
she was mocked and humiliated by website
posts that she says were false and malicious.
Sarah Jones took the stand Monday in a
retrial of her federal lawsuit in Covington,
Ky., against thedirty.com, a Scottsdale,
Ariz.-based website, and its operator, Nik
Richie.
AJanuary trial in the lawsuit resulted in a
hung jury.
SPORTS 15
Tuesday • July 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
650-354-1100
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 51 38 .573 —
Washington 46 43 .517 5
Philadelphia 44 46 .489 7 1/2
New York 37 48 .435 12
Miami 32 56 .364 18 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 53 34 .609 —
Pittsburgh 53 35 .602 1/2
Cincinnati 50 39 .562 4
Chicago 39 48 .448 14
Milwaukee 36 52 .409 17 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 47 42 .528 —
Los Angeles 43 45 .489 3 1/2
Colorado 43 47 .478 4 1/2
San Francisco 40 47 .460 6
San Diego 40 50 .444 7 1/2
Monday’s Games
Oakland 2, Pittsburgh 1
Philadelphia 3, Washington 2
Atlanta 7, Miami 1, 14 innings
Chicago Cubs 8, Chicago White Sox 2
Milwaukee 4, Cincinnati 3
L.A. Dodgers 6, Arizona 1
Colorado 4, San Diego 2
N.Y. Mets at San Francisco, Late
Tuesday’s Games
Oakland (Straily 5-2) at Pittsburgh (Cole 4-1), 4:05
p.m.
Washington (Jordan 0-1) at Philadelphia
(Hamels 3-11), 4:05 p.m.
Atlanta (Teheran 6-4) at Miami (H.Alvarez 0-0),
4:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Blanton 2-10) at Chicago Cubs
(T.Wood 5-6), 5:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Cingrani 3-0) at Milwaukee (W.Peralta
5-9), 5:10 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 54 37 .593 —
Tampa Bay 50 40 .556 3 1/2
Baltimore 49 41 .544 4 1/2
New York 48 41 .539 5
Toronto 43 45 .489 9 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 49 39 .557 —
Cleveland 46 43 .517 3 1/2
Kansas City 42 44 .488 6
Minnesota 37 49 .430 11
Chicago 34 52 .395 14
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 53 37 .589 —
Texas 52 37 .584 1/2
Los Angeles 43 45 .489 9
Seattle 40 49 .449 12 1/2
Houston 32 57 .360 20 1/2
Monday’sGames
Detroit 4, Cleveland 2, 10 innings
Kansas City 5, N.Y.Yankees 1
Oakland 2, Pittsburgh 1
Texas 8, Baltimore 5
Tampa Bay 7, Minnesota 4
Chicago Cubs 8, Chicago White Sox 2
Seattle 11, Boston 4
Tuesday’sGames
Kansas City (Shields 3-6) at N.Y.Yankees (Sabathia
9-6), 4:05 p.m.
Oakland (Straily 5-2) at Pittsburgh (Cole 4-1),4:05
p.m.
Texas (M.Perez 2-1) at Baltimore (Britton 2-2), 4:05
p.m.
Toronto (Jo.Johnson 1-3) at Cleveland (U.Jimenez
6-4), 4:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Quintana 3-2) at Detroit (Ver-
lander 9-5), 4:08 p.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Montreal 9 4 4 31 31 25
Kansas City 8 5 6 30 26 19
New York 8 7 4 28 25 24
Philadelphia 7 6 6 27 29 29
Houston 7 6 5 26 20 18
New England 6 5 6 24 21 14
Columbus 6 8 5 23 23 23
Chicago 6 8 3 21 19 25
Toronto FC 2 8 7 13 17 24
D.C. 2 13 3 9 8 29
WESTERNCONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake 10 5 4 34 29 18
FC Dallas 8 3 7 31 27 22
Portland 7 2 9 30 28 17
Vancouver 8 5 5 29 29 25
Los Angeles 8 7 3 27 27 22
Colorado 7 7 5 26 23 22
Seattle 7 6 3 24 21 19
San Jose 5 9 6 21 20 32
Chivas USA 3 10 5 14 16 32
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
———
Saturday’s Games
New England 2, San Jose 0
Houston 1, Philadelphia 0
Vancouver 2, Seattle FC 0
Sunday’s Games
Sporting Kansas City 2, Chicago 1
Columbus 1, Portland 0
Montreal 1, Chivas USA 1, tie
D.C. United at Colorado, late
FC Dallas at Los Angeles, late
Friday, July 12
Chivas USA at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m.
Saturday, July 13
Montreal at New York, 4 p.m.
Houston at New England, 4:30 p.m.
Toronto FC at Sporting Kansas City, 5:30 p.m.
Real Salt Lake at FC Dallas, 9 p.m.
Seattle FC at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
MLS GLANCE
vs.Seattle
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/13
Mets
12:45p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/10
Mets
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/9
@Padres
7:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/11
@Padres
7:10p.m.
NBC
7/13
@Padres
7:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/12
@Padres
1:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/14
vs.Dbacks
7:15p.m.
NBC
7/19
vs. RedSox
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/14
vs. RedSox
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/13
@Angels
7:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/19
@Angels
6:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/20
vs. RedSox
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/12
@Pirates
4:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/9
@Pirates
4:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/10
vs.Norwich
City
7:30p.m.
7/20
vs.Portland
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/27
vs. Chivas
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/4
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Recalled RHP Louis Cole-
man from Omaha (PCL). Optioned LHP Will Smith
to Omaha.
NEW YORK YANKEES—Added 1B Travis Ishikawa
to the roster. Assigned INF David Adams to Scran-
ton/Wilkes-Barre (IL).
OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Recalled 2B Grant Green
from Sacramento (PCL).Designated INF Adam Ros-
ales for assignment.
SEATTLEMARINERS—DesignatedRHPJeremyBon-
dermanfor assignment.RecalledLHPLucas Luetge
from Tacoma (PCL).
National League
CHICAGO CUBS—Acquired RHP Ivan Pineyro and
aplayer tobenamedfromWashingtonfor OFScott
Hairston.
COLORADO ROCKIES—Placed RHP Roy Oswalt on
the 15-day DL.Recalled OF Charlie Blackmon from
Colorado Springs.
LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Placed OF Matt Kemp
and RHP Stephen Fife on the 15-day DL, Kemp
retroactive to July 6. Recalled OF Scott Van Slyke
fromAlbuquerque(PCL).AddedRHPRickyNolasco
to the roster.
MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Activated OF Ryan Braun
from the 15-day DL. Placed 3B Aramis Ramirez on
the 15-day DL, retroactive to July 7.
SAN DIEGO PADRES—Recalled RHP Brad Brach
from Tucson (PCL). Optioned LHP Robbie Erlin to
Tucson.
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS—Placed INF Joaquin
Arias on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Nick Noonan
from Fresno (PCL).
WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Activated RHP Dan
Haren from the 15-day DL. Optioned 1B-OF Tyler
Moore to Syracuse (IL).
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
LOS ANGELES CLIPPERS—Named Alvin Gentry as-
sociateheadcoachandArmondHill,KevinEastman
and Tyronn Lue assistant coaches.
NEW YORK KNICKS—Signed G Tim Hardaway Jr.
and F C.J. Leslie.
PHILADELPHIA 76ERS—Announced the resigna-
tion of chief executive officer Adam Aron. Named
Scott O’Neil chief executive officer.
WASHINGTON WIZARDS—Signed F Otto Porter
and G Glen Rice, Jr.
FOOTBALL
CanadianFootball League
WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS—Signed WR-KR Aaron
Woods. Added WR Taylor Renaud to the practice
roster.
National Football League
NEW YORK GIANTS—Signed WR Victor Cruz to a
multiyear contract extensionthroughthe2018sea-
TRANSACTIONS
By Mary Claire Dale
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHILADELPHIA — The NFL and
former players must try to negoti-
ate a dispute over whether com-
plaints about concussion-related
injuries belong in court or in arbi-
tration, a federal judge said
Monday.
U.S. District Judge Anita B.
Brody of Philadelphia had planned
to rule July 22 in a legal fight that
involves about 4,200 former play-
ers and could be worth billions of
dollars.
But instead she ordered the two
sides to begin mediation with
retired federal Judge Layn Phillips.
The retirees want the right to sue
the league, while the NFL insists
the claims must be arbitrated under
terms of the collective bargaining
agreement.
Brody asked for a progress
report by Sept. 3, while placing a
gag order on the lawyers. Both
sides agreed to comply.
Many former players say they
suffer from dementia, Alzheimer’s
disease and other neurological
conditions, which they believe
stem from on-field concussions.
The league insists that safety has
always been a top priority.
