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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Wednesday • July 10, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 280
JETLINER CRASH
LOCAL PAGE 5
A’S BEAT
PIRATES
SPORTS PAGE 11
HEALTHY SPIN
ON FISH TACOS
FOOD PAGE 19
NTSB: PILOTS RELIED ON AUTOMATIC SPEED CONTROL
Noise in
the hills
Burlingame neighbors in bitter
dispute over home construction
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A simmering brouhaha in
the Burlingame hills started
with a beehive near a pool
and a first complaint
between neighbors, escalat-
ed when tortoises started
burrowing across property
lines, came to a fever pitch
when band saws roared at 6
a.m. and will come to a head
when the two parties finally
sit down for mediation,
which has been delayed
three times already now.
The dispute pits San
Bruno school teacher John
Lucero against his neighbor
Burlingame Planning
Commissioner Michael
Marching to your own drum
Musician Sheila E. talks to troubled teens
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Singer and drummer Sheila E. has faced
her share of audiences but says groups
like the one she faced yesterday are the
toughest.
Crossed arms, emotional walls and
minds already made up about who she is
and what she is about to say — that’s
Sheila E.
By Sally Schilling
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
BART commuters stranded by the
three-day strike last week spiked ferry
ridership but, with the strike on hold,
the new riders have returned to their
regular routines, ferry officials said.
Ridership on the ferry — which
comes into the South San Francisco
terminal in Oyster Point near a cluster
of biotech companies on the shore —
seems to have gone back to normal,
said Ernest Sanchez, spokesman for
San Francisco Bay Ferry.
“When we’ve had issues like this, it
normally returns to pre-event levels,”
Sanchez said.
With low ridership since the South
San Francisco ferry service began in
June 2012, city officials wish more
people would consider it.
South San Francisco Councilwoman
Karyl Matsumoto was excited about
the addition of the ferry as a transit
option. But while it is good for the
city, ridership is still too low, she
said.
“It’s a lovely line, but it just has not
Ferry ridership boom short-lived
After BART strike halted, commuters return to previous routine
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Former residents of the Hallmark
House Apartments, destroyed in a six-
alarm fire Sunday, stood in line yester-
day for a chance to recover any belong-
ings remaining from the blaze that left
nearly 100 homeless and one dead.
Fire victims were provided assis-
tance at the Woodside Road apartment
complex yesterday by the county’s
Human Services Agency and other
nonprofit agencies as they waited to
Fire victims recover possessions
SALLY SCHILLING/DAILY JOURNAL
Ridership on the South San Francisco ferry line boomed during
the BART strike but has since returned to pre-strike levels.
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
Former residents of an apartment complex destroyed in a Sunday fire were able to remove belongings from their units
yesterday with the help of Redwood City fire officials.
JOHN LUCERO
Michael Gaul has posted this
sign for his neighbor to see.
It includes the term ‘GFY’
which could be considered
threatening to some. See FEUD, Page 16
See SHEILA, Page 16
Apartment complex in
six-alarm fire red-tagged
See FERRY, Page 20
See FIRE, Page 20
FOR THE RECORD 2 Wednesday • July 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Actor Adrian
Grenier is 37.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1913
The highest recorded shade tempera-
ture was measured in Death Valley at
134 degrees Fahrenheit.
“When I feel the
heat, I see the light.”
— Everett Dirksen, American politician (1896-1969)
Banjo player Bela
Fleck is 55.
Singer Jessica
Simpson is 33.
Birthdays
REUTERS
The snow-covered Popocatepetl volcano spews a cloud of steam into the air in Puebla , Mexico.
Wednesday: Mostly cloudy in the morn-
ing then becoming partly cloudy. Patchy
fog in the morning. Highs in the mid 60s.
West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Wednesday ni ght: Mostly cloudy.
Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the
lower 50s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Thursday: Cloudy in the morning then
becoming sunny. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the
lower 60s. Southwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Thursday night: Partly cloudy in the evening then
becoming cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the
lower 50s. Southwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Friday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming partly
cloudy. Patchy fog. Highs in the mid 60s.
Friday night through Sunday: Mostly cloudy.
Local Weather Forecast
(Answers tomorrow)
ELOPE EJECT TRAUMA ENGULF
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: He paid for his neighbor’s new oak because
he wanted to — “TREET”
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SURCO
CATHH
DOINIE
RACSEC
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
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Ans.
here:
I n 1509, theologian John Calvin, a key figure of the
Protestant Reformation, was born in Noyon, Picardy,
France.
I n 1890, Wyoming became the 44th state.
I n 1919, President Woodrow Wilson personally delivered
the Treaty of Versailles (vehr-SY’) to the Senate, and urged
its ratification. (However, the Senate rejected it.)
I n 1925, jury selection took place in Dayton, Tenn., in the
trial of John T. Scopes, charged with violating the law by
teaching Darwin’s Theory of Evolution. (Scopes was con-
victed and fined, but the verdict was overturned on a techni-
cality. )
I n 1929, American paper currency was reduced in size as
the government began issuing bills that were approximate-
ly 25 percent smaller.
I n 1940, during World War II, the Battle of Britain began
as Nazi forces began attacking southern England by air.
(The Royal Air Force was ultimately victorious.)
I n 1951, armistice talks aimed at ending the Korean War
began at Kaesong.
I n 1962, AT&T’s Telstar 1 communications satellite, capa-
ble of relaying television signals and telephone calls, was
launched by NASAfrom Cape Canaveral.
I n 1973, the Bahamas became fully independent after three
centuries of British colonial rule. John Paul Getty III, the
teenage grandson of the oil tycoon, was abducted in Rome
by kidnappers who cut off his ear when his family was slow
to meet their ransom demands; young Getty was finally
released in December 1973 in exchange for nearly $3 mil-
lion.
I n 1978, ABC-TV launched its reformatted evening news-
cast, “World News Tonight,” with anchors Frank Reynolds,
Peter Jennings and Max Robinson.
Former boxer Jake LaMotta is 92. Writer-producer Earl
Hamner Jr. is 90. Former New York City Mayor David N.
Dinkins is 86. Actor William Smithers is 86. Broadway com-
poser Jerry Herman is 82. Director Ivan Passer is 80. Actor
Lawrence Pressman is 74. Singer Mavis Staples is 74. Actor
Mills Watson is 73. Actor Robert Pine is 72. Rock musician
Jerry Miller (Moby Grape) is 70. International Tennis Hall of
Famer Virginia Wade is 68. Actor Ron Glass is 68. Actress Sue
Lyon is 67. Folk singer Arlo Guthrie is 66. Rock musician
Dave Smalley is 64. Country-folk singer-songwriter Cheryl
Wheeler is 62.
Meat is federally inspected for quality
and graded as ‘prime,’ ‘choice’ or
‘select.’ Once inspected, the meat is
stamped with a purple mark. The dye
used to stamp the grade is made from a
vegetable dye and is not harmful.
***
Fish travel in schools. Dolphins travel
in pods.
***
When Theodor Geisel (1904-1991)
wrote and illustrated books for children
using the pen name Dr. Seuss. When
Geisel wrote a book that was illustrated
by someone else he used the pen name
Theo Lesieg (Geisel spelled back-
wards).
***
A pound of poppy seeds has about
900,000 seeds.
***
The Antique Caterpillar Machinery
Owners Club, founded in 1991, has
more than 3,000 members. The club is
for people who own and collect antique
Caterpillar equipment or scale models,
such as tractors and bulldozers.
***
While swimming, elephants use their
trunks as a snorkel to breathe.
***
Buddy Holly (1936-1959) and the
Crickets recorded “Peggy Sue” in 1957.
The song was named after Peggy Sue
Gerron, the girlfriend of the Crickets’
drummer Jerry Allison (born 1939). In
2008, Gerron released a memoir in titled
“Whatever Happened to Peggy Sue?”
***
Hawaii’s state capitol is Honolulu. In
the Hawaiian language Honolulu means
‘sheltered harbor.’
***
Do you know what an anometer meas-
ures? How about a accelerometer,
barometer and galvanometer? See
answer at end.
***
The first X-ray ever taken was of a hand.
It was the hand of the wife of Wilhelm
Conrad Röntgen (1845-1923), the
German physician that discovered the
X-ray by accident in 1895. Röntgen
called his discovery X-radiation; the X
stood for “unknown.”
***
The meaning of the term ‘swan song’ i s
a final gesture or performance given
before dying. It was once believed that a
swan sang beautifully and mournfully
just before they death. It’s not true, but
it is the origin if the term.
***
Ohio’s state flag is pennant shaped. It is
the only state flag that is not rectangu-
lar.
***
Ameerkat named Timon and a warthog
named Pumbaa befriend Simba the lion
in the Disney movie “The Lion King”
(1994).
***
Construction of the Berlin Wall began
in 1961. Also in 1961, John F.
Kennedy (1917-1963) was sworn in as
president and the first disposable diaper,
Pampers, was introduced.
***
The first lines to the Beatles song
“Imagine” (1971) are “Imagine there’s
no heaven / It’s easy if you try / No hell
below us / Above us only sky.”
***
Fiddler crabs are usually smaller than 2
inches. The male fiddler crab has a large
fiddle-shaped claw. The other claw is
small. If the large claw is lost, the
opposite side will develop into a fiddle
claw after the next molt.
***
In a classic tale of Robin Hood, the
Sheriff of Nottingham lured Robin
Hood to an archery match with the
promise of a golden arrow as a prize.
The Sheriff was foiled when Robin
Hood attended the match in disguise.
***
Founded in 1842, the New York
Philharmonic is the oldest symphony
orchestra in the United States. The
Philharmonic currently plays 180 con-
certs per year.
***
Answer: An anometer measures wind
speed. An accelerometer records the rate
of acceleration of an aircraft or rocket. A
barometer measures changes in atmos-
pheric pressure to determine the weath-
er. A galvanometer measures the flow of
electricity in a circuit.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Gold Rush,No.
1, in first place; Lucky Charms, No. 12, in second
place; and Eureka, No. 7, in third place. The race
time was clocked at 1:45.17.
5 8 1
3 21 43 45 48 14
Mega number
July 9 Mega Millions
2 13 35 36 52 11
Powerball
July 6 Powerball
8 12 30 32 34
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
7 5 1 8
Daily Four
8 8 5
Daily three evening
2 18 20 21 45 24
Mega number
July 6 Super Lotto Plus
3
Wednesday • July 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
BURLINGAME
Burglary. A residence was burglarized on
the 2100 block of Trousdale Drive before
11:28 p.m. Thursday, July 4.
Disturbance. Fireworks were set off on the
400 block of Bloomfield Road before 11:12
p.m. Thursday, July 4.
Vandalism. A mailbox was vandalized on
Burlingame Avenue and Dwight Road before
10:25 Thursday, July 4.
Arre s t. A juvenile was arrested for assault
on the first block of Bloomfield Road before
7:39 p.m. Thursday, July 4.
Disturbance. Fireworks were set off on
Clarendon Road and Peninsula Avenue
before 2:46 p.m. Thursday, July 4.
Disturbance. Two siblings were involved
in a loud verbal dispute on the 1000 block of
El Camino Real before 11:31 a.m. Thursday,
July 4.
Suspi ci ous ci rcumst ances. A man
reported that someone attempted to steal his
license plates on the 1000 block of Carolan
Avenue before 9:46 a.m. Thursday, July 4.
