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MTH221 / MTH 221 / Week 1 DQ 3

MTH221 / MTH 221 / Week 1 DQ 3

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Week 1 DQ 3










There is an old joke, commonly attributed to Groucho Marx, which goes something like this: “I don’t want to belong to any club that will accept people like me as a member.” Does this statement fall under the purview of Russell’s paradox, or is there an easy semantic way out? Look up the term fuzzy set theory in a search engine of your choice or the University Library, and see if this theory can offer any insights into this statement

Week 1 DQ 3










There is an old joke, commonly attributed to Groucho Marx, which goes something like this: “I don’t want to belong to any club that will accept people like me as a member.” Does this statement fall under the purview of Russell’s paradox, or is there an easy semantic way out? Look up the term fuzzy set theory in a search engine of your choice or the University Library, and see if this theory can offer any insights into this statement

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Week 1 DQ 3

There is an old joke, commonly attributed to Groucho Marx, which goes something like this: “I don’t want to belong to any club that will accept people like me as a member.” Does this statement fall under the purview of Russell’s paradox, or is there an easy semantic way out? Look up the term fuzzy set theory in a search engine of your choice or the University Library, and see if this theory can offer any insights into this statement

This particular one is actually a brain taster! But, it's interesting nevertheless. After a little online searching, Groucho's quote: "I don't want to belong to any club that will accept people like me as a member." appears to come under the idea of Russell's contradiction more-so compared to confused reasoning. Nevertheless, I can observe

By making an apparently absolute truth by stating that he will not belong to a club which will have him. he is creating a complete truth. and are. because they teeter on the fringe of philosophy instead of mathematics. as its name shows. In Groucho's statement. But. thereby creating a contradiction. By stating that he will not belong to a club. ultimately. in stating this. In Groucho's quotation. But. with confused reasoning. the "fuzziness" of his statement comes from the natural contradiction of the reasoning behind the statement itself. it's meant to clarify the "grey area" between complete truths and complete falsities. the "grey area" between both sciences. there isn't any grey area (which I can observe). To give the crowd which thinks that this drops under confused reasoning a leg to stand on. With both phrases. he states he will not belong to a club (set) which will have him. I am still going pretty heavily toward Russell's contradiction for this one. . they appear to be a method to mathematically clarify the philosophical variable which is human nature. These concepts intrigue me.how both might be related. he has positioned himself into an "elastic" set outside the original set (the club). Russell's contradiction is actually a reflection of contradictions in sets. in and of themselves. On the contrary. he has lumped himself into his own set (club).

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