Both sides have something to
fear from a court ruling. Brody
could throw out the lawsuits and
steer them to arbitration; or accept
some or all of them, and open up
internal NFL files to plaintiffs’
lawyers looking for a smoking
gun. Still, sports law professor
Marc Edelman, who teaches at
Fordham University and Baruch
College, called it “highly unlike-
ly” that either side would budge
during mediation.
“The sentimental impact of this
type of case is one that would
make it strongly advantageous for
the plaintiffs to get to a jury, ”
Edelman said. “The position the
NFL has taken is they are not
liable for anything that’s hap-
pened to the players.”
In legal arguments before Brody
in April, NFL lawyer Paul Clement
said teams bear the chief responsi-
bility for health and safety under
the contract, along with the play-
ers’ union and the players them-
selves. Players’ lawyer David
Frederick accused the league of
concealing studies linking con-
cussions to neurological problems
for decades.
“The plaintiffs got in a lot of
their case, that the NFL glorified
violence all these years. I would
think in mediation that Judge
Phillips would let it go further, if
that’s what they want to talk
about,” said Andrew Brandt, who
directs a sports law center at
Villanova University School of
Law.
In recent years, a string of for-
mer NFL players and other con-
cussed athletes have been diag-
nosed after their deaths with
chronic traumatic encephalopa-
thy, or CTE, including popular Pro
Bowler Junior Seau and lead plain-
tiff Ray Easterling. Both commit-
ted suicide last year.
About one-third of the league’s
12,000 former players have joined
the litigation since 2011. Some
legal experts feel the NFL may be
most vulnerable on claims from a
few hundred “gap” players, who
played during years when there
was no contract in place.
“We respect and will comply
with the court’s order regarding
mediation and will be available to
meet with Judge Phillips at his
direction,” NFL spokesman Greg
Aiello said in a statement. The
Plaintiffs’ Executive Committee
for the former NFL players also
pledged to “follow the court’s
directive.”
Phillips, 61, had a meteoric law
career before leaving the federal
bench in Oklahoma and moving to
private practice before age 40. He
was a tennis standout at the
University of Tulsa, where he also
played flag football, according to
an online biography. He is now
based in Newport Beach, Calif.
“Judge Phillips is pleased to
have been appointed ... in this
challenging and complex matter.
He looks forward to working with
the parties to achieve resolution,”
his office said in a statement.
Judge orders NFL, retired players to negotiate
16
Tuesday • July 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BALTIMORE — Alberta Hough struggles
to feed herself a snack, her arms shaking
badly from Parkinson’s disease. Days earli-
er, the 84-year-old fell while eating, sliding
off her kitchen chair.
The rest of Hough’s day isn’t much easier
to navigate. She wobbles into a bathtub
with no grab bar. Her feet catch on damaged
floor tiles. Part of the banister she needs to
steady herself on the stairs has pulled out of
the wall. At the back door, a rickety wooden
ramp no longer supports the scooter that
helps her get around.
The environment in which you live can be
as disabling as a disease, and too often,
older Americans wind up in a nursing home
not because they’re super-sick but because
they can’t get through their days safely at
home.
Now a major research project will bring
handymen, occupational therapists and
nurses into the homes of 800 low-income
seniors in Baltimore to test if some inex-
pensive fix-ups and strategies for daily liv-
ing can keep them independent longer, and
save millions in taxpayer dollars spent on
nursing home care.
“Very small changes can make a big differ-
ence,” said Sarah Szanton, a Johns Hopkins
University associate nursing professor who
leads the project. “We’re not saying,
‘What’s your blood pressure?’ We’re focus-
ing on function: What do they want to do?”
Losing independence is a leading fear as
people age. But a recent poll shows that too
few comprehend the changes in lifestyle
needed to offset the chronic illnesses and
gradual slowdown that hit just about every-
one in the 70s, 80s and beyond.
Asked about their choice of living situa-
tion when they’re older, Americans 40 and
over say their top priorities are a one-level
home with no stairs, that’s close to their
children and medical care, according to the
poll by the AP-NORC Center for Public
Affairs Research.
Chances are, that won’t be enough.
For Hough, No. 1 is feeding herself with-
out everything tumbling off the fork.
“I’m shaking all the time,” she quietly
told Hopkins occupational therapist
Allyson Evelyn-Gustave.
Hough’s other priority is not falling, and
stairs are only one of her home’s hazards.
To Hopkins’ Szanton, bridging the gap
between what older adults are able to do and
what their homes allow them to do is key to
maintaining independence.
The Capable study aims to prove how.
During 10 home visits over four months,
the Hopkins team is tailoring interventions
— including about $1,100 in home repairs
or modifications provided for free — to help
low-income seniors who are having trouble
caring for themselves.
Drills buzzed in Hough’s house as carpen-
ters installed a new banister and added grab
Fixing up seniors’ homes to help them age in place
A major research project will bring handymen, occupational therapists and nurses into the
homes of 800 low-income seniors in Baltimore to test if some inexpensive fix-ups and strategies
for daily living can keep them independent longer,and save millions in taxpayer dollars spent
on nursing home care.
See SENIORS, Page 18
18
Tuesday • July 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
HEALTH
bars and a raised toilet seat in the bathroom.
They replaced patches of flooring to prevent
trips and prepared to tackle the ramp.
As for eating, Evelyn-Gustave recom-
mended a little-known tool: utensils and
cups that are specially weighted to counter
Hough’s tremors.
“It’ll be easier for you to hold,” she prom-
ised.
The set of utensils costs only about $20,
one of the affordable tips the study is gener-
ating. Hough’s daughter had thought the
only solution was an aide to feed her mother,
which the older woman hates.
“I always said I wouldn’t let my mom go to
a nursing home,” said Gloria J. Hawks, 66,
who is determined to care for her mother in
the house the two share.
The Capable project — it stands for
Community Aging in Place, Advancing
Better Living for Elders — is being closely
watched by Medicaid officials in other states
as a way to coordinate care and improve the
functional problems that lead to pricey, and
sometimes preventable nursing home
admissions. Today, it’s difficult for Medicaid
patients to get these services.
With more than $8 million in research
money from the National Institutes of
Health and the Centers for Medicare and
Medicaid Services, the project goes beyond
home repair for health. It starts with a full-
scale assessment of each participant’s
needs.
In one home, a Hopkins nurse discovered
that an 82-year-old woman was taking all of
her 26 daily medications at once instead of
staggered throughout the day, leaving her
disoriented and sedentary until she became
too weak to get out of bed without help.
First the nurse fixed the medication sched-
ule. Then the occupational therapist taught
the woman leg-strengthening exercises and
installed $30 steel risers to make it easier
for her to get in and out of bed. Add new ban-
isters, and soon she was moving around on
her own.
Whether it is the cost or emotional ties,
many people grow old in the same home
where they spent their younger, more agile
years. An AARP survey in 2010 found nearly
90 percent of seniors wanted to remain in
their current home for as long as possible.
Yet government figures show nearly 1 in 5
seniors living in the community have trou-
ble with at least one activity of daily living,
such as walking or bathing.
Those physical limitations become more
difficult with doorways too narrow for walk-
ers, toilets that are lower than chairs, and
kitchen counters too tall to sit while cook-
ing. Plus, nearly one-third of older adults
experience a fall every year, and most who
are injured fell inside the home, according to
the Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention.
“You don’t think about that stuff,” said
Hattie Watties, who can’t imagine leaving
her Baltimore home of 36 years, that’s near
children and grandchildren. “You just do
what you have to.”
For Watties, 74, that meant climbing onto
kitchen counters to reach too-high cabinets.
Steep, dark stairs to the basement laundry
only had a partial railing, so she threw
clothes down and inched her way after them.
No more: Carpenter Tyrone White lowered
Watties’ cabinets to a comfortable reach,
installed railings, and showed how an ener-
gy-saving compact fluorescent light bulb
provided more light than a regular bulb in
the dim stairway.
Continued from page 17
SENIORS
vides a place to relax, food and Internet
access to military members and their fami-
lies — helped more than 200 people.
When USO volunteer Leann Thornton of
South San Francisco read the news of the
plane crash, she abandoned her leisurely
afternoon of baking.
She immediately made some calls and
prepared a shopping list for a Costco run.
“The first thing you do when there is a
disaster is you know you’re going to need
food,” said Thornton.
When she arrived at the airport with sup-
plies for the center, it was surprisingly
calm for a major airport on a holiday week-
end since flights were grounded.
“It was just eerie, how quiet it was,” she
said.
The USO center was already crowded when
she arrived. Several other staff and volun-
teers had rushed in to help and direct visi-
tors to two nearby conference rooms
opened up to accommodate the overflow.