FOSTER CITY
Fireworks. Two adults and a group of chil-
dren were seen setting off fireworks on
Menhaden Court before 11:36 p.m.
Thursday, July 4.
Publ i c i ntoxi cati on. An intoxicated man
was seen kicking cars in a parking lot on
Metro Center Boulevard before 10:41 p.m.
Thursday, July 4.
DUI. An intoxicated woman was seen driv-
ing a truck on Polaris Avenue and Neptune
Lane before 10:08 p.m. Thursday, July 4.
DUI. Aman was seen stumbling and getting
into a vehicle on Niantic Drive before 9:41
p.m. Thursday, July 4.
Police reports
When you’re a Jet ...
Approximately 12 people were seen
dancing in the street on DNA Way in
South San Francisco before 12:12 a.m.
Sunday, June 30.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Synthetic turf is off the table but the San
Carlos City Council sent staff back to the
drawing board for other aspects of its
Crestview Park renovation — in particular,
ways to potentially save a memorial redwood
tree and add a safe place for stargazing.
The City Council Monday night opted
against endorsing the recommended design
known as Concept C and instead asked for a
new Concept E to consider at the Aug. 26
meeting. The new concept would include
enough hardscape surfaces for the
astronomers who hold stargazing parties and
worry about stumbling in the dark.
Staff will also return with cost estimates for
replacing the existing grass field with new
natural turf to see if it fits within the $1.7 mil-
lion project budget and options for a desired
roundabout at the park entryway.
As proposed, the roundabout will require
removing a redwood tree at which a memorial
plaque currently sits. Councilmembers Ron
Collins and Karen Clapper said they will each
speak with members of the Nannarone family
about moving the plaque elsewhere and plant-
ing a new tree. The plaque honors Greg
Nannarone who died of leukemia at age 16 in
1984.
The reduced number of trees in the park plan
was an overall concern for the City Council
although much of the focus was on the specif-
ic redwood. Although the council, minus
Mayor Bob Grassilli who had to recuse him-
self because he lives too close to the park,
prefers to save the tree, Councilman Ron
Collins conceded it isn’t a deal breaker.
“If we can’t keep it, I can live with that,” he
said, adding separately about a replacement
that “the nice thing about redwoods is they
grow quickly.”
The council could choose to keep the tree
but only if the existing entry and parking
configuration remains, said City Manager Jeff
Maltbie.
Clapper called the sacrifice of one tree a
long-term commitment to a turnabout which
will provide more safety to those dropping
off and picking up at the park.
Astronomer and longtime resident Ken Lum
also asked that the turnabout be made safe for
him and other skywatchers, noting that curbs
and stones can represent tripping hazards.
Some of the lengthy public comment peri-
od included residents with opinions about the
original call to use synthetic turf although
staff changed its mind before the meeting and
now recommends natural grass. At least one
speaker worried that reopening the public
debate over the Crestview design opens that
possibility back up but others said city staff
needs more time before deciding on a final
blueprint because none of the original con-
cepts Athrough D were well thought-out.
“We all need to step back, take a deep breath
and revisit our concerns,” Susan Blackman
said.
Crestview is a 1.1-acre park located on
Crestview Drive north of Brittan Avenue.
Many residents — often those opposed to
synthetic turf — pointed to its charm or
describe it as a neighborhood park rather than
one that draws from throughout the city like
the larger Highlands Park.
The Planning Commission favored 3-1
Concept C which included new playground
equipment, nine parking spaces rather than
the existing 15 and the addition of five trees.
However, the commission split evenly 2-2
over the original synthetic turf recommenda-
tion.
Council seeks new park design concept
Synthetic turf idea dries up at San Carlos’ Crestview Park
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The county’s former chief probation officer
is ready to begin trial on two felony charges
of possessing child pornography lodged after
federal investigators reportedly found more
than 400 graphic images of children on his
home computer in December.
Stuart James Forrest, 61, is expected to
mount a defense that admits possessing some
pornographic images but arguing they were
related to his job heading the San Mateo
County Probation Department. On Tuesday,
Forrest appeared in court for a conference on
his readiness for trial and
to begin discussing trial
motions. The five-day jury
trial is set for Monday,
July 15.
Forrest has pleaded not
guilty to two felony
counts stemming from his
alleged possession on
Dec. 20 and Dec. 21.
Although Forrest report-
edly possessed more than
400 illegal images on a USB drive and laptop
at his home, the law typically allows a person
only to be charged for each incident of pos-
session rather than the total number of pho-
tographs or videos.
The two days linked to the charges by the
state Attorney General’s Office are when feder-
al agents searched Forrest’s office at the Youth
Services Center in San Mateo and the San
Mateo County Superior Court placed him on
administrative leave. Shortly after, Forrest
reportedly tried killing himself on the steps
of a San Mateo church when confronted by
sheriff’s deputies and, 10 days later, retired
from the county. Forrest is free from custody
on a $10,000 bail bond.
Ex-probation head ready for trial on possessing child pornography
Stu Forrest
4
Wednesday • July 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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New city clerk named
Crystal Mui, who has been act-
ing San Carlos city clerk the past
five months,
has been named
to the position
pe r ma ne nt l y,
the city
announced yes-
terday.
Mui has been
filling in the
position while
then-city clerk
C h r i s t i n e
Boland served as acting parks and
recreation director. Boland has
since been named to that slot per-
manently and City Manager Jeff
Maltbie said Mui proved she is
well equipped to take on the clerk’s
job.
“Crystal brings with her strong
coordinating and organizational
skills and has excelled in her work
as the acting director. I know that
she will continue to be a major
contributor to the city in the years
ahead,” Maltbie said in a prepared
statement.
Mui joined the city in October
2006 as the administrative assis-
tant to the administrative services
director before later moving to the
city clerk’s office to serve the same
position. She began her career in
the public sector in 2002 as an
intern for the city of Burlingame
and, when she left, was the execu-
tive assistant for the city manag-
er/city attorney’s office.
Mui was raised in Millbrae and
spent most of her life on the
Peninsula. In 2006, she earned a
bachelor’s degree from San
Francisco State University and is
currently in the process of becom-
ing a certified municipal clerk.
Redwood City hires new
communications manager
Sheri Costa-Batis is Redwood
City’s new public communication
and engagement manager begin-
ning at the end of July, the city
announced yesterday.
Costa-Batis starts July 24 and
takes over for Malcolm Smith,
who is retiring after 12 years with
Redwood City. Costa-Batis was
most recently a public affairs spe-
cialist with the city of San Mateo.
“Her proven track record, her
deep skill set covering both tradi-
tional and new media and her
strong passion for public service
and community engagement made
her the top candidate to fill this
critical role with Redwood City, ”
City Manager Bob Bell said in a
prepared statement.
Costa-Batis has degrees in com-
munications and public adminis-
trations. She has more than 15
years of experience, including
time with the city and county of
San Francisco where she served as
public works information officer.
Tesla joins Nasdaq-100;
replacing Oracle
Tesla joined the Nasdaq-100
Index on Monday as software
maker Oracle Corp. heads to the
New York Stock Exchange.
The electric car maker’s stock
rose in premarket trading Tuesday.
Oracle announced its planned
move to the NYSE in June. At the
time, the NYSE said that it would
be its largest market transfer list-
ing to date. Oracle, based in
Redwood Shores will be the fourth
Nasdaq-100 company to transfer to
the NYSE in the past year. Its mar-
ket capitalization was $146.5 bil-
lion at the end of trading Monday,
according to FactSet.
Tesla, based in Palo Alto, has an
approximately $12.8 billion mar-
ket capitalization.
The company currently sells
only the $70,000 Model S sedan,
but its “X” SUV is slated for the
second half of 2014 and the “Gen
III,” which will be half the price of
the Model S, is slated to hit the
road in three or four years.
Crystal Mui
Local briefs
5
Wednesday • July 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Probation officer
publishes novel
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Having only one crayon with which to color may seem
limiting — but it didn’t to Nancy LaRonda Johnson.
As a child, Johnson loved the chil-
dren’s book “Harold and the Purple
Crayon.” The beloved children’s book
tells the tale of a little boy who uses his
purple crayon to create a variety of
worlds and adventures. Johnson, a San
Mateo County probation officer,
believes in transformation. She thinks
people can change and enjoys watching
and even creating those stories. While
Johnson can’t control those with whom
she works, she can create a welcomed ending in her own sto-
ries.
“My faith is strong and I do believe that anyone alive can
change,” she said.
Johnson, who lives in Hayward, recently published her
first novel, “Anticipation of the Penitent.” The book tells
the story of Thomas, a serial killer who targets little girls,
and his mother Alezea. It’s not just about the actions of
Thomas but also how he grew up and his mother’s attempt
to save her son.
Johnson enjoys stories of ordinary people facing
extraordinary circumstances. In this book, she said, there
are tests of both faith and humanity.
Johnson grew up with plans not to write but to be an
attorney working for the District Attorney’s Office. As a lit-
tle girl in Berkeley, she was heavily influenced by the
movie “And Justice for All” staring Al Pacino. Johnson
envisioned herself in the courtroom being a part of that
fight. She attended the University of California at Santa
Cruz and the University of San Francisco School of Law.
Once she got a taste of working in the District Attorney’s
Office, Johnson realized it wasn’t for her. However, she
instead found a niche creating pretrial reports for proba-
tion. Johnson’s work required her to really get to know
defendants and their backgrounds. As a result, Johnson
could often see the connections to their circumstances and
the negative path the individuals chose to take.
Although she wasn’t planning to write a book at the time,
the work provided solid training in character development.
Johnson actually has been a natural writer for years, pen-
ning poems and journal entries. She even considered a cre-
ative writing minor in college but instead decided to study
abroad in Italy.
About 12 years ago, she switched from writing the pretri-
al reports to working in probation to take advantage of
more traditional workday hours. Writing a book became a
hobby for her though it took a lot of time. Johnson really
needed to teach herself about the writing process. There
were lots of revisions and writing on a laptop while taking
the train to work.
Johnson’s book explores the idea that things aren’t black
and white. There are evil people, she acknowledged, but not
everyone who does something bad is evil. Johnson noted
that the first bit of feedback she’s received included her
book starting a bit darker than she thought. However,
Johnson knows how it ends, so she doesn’t see it that way.
“If you like books [that] go deep into who people are,”
then this book will be enjoyable, she said.
Johnson is already working on the sequel, which she
hopes will be completed more quickly than the first. When
not writing, Johnson enjoys tennis and traveling. In fact,
vacation is her favorite word.
To learn more about Johnson, or to read her blog, visit
www.nancylarondajohnson.com.
heather@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Nancy Johnson
By Martha Mendoza and Joan Lowy
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The pilots of Asiana Flight 214
relied on automated cockpit equipment
to control the jetliner’s speed as they
landed at San Francisco airport, but
realized too late they were flying too
low and too slow before the aircraft
crashed, investigators said Tuesday.
The new details were not conclusive
about the cause of Saturday’s crash,
but they raised potential areas of
focus: Was there a mistake made in set-
ting the automatic speed control, did
it malfunction or were the pilots not
fully aware of what the plane was
doing?
One of the most puzzling aspects of
the crash has been why the wide-body
Boeing 777 jet came in far too low and
slow, clipping its landing gear and
then its tail on a rocky seawall just
short the runway. The crash killed two
of the 307 people and injured scores of
others, most not seriously.