“There’s great satisfaction to give back a
little bit to those who serve our country, ”
said Thornton, who has volunteered for
USO for five years.
The scene was not chaotic, because mili-
tary personnel are for the most part very
calm and gracious, she said.
“They weren’t frantic as the other termi-
nal would be,” she said.
When Thornton was giving out extra
blankets, someone told her, “Oh, it’s OK,
I’ve slept in worse places.”
“They don’t ask for much,” she said.
“They’re just content with anything they
have.”
Thornton returned to the airport on
Sunday to find one man who was still wait-
ing with his daughter after almost 48 hours,
she said.
“He was very calm and said, ‘Ya, we’ll get
out of here eventually,’” she said.
One member of the military who was
headed for Japan was on the plane that was
about to take off on the adjacent runway as
the Asiana Airlines flight crashed and burst
into flames, said Bay Area USO Director Jeff
Herndon.
He was delayed more than 12 hours and
stayed at the center, said Herndon.
Another military member who was on his
way to Korea was delayed 24 hours, he said.
“They have a place to sleep and eat, so
it’s no extra cost to them,” said Herndon,
who heard that many local hotels had dou-
bled their room rates after Saturday’s emer-
gency.
The center, which served almost 27,000
people last year, allows for members of the
military and their families to avoid extra
expenses in the event of an emergency.
“Otherwise, you’re sitting down on the
concourse, twiddling your thumbs, wonder-
ing what to do and paying $10 for a sand-
wich,” he said.
On Sunday, the 2,000-square-foot center
served 185 visitors. Herndon expects to
serve a higher than normal number of visi-
tors through the end of the week. The USO
center at the San Francisco International
Airport is open 24 hours every day to all
military and their family members.
Continued from page 1
USO
ly lost most of their possessions.
About 25 residents were briefly hospital-
ized and another 61 were housed at the evac-
uation center at the Fair Oaks Community
Center by the Red Cross, said agency
spokesman Woody Baker-Cohn.
The agency will have a service center
open today at the armory on 939 Velota
Road between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m., Baker-
Cohn said.
About 30 people stayed the night at the
armory on cots including Mike Rolen and
his family, Monica Moyle, Gilbert
Rodriguez, John Lopez, Angela Parks and
Jacqueline Smith.
Rolen not only quickly ushered his family
out of the second-floor apartment he lived in
but also went back to pull a man out of a unit
who needs a wheelchair to get around.
“I did not know the man until the fire. He
was stuck,” Rolen said about his neighbor.
Many of the displaced residents have
Section 8 housing vouchers and are provid-
ed assistance by the San Mateo County
Human Services Agency.
“We could be in a temporary shelter for a
long time,” said Rodriguez, 53, who lived at
the complex for six years. “It will be hard to
place us.”
More than 20 suffered some injuries from
the blaze, including three firefighters.
While flames were clearly visible from
one side of the building early Sunday, a
group of residents were trapped on the third
floor away from where the fire was visible,
said Smith, 64, who was rescued by fire-
fighters on a ladder truck.
“Some were tying bed sheets together to
climb down and then a fireman said ‘don’t
jump,’” Smith told the Daily Journal. “They
ran the ladders up but I couldn’t walk down.
I had to slide down on my butt.”
More than 100 firefighters with 20
engines and seven ladder trucks responded
to the fire.
The Peninsula Humane Society accepted
about eight cats, two dogs and two birds
from displaced residents. No pets were
reported having perished in the fire.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
FIRE
HEALTH 19
Tuesday • July 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Carla K. Johnson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO — A 2-year-old girl who
was implanted with a windpipe grown
from her own stem cells has died, three
months after she became the youngest
person to receive the experimental
treatment.
Hannah Warren died Saturday at
Children’s Hospital of Illinois in
Peoria, hospital spokeswoman Shelli
Dankoff said. Dr. Rick Pearl, one of
three surgeons involved in the opera-
tion, told the Associated Press that
Hannah died of lung complications
following a second surgery, but that
the new windpipe “worked very well”
until the end.
Her family asked for privacy, but
expressed their sorrow in a fundraising
blog updated Sunday: “She is a pioneer
in stem-cell technology and her
impact will reach all corners of our
beautiful Earth. Her new trachea was
performing well, but her lungs went
from fairly good, to weak, to poor. ”
Hannah’s treatment was part of an
ongoing scientific effort to develop
lab-grown tissues and organs. Similar
methods have been used to grow blad-
ders, urethras and last year a girl in
Sweden got a lab-made vein using her
own stem cells and a cadaver vein.
In Hannah’s case, the stem cells
came from her bone marrow. They were
seeded in a lab onto a plastic scaffold,
where it took a few days for them to
multiply and create a new windpipe,
which was implanted April 9.
Hannah was born in South Korea and
traveled to Illinois for the surgery. A
pediatric surgeon in Peoria had met
Hannah’s family while on a business
trip to South Korea and helped connect
them with Dr. Paolo Macchiarini, an
Italian surgeon based in Sweden who
pioneered the technique.
Hannah’s parents, Darryl Warren and
Lee Young-mi, had read about
Macchiarini’s success using stem-cell
based tracheas, but they couldn’t afford
to pay for the operation at his center in
Stockholm. Dr. Mark Holterman, the
Illinois doctor, helped the family
arrange to have the procedure at his
hospital with Macchiarini leading the
surgical team. Children’s Hospital
waived the cost.
The hospital is part of OSF Saint
Francis Medical Center, a Roman
Catholic system that considers the
operation part of its mission to pro-
vide charity care and a way to champi-
on a type of stem-cell therapy that
doesn’t involve human embryos, the
surgeons said in April. The Catholic
church opposes using stem cells
derived from human embryos in
research or treatment.
Hannah had lived in a Seoul hospital
all her short life before flying to the
U.S. and her lungs weren’t strong, said
Pearl, who is surgeon-in-chief at
Children’s Hospital. She required a
second surgery June 11 for a leak in her
esophagus. Lung complications fol-
lowed.
The girl’s family and her caregivers
believe the knowledge gained from her
surgery will benefit other patients.
Girl who received lab-made windpipe dies
Unusual pattern of spine
injuries from jet crash
By Lauran Neergaard
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Many survivors of Saturday’s plane crash in San
Francisco have a surprising pattern of spine injuries that a
doctor says shows how violently they were shaken despite
wearing seat belts.
So far, two people are unable to move their legs — doc-
tors don’t yet know if the damage is permanent — and sev-
eral others have needed surgery to stabilize their spines so
they can move, said Dr. Geoffrey Manley, neurosurgery
chief at San Francisco General Hospital who is overseeing
their care.
Among the worst injuries are crushed vertebrae that com-
press the spinal cord, and ligaments so stretched and torn
that they can’t hold neck and back joints in place, Manley
said in an interview Monday.
That 305 of the 307 passengers and crew of the Asiana jet
survived the crash is remarkable, and a testimony to
improvements in airline safety in recent years. More than
180 people went to hospitals with injuries, but only a
small number were critically injured.
Still, Manley said even among those who suffered mild
spine trauma, he is struck by a pattern that shows how their
upper bodies were flung forward and then backward over the
lap belts that kept them in their seats and undoubtedly
saved their lives.
The injuries are somewhat reminiscent of the days before
shoulder belts in cars, although much more severe, said Dr.
David Okonkwo of the University of Pittsburgh Medical
Center, who isn’t involved with the survivors’ care.
Does that mean shoulder belts in airplanes would prevent
such injuries? Okonkwo said that’s simplistic considering
how much more speed and force are involved in a plane
crash. Shoulder belts might just transfer that force to the
neck, he cautioned.
“If you put in the shoulder belt, it might just move the
injuries up further. Your head weighs a tremendous amount,”
agreed San Francisco’s Manley. He hopes to study the issue,
comparing survivors’ injuries to where they sat.
Hannah Warren’s treatment was part of an ongoing scientific effort to develop lab-grown tissues and organs.
DATEBOOK 20
Tuesday • July 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
TUESDAY, JULY 9
Free Forum for Caregivers. 5:30 p.m.
to 7:30 p.m. Senior Focus Center, 1720
El Camino Real, Suite 10, Burlingame.
Space is limited. The forum will cover
an update on dementia care and
mindful moments in caregiving. The
event is not for professional caregivers.
Free. For more information and to
register call 696-3660.
Mime Troupe: Oil and Water. Music
at 6:30 p.m., show at 7 p.m. Mitchell
Park, South Field, 600 E. Meadow Drive
and Cowper Street, Palo Alto. Free. For
more information go to sfmt.org.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 10
Sons In Retirement, Branch 1, Will
Hold Their General Luncheon
Meeting. Elks Club. 229 W. 20th Ave.,
San Mateo. Speakers are Jim
Codromac and Kevin Kyes, who will
discuss misunderstood government
entitlement programs designed to
protect you from financial devastation
due to critical or chronic illness and
costs for Skilled Nursing Care. Free. For
more information call 341-8298.
RSVP deadline for San Mateo
Newcomers Club. Luncheon on
Tuesday July 16 at Noon. Spices
Restaurant, 929A Edgewater Blvd.,
Foster City. The program for the
luncheon will be a speaker of Freedom
House, San Francisco. This is an
independent, non-profit organization
whose mission is to bring hope,
restoration and new life to survivors
of human trafficking by providing
housing and long-term after-care
services. Checks must be received by
Wednesday July 10. $25. Sent to Janet
Williams, 1168 Shoreline Drive, San
Mateo. For more information call 286-
0688.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon to
1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E. Fourth
Ave., San Mateo. $17 for lunch. For
more information call 430-6500 or go
to sanmateoprofessionalalliance.com.
JVS Orientation and Enrollment
Session.1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Peninsula JCC,
800 Foster City Blvd., Foster City. We
will provide you with an overview of
the services, programs and resources
that will support you in your job
search. We can help you with finding
a job, making a resume, interviewing,
networking, staying motivated and
writing your summary for LinkedIn.
We work with people from all
backgrounds and all levels of
experience and expertise. Free. For
more information email
jcowan@jvs.org.
DWWilson Magic Show. 2 p.m. San
Mateo Public Library Marina branch,
1530 Susan Court, San Mateo. DW
Wilson’s ultimate magic show
combines audience participation,
comedy and real live animals. Free. For
more information call 522-7838.
Candidate Seminar for November
elections. 2 p.m. Elections Division, 40
Tower Road, San Mateo. Free and open
to the public. For more information go
to
https://www.shapethefuture.org/elect
ions/2013/nov/ or call 312-5293.
Project Zen Massage. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Project Zen Massage, 318 Burlingame
Ave., Burlingame. There will be
complimentary wine, cheese, live
music and massage giveaways. Free.
For more information call 889-5000.
Music in the Park — Bundy Browne
and the Espresso Rhythm Section.
6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Stafford Park, corner
of King Street and Hopkins Avenue,
Redwood City. Free.
The Loudest Man on Earth —
Preview. 8 p.m. Lucie Stern Theatre,
1305 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. The
show will run until Aug. 4.Tickets start
at $19 for ages 30 and under. Savings
available for educators, seniors and
patrons 30 and under. A $5
convenience fee will be assessed for
online and telephone orders. For more
information call 463-1960 or go to
theatreworks.org.
THURSDAY, JULY 11
Retired Public Employees
Association Chapter 46 Meeting.
10:30 a.m. Elks Lodge, 229 W. 20th Ave.,
San Mateo. Guest speaker Scott Yates
will share the latest news from
CalPERS and will discuss how we can
protect our pension rights. $14 for
lunch. For more information call 207-
6401.
Free Lecture on Conservatorship.
Noon. San Mateo County Law Library,
710 Hamilton St., Redwood City. Free.
For more information call 363-4913 or
go to www.smclawlibrary.org.
Movies for School Age Children:
‘Willy Wonka and the Chocolate
Factory.’ 3:30 p.m. San Mateo Public
Library-Oak Room, 55 W. Third Ave.,
San Mateo. Free. For more information
call 533-7838.
The Cottontails. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Central Park, 50 E. Fifth Ave., San Mateo.
For more information visit
ci.sanmateo.ca.us.
Melissa Peabody’s newfilm — ‘San
Francisco: Still Wild at Heart.’ 6:30
p.m. South San Francisco Municipal
Services Building, 33 Arroyo Drive,
South San Francisco. Following the
showing, Peabody will talk about how
making this film came about and what
impact her film has made. Free. For
more information call 829-3876.
The Loudest Man on Earth —
Preview.7:30 p.m. Lucie Stern Theatre,
1305 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. The
show will run until Aug. 4.Tickets start
at $19 for ages 30 and under. Savings
available for educators, seniors and
patrons 30 and under. A $5
convenience fee will be assessed for
online and telephone orders. For more
information call 463-1960 or go to
theatreworks.org.
FRIDAY, JULY 12
ASDA Northern California 2013
Postage Stamp Show.Westin Hotel, 1
Old Bayshore Highway, Millbrae. Free.
For more information go to
thestamplove.com.
Presentation on Preservation of
Family Photos. 1 p.m. San Mateo
County History Museum, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Photograph
Conservator Gawain Weaver makes a
presentation on preserving family
photographs. Weaver will discuss
types of photographs found in family
collections, clues to dating them and
procedures to preserving them. Free
with prices of admission. Admission
$5 for adults, $3 for students and
seniors. For more information call 299-
0104.
Jewelry on the Square and Surfin
Safari: Beach Boys Tribute. 5 p.m. to
8:30 p.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Music will
begin at 6 p.m. Free. For more
information call 780-7311.
Members’ Exhibit and Taking
Digital Art to the Streets. 5:30 p.m. to
8 p.m. Pacific Art League, 227 Forest
Ave., Palo Alto. The PAL will host an
opening reception for two new
exhibitions which will be on display
from July 1 to July 25. Free. For more
information call 321-3891 or go to
www.pacificartleague.org.
Summer Concert: AndreThierryand
Zydeco Magic. 6 p.m. to 8 pm. Burton
Park, 1070 Cedar St., San Carlos. Free.
For more information go to
www.cityofsancarlos.org.
South San Francisco Open Mic. 7
p.m. to 11 p.m. 116 El Campo Drive,
South San Francisco. Free. For more
information call 451-2450.
Art Opening. 7 p.m. Sanchez Art
Center, 1220 Linda Mar Blvd, Pacifica.
‘The Works of Wanxin Zhang,’ an
exhibition of ceramic sculptures
curated by Jerry Ross Barrish. Other
exhibits currently showing are ‘Shifting
the Body: Explorations from the
Female Perspective’ and ‘Regrets Only.’
For more information call 355-1894.
‘Becky’s New Car’ opens at the
Dragon Theatre. 8 p.m. The Dragon
Theatre, 2120 Broadway, Redwood
City. Ticket prices range from $15 to
$35. The show will run through Aug.
4. For more information and for tickets
go to
dragonproductions.net/activities/201
3season/beckysnewcar.html.
Broadway By the Bay presents
‘Oliver!’ 8 p.m. Fox Theatre, 2215
Broadway, Redwood City. Come enjoy
the performance that brings Charles
Dickens’ timeless classic of the young
boy who asked for more to life. $35 to
$55. Tickets may be purchased at the
box office located at 2219 Broadway,
Redwood City. For more information
call 369-7770.
The Loudest Man on Earth —
Preview. 8 p.m. Lucie Stern Theatre,
1305 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. The
show will run until Aug. 4.Tickets start
at $19 for ages 30 and under. Savings
available for educators, seniors and
patrons 30 and under. A $5
convenience fee will be assessed for
online and telephone orders. For more
information call 463-1960 or go to
theatreworks.org.
Movies on the Square: ‘Life of Pi.’
8:45 p.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Free. For
more information call 780-7311 or go
to
www.redwoodcity.org/events/movies.
html.
Live Salsa, Bachata, Merengue and
Cha Cha Cha with Avance. 9 p.m.
Club Fox, 2209 Broadway, Redwood
City. $15. For more information call
(877) 435-9849 or go to
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
SATURDAY, JULY 13
Electronic Recycling at Saint Peter
Catholic Church. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 700
Oddstad Blvd., Pacifica. For more
information call 359-6313.
Electronic Recycling at Saint Peter
Catholic Church. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 700
Oddstad Blvd., Pacifica. For more
information call 359-6313.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
come into contact with one of our two
victims,” Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-
White said during a news conference
called to highlight the heroic efforts
of first responders. “I assure you, we
are looking closely at this.”
Findings of what caused the 16-year-
old’s death — the plane crash, the fire
truck, or both — may not come for
several weeks.
Afirefighter first reported to a superi-
or on Saturday that a passenger who
was on the ground roughly 30 feet from
the wreckage and near the escape slide
may have been run over as fire crews
were shifting from dousing the flames
to taking victims to hospitals, offi-
cials said.
Police, FBI agents, the coroner and
other officials were notified after the
firefighter at the scene reported his
concerns, officials said. The drivers of
the first five trucks to respond to the
emergency were given drug and alco-
hol tests, which they passed.
It’s not clear why the firefighters
thought someone had been run over.
Fire Department officials said they did
not want to provide details because of
the ongoing investigation by city
police, the county coroner whose
office received the body and the
National Transportation Safety Board.