Among those injured were two flight
attendants in the back of the plane,
who survived despite being thrown
onto the runway when the plane
slammed into the seawall and the tail
broke off.
National Transportation Safety
Board chairman Deborah Hersman said
the autothrottle was set for 157 mph
and the pilots assumed it was control-
ling the plane’s airspeed. However, the
autothrottle was only “armed,” she
said.
Hersman said the pilot at the con-
trols, identified by Korean authorities
as Lee Gang-guk, was only about
halfway through his training on the
Boeing 777 and was landing that type
of aircraft at the San Francisco airport
for the first time ever. And the co-pilot,
identified as Lee Jeong-Min, was on
his first trip as a flight instructor.
Autothrottles typically have three
settings — off, on and armed. An
autothrottle that is armed but not on
will remain at its previous speed,
which was probably near idle, said
Doug Moss, a pilot for a major U.S.
airline and an aviation safety consult-
ant in Torrance, Calif. Pilots will fre-
quently shift to idle off and on when
preparing to land in order to descend
faster.
The pilot flying the plane had turned
off his flight director, while the train-
ing captain had his flight director on,
Hersman said. The flight director com-
putes and displays the proper pitch and
bank angles required in order for the
aircraft to follow a selected path.
In most airliners, an autothrottle
will not turn on if one flight director is
off and one on because it has to work
in harmony with the flight directors —
both need to be either on or off, Moss
said.
NTSB: Pilots relied on automatic speed control
REUTERS
The National Transportation Safety Board Investigator in Charge Bill English, right, and Chairman Deborah Hersman discuss
the progress of the Asiana Airlines flight 214 investigation in San Francisco.
6
Wednesday • July 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Ronald George Goerss
April 10, 1929 - July 4, 2013
Ronald George Goerss, passed away
peacefully shortly after midnight on
Independence Day, 2013. Born on
April 10, 1929, in Tonawanda, NY, to
dedicated parents Elmer and Lydia
(Brauer) Goerss, he is survived by his
loving wife, Elizabeth (Ross) Goerss,
his sons, Ronald S. and David, his
daughter, Susan Goerss Brown,
and their spouses Edith Foothorap,
Monica Delgado Goerss, and Daniel
G. Brown. He is also survived by his
grandchildren, Thomas and Robert
Goerss, Justin Goerss, and Caitlin
and Brenna Brown.
Ron is a graduate of the Concordia Seminary, in St. Louis, MO, where he played
intercollegiate basketball and obtained both his B.A. and M.Div. degrees. Ron brought
drive, passion, and humor wherever he went. Before graduating from the seminary, he
served a year as Vicar at West Portal Lutheran Church in San Francisco, when he met
the love of his life, Betsy, then a youth group counselor of the “Friday Nighters” at Trinity
Lutheran Church in Burlingame. Soon to be married, he received and declined an offer
from the famed coach, Clair Bee, to play for the NBA Baltimore Bullets. In 1954, Ron
moved to Southern California to found the Lutheran campus ministry at UCLA, and for
12 years served as the campus pastor. He dedicated the campus Lutheran chapel in 1965.
During this time, he earned an M.A. from the University of Southern California. He also
served a year as pastor to the university community and co-pastor of Emmanuel Lutheran
Church in Valparaiso, Indiana.
In 1966, Ron decided to pursue a career in business as a management consultant,
working first as Manager of Staff Recruitment at McKinsey & Co., Los Angeles. He went
on to join MRG Corporation, Los Angeles, as a partner. In 1971, Ron and his family
moved to Burlingame, CA when he became Vice President of Heidrick & Struggles, the
international executive search firm and was associated with the San Francisco office
from 1971 to 1980. He was co-founder and partner of Smith, Goerss & Ferneborg,
headquartered in San Francisco, awarded “Hall of Fame” designation by industry
observers. Before retirement, Ron joined Boyden Global Executive Search as partner.
Ron was an avid sports fan, lifelong reader, published author and world traveler. He
could find the humor in any situation and was ready to share it at a moment’s notice. He
supported several charities and was known to participate in many lively discussions about
current events and politics. He never forgot his Lutheran ministry and often assisted his
fellow pastors when needed.
Friends are invited to attend a Memorial service held at St. Andrews Lutheran
Church, 1501 So. El Camino Real, San Mateo on Saturday, July 13th at 11:00 a.m.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Ron’s favorite charity, Samaritan House
in San Mate
Obituary
FEDERAL
GOVERNMENT
• U. S. Rep.
Jackie Speier, D-
San Mateo, will be
holding a town hall
meeting in Belmont
10 a.m.-11 a.m.
Saturday, July 13.
The meeting will give constituents an
opportunity to speak with Speier in person
about issues affecting their community,
according to Speier’s office.
The town hall meeting is at Belmont
City Hall, 1 Twin Pines Lane, in Belmont.
For more information visit
www.speier.house.gov, https://www.face-
book.com/JackieSpeier or https://twit-
ter.com/RepSpeier.
COUNTY GOVERNMENT
• The Board of Supervisors tentative-
ly approved nearly $1 million in Measure
A revenue to add two sheriff’s deputies at
schools as school resource officers. The
Board of Supervisors also heard a $6.5 mil-
lion request to implement the North Fair
Oaks Community Plan and more than
$9 million for prevention and early inter-
vention of children at risk of abuse, trauma
or mental illness.
CITY GOVERNMENT
• An environmental impact report scop-
ing meeting for a proposed renovation of
the north block of the Hi l l sdal e
Shoppi ng Center has been scheduled for
Wednesday, July 24 from 7 p.m.-8 p.m. at
the San Mateo Senior Center, assem-
bly room, 2645 Alameda de las Pulgas in
San Mateo. The proposed project includes
the reconfiguration of the north block
structures to include replacing Sears with
Target and several smaller retail outlets
fronting on 31st Avenue, relocating the
food court to the retail bridge above 31st
Avenue and creating an outdoor seating ter-
race, replacing Cost Pl us with a new lux-
ury cinema, pedestrian-friendly streetscape
improvements to 31st Avenue and recon-
figuration of and landscape improvements
to the parking areas. No changes are pro-
posed to the Outback Restaurant and the
Bohannon Devel opment Company
offices buildings.
If you wish to comment on the EIR, con-
tact project planner Tricia Schimpp at
522-7244 or by email tschimpp@cityof-
sanmateo.org.
Mary A. Cattaneo-Berryman
Mary A. Cattaneo-Berryman, born March
14, 1938, died peacefully in the comfort of
her home surrounded by
family July 5, 2013.
A resident of Redwood
City, she was 75.
Mary was born in Los
Angeles. She spent her
childhood in Minnesota
growing up with her par-
ents, brother and large
extended Italian family
until they relocated to Redwood City in her
early teens which became her home for the
remainder of her life. Mary was a loving, car-
ing and kind mother, grandmother, sister,
aunt and friend who is survived by her loving
children Steven Walls, Kim (Doug) Sterling,
Janet (Ken) Strain, Margaret (John) Esplana,
Michael (Tiffany) Sims and Michele (Brian)
Zeh; 13 grandchildren and one great-grand-
child; her brother John (Kathy) Cattaneo, two
nephews and many loving friends and family.
Mary was predeceased by her parents Carl and
Shirley Cattaneo. “Mary loved everyone she
met and they loved her.”
Memorial services will be 1 p.m. Monday,
July 15 at the Messiah Lutheran Church locat-
ed at 1835 Valota Road, Redwood City. In lieu
of flowers donations can be made to Mission
Hospice www.missionhospice.org.
Dennis Drew Williams
Dennis Drew Williams, born Feb. 24,
1948, died unexpectedly July 4, 2013.
Dennis was a lifelong
Peninsula resident mostly
in San Carlos. Dennis loved
dogs and enjoyed volunteer-
ing with Pets in Need. He is
survived by his wife Judy,
his sons Dan and Mike and
his grandson Johan.
“He will be greatly
missed by all.”
Obituaries
NATION 7
Wednesday • July 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — They huddle outside office build-
ings and they can’t satisfy their nicotine cravings by
lighting up on planes and trains, but now smokers
could be getting a break from an unlikely source.
A glitch involving President Barack Obama’s health
care law means smokers may get at least some relief
next year from tobacco-use penalties that could have
made their premiums unaffordable.
In yet another health care overhaul delay, the admin-
istration has quietly notified insurers that a computer
system problem will limit penalties that the law says
the companies may charge smokers. A fix will take at
least a year.
Older smokers are more likely to benefit from the
glitch, experts say. But depending on how insurers
respond to it, it’s also possible that younger smokers
could wind up facing higher penalties than they other-
wise would have.
Some see an emerging pattern of last-minute switch-
es and delays as the administration scrambles to pre-
pare the Oct. 1 launch of new health insurance markets
for people who don’t have job-based insurance. Last
week, the White House unexpectedly announced a one-
year postponement of a major provision in the law that
requires larger employers to offer coverage or face
fines.
The smokers’ glitch is “a temporary circumstance
that in no way impacts our ability to open the market-
places on Oct. 1,” Health and Human Services spokes-
woman Joanne Peters said in a statement.
A break for smokers? Glitch
may limit tobacco penalties
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Framing a new
argument against President Barack
Obama’s health care law, congressional
GOPleaders called Tuesday for a delay in
the law’s requirement that individual
Americans carry health insurance.
House Speaker John Boehner, R-
Ohio, and other senior Republicans
told Obama in a letter that his decision
last week to grant a one-year delay for
employers but leave in place provi-
sions for individuals and families had
created many new questions and con-
cerns.
At a Capitol Hill news conference,
Boehner vowed to hold another vote
this month to remove the individual
mandate, arguing that it was necessary
to “correct this injustice.”
“If businesses can get relief from
Obamacare, the rest of America ought to
be able to get relief as well,” Boehner
told reporters. He later added, “We’ll
have another vote, count on it.”
House Majority Leader Eric Cantor,
R-Va., called Obama’s move last week
“stunning.”
“I never thought I’d see the day when
the White House and the president came
down on the side of big business but
left the American people out in the
cold,” Cantor said.
White House spokesman Jay Carney
said the administration has no inten-
tion of delaying the individual man-
date.
GOP wants delay in health law’s individual mandate
By Charles Babington
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Republicans’
knack for congressional redistricting
helps them control the U.S. House, but
it may be working against them on
immigration changes that national
GOP leaders see as critical to the next
presidential election.
House Republicans generally repre-
sent far fewer Hispanics than
Democrats do. And that leaves many
GOP members representing white con-
servatives, many of whom oppose a
path to citizenship for immigrants liv-
ing here illegally.
The combination poses a high hur-
dle for passage of a comprehensive
immigration overhaul in the
Republican-controlled House. The
Senate has passed such a measure,
which includes an eventual pathway to
citizenship, accompanied by greater
border security. A GOP-sanctioned
study of Mitt Romney’s November
defeat concluded that the party must
embrace immigration reform to stem
its huge losses among Hispanic vot-
ers, a fast-growing group.
GOP redistricting skills may hurt immigration push
REUTERS
U.S. House Speaker John Boehner takes a question from a reporter during a news
conference on Capitol Hill.
NATION/WORLD 8
Wednesday • July 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
REUTERS
A police officer walks amongst burned train axles in Lac Megantic, Canada.