Airport video surveillance footage
reviewed by federal accident investiga-
tors proved inconclusive, NTSB
Chairwoman Deborah Hersman said.
“It is a very serious issue and we
want to understand it,” she said. “We
want to make sure we have all the facts
before we reach conclusions.”
The job of gathering those facts —
including determining whether the evi-
dence shows that the girl was hit by
the truck and if she was still alive when
it happened — has fallen in large part
to San Mateo County Coroner Robert
Foucrault.
Fourcrault said Monday the two
Chinese girls have been identified
through fingerprints. Their autopsies
were completed and their bodies pre-
pared to be claimed by their parents,
who were expected to arrive in San
Francisco on Monday.
Foucrault originally had planned to
release a preliminary cause of death for
each of them on Monday, but decided
to wait until he could do a broader
inquiry that will include reviewing
written information from the public
safety agencies that responded to the
crash, audio dispatch files and perhaps
interviews.
“This is a very high-profile case and
has obviously generated a lot of atten-
tion,” Foucrault said at his office locat-
ed a few miles south of San Francisco
International Airport where the plane
crashed Saturday. “I want to make
absolutely sure my conclusions are
correct.”
He said he made the decision to hold
off independently and that neither city
officials nor federal accident investiga-
tors had asked him for a postpone-
ment.
Chinese state media and Asiana have
identified the girls as Ye Mengyuan and
Wang Linjia, students at Jiangshan
Middle School in Zhejiang, an affluent
coastal province in eastern China.
They were part of a group of 29 stu-
dents and five teachers from the school
who were heading to a summer camps
in Southern California, according to
education authorities in China.
Meanwhile, firefighters and police
officers on Monday gave their first
accounts of what they encountered in
the first minutes after the Saturday’s
crash.
Most of the passengers had exited
the crippled craft before firefighters
arrived, but four passengers were still
trapped in the back.
Three firefighters — and two police
officers without safety gear — rushed
onto the plane to help evacuate
trapped passengers, including one who
was trapped under a collapsed bulk-
head. They had gotten everyone off the
craft except one elderly man, who was
in his seat, moaning and unable to
move.
“We were running out of time,” San
Francisco Fire Department Lt. Dave
Monteverdi recalled. “The smoke was
starting to get thicker and thicker. So
we had no choice. We stood him up and
amazingly, he started shuffling his
feet....We were able to get him out and
he was pretty much the last person off
the plane.”
Monteverdi and his two colleagues
boarded the plane by charging up the
front, left emergency chute that most
of the passengers had already used to
exit the burning craft.
“If he can do it, I can do it,” Fire
Department Lt. Chrissy Emmons said
she told herself before clambering up
the chute after Monteverdi.
Continued from page 1
SFO
three-alarm response at SFO.
“It’s been many years since that
there’s been an incident at that air-
port,” said Myers.
“We’re pretty attuned to knowing
what we needed to do, we’ve just never
had to actually do it until Saturday. ”
The county sent four battalion
chiefs, four ladder trucks, 11 fire
engines and four fireboats to SFO,
mostly from departments in northern
and central San Mateo County.
“[But] pretty much everybody in the
fire department and the county partici-
pated,” said Myers, adding that fire
departments from all over the county
filled in the missing resources at sta-
tions that sent trucks to the airport.
The 70 people from various fire
departments helped with fire rescue and
patient care at the scene. Myers was
happy with the fire department’s
response to an extreme emergency.
“You’re always going to have a
chaotic scene, but everyone did really
well,” he said.
The next day, the county’s mutual fire
aid was activated again for a six-alarm
fire in Redwood City.
The county was able to provide fire
resources for both incidents and main-
tain regular coverage without needing
to call in help from other counties,
said Myers.
San Mateo County American
Medical Response sent more than 100
paramedics, emergency medical tech-
nicians and support staff to the scene
of the crash Saturday.
“We’ve never been so proud of the
care and compassion of our care-
givers,” said Brad White, general man-
ager of AMR of San Mateo County.
Five AMR ambulances already on
duty were sent to SFO, and another 12
ambulances were activated as part of
AMR’s emergency response team, said
White.
Many of the responders were off-
duty employees who carry pagers in
case of emergencies.
“We have a really, really solid group
of employees who are ready to
respond,” he said, adding that many of
the caretakers who whipped into
action Saturday also responded to San
Bruno gas pipeline explosion that left
eight people dead in 2010.
“As tragic as that was, it helped us
prepare for this disaster,” he said.
AMR transported a total 103
patients Saturday. Its first ambulance
arrived at the scene of the crash five
minutes after receiving the initial
emergency dispatch call at 11:29 a.m.
on Saturday, said White.
The emergency response team for
San Mateo County performs its own
drills monthly and runs drills in con-
junction with SFO and South San
Francisco firefighters annually, said
White.
“Those drills are critical for being
prepared for these kinds of things,”
said White. “There’s a tremendous part-
nership in San Mateo County of all
emergency service providers.”
AMR in San Mateo County is the
first AMR response team to be called
upon in the event of an emergency at
SFO. On Saturday, AMR activated
another 21 ambulances from San
Francisco, Marin, Napa and Contra
Costa counties.
Continued from page 1
CRASH
COMICS/GAMES
7-09-13
monday’s PUZZLE soLVEd
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Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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1 Certain saucers
5 Afternoon social
8 Peruse
12 Flying toy
13 Circle portion
14 Domed recess
15 Offered
17 Distribute
18 Bad-mouth
19 Frolics
21 Record material
24 El —, Texas
25 Umbrage
26 Pencil part
30 Name in cheesecake
32 — Maria
33 Overfow (with)
37 Runs its course
38 Pixie
39 Withered
40 Choir members
43 Reunion crowd
44 Ship’s spine
46 Ruminated
48 Oater extras
50 Trim
51 Endure
52 Iffy
57 Dairy case item
58 Juan’s gold
59 First name in fashion
60 Prospects
61 Econ. indicator
62 Aid and —
down
1 Luau strings
2 Rig the horserace
3 New York Giants hero
4 Squalid
5 Youngsters
6 Before, before
7 Down Under rockers
8 Bulwarks
9 “En garde” weapons
10 Elroy’s dog
11 Poor grades
16 Aswan Dam site
20 Mimic
21 Carpenter’s clamp
22 Persia, nowadays
23 Bookish type
27 66 and I-80
28 Has a fever
29 Secure
31 Fireproof material
34 Cartoon shrieks
35 Huron neighbor
36 Repair
41 Tavern order
42 Complacent
44 Eucalyptus eater
45 German industrial center
47 City near Syracuse
48 Raindrop sound
49 Air pollution
50 Wheat or corn
53 Prince Val’s son
54 Noggin
55 Stretchy bandage
56 Parcel of land
diLBErT® Crossword PUZZLE
fUTUrE sHoCk®
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TUEsday, JULy 9, 2013
CanCEr (June 21-July 22) -- This may not be one
of your better days for managing resources, either
yours or other people’s. Even if asked to do so, don’t
take on any fscal responsibilities.
LEo (July 23-Aug. 22) -- If someone thinks you’re
acting self-serving, this person might place obstacles
in your path just to trip you up. Don’t give them an
excuse to interfere -- be openly generous and altruistic.
VirGo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- When attempting
to fulfll an ambitious objective, you should keep
moderation in mind. Even if you’re on the right track,
watch out, because the rail might be fimsy.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Any involvement that
has strong elements of risk or speculation would
be best avoided today. There’s a chance that your
belief in losing might take precedence over your will
to win.
sCorPio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Even though you’re
apt to be ambitious and industrious, you might
do things the hard way, which will end up being
counterproductive. Think your moves through
carefully.
saGiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- If you’re trying
to bluff your way through something, you had better
have a good poker face. Opponents will easily read
your intentions if you’re not careful.
CaPriCorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- It will take some
exceptionally shrewd maneuvering on your part to
come out on top in a business matter. Keep this in
mind when you sit down to negotiate.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Strive to maintain
harmony and balance in all of your personal and
business affairs. If you don’t, things could get out of
sync very quickly.
PisCEs (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Sadly, others won’t
be as eager to help you as you are to help others.
Don’t embarrass yourself by requesting a favor from
someone unless it’s absolutely necessary.
ariEs (March 21-April 19) -- Even though you try
to promote cooperation, you might still run into
someone who resists all such attempts. Don’t be
afraid to play rough.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) -- If you fnd yourself
having to share credit with someone you dislike,
don’t make your feelings obvious. Be above it all and
give acknowledgement where it is due.