By Sean Farrell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LAC-MEGANTIC, Quebec — Canadian
authorities said they have opened a criminal
investigation into the fiery wreck of a run-
away oil train in this small town as the death
toll climbed to 15, with dozens more bodies
feared buried in the burned-out ruins.
Quebec police Inspector Michel Forget
said Tuesday that investigators have “discov-
ered elements” that have led to a criminal
probe. He gave no details but ruled out terror-
ism and said police are more likely exploring
the possibility of criminal negligence.
The death toll rose with the discovery of
two more bodies Tuesday. About three dozen
more people were missing. The bodies that
have been recovered were burned so badly
they have yet to be identified.
Investigators zeroed in on whether a fire on
the train a few hours before the disaster set off
a deadly chain of events that has raised ques-
tions about the safety of transporting oil in
North America by rail instead of pipeline.
The unmanned Montreal, Maine &
Atlantic Railway train broke loose early
Saturday and sped downhill in the darkness
nearly seven miles (11 kilometers) before
jumping the tracks at 63 mph (101 kph)
near the Maine border. All but one of the 73
cars were carrying oil. At least five explod-
ed.
Rail dispatchers had no chance to warn
anyone during the train’s 18-minute journey
because they didn’t know it was happening
themselves, Transportation Safety Board
officials said Tuesday. Such warning systems
are not in place on secondary rail lines, said
TSB manager Ed Belkaloul.
Criminal probe opens in
Quebec oil train wreck
By Mike Schneider and Klyle Hightower
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANFORD, Fla. — Defense attorneys on
Tuesday tried to get Trayvon Martin’s text
messages and cellphone photos dealing
with fighting and guns introduced at George
Zimmerman’s second-degree murder trial as
they neared the finish of their presentation.
Zimmerman’s attorneys called a forensics
computer analyst to tell the judge presiding
over the trial that text messages on Martin’s
cellphone showed he was trying to buy or
sell a gun. The analyst, Richard Connor,
read to the judge text messages he found on
Martin’s phone that describe Martin
recounting a fight he had been in to a friend.
Jurors were out of the courtroom. The tes-
timony was given to Judge Debra Nelson to
help her decide whether to allow the defense
to use them. She had ruled that information
about Martin’s interest in guns and fighting
couldn’t be used during opening statements.
But she left open the possibility that they
could be introduced later.
Prosecutor John Guy said jurors shouldn’t
be presented with the text messages and
photos of a gun found on
Martin’s phone, as well
as a Facebook posting
from a half-brother ask-
ing Martin when he was
going to teach him how
to fight.
“It would mislead the
jury and be prejudicial,”
Guy said. “It doesn’t tell
us about Trayvon Martin
and certainly doesn’t tell
us what George
Zimmerman knew about
Trayvon Martin.”
However, defense attor-
ney Don West said they
were relevant.
“It relates to his physi-
cal capabilities, his
knowledge of fighting,”
West said.
The effort to get the
text messages and cellphone images intro-
duced came after the judge said she would rule
Wednesday on whether a defense animation
depicting the fatal struggle between Martin
and Zimmerman can be played for jurors.
Confusion on Snowden
acceptance of Venezuela offer
MOSCOW — The WikiLeaks secret-
spilling site on Tuesday said NSA leaker
Edward Snowden has not
yet formally accepted
asylum in Venezuela, try-
ing to put to rest growing
confusion over whether
he had taken up the coun-
try’s offer.
Venezuelan President
Nicolas Maduro has
offered asylum to
Snowden and says his
country received a
request from the former NSA systems ana-
lyst. But Snowden, who is believed to be in
a Moscow airport’s transit zone, has applied
for asylum in other countries as well, and it
is not clear how easy it would be for him to
travel to the Latin American country.
On Tuesday, a prominent Russian lawmak-
er tweeted that Snowden had accepted
Venezuela’s offer, then deleted the posting a
few minutes later.
It was not possible to immediately reach
Alexei Pushkov, the head of the Russian
parliament’s foreign affairs committee who
has acted as an unofficial point man for the
Kremlin on the Snowden affair.
Illinois enacts nation’s
final concealed-gun law
SPRINGFIELD, Ill. — The last holdout
on allowing the public possession of con-
cealed guns, Illinois joined the rest of the
nation Tuesday as lawmakers raced to beat a
federal court deadline in adopting a carry
law over Gov. Pat Quinn’s objections.
Massive majorities in the House and
Senate voted to override changes the
Democratic governor made just a week ago
in an amendatory veto.
Some lawmakers feared failure to pass
something would mean virtually unregulat-
ed weapons in Chicago, which has endured
severe gun violence in recent months —
including more than 70 shootings, at least
12 of them fatal, during the Independence
Day weekend.
“This is a historic, significant day for
law-abiding gun owners,” said Rep.
Brandon Harris, a southern Illinois
Democrat who, in 10 years in the House,
has continued work on concealed carry
begun by his uncle, ex-Rep. David Phelps,
who began serving in the mid-1980s.
“They finally get to exercise their Second
Amendment rights.”
Defense trying to get Martin texts
and cellphone photos introduced
Trayvon Martin
George
Zimmerman
News briefs
Edward
Snowden
OPINION 9
Wednesday • July 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Peninsula Bridge
Editor,
First, thanks to Heather Murtagh
for another well-written education
story (“Offering an educational
bridge” in the July 9 edition of the
Daily Journal). Regular readers of
the Daily Journal are fortunate to
have this award-winning reporter
serving our area.
Second, congratulations to St.
Matthew’s Episcopal Day School
for offering this hugely successful
opportunity to fifth and sixth
graders willing to devote their sum-
mer vacation to hard academic work.
The program, according to
Executive Director Deirdre Marlowe,
is now in its 24th summer.
Although this particular five-week
class is being held at an
Episcopalian facility, one needs not
be of that faith to qualify.
The one unfortunate point that I
see is that students are accepted
only from San Mateo to Mountain
View. Ms. Marlowe states that
growth is a function of revenue gen-
eration and a suitable location in
order to offer their program to a
wider geographic area. For example,
donors range from individuals of the
Sand Hill Foundation to the
Mountain View Rotary. If we could
get some northern funding the pro-
gram might be able to expand up
here. Rotary, Lions, are you listen-
ing?
Until these groups get together,
readers can support the Peninsula
Bridge Program at www. peninsula-
bridge.org.
Alice Barnes
San Bruno
Sue Lempert’s local ‘heroes’
Editor,
Many thanks to Sue Lempert for
recognizing the many of us who vol-
unteer in local schools and service
organizations (column, “The extra
ordinary,” in the July 8 edition of the
Daily Journal).
But the fact is that Sue herself is
not only one of the heroes in this
community; arguments could be made
that she is the local volunteer
“leader.” She served several terms as a
trustee on the San Mateo elementary
school board and again on the San
Mateo high school board, but that
wasn’t enough for Sue. She was a
member of the San Mateo City
Council, then mayor, and all the
while has been assisting several serv-
ice organizations. Where does she
find time to write a weekly column for
the Journal?
Stan Gross
San Mateo
The Zimmerman case
Editor,
What difference does it make who
cried for help during the fight between
George Zimmerman and his murder
victim, Trayvon Martin? It could be
either of the two, and unrelated to
who initiated and was responsible for
that fatal confrontation. There seems
to be no doubt that Zimmerman left
his car and kept following Trayvon,
despite the 911 operator telling him
not to. If Zimmerman pursued and
tried to stop Trayvon, or challenged
him in some way, the natural reaction
for Trayvon would be to resist and
defend himself, try to get away or hit
back and take the aggressor down, in
which case Zimmerman may have
cried out. But if he were pinned down
on his back, as he claims, how could
he get his gun out from underneath
both shirt and jacket, hidden inside
his pants in the back and be able to
shoot Trayvon in the heart? He proba-
bly already had his gun out, ready to
shoot. In that case, Trayvon’s only
chance was to try a knock-out, caus-
ing Zimmerman to fall and slightly
scratch his head. Still, he was able to
shoot and kill Trayvon, and later call
it “God’s will.”
If not for Zimmerman, Trayvon
would have made it home with his
iced tea and Skittles alive. While on
the phone with a friend complaining
about a scary guy he was trying to get
away from, he wasn’t likely to follow
him and pick a fight. That’s what
Zimmerman did. He didn’t “fight for
his life” — he took Trayvon
Martin’s .
Jorg Aadahl
San Mateo
Letters to the editor
T
here were two worst-case sce-
narios Saturday. One emer-
gency responders regularly
train for, the other was something
quite unimaginable.
The crash of Asiana Airlines flight
214 was certainly unexpected, but
such a catastrophic event is within
the realm of possibility and there are
specific plans in place at San
Francisco International Airport and in
neighboring jurisdictions just in case
it does happen. First responders
rushed to the scene, some without
concern even over their own well-
being, to save as many people as pos-
sible. The effort was successful and
should be lauded. Countless personnel
mobilized immediately and the injured
were shuttled to a number of hospitals
for critical care.
The other unimaginable scenario is
that preliminary reports conclude one
of the crash victims may have been
run over by a first-response vehicle. If
true, it is a regrettable incident and
surely no one would feel worse than
the person responsible.
However, the incident should in no
way taint the above-board response of
those who immediately took to the
runway to help those in need after this
crash. Most would simply say they
were doing their jobs, but there is a
certain amount of heroism instilled in
the profession.
It also calls to attention the point
of disaster training and mutual aid
response by a number of public safety
agencies. Without that extensive
training, the situation could have
turned out much different, with the
casualty list significantly higher. Is
also proves that training scenarios,
no matter how complex, are far differ-
ent than real-life situations — which
are messy, high-stress and constantly
evolving.
While this crash was terrifying and
devastating, it could have been a lot
worse. We’d like to think that the
emergency response training had
something to do with that. The inves-
tigation into the crash will surely
yield changes to aviation safety
measures. It should also provide
information for first responders’ train-
ing for future crises.
For the most part, this area snapped
to attention and came forward with
immediate assistance. From those
who gave blood and businesses who
kept their doors open later to help
stranded travelers to the men and
women who immediately put their
neck on the line without a second
thought to ensure the safety of those
in peril. These are the efforts that
should be remembered while we learn
from this crash.
Above-board first-response effort
Faith-based?
“R
eligion is one area of our discourse where
it is considered noble to pretend to be cer-
tain about things no human could possibly
be certain about.” — Sam Harris, “Letter to a Christian
Nation.”
My ears perked up when I
heard the term “faith-based
organization” as it was used
recently during the report
about how some city
employees in Richmond
said they were upset about
the display of the Gay Pride
flag at City Hall. It made
me wonder what would hap-
pen if we were to celebrate
an atheist pride month
(probably December) with a
parade and fly a flag which,
as far as I know, doesn’t exist, on various city halls. We
could call it, as Sir Salman Rushdie imagined,
“Atheistmas.”
Evidently, members of “faith-based” organizations
believe things that can’t be proven, such as that which
was written many, many years ago by “faith-based” peo-
ple looking for answers to the mysteries of life. My
ears perked up because I had just read Julia Scheeres’
book, “One hundred Lives,” about the Jim Jones
tragedy. These were “faith-based” followers who were so
desperate that they fell under the spell of an obviously
narcissistic psychopath who came to believe that he
was more holy than Jesus. It’s scary to think that so
many people could be taken in like that.
Sheeres’ book evoked the memory of when, back in
the ’70s, my brother was a Jim Jones wannabe! He actu-
ally knew Jones when he lived in Indianapolis. He tried
to organize a church of his own and ended up with a few
“faith-based” devotees who followed him wherever he
decided to settle for a while. In the process, he com-
pletely intimidated his wife and thoroughly messed up
his three kids’ lives.
As Richard Dawkins, author of “The God Delusion,”
wrote: “Faith can be very dangerous and to deliberately
plant it into the vulnerable mind of an innocent child is
a grievous wrong.” Children need to be brought up with
enough self-confidence to be able to question and to be
aware of those who try to use them for their own benefit
— like mindless devoted followers. The idea that you do
what Father tells you, with no questions asked, no mat-
ter how screwed up Father and Mother may be, is often
what leads to “faith-based” people who may turn out to
be cult leaders. Those who had no direction, no nurtur-
ing parents and, as a result, may be feeling deprived of
family are likely to idolize the Jim Jones types.
Of course, our world and our place in it is marvelous
and mysterious, but who says that the myths and tales
created all those many years ago, by and for people who
had absolutely no scientific understanding, were any-
thing but figments of their imagination and wishful
thinking? As Harris wrote, “It is time that we admit that
faith is nothing more than the license religious people
give one another to keep believing when reasons fail.”
When it comes to the problem in Richmond, it seems
to me that if someone wants to live a “faith-based” life,
they should keep their beliefs to themselves and refrain
from trying to impose them on others. And if it’s too
much to ask that they do their own thinking, it’s impor-
tant that they learn the difference between a relatively
innocuous leader — like possibly the pastor at their
community church — and one who, like Jim Jones, is
out to use them for his own narcissistic ends. As Greg
M. Epstein wrote in “Good Without God”: “If you ever
meet anyone who tells you his or her religion can offer
all the answers, run for the hills. Or at least hide your
wallet.”
Obviously, I’m not a member of a “faith-based” organ-
ization, but as far as the Gay Pride (or any other except
California’s) flag being flown at city halls and other
government buildings (though it’s a beautiful banner),
it is, as I see it, inappropriate. For those of us who
think that people have a right to live whatever lifestyle
they choose (as long as it doesn’t harm others), it
makes us question their motives. And then there’s the
in-your-face parade, but that’s something else again.
These concerns come from a devoted great-grandmoth-
er who is motivated by an avid interest in many issues
(some of which are considered politically incorrect to
mention) that affect the lives of many people and have
for far too often been swept under the rug. I go along
with Mr. Epstein: “We need, not divine guidance coming
to us in a flash from the sky, but human wisdom, coaxed
and cultivated methodically, purposefully. ”
Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 700
columns for various local newspapers. Her email address
is gramsd@aceweb.com.
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BUSINESS 10
Wednesday • July 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 15,300.34 75.65 10-Yr Bond 2.63 0.015
Nasdaq3,504.26 3,504.26 Oil (per barrel) 103.97
S&P 500 1,652.32 11.86 Gold 1,249.00
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Tuesday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Barnes & Noble Inc., up 95 cents at $18.61
The bookseller said that its CEO William Lynch was resigning after three
years on the job.The company did not name a replacement.
Wolverine World Wide Inc., up $2.11 at $57.38
The footwear and clothing company’s fiscal second-quarter net income
fell 13 percent, but its adjusted results easily beat expectations.
The Kroger Co., up 96 cents at $37.15
The supermarket operator said that it has agreed to buy Harris Teeter
Supermarkets Inc. for about $2.44 billion in cash.
Pandora Media Inc., down 87 cents at $19.65
The Internet radio company said that the number of hours people listened
to its music in June rose from year-ago levels,but fell from May of this year.
Nasdaq
Hi-Tech Pharmacal Co. Inc., up $1.72 at $35.25
The Amityville, N.Y.-based generic and branded drugmaker reported a
loss of $4.6 million in its fourth quarter as revenue fell.
Intuitive Surgical Inc., down $80.78 at $419.30
The maker of robotic surgery system forecast disappointing second-
quarter sales saying that it was hurt by reduced hospital admissions.
Amarin Corp. PLC, down 59 cents at $5.58
The Irish drugmaker said that it plans to sell 21.7 million American
Depositary Shares in an underwritten public offering.
Natus Medical Inc., down 62 cents at $11.78
Shares of the medical device maker for newborn care continued to fall
a day after saying its second-quarter revenue missed expectations.
Big movers
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The stock market is
getting its momentum back.
All major stocks indexes rose
Tuesday, and the biggest gains were in
riskier small-company stocks and sec-
tors that do best when the economy is
growing.
Major indexes rose for a fourth
straight day. The Standard & Poor’s
500 index had its best run in two
months.
Traders have grown more confident
after Friday’s strong jobs reports and
on expectations of record corporate
earnings for the second quarter, which
ended June 30. So far, the stock market
is up nearly 3 percent in July follow-
ing a 1.5 percent dip in June, its first
monthly decline since October.
The Russell 2000, an index of small-
company stocks, rose nearly 1 percent
Tuesday. The Dow Jones transporta-
tion average, seen as a leading indica-
tor for the broader economy, led all
indexes with a 2.3 percent rise, its best
performance in a month.
The gains suggest that investors are
more certain that the economy’s
prospects are good. In the first half of
the year, stock markets were powered
by companies that pay large dividends
and are considered a sure way to make
money even when the economic out-
look is iffy.
The Russell 2000 rose eight points,
or 0.9 percent, to 1,018.05. It has
gained 4.2 percent in July and is mov-
ing deeper into record territory. The
index has risen 20 percent, this year,
more than its large-company counter-
parts, the Dow Jones industrial aver-
age and the S&P 500 index.
Investors “are starting to go to the
more aggressive areas that usually do
better in an expansionary economy, ”
said Ryan Detrick, a senior technical
strategist at Schaeffer’s Investment
Research.
The Dow Jones transportation was
led by strong gains for Alaska Air
Group and FedEx.
The index jumped 148 points to
6,446. Alaska Air Group rose 7 per-
cent after it forecast an additional $50
million a year in revenue from
increased fees. FedEx rose 6 percent on
speculation that William Ackman’s
hedge fund, Pershing Square, could
invest in the company.
Wall Street is also turning its atten-
tion to corporate earnings. Results for
the second quarter, which ended nine
days ago, should give traders and
investors insights into the economy.
Market watchers spent most of June
trying to figure out where the Federal
Reserve was headed with its economic
stimulus program.
Along with the quarterly results,
investors want to see how confident
companies are about the rest of the
year, said Cam Albright, director of
asset allocation for Wilmington Trust
Investment Advisors.
Major U.S. stock indexes have
notched a series of all-time highs this
year on expectations that earnings
will remain at record levels.
“A lot of what the market has justi-
fied its advances on is a strong second
half for the economy and a strong sec-
ond half for earnings,” said Albright.
“It’s important that we see verification
of that.”
Alcoa was the first major company to
announce second-quarter results. The
aluminum maker late Monday reported
a loss that wasn’t as big as financial
analysts feared. The company benefit-
ed from strong demand for aluminum
used in autos and airplanes, although
that was offset by weaker prices.
Traders weren’t impressed by the
results, though. After rising initially,
the stock ended down 1 cent, or 0.1
percent, to $7.91.
Yum Brands, which owns KFC, Pizza
Hut and Taco Bell, and Family Dollar
Stores are among the companies
reporting their earnings this week.
JPMorgan Chase and Wells Fargo will
also report.
Stocks head higher for fourth day
By Marjorie Olster
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The International
Monetary Fund said Tuesday that it
sees slower global growth in 2013 and
2014 than it did just three months ago,
citing expectations of a slowdown in
key developing countries such as
China and Brazil and a more protracted
recession in Europe.
The international lending agency
released an update of its World
Economic Outlook issued in April,
projecting the world economy will
grow at 3.1 percent this year, down
from a 3.3 forecast three months ago.
The 2014 projection was cut to 3.8
percent from 4.0 percent.
“The world economy remains in a
three-speed mode,” said Olivier
Blanchard, IMF director of research.
“Emerging markets are still growing
rapidly. The U.S. recovery is steady,
but much of Europe continues to strug-
gle,” he told a news conference in
Washington, where the IMF is based.
Blanchard said growth almost
everywhere is a bit weaker than fore-
cast in April, but downward revisions
are particularly noticeable in develop-
ing countries.
The IMF said the possibility of a
more drawn-out slowdown in develop-
ing countries is a new risk that has
emerged since April. Blanchard noted a
clear downward trend in China, Russia,
Brazil and India and attributed it to
slowdowns in domestic demand and
consumption but also to weaker
exports because of sluggishness in
advanced economies.
China’s 2013 forecast was scaled back
to 7.8 compared to 8.1 in April. For
2014, it fell to 7.7 from 8.3 percent.
IMF forecasts slower global growth in 2013-14
Late to the Chinese
market, Ford aims to catch up
CHONGQING, China — Dave Schoch has one of the
toughest jobs at Ford Motor Co.: catching the competi-
tion in the world’s biggest car market.
When Schoch (pronounced Shock) arrived in China 13
years ago, the government was building eight-lane free-
ways in major cities, but bicyclists and pedestrians still
filled the streets. The Chinese were buying fewer than 2
million cars and trucks each year, a fraction of the 14.4
million sold in 2000 in the U.S.
When he returned to China last year, Schoch was
stunned. The freeways were choked with cars, from inex-
pensive, Chinese-made Wuling minivans to Mercedes-
Benz sedans. The red-hot Chinese economy had more than
doubled annual wages, giving millions of people the
money to buy a first vehicle or move up to a luxury brand.
“Things turned upside-down,” says Schoch, who was
named head of Ford’s Asia Pacific operations in the fall.
“You have to be here and experience it to believe what has
happened in the last decade.”
Last year, Chinese consumers bought 19 million cars
and trucks — 5 million more than consumers in the U.S.
Ford’s share of those sales was just 3 percent. Years of
corporate chaos and financial trouble slowed Ford’s entry
into China as its rivals gained a foothold. Together,
General Motors and Volkswagen control a third of
China’s market.
Alaska Airlines increases fee to check a suitcase
Alaska Airlines is raising its fee for checking a suitcase
to $25, bringing it in line with most major airlines.
For tickets purchased on or after Oct. 30, the Seattle-
based airline will charge passengers $25 each for the first
and second checked bags. Additional bags will cost $75.
Alaska currently charges $20 per bag for the first three
suitcases.
The airline will keep its unique baggage service guaran-
tee. If a passenger’s bags are not at the baggage claim
area within 20 minutes of the plane parking at the gate,
Alaska will give them a $20 discount code for use on a
future flight or 2,000 bonus frequent flier miles. The dis-
count will increase to $25 and the miles to 2,500 on Oct.
30.
The time remains the same, according to spokesman
Marianne Lindsey.
Netflix to host video chat in lieu of earns call
LOS GATOS — Netflix already streams movies and TV
shows. On July 22, it will also stream a live video dis-
cussing its earnings results.
Netflix Inc. said late Monday that instead of its regular
conference call, CEO Reed Hastings and Chief Financial
Officer David Wells will host a video chat discussing the
company’s quarterly results. The company said the dis-
cussion will be moderated by BTIG Research analyst Rich
Greenfield and CNBC reporter Julia Boorstin.