GEmini (May 21-June 20) -- It isn’t likely that you’ll
get others to have faith in your ideas if you show
doubt about them yourself. Have confdence or go
home.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Tuesday • July 9, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Tuesday • July 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CALL CENTER Positions - Internet Car
Parts, Adam McCoy, (415)999-9823
HIRING LINE COOKS - Evenings, Avan-
ti Pizza. . 3536 Alameda, MENLO PARK,
CA (650)854-1222.
110 Employment
AUTMOTIVE -
NOW HIRING
SERVICE TECHNICIANS
OILSTOP DRIVE-THRU
OIL CHANGE
• Excellent benefits
• No experience necessary
• Complete training program
• Retirement program
• Advancement opportunities
• Competitive pay
APPLY IN PERSON AT
2009 El Camino Real, San Mateo
Monday-Saturday 8-6
For more info: www.oilstopinc.com
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
GREAT CLIPS
@ Sequoia Station
Redwood City
Now Hiring
Stylists & Managers.
Call Flo/Randy
408 247-8364 or 408 921-9994
Grand Opening Soon!
110 Employment
CLEANING -
HOUSE CLEANERS
NEEDED
Excellent pay. Company car.
Must have valid CDL and cleaning ex-
perience. Call Molly Maids, (650)
837-9788. 1700 S. Amphlett Blvd,
#218, San Mateo
CUSTOMER SERVICE/
SEAMSTRESS -
YOU ARE INVITED
Are you:
Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have:
Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for emplployment benefits
Sewiing skills
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available for
Customer Service/Seamstress.
Call for appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo CA, 94402
23 Tuesday • July 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256324
The following person is doing business
as: Time to Live Life Coaching, 181 Mor-
ton Dr., DALY CITY, CA 94015 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Zaree-
na Garrison, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Zareena Garrison /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/18/13, 06/25/13, 07/02/13, 07/09/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256325
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Happy Campers Infant Toddler
Center, 300 El Camino Real, SAN CAR-
LOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered by
the following owners: Angela Grech and
John Grech, 408 Biscayne Ave., Foster
City, CA 94404. The business is con-
ducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ John Grech /
/s/ Angela Grech /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/18/13, 06/25/13, 07/02/13, 07/09/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256099
The following person is doing business
as: Nernst Engineering, 64 Eddy Stone
Ct., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94065 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Hooman Hafezi, same adress. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 05/01/2013.
/s/ Hooman Hafezi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/25/13, 07/02/13, 07/09/13, 07/16/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256100
The following person is doing business
as: Meal Boxes Etc., 724 S. Amphlett
Blvd., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Ka-
makshis Kitchen, LLC, CA. The business
is conducted by a Limited Liability Com-
pany. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Narayanan Kallingal /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/25/13, 07/02/13, 07/09/13, 07/16/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256275
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Molly’s Wheat Free Confection
Company, 505 S. B St., SAN MATEO,
CA 94401 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owners: Molly Bullard and Dan
Topoian, 1767 Juniper Ave., San Bruno,
CA 94066. The business is conducted by
a Married Couple. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Molly Bullard /
/s/ Dan Topoian /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/25/13, 07/02/13, 07/09/13, 07/16/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256358
The following person is doing business
as: Inspiring Spaces, 3130 Alpine Rd.,
Ste 288-154, PORTOLA VALLEY, CA
94028 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Amy Friedberg, 130 E. Flores-
ta Way, PORTOLA VALLEY, CA 94028.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
01/01/2013.
/s/ Amy Friedberg /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/25/13, 07/02/13, 07/09/13, 07/16/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256454
The following person is doing business
as: Sequenta Clinical Laboratory, 400 E.
Jamie Ct., Ste. 301, SOUTH SAN FRAN-
CISCO, CA 94080 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Sequenta, Inc,
CA. The business is conducted by an In-
dividual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
03/01/2012.
/s/ Thomas Willis /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/25/13, 07/02/13, 07/09/13, 07/16/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256575
The following person is doing business
as: Clinoso, 1305 Morse Blvd., SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Philip Jeffrey
Marquis, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Philip J. Marquis /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/02/13, 07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256338
The following person is doing business
as: California Auto Center, Burlingame,
751 California Dr., BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Lam, Andrew, Inc, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 06/18/2013.
/s/ Andrew Lam /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/02/13, 07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256503
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: 1) California Auto Center, 2)
California Auto Center, Millbrae 316 El
Camino Real, Millbrae, CA 94030 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: 1) Andrew Lam, 751 California Dr.,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010, 2) Zhi Ren Li
1200 E. Hillsdale Blvd., #220, Foster
City, CA 94404, 3) Powai Leung, 125 El
Camino Real, San Bruno, CA 94066, 4)
Feng Wang Zhao, 16 Via Ambra, New-
port Coast, CA 92657. The business is
conducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 08/02/2013.
/s/ Andrew Lam /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/24/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/02/13, 07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256244
The following person is doing business
as: Aquarius Water Filtration, 742 Dart-
mouth Ave., SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Bradford Nickel, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Bradford Nickel /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/02/13, 07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256193
The following person is doing business
as: Tony’s Tree Trimming Service’s, 485
Huntington Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA
94066 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Maveve Tony Latu and Mafi-
leo Eleanor Latu. same address. The
business is conducted by a Married Cou-
ple. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Mafileo E. Taumoepeau /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/02/13, 07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256216
The following person is doing business
as: 2020venture, 3345 Marisma Street,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Musa
Sayyed, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 06/03/2013.
/s/ Musa Sayyed /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/02/13, 07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256348
The following person is doing business
as: Populus Energy, LLC, 951 Mariners
Island Blvd., #384, SAN MATEO, CA
94404 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Populus, LLC, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Limited Liability.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 02/06/2013.
/s/ Seth Portner /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/02/13, 07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256654
The following person is doing business
as: 1) The Learning Lab, 2) Learning
Lab, 1050 Chestnut St., Ste 201, MEN-
LO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Amanda
Sparr, 20 Willow Rd., #24, MENLO
PARK, CA 94025. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 07/08/2013.
/s/ Amanda J. Sparr /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256658
The following person is doing business
as: Lai Lai Restaurant, 334 Broadway,
MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Jimmy Lai
Lai & Company, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 10/31/1983.
/s/ Vincent Lin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256414
The following person is doing business
as: QBeFiT, 1072 Shell Blvd., Ste. 1,
FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Andrew F.
Stebbins, 351 Stanchion Lane, Foster
City, CA 94404. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 05/01/2012.
/s/ Andrew F. Stebbins /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256565
The following person is doing business
as: Maggie’s Medical, 1075 Annapolis
Street, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Maggie LaBarbera, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 06/23/2013.
/s/ Margaret LaBarbera /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256314
The following person is doing business
as: Avenue Lesage, 1208 Admiralty
Lane, FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Celine Hakoun, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Celine Hakoun /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256470
The following person is doing business
as: Pendragon Studios, 871 Newport Cir-
cle, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94065 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Debra Elaine Fowler, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Debra E. Fowler /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256213
The following individual is doing business
as: 1) MARSHALL EDWARD MIKELS, 2)
MARSHALL E. MIKELS, 3) MARSHALL
MIKELS, 4) EDWARD M. MIKELS, 5)
EDWARD MIKELS, 6) MIKELS MAR-
SHALL E. 7) MIKELS MARSHALL ED-
WARD is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: MARSHALL EDWARD MI-
KELS 115 15TH Avenue San Mateo, CA
94402 and Marshall Edward Mikels 1625
Grant Road, Mount Shasta, California,
The business is conducted by an individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
10/21/1946. Ref: FBN-003002684-
F58739417-549628951-06/13/13
/s/ Marshall Edward Mikels /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/14/13, 06/21/13, 06/28/13, 07/05/13.)
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
CHANGE IN OWNERSHIP OF ALCO-
HOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE
Date of Filing Application: July 3, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
SUN HONG HE, INC.
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
102 S EL CAMINO REAL
MILLBRAE, CA 94030-3121
Type of license applied for:
41-On-Sale Beer And Wine-Eating
Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
July 9, 2013
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #M-247712
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Cali-
fornia Auto Center, 751 California Dr.,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 The fictitious
business name referred to above was
filed in County on 11/21/11 The business
was conducted by: Lam, Andrew, Inc.
/s/ Andrew Lam /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 06/24/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 07/02/13,
07/09/13, 07/16/2013, 07/23/2013).
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST JORDINIAN passport and Green
Card. Lost in Daly City, If found contact,
Mohammad Al-Najjar (415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
210 Lost & Found
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, $90.,
(650)610-9765
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIER 5200 BTU window air conditioner
- never used, in box, $95. obo, (650)591-
6842
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WEBER BRAND Patio Refrigerator,
round top load, for beer, soda, and wa-
ter. $30 obo (650)591-6842
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, SOLD!