Business briefs
<< Giants’ freefall continues, page 12
• Documents ID ex-Patriot as triggerman, page 13
Wednesday, July 10, 2013
CHIP AND A CHAIR: CELEBRITIES TRY TO BUCK LONG ODDS AT WORLD SERIES OF POKER >> PAGE 12
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — With the NBA’s moratorium
on free agency set to lift Wednesday, the
Golden State Warriors wrapped up most of
their major work ahead of schedule.
The Warriors added some depth by reach-
ing agreements with guard Toney Douglas
and center Jermaine O’Neal on Tuesday, a
person with knowledge of the situation
said. The person spoke on condition of
anonymity because teams can’t confirm
moves until the new league year begins
Wednesday.
Both are believed to be one-year con-
tracts.
The moves cap a busy and bountiful peri-
od for general manager Bob Myers and his
staff since free agent talks began July 1.
While there will surely be additional roster
moves, it’s unlikely the Warriors will do
any more major shuffling this summer.
Golden State already has agreements in
place to sign Andre Iguodala, Marreese
Speights, Douglas and O’Neal. The team
even announced Tuesday that the Warriors’
first-round pick, Serbian point guard
Nemanja Nedovic, signed his rookie con-
tract.
Nedovic had been working on a buyout
with his Lithuanian pro team since the
Warriors drafted him 30th overall. He will
play with the Warriors’ summer league team
Saturday in Las Vegas before returning to
Serbia to fulfill his commitments to the
national team.
The Warriors, which entered free agency
with severe salary cap restrictions, kept
finding ways to clear space the past nine
days— and could clear even more through
additional sign-and-trade deals with some of
those agreements. Through free agency or
trades, they parted ways with Jarrett Jack,
Carl Landry, Brandon Rush, Andris
Biedrins, Richard Jefferson, two first-round
Warriors continue to wheel and deal
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Belmont-Redwood Shores 10-11
District 52 All-Star team had its work cut out
for it when it faced Pacifica American in
Game 1 of the championship series at
Kiwanis Field at Red Morton Park in
Redwood City Tuesday evening.
Belmont-RWS has been in survival mode
since an 11-10, second-round loss to San
Mateo American, forcing it play — and win
— six straight days.
Pacifica American, on the other hand, had
breezed into the championship series,
outscoring its opponents 29-5. Just as
important, this Pacifica 10-11 team is com-
prised of many of the same stalwarts from
the District 52 9-10 championship it won
last year. Over the last two years, Pacifica
American had been 9-0 in District 52 play.
Tuesday, however, behind a stellar pitch-
ing performance from Drew Dowd, Belmont-
Redwood Shores handed Pacifica American
its first loss of the 2013 tournament.
Belmont-RWS broke open a 4-4 tie with an
eight-run bottom of the fifth to post a 12-4
win and force a winner-take-all champi-
onship game at 5:30 p.m. today at Kiwanis
Field.
“Why not us? That’s been our motto,’ said
Belmont-RWS coach Tom McGuire. “It’s
been an incredible ride. We’ve played six
days in a row and we get to come back and
play [today].”
Early on, it appeared Pacifica American
was going to use the game as a coronation.
It scored twice in the inning and tacked on
two more in the second to take a 4-0 lead.
But Dowd settled down after that. After
giving up four runs on five hits in the first
two innings, the diminutive lefty allowed
only two more hits the rest of the way.
“He’s the leader of this team. An incredi-
ble kid,” McGuire said. “He’s carried us. He
battled.”
Replay for crown
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Belmont-Redwood Shores second baseman Ryan Carbullido cleanly fields a grounder to start a
4-6-3 double play in a 12-4 win over Pacifica American in the District 52 10-11 All-Star tourney.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Cal-Hi Sports released its 33rd annual
state players of the year teams and the
Peninsula has several baseball players
named on the various lists.
Serra outfielder Jordan Paroubeck, the
2013 Daily Journal Baseball Player of the
Year, was named on the most prestigious of
honor rolls — a spot on the overall All-
State Team.
Hillsdale’s Armando Fajardo, was chosen
for the Medium School Second Team, while
Menlo School’s Austin Marcus and Jack
Redman made the Small School squads.
Paroubeck helped lead Serra to a co-West
Catholic Athletic League championship and
a spot in the Central Coast Section
Division I championship game. He batted
.402 with 22 extra-base hits, including
seven home runs and was named the WCAL
Player of the Year. He was the 69th pick
overall of the 2013 MLB Draft by the San
Diego Padres.
Fajardo had a monster season as well as he
captured the Peninsula Athletic League’s
Bay Division Player of the Year award.
Fajardo, a shortstop, batted .458 with 39
RBIs, 10 doubles and eight home runs. He
scored 29 runs as well, leading the Knights
in every statistical offense category.
Marcus was one of three catchers selected
to the Small School First Team. The West
Bay Athletic League MVP made only four
errors this season, which is a rarity for a
player who spends most of his time behind
the plate. He also threw out 50 percent of
stolen base attempts.
On the mound, he was second on the team
in pitching appearances and led the
Knights’ pitching staff with 56 strikeouts.
Offensively, he tied for team high honors
in RBIs with 21 and seven extra-base hits.
Redmond, a left-handed pitcher who com-
piled a Menlo-leading 8-1 record, was
named to the Small School Second Team. He
Five named to Cal-Hi Sports all-state teams
By Will Graves
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PITTSBURGH — Dan Straily pitched two-
hit ball into the seventh inning, Brandon
Moss hit a two-run homer and the Oakland
Athletics beat the Pittsburgh Pirates 2-1 on
Tuesday night.
Straily (6-2) struck out seven and walked
three in 6 1-3 innings for his second
straight strong outing.
Grant Balfour worked the
ninth to remain perfect in
24 save chances this sea-
son. The A’s have won 10
of 13.
Gerrit Cole (4-2) lost
his second consecutive
decision despite working
seven innings for the
first time in his four-
week major league career. Cole allowed five
hits, struck out four and walked two.
After the start was delayed 1 hour, 42 min-
utes, Pedro Alvarez hit his 23rd home run but
Pittsburgh matched a season high with its
fourth straight loss.
Straily has struggled starting on four
days’ rest during his brief major league
career, coming in 0-3 with a 7.16 ERAwhen
not given at least five days between starts.
Yet the rookie had no issues dealing with
Pittsburgh’s suddenly punchless offense.
The Pirates have scored just six runs during
a 2-6 slump that has dropped them behind
first-place St. Louis in the heated NLCentral
race.
Alvarez provided Pittsburgh’s lone run
A’s just
keep on
winning
A’s 2, Pirates 1
Belmont-Redwood Shores hands Pacifica American 10-11 first loss
Brandon Moss
See ATHLETICS, Page 14
See STATE, Page 14
See WARRIORS, Page 14
See ALL STARS, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Wednesday • July 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Hannah Dreier
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LAS VEGAS — Each summer,
actors and athletes who are stars in
their own right compete alongside
professional gamblers and
wannabes for the world’s biggest
poker prize.
This week, sitcom star Ray
Romano and comedian Kevin
Pollak are among the glitterati don-
ning caps and ear buds at the World
Series of Poker at the Rio hotel-
casino off the Las Vegas Strip.
The $10,000 buy-in, no-limit
Texas Hold ‘em main event started
Saturday and runs through July 15,
when the field will be cut to a final
nine. Play then pauses until
November, when competition at
the final table airs live on ESPN.
Entries are slightly down this
year, with 6,352 players from 83
nations anteing up. The winner
takes home $8.4 million and a
gold-diamond-drenched bracelet —
the Super Bowl ring of gambling.
Players trickled in Tuesday for the
44th annual main event dressed in
tracksuits and T-shirts, sporting
baseball caps and looking bleary-
eyed in the oppressive afternoon
sun.
Inside, they played in silence at
closely clustered tables, where
game-day cologne scented the air
(women constitute about 5 percent
of entrants). Hundreds of stacks of
clicking chips sounded like
locusts.
Wearing a black cap, Romano
chatted with eight-time bracelet
winner Eric Seidel about his days at
the Comedy Cellar and his upcom-
ing shows at the Mirage casino as a
steady stream of chips flowed from
around the table into the profes-
sional’s stacks.
The comic said he was learning
from Seidel’s patient style, and
hoping to stay in the game for as
long as possible.
“When I want to do something
that I suck at but I’m obsessed with,
it’s golf for 11 months out of the
year. So I like to switch it up,” he
said. “Believe me, when I bust out,
it’s as devastating to me as every-
one else,” he said.
The tournament comes a decade
after a 27-year-old amateur with the
fortuitous name Chris Moneymaker
claimed the grand prize. On
Monday, World Series of Poker offi-
cials presented Moneymaker with a
bronze bust commemorating the
moment in 2003 when he bluffed
the best players in the world.
After that, every poker player
with a pair of mirrored sunglasses
thought they could take on the
pros, and the popularity of the
annual marathon event exploded.
Professionals quickly point out
that novices can pose a bigger dan-
ger than expected because they play
unpredictably, and there is little
room in the live tournament to
learn their style.
Celebrities try to buck odds at poker world series
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Marlon Byrd’s two-
out grand slam capped a five-run eighth
inning and the New York Mets beat the San
Francisco Giants 10-6 on Tuesday for their
third consecutive win.
Aday after needing 16 innings to top the
Giants in a game that ended at 12:42 a.m.,
the Mets squandered leads of 3-2 and 5-3 but
held off the slumping World Series champs
by scoring five times against the Giants
bullpen.
Omar Quintanilla had three hits for the
Mets while Byrd and David Wright added two
apiece. Wright drew a two-out walk before
Byrd’s home run off San Francisco reliever
Jake Dunning.
Marco Scutaro singled twice for the
Giants but was thrown out at home trying to
score from first base on Pablo Sandoval’s
double in the first.
The Giants scored more than four runs for
just the fourth time in 22 games but still
lost and fell a season-high nine games under
.500. San Francisco also has the worst
record in the majors (17-34) since May 13.
Scott Rice (4-5) retired one batter for the
win as the Mets overcame a shaky outing by
starter Dillon Gee. Gee allowed five runs and
nine hits over 6 2-3 innings. He also
walked five.
Carlos Torres pitched the final two
innings and gave up Nick Noonan’s pinch-
hit RBI single in the ninth, one night after
New York’s bullpen tossed nine scoreless
innings.
Another dismal loss for San Francisco Giants
Mets 10, Giants 6
SPORTS 13
Wednesday • July 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Diabetic Neuropathy
FEET, LEGS, HANDS
Prickling orTingling of Feet/Hands
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATTLEBORO, Mass. — A man
linked to the murder case involving
former New England Patriots player
Aaron Hernandez cast him as the
triggerman in a police interview,
according to documents filed
Tuesday in Florida that provide the
most damning evidence yet against
the star athlete.
The records, obtained by The
Associated Press, also show a vehi-
cle wanted in a double killing in
Boston a year before had been rent-
ed in Hernandez’s name.
Hernandez has been charged with
murder in the June killing of Boston
semi-pro football player Odin
Lloyd. The records say Hernandez
associate Carlos Ortiz told
Massachusetts investigators that
another man, Ernest Wallace, said
Hernandez shot Lloyd in an industri-
al park near Hernandez’s home in
North Attleborough.
The documents were filed in court
by the Miramar, Fla., police depart-
ment to justify a search of Wallace’s
mother’s home in that city.
The records also show that police,
while investigating Lloyd’s
killing, searched in Hernandez’s
hometown of Bristol, Conn., and
found a vehicle wanted in connec-
tion with a July 2012 double homi-
cide near a Boston nightclub.
Hernandez has pleaded not guilty
in Lloyd’s killing. His legal team
did not return email messages
Tuesday. Wallace faces an accessory
to murder charge in the case and has
pleaded not guilty.
Prosecutors say Hernandez,
Wallace and Ortiz drove with Lloyd
in a rented Nissan Altima to the
industrial park where Lloyd was
fatally shot.
Ortiz told police that during the
drive Hernandez told Lloyd that
Lloyd had been “chilling” with peo-
ple Hernandez had problems with,
the documents say. But Ortiz told
police the two men shook hands and
the problem seemed smoothed over.
However, the Altima soon stopped,
and everyone but Ortiz got out to
urinate, according to Ortiz’s
account.
The witness told police he then
heard gunshots before Hernandez
and Wallace got back into the car
without Lloyd and the car sped away.
Ortiz said he couldn’t see who
fired the shots because it was dark.
Back at Hernandez’s home, Ortiz
said, Wallace asked him to get a
small gun out from under the dri-
ver’s seat. Ortiz said he did and gave
it to Hernandez once they were
inside.
Ortiz said he then went to sleep.
When he woke up in the afternoon,
according to his account, the three
men returned the Altima and rented a
Chrysler 300 before returning to
Hernandez’s home. Ortiz and
Wallace then went to an apartment
in the area that Hernandez and other
football players used. Wallace let
Ortiz in before leaving for a long
time, the documents say. The two
then drove to Bristol. Ortiz told
police Wallace said Hernandez shot
Lloyd.
Documents paint ex-Patriot as triggerman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
COLUMBUS, Ohio — Ohio State
football fans always want to defeat
what they call “That school up
North.”
So when a 12-year-old Buckeyes
fan was diagnosed with cancer 14
months ago, he chose to name his
disease Michigan.
He wanted to beat it — and he
has.
The young fan, Grant Reed, was
released from Nationwide
Children’s Hospital in Columbus
Friday after receiving a final
chemotherapy session.
Grant’s father, Troy Reed, on
Tuesday said his son was readmitted
to the hospital over the weekend
because of a bacterial infection, but
he added the boy is doing “very
well.”
“Our prognosis is very good,” he
said. “It shows that he has indeed
beat Michigan.”
In May 2012, Grant underwent a
16 1/2-hour surgery to have a brain
tumor removed. Although the sur-
gery was successful, he woke up
without being able to move his left
side or speak and had a serious
vision problem.
He spent nearly 10 weeks at the
hospital following the surgery. He
then went through occupational
and speech therapies and was able
to continue to attend school. He
will be in seventh grade this fall.
But his road to recovery included
several rounds of radiation and
chemotherapy treatments.
Grant’s first chemo session, his
dad said, was during the Buckeyes’
season-opening game in
September.
“We had a mini party and watched
the Buckeyes play here at the hos-
pital,” Troy Reed said Tuesday
while Grant was back at the hospi-
tal. He added that the Reeds contin-
ued to watch OSU games at the hos-
pital during the weekends that
Grant was admitted to continue his
chemotherapy treatment.
Buckeyes fan, 12, beats cancer he named ‘Michigan’
SPORTS 14
Wednesday • July 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Advertisment
picks and two second-round picks.
The last of those moves, which can be offi-
cially announced as soon as Wednesday, should
solidify the end of coach Mark Jackson’s rota-
tion.
Douglas played for the Houston Rockets and
Sacramento Kings last season, averaging 7.5
points and 2.1 assists in 18.1 minutes per game.
The 27-year-old gives Golden State some added
backcourt depth to help alleviate the loss of
Jack, who agreed to a four-year, $25 million deal
with Cleveland.
The Warriors are hoping the 34-year-old
O’Neal can be a reliable backup to Andrew Bogut
while Festus Ezeli recovers from right knee sur-
gery, which is expected to sideline him another
five to eight months. O’Neal showed he might
have some NBAlife left with Phoenix last year
after knee and wrist surgeries had turned the six-
time All-Star into a shell of his former self.
O’Neal averaged 8.3 points, 5.3 rebounds and
1.4 blocks in 18.7 minutes with the Suns. The
6-foot-11 center is entering his 18th season in
the NBA.
Continued from page 11
WARRIORS
led the pitching staff with a 2.38 ERA in 72
innings in 18 appearances.
If you’re looking for a player to watch next
year, keep an eye on Woodside outfielder Brad
Degnan, who was named to the All Underclass
Team for players who recently completed their
junior season or younger.
Degnan put his name on the map with a
record-setting, three-homers-in-one inning
performance against Westmoor in April, but
Degnan is no one-hit wonder. He batted .591 for
the Wildcats, drove in a team-leading 21 RBIs
and cracked eight doubles as well in securing
PALOcean Division Player of the Year honors.
Continued from page 11
STATE
Pacifica American coach Steve Falk tipped
his cap to Dowd.
“We hit the ball (well). Alot of balls right at
them,” Falk said. “They made the plays.
[Dowd] kept the ball down.”
As Dowd kept the Pacifica American bats at
bay, the Belmont-Redwood Shores offense
finally got its offense going. It tied the score
with four runs in the bottom of the second.
Belmont left the bases loaded in the third and
were held hitless in the fourth before erupting
for eight runs in the fifth.
Belmont-Redwood Shores scored eight runs
on nine hits in the fifth and had back-to-back-
to-back doubles from Dowd, Stevie Dong and
Aiden Feeley as Belmont send 12 batters to
the plate in the frame.Dong and Ben Fong had
the big hits in the inning, with each driving
in a pair of runs — Fong’s came on a long sin-
gle in his second at-bat of the inning.
Dong, Fong and Logan Snow did the bulk of
the damage for Belmont-Redwood Shores.
Dong was 3 for 3 with two RBIs, a double and
a run scored. Fond was 3 for 4 with a pair of
RBIs and a pair of runs scored. Snow went 2
for 2, scoring two runs in the process.
Pacifica American was led by Justice Turner,
who drove in a pair of runs with a first-inning,
bases-loaded walk and then delivered a run-
scoring single in the second. Andrew
Harkness scored a pair of runs, while Nate
Azzopardi also drove in a run with a bases-
loaded walk.
“It’s huge to put an exclamation point (on a
win),” McGuire said. “I think it sends a mes-
sage.”
In other District 52 action, San Mateo
National scored once in the top of the seventh
to beat Foster City to capture the 9-10 District
52 championship.
San Mateo jumped out to a 4-0 lead with four
runs in the second inning. It eventually
stretched its lead to 5-1 before Foster City
scored three in the bottom of the fourth to cut
its deficit to 5-4.
Foster City then tied the score with a run in
the bottom of the fifth.
Continued from page 11
ALL STARS
with a 448-foot drive to the bushes in center
leading off the second. The home run made
him just the third player in team history to
reach 23 homers before the All-Star break,
joining Ralph Kiner and Willie Stargell.
In a way, Alvarez is having the type of sea-
son the franchise once envisioned for Moss.
The first baseman spent parts of three seasons
with the Pirates between 2008-10, with
Pittsburgh hoping his raw left-handed power
would help him pound balls off — or over —
the Clemente Wall in right field.
It never really happened. Moss hit all of 13
homers in 195 games for the Pirates before
eventually making his way to Oakland, where
he’s become a key cog in one of baseball’s
biggest surprises.
Moss provided a glimpse of what could have
been in Pittsburgh in the fourth when Cole
wobbled for the briefest of moments. The
right-hander had retired nine straight when
John Jaso stepped to the plate. The Pirates
swung the defense to the right only to have
Jaso smack a double down the left-field line.
The ball would have been playable if Alvarez
was in his normal position at third base.
Instead, he was 40 feet away as the ball rolled
into the outfield.
One pitch later, Moss gave the A’s the lead,
sending a changeup into the second row in
right to give Straily all the backing he needed.
The Pirates didn’t get a runner to third base
over the final six innings. Their best chance
to tie the game came in the seventh when
Alvarez led off with a walk and moved to sec-
ond on Russell Martin’s sacrifice bunt.
Oakland reliever Sean Doolittle replaced
Straily and struck out pinch-hitter Gaby
Sanchez before getting Jordy Mercer to pop
up to first.
Jose Tabata led off the ninth with a single
off Balfour, but Andrew McCutchen and
Alvarez struck out before Martin grounded out
meekly to first as Balfour extended his club
record for consecutive save chances converted
to 42, dating to last season.
NOTES: The start of the game was pushed
back due to the potential of inclement weath-
er. While lightning flashed several times dur-
ing the 1:42 delay, it never actually rained. ...
Oakland LF Yoenis Cespedes was selected to
the American League team for the Home Run
Derby next Monday night in New York.
Cespedes, who has 15 home runs this season,
is the first A’s player to be chosen for the
Home Run Derby since Jason Giambi in 2001.
Continued from page 11
ATHLETICS
Dodgers get push on
to land Puig on All-Star team
PASADENA — If Lorena Ramos has any
influence, Los Angeles Dodgers rookie
Yasiel Puig will win the fan voting for a
spot on the All-Star team.
The 38-year-old season ticket holder esti-
mates she has texted 5,000 times on Puig’s
behalf to ensure he lands the last roster spot
on the NLteam for next week’s game in New
York.
Ramos was working her phone some more
in between watching the Dodgers’ road game
at Arizona on Tuesday night from Barney’s
Beanery in Old Town Pasadena, along with
other blue-and-white clad fans.
The viewing and voting party was the sec-
ond of three hosted by the Dodgers around
the Los Angeles area to give Puig a final
push in the balloting. Former Dodgers star
Steve Garvey, who made the 1974 All-Star
Game as a write-in candidate, was on hand as
honorary campaign manager.
Sports brief
SPORTS 15
Wednesday • July 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
by
Special:
4 Speakers
650-354-1100
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 52 38 .578 —
Washington 46 44 .511 6
Philadelphia 45 46 .495 7 1/2
New York 39 48 .448 11 1/2
Miami 32 57 .360 19 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 54 34 .614 —
Pittsburgh 53 36 .596 1 1/2
Cincinnati 50 40 .556 5
Chicago 40 48 .455 14
Milwaukee 37 52 .416 17 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 47 43 .522 —
Los Angeles 44 45 .494 2 1/2
Colorado 43 48 .473 4 1/2
San Diego 41 50 .451 6 1/2
San Francisco 40 49 .449 6 1/2
Tuesday’s Games
Oakland 2, Pittsburgh 1
Philadelphia 4, Washington 2
Atlanta 6, Miami 4
Chicago Cubs 7, L.A. Angels 2
Milwaukee 2, Cincinnati 0
St. Louis 9, Houston 5
L.A. Dodgers 6, Arizona 1
San Diego 2, Colorado 1
N.Y. Mets 10, San Francisco 6
Wednesday’s Games
Atlanta (Maholm 9-7) at Miami (Ja.Turner 2-1),
9:40 a.m.
Cincinnati (Leake 7-4) at Milwaukee (Hellweg 0-
2), 11:10 a.m.
N.Y. Mets (Z.Wheeler 2-1) at San Francisco
(M.Cain 5-5), 12:45 p.m.