298 Collectibles
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $90.,
(650)596-0513
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
298 Collectibles
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
84 USED European (34) and U.S. (50)
Postage Stamps. Most issued before
World War II. All different and all detach-
ed from envelopes. $4.00, 650-787-
8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MENORAH - Antique Jewish tree of life,
10”W x 30”H, $100., (650)348-6428
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria
650-873-8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
24
Tuesday • July 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Pequod captain
5 Online diary
9 “My stars!”
14 Sagan of
“Cosmos”
15 Capital NW of
Napoli
16 Challenges
17 Tex-Mex fare
18 Piece of news
19 Flash of starlight
20 12-gauge ammo
23 Talc-to-diamond
hardness scale
inventor
24 Tic-tac-toe win
25 Hush-hush
28 Baseball family
name
30 Tiny, to tam
wearers
33 Little
consideration
35 Harbor vessel
36 Squares with
dinner rolls
37 NFL fifth periods
38 Olin of “Alias”
39 Lode load
40 Woolgatherer’s
tool
44 Road crew goo
45 Sharing pronoun
46 Janitor’s tool
47 Jungle __
48 Lip soother
49 Eye protection
for a tot’s bath
55 Reason for some
food recalls
56 Pro foe
57 Turner in a
barbecue
59 Pin place
60 Genuine
61 “Contents could
cause Dad to
make breakfast”
brand
62 Pat down
63 Indian dress
64 Bridge position
DOWN
1 Play a part
2 Lukas of
“Witness”
3 Elaborate
entrance
4 They may be late
5 High beams
6 Sacred flower, in
Hinduism
7 Prophetic sign
8 Looker’s legs
9 Beat by a nose
10 Winemaking
giant
11 Seed pod
12 Man caves,
perhaps
13 Old jet set jet,
briefly
21 Legal wrong
22 Filly’s foot
25 100 smackers
26 Butler’s bride
27 Election
participant
28 __ liberales:
universidad
course
29 Daffy Duck has
one
30 Iron emission
31 Canadian
storywriter Alice
32 Shocked
34 Gardener
attacking weeds,
say
38 “Hmm ...”
40 Coffee additive
for the lactose
intolerant
41 Camel feature
42 One of Kenya’s
official
languages
43 Prefix with port
47 Strong winds
48 Massive,
relatively hot
luminous body
49 Wound
reminder
50 Pueblo Indian
51 Boathouse
equipment
52 Draft category
53 Nancy Lopez’s
org.
54 Works on a
trench
55 Sprite
58 Little shaver
By Jack McInturff
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
07/09/13
07/09/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
302 Antiques
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500
(650)766-3024
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HARMON/KANDON SPEAKERS (2)
mint condition, great, for small
office/room or extra speakers, 4 1/2 in.
high, includes cords $8., SOLD!
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center draw locks all comes with
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame SOLD!
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
304 Furniture
3 MEDAL base kitchen cabinets with
drawers and wood doors $99
(650)347-8061
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR (2), with arms, Italian 1988 Cha-
teau D'Ax, solid, perfect condition. $50
each or $85 for both. (650)591-0063
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COPENHAGEN TEAK dining table with
dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions. 48/88"
long x 32" wide x 30" high. $95.00
(650)637-0930
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
COUCH. GREEN Cloth with end reclin-
ers on both sides. Beverage holder in the
middle, $50 (650)572-2864
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 draw dresser 61" wide,
31" high, & 18" deep $50., (650)592-
2648
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
304 Furniture
GLASS DINING Table 41” x 45” Round-
ed rectangle clear glass top and base
$85 (650)888-0129
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
LIGHT WOOD Rocking Chair & Has-
sock, gold cushions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
RECLINER ROCKER - Like new, brown,
vinyl, $99., SOLD!
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR with wood carving,
armrest, rollers, and it swivels $99.,
(650)592-2648
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEAK TV stand, wheels, rotational, glass
doors, drawer, 5 shelves. 31" wide x 26"
high X 18" deep. $75.00 (650)637-0930
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
WICKER ENTERTAINMENT CABINET -
H 78” x 43” x 16”, almost new, $89.,
(650)347-9920
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
3 PIECE fireplace set with screen $25
(650)322-2814
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, (650)578-9208
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
1/2 HORSE power 8" worm drive skill
saw $40 OBO (650)315-5902
10" BAN Saw $75.00 (650) 347-8367
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
BLACK & DECKER CORDLESS 18 volt
combo drill, vacuum, saw, sander, two
batteries & charger, brand new, $95.
obo, SOLD!
BLACK AND Decker, 10” trimmer/edger
, rechargeable, brand new, $50
(650)871-7200
BOB VILLA rolling tool box & organizer -
brand new with misc. tools, $40. obo,
(650)591-6842
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTMANS PROFESSIONAL car buf-
fer with case $40 OBO (650)315-5902
CRAFTSMAN 14.4 VOLT DRILL - bat-
tery & charger, never used, $35. obo,
SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 3/8” 16.8 volt drill & vac-
uum combo, brand new, with charger,
$45. obo, SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DREMEL HIGH SPEED ROTARY TOOL
- all attachments, never used, $25. obo
SOLD!
ELECTRIC HEDGE trimmer good condi-
tion (Black Decker) $40 (650)342-6345
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
308 Tools
LADDER - 24' aluminum 2 section ladder
$20., SOLD
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 21” Belt Sander with long cord,
$35 (650)315-5902
NEW DRILL DRIVER - 18V + battery &
charger, $30., (650)595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SANDER, MAKITA finishing sander, 4.5
x 4.5"' used once. Complete with dust
bag and hard shell case. $35.00 SOLD!
SMALL ROTETILLER 115 Volt Works
well $99.00 (650)355-2996
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
TORO ELECTRIC POWER SWEEPER
blower - never used, in box, $35. obo,
(650)591-6842
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $65 (650)341-8342
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
3 LARGE old brown mixing bowls $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History,
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
5 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $9. for all
(650)347-5104
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEO 75 with jackets 75 with-
out $100 for all, SOLD!
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
AIR CONDITIONER - Window mount,
$50. obo, (650)438-4737
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99., (650)580-
3316
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASTRONOMY BOOKS (2) Hard Cover
Cambridge Encyclopedia of Astronomy,
World of Discovery, $12., (650)578-9208
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14., (650)578-9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, $40,
(650)347-5104
BAY BRIDGE Framed 50th anniversary
poster (by Bechtel corp) $50
(650)873-4030
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection SOLD!
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY Jake AB Scissor Exercise Ma-
chine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
310 Misc. For Sale
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
(650)578-9208
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOOD HEALTH FACT BOOK - un-
used, answers to get/stay healthy, hard
cover, 480 pages, $8., (650)578-9208
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HABACHI BBQ Grill heavy iron 22" high
15" wide $25 (650)593-8880
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model", $250., (650)637-0930
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LAUNDRY SORTER - on wheels, triple
section, laundry sorter - $19., (650)347-
9920
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12” L x
5”W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, (650)341-1861
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW COWBOY BOOTS - 9D, Unworn,
black, fancy, only $85., (650)595-3933
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., (650)578-9208
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SAFETY SHOES - Iron Age, Mens steel
toe metatarfal work boots, brown, size 10
1/2, in box, $50., (650)594-1494
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. White Rotary
sewing machine similar age, cabinet
style. $85 both. (650)574-4439
SLIDE PROJECTOR - Airequipt Super-
ba 66A slide projector and screen.
$50.00 for all. (650)345-3840
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STAINED GLASS panels multi colors
beautiful work 35" long 111/2" wide $79
OBO (650)349-6059
STAINED GLASS,
28”x30” Japanese geisha motif, multi
colored, beautiful. $200 (650)520-9366
25 Tuesday • July 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
310 Misc. For Sale
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, (650)341-1861
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLKSWAGON NEW Beatle hub cap,
3, $70 for All SOLD!
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WEBER GO ANYWHERE GAS BARBE-
QUE - never used, in box, $40., SOLD!
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
311 Musical Instruments
GUITAR FOR sale. Fender Accoustic,
with case. $89.00 (415)971-7555
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
MARTIN GUITAR 1971 D-18S Great
shape, Great sound. Price reduced to
$1200. (650)522-8322
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
ATTRACTIVE LADIES trench coat red,
weather proof size 6/8 $35
(650)345-3277
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
IONIC BREEZE quadra, Sharper Image,
3 level silent air purifier. 27”h, energy
saver, original box with video. Excellent
condition. $77. (650)347-5104
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS JACKET - size XXL, Beautiful
cond., med., $35., (650)595-3933
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW! OLD NAVY Coat: Boy/Gril, fleece-
lined, hooded $15 (415)585-3622
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
316 Clothes
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
brand new, never worn for $25
(650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
150 COPPER spades for #6 strand.
Copper wire. $50.00 for all.
(650)345-3840
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
PVC SCHEDULE 80 connectors and
coupling. 100 pieces in all. $30.00 for all
(650)345-3840
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 AIR rifles, shoots .177 pelets. $50 ea
Obo (650)591-6842
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$25.(650)368-0748.
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
BIKE TRAINER Ascent fluid $85
(650)375-8021
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
FOR SALE medium size wet suit $95
call for info (650)851-0878
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BAG with 15 clubs $35. SOLD.
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
KELTY SUPER TIOGA BACKPACK -
$40., (650)552-9436
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels, $85.
obo, (650)223-7187
ROWING MACHINE. $30.00
(650)637-0930
SCHWINN STATIONARY RECUMBENT
BIKE, $45., SOLD!
STATIONARY EXERCISE BICYCLE -
Compact, excellent condition, $40. obo,
(650)834-2583
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
TENT - one man packable tent - $20.,
(650)552-9436
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
THULE SKI RACK - holds 3 pairs, $85.,
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL EXERCISE- Pro Form 415
Crosswalk, very good condition $200 call
(650)266-8025
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40.,
(408)764-6142
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
SLEEP APNEA breathing machine com-
plete in box helps you breathe, costs $$$
sacrifice for $75, (650)995-0012
WALKER - $25., brand new, tag still on,
(650)594-1494
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
515 Office Space
SAN MATEO DRIVE beautiful Medical
Office space for rent only $75/day.
Paulsurinder1@yahoo.com
620 Automobiles
1996 FORD MUSTANG convertible
coupe automatic with 118k miles,looks
and drives excellent great summer car
#5002 on sale for low price of 4995.00
plus fees. (650)637-3900
1997 LEXUS LX 450 full size SUV with
152k miles 4x4 automatic with all power
& convenient options and 3rd row seat
clean Car Fax in excellent shape
#5011on sale for 8500.00 plus fees.
(650)637-3900
1998 JEEP Grand Cherokee limited 4x4
automatic with164k miles in new condi-
tions,fully loaded clean Car Fax #4507
on sale for only 4750.00 plus normal
fees. (650)637-3900
2000 DODGE Durango SUV slt 4x4 with
156k miles. In great conditions with 3rd
row seat, nice family SUV #5034 on sale
for 3995.00 plus fees. (650)637-3900
2001 TOYOTA Camry LE automatic se-
dan with 101k miles, lots of recent serv-
ices done, all power package clean Car
Fax #4516 sale price 4950.00 plus fees.
(650)637-3900
2001 MBZ ML320 mid size SUV with
133k miles all wheel drive with 3rd row
seat, black on black leather loaded v6
auto #4430 priced to sell quick 6995.00
plus fees (650)637-3900
2001 VW JETTA GLS Turbo stick shift 5
speed manual with 120k miles comes
with lots of safety and power options
#4504 on sale for 4500.00 plus fees.
(650)637-3900
2002 HONDA Civic EX coupe two door
automatic with 161k miles.clean car and
clean Car Fax . Loaded with
options#5047 priced at 5750.00 plus
fees. (650)637-3900
2002 VOLVO S80 sedan 4 door auto-
matic with 107k miles. Safe, roomy with
luxry.great conditions and lots of conven-
ient options #5040 on low price sale of
5995.00 plus fees. (650)637-3900
2004 SATURN Ion 3 sedan with 94k
miles.she comes with stick shift standard
transmission 4 door all power package
and great on gas, clean Car Fax #4521
on sale for 5850.00 plus fees. (650)637-
3900
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
ACCURA 1997 3.0 CL CP Black, Auto-
matic $3300, (650)630-3216
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBIL”79Royal Delta 88, 122k
Miles, in excelleny Condition $1,800
(650)342-8510
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo Rob SOLD!
HONDA 1983 ASCOT VT 500 Motorcy-
cle, looks like 2012, must see. $1100,
obo, SOLD!
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $50. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35., (650)670-
2888
NEW MOTORCYCLE HELMET - Modu-
lar, dual visor, $69., (650)595-3933
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $60 for all
(650)588-7005
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPEAR tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Four steel
13in rims. Factory Hub Caps. $150. San
Bruno. SOLD!
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
670 Auto Parts
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Bath
TUBZ
Over 400 Tubs on display!
World’s Largest “Hands-On, Feet-In”
Showroom
4840 Davenport Place
Fremont, CA 94538
(510)770-8686
www.tubz.net
Asphalt/Paving
AIM CONSTRUCTION
John Peterson
• Paving • Grading
• Slurry Sealing • Paving Stones
• Concrete • Patching
We AIM to please!
(650)468-6750
(408)422-7695
Lic.# 916680
Cabinetry Contractors
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Home repairs &
Foundation work
Retaining wall • Decks • Fences
No job too small
Gary Afu
(650)207-2400
Lic# 904960
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
26
Tuesday • July 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Cleaning
Concrete
CHETNER CONCRETE
Lic #706952
Driveways - Walkways
- Pool Decks - Patios - Stairs
- Exposed Aggregate - Masonry
- Retaining Walls - Drainage
- Foundation/Slabs
Free Estimates
(650)271-1442 Mike
Construction
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Electricians
Solas
Electric
Best Rates
On all electrical work
7 days a week
Free Estimates
(650) 302-7906
CA License 950866
Bonded and Insured
Gardening
JOSE’S
COMPLETE GARDENING
Complete gardening &
Landscaping
Commercial & Residential
Licensed
Free Estimates
(650)315-4011
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
Painting
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets,
Also, Electrical, Hauling
Carpet, Tile & Stucco
(650)461-0326
Lic# 983312
HAMZEH PLUMBING
5 stars on Yelp!
$25 OFF First Time Customers
All plumbing services
24 hour emergency service
(415)690-6540
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
27 Tuesday • July 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Cemetery
CRIPPEN & FLYNN FUNERAL
CHAPELS
Family owned & operated
Established 1949
Personalized cremation &
funeral services
Serving all faiths & traditions
Woodside chapel: (650)369-4103
FD 879
Carlmont chapel: (650)595-4103
FD 1825
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)868-0082
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
UNION SPA & SALON
Grand Opening
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT
SENIOR LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
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By Benjamin Shingler
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LAC-MEGANTIC, Quebec —
Traumatized survivors of an oil train
derailment that wiped out the heart of
a small town braced for more bad
news as inspectors were finally
cleared to enter the charred site and
look for remains late Monday, more
than two days after the disaster that
killed at least 13 people. Atotal of 50
were missing and the death toll was
sure to rise.
Quebec provincial police Sgt.
Benoit Richard said eight more bod-
ies had been found in the wreckage
after firefighters doused the flames
and cooled down some of the oil
tankers that were in danger of explod-
ing. Five bodies were found over the
weekend, and police would not say
where the newly discovered ones
were, for fear of upsetting families.
All but one of the train’s 73 tanker
cars were carrying oil when they
came loose early Saturday, sped
downhill nearly seven miles (11
kilometers) into the town of Lac-
Megantic, near the Maine border, and
derailed. At least five of the cars
exploded.
The blasts destroyed about 30
buildings, including a public library
and a popular bar that was filled with
revelers, and forced about a third of
the town’s 6000 residents out of their
homes.
Sophie L’Heureux, a manager at the
bar, was woken up at home by the
explosion. She said she believed
there were about 50 people in the bar,
including many close friends.
“I’m in survival mode right now.
My priority is to try sleep if I can, eat
if I can,” she said. “For the rest, it’s
one minute, one day at a time.”
The derailment raised questions
about the safety of Canada’s growing
practice of transporting oil by train,
and was sure to bolster arguments
that a proposed oil pipeline running
from Canada across the U.S. — one
that Canadian officials badly want —
would be safer.
Raymond Lafontaine, who believed
he lost three members of his family,
including his son, said he was angry
with what appeared to be lack of safe-
ty regulations.
“We always wait until there’s a big
accident to change things,” said
Raymond Lafontaine, who had three
missing relatives. “Well, today we’ve
had a big accident, it’s one of the
biggest ever in Canada.”
Canada train derailment death toll rises to 13
Brazil opens
investigation into U.S. spying
SAO PAULO — The Brazilian government began an
investigation Monday into whether telecommunications
firms operating in the country cooperated with the U.S. as
part of a spying program that has collected data on billions
of telephone and email conversations.
Anatel, the government agency that regulates the telecom
sector in Brazil, said it’s working with federal police and
other government agencies on the investigation.
Around the world
REUTERS
The remains of a burnt train are seen in Lac Megantic, Canada.

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