Oakland (Milone 8-7) at Pittsburgh (Liriano 8-3),
4:05 p.m.
Washington (G.Gonzalez 6-3) at Philadelphia
(Lee 10-2), 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 8-6) at Chicago Cubs
(Samardzija 5-8), 5:05 p.m.
Houston (Lyles 4-3) at St. Louis (S.Miller 9-6), 5:15
p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 7-3) at Arizona (Skaggs 2-1),
6:40 p.m.
Colorado (J.De La Rosa 8-5) at San Diego
(Cashner 5-4), 7:10 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 54 37 .593 —
Tampa Bay 51 40 .560 3
Baltimore 49 42 .538 5
New York 48 42 .533 5 1/2
Toronto 43 46 .483 10
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 49 40 .551 —
Cleveland 47 43 .522 2 1/2
Kansas City 43 44 .494 5
Minnesota 37 50 .425 11
Chicago 35 52 .402 13
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 54 37 .593 —
Texas 53 37 .589 1/2
Los Angeles 43 46 .483 10
Seattle 40 49 .449 13
Houston 32 58 .356 21 1/2
Tuesday’sGames
Kansas City 3, N.Y.Yankees 1
Oakland 2, Pittsburgh 1
Texas 8, Baltimore 4
Cleveland 3,Toronto 0
Chicago White Sox 11, Detroit 4
Tampa Bay 4, Minnesota 1
Chicago Cubs 7, L.A. Angels 2
St. Louis 9, Houston 5
Boston at Seattle, late
Wednesday’sGames
Kansas City (W.Davis 4-7) at N.Y. Yankees (Nova 3-
2), 4:05 p.m.
Oakland (Milone 8-7) at Pittsburgh (Liriano 8-3),
4:05 p.m.
Texas (Lindblom 1-2) at Baltimore (W.Chen 3-3),
4:05 p.m.
Toronto (Rogers 3-4) at Cleveland (Masterson 10-
7), 4:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Axelrod 3-5) at Detroit (Por-
cello 5-6), 4:08 p.m.
Minnesota (Correia 6-6) at Tampa Bay (Hellickson
8-3), 4:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 8-6) at Chicago Cubs
(Samardzija 5-8), 5:05 p.m.
Houston (Lyles 4-3) at St. Louis (S.Miller 9-6), 5:15
p.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Montreal 9 4 4 31 31 25
Kansas City 8 5 6 30 26 19
New York 8 7 4 28 25 24
Philadelphia 7 6 6 27 29 29
Houston 7 6 5 26 20 18
New England 6 5 6 24 21 14
Columbus 6 8 5 23 23 23
Chicago 6 8 3 21 19 25
Toronto FC 2 8 7 13 17 24
D.C. 2 13 3 9 8 29
WESTERNCONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake 10 5 4 34 29 18
FC Dallas 8 3 7 31 27 22
Portland 7 2 9 30 28 17
Vancouver 8 5 5 29 29 25
Los Angeles 8 7 3 27 27 22
Colorado 7 7 5 26 23 22
Seattle 7 6 3 24 21 19
San Jose 5 9 6 21 20 32
Chivas USA 3 10 5 14 16 32
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
———
Saturday’s Games
New England 2, San Jose 0
Houston 1, Philadelphia 0
Vancouver 2, Seattle FC 0
Sunday’s Games
Sporting Kansas City 2, Chicago 1
Columbus 1, Portland 0
Montreal 1, Chivas USA 1, tie
D.C. United at Colorado, late
FC Dallas at Los Angeles, late
Friday, July 12
Chivas USA at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m.
Saturday, July 13
Montreal at New York, 4 p.m.
Houston at New England, 4:30 p.m.
Toronto FC at Sporting Kansas City, 5:30 p.m.
Real Salt Lake at FC Dallas, 9 p.m.
Seattle FC at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Portland, 11 p.m.
Sunday, July 14
Chicago at Vancouver, 7 p.m.
Toronto FC 3, Montreal 3, tie
Chicago 3, San Jose 2
Sporting Kansas City 1, Vancouver 1, tie
Real Salt Lake 2, Philadelphia 2, tie
Seattle FC 2, D.C. United 0
Thursday’s Games
Chivas USA at FC Dallas, 6 p.m.
MLS GLANCE
vs.Seattle
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/13
Mets
12:45p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/10
Mets
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/9
@Padres
7:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/11
@Padres
7:10p.m.
NBC
7/13
@Padres
7:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/12
@Padres
1:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/14
vs.Dbacks
7:15p.m.
NBC
7/19
vs. RedSox
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/14
vs. RedSox
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/13
@Angels
7:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/19
@Angels
6:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/20
vs. RedSox
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/12
@Pirates
4:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/9
@Pirates
4:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/10
vs.Norwich
City
7:30p.m.
7/20
vs.Portland
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/27
vs. Chivas
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/4
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
BOSTONREDSOX—Placed RHP Alex Wilson was
placedonthe15-dayDL.RecalledOFJackieBradley
Jr. from Pawtucket (IL). Optioned RHP Jose De La
Torre to Pawtucket. Selected RHP Brandon Work-
man from Pawtucket.
DETROITTIGERS—Placed2BOmar Infanteonthe
15-day DL. Recalled INF Hernan Perez from Erie
(EL).
MINNESOTATWINS—Placed LHP Caleb Thielbar
on the bereavement list. Recalled RHP Michael
Tonkin from Rochester (IL).
TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Signed RHP Kendall
Graveman and LHP Chad Girodo to minor league
contracts.
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Activated OF
Adam Eaton from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP
Charles Brewer to Reno (PCL).
FLORIDAMARLINS—Recalled LHP Duane Below
from New Orleans (PCL).
NEW YORK METS—Called up RHP Gonzalez
Germen from Las Vegas (PCL).
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES—Called up RHP Luis
Garcia from Lehigh Valley (IL). Optioned RHP
Phillippe Aumont to Lehigh Valley.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Placed 2B Neil Walker
on the 15-day DL,retroactive to July 7.Recalled INF
Josh Harrison from Indianapolis (IL).
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Traded RHP Mitchell
BoggstoColoradofor Colorado’sinternational sign-
ing bonus slot number four. Released INF Ty
Wigginton.Purchased the contract of C Rob John-
son from Memphis (PCL).
SANDIEGOPADRES—Announced the resigna-
tion of president and CEO Tom Garfinkel. Named
Ron Fowler interim president and CEO. Agreed to
terms with OF Hunter Renfroe on a minor league
contract. Recalled RHP Miles Mikolas from Tucson
(PCL). Optioned RHP Tyson Ross to Tucson.
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS—Placed C Hector
Sanchez on the 15-day DL. Called up RHP Michael
Kickham from Fresno (PCL). Purchased the con-
tract of 2bKensukeTanakafromFresno.Designated
OF Cole Gillespie for assignment. Agreed to terms
with OF Jeff Francoeur on a minor league contract.
NBA
LOSANGELESCLIPPERS—WaivedFDaJuanSum-
mers.
SACRAMENTO KINGS—Named Dee Brown as-
sistant coach and director of player development,
Micah Nori assistant coach and Bill Pope advanced
scout.
NFL
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Signed QB-RB
Denard Robinson.
SANFRANCISCO49ERS—Signed S Eric Reid to a
four-year contract.
NHL
ANAHEIMDUCKS—Named Jarrod Skalde assis-
tant coach for Norfolk (AHL). Signed RW Zack
Stortini and Dn Nolan Yonkman to one-year con-
tracts.
CHICAGOBLACKHAWKS—Named Mark Osiecki
assistant coach for Rockford (AHL).
COLORADO AVALANCHE—Signed F Nathan
MacKinnon to a three-year contract.
PHOENIXCOYOTES—Re-signed F Andy Miele to
a one-year contract.
TRANSACTIONS
16
Wednesday • July 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Gaul and the sizable home Gaul is building
above Mercy High School on Adeline
Drive.
Gaul pulled permits for the property back
in 2005 and has been working on the home
ever since. It is near completion but Gaul
will first have to address a code enforcement
violation that Lucero pointed out to
Burlingame officials.
Lucero asked Gaul if he could quiet it down
during early-morning hours on the week-
ends last year and got 13 other neighbors to
sign a letter seeking a meeting to discuss all
the construction noise that rings through
the hills.
Gaul allegedly refused to meet with the
neighbors so Lucero got the city involved
by pointing out what he thought were code
enforcement violations during construction
of his home and then alleged that Gaul was
not doing work on his home but instead was
running his general contractor’s business
out of his garage. Lucero even pho-
tographed and videotaped some of the con-
struction activity to prove his case which
caused Gaul to display a sign that read
“GFY” with the time the next work would be
done on the home.
“Considering that some of these viola-
tions have existed since the building permit
was ‘finaled’ approximately seven years
ago, it is the neighborhood perception that
the Gauls’ affiliation with the city entitles
them to flaunt the violations and disregard
the polite requests and well-being of their
neighbors,” Lucero wrote the city in
October.
The city ultimately was unable to verify
most of the violations, however.
Gaul is the only residence on that stretch
of Adeline Drive that is actually in
Burlingame proper. All the rest of the
homes nearby are in unincorporated San
Mateo County. The dispute has often had the
city and county saying it was the other’s
problem to solve, Lucero said.
So Lucero decided to file a complaint for
nuisance in San Mateo County Superior
Court seeking relief that then prompted
Gaul to file a cross complaint for harass-
ment.
When the two finally meet in mediation,
Lucero hopes the outcome will be that Gaul
keeps it quiet on the weekends.
Gaul, however, has a different goal.
“I hope he gets a life,” Gaul told the Daily
Journal. “It is ludicrous. He has taken it too
far. ”
Lucero’s family has owned the home on
the 2800 block of Adeline Drive for 25
years, well before Gaul moved into the
home he started building from the ground up
in 2006. The Luceros used to look out at a
big empty lot from the living room but now
face a large multi-level structure with the
garages facing the bedroom.
“You may not realize it, but the noise is
affecting the enjoyment of our homes and
our neighborhood,” the neighbors wrote in
the letter to the Gauls.
President of the Burlingame Hills
Improvement Association, Steve Epstein,
has taken Lucero’s side in this situation and
said he’d be a little fearful living next to
Gaul considering the “GFY” sign.
“It is very fortunate. It pains me to see,”
Epstein said.
Gaul’s cross complaint accused Lucero of
being far more than noisy, it accused him of
“aberrational sexual gawking behavior”
related to Gaul’s 13-year-old daughter.
It also accused him of running an illegal
bed and breakfast and renting out his home
to a film crew that disrupted the Gauls’ abili-
ty to sleep, according to the cross com-
plaint.
It also alleges Lucero “has lewdly and las-
civiously photographed [his daughter] and
followed her in his car. ”
Gaul has since dropped the cross com-
plaint, he told the Daily Journal.
“It’s a waste of time and money,” he said.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
FEUD
what the 55-year-old musician said she
expected just minutes before addressing
more than 100 incarcerated teens at San
Mateo County’s juvenile hall.
“But I am planting the seed and if I can
just reach one child that’s something,” she
said.
Sheila E. — born Sheila Escovedo but rec-
ognized by her stage name — may be best
known to certain generations for her hit
song “The Glamorous Life” but the
Grammy-nominated musician’s early years
were far from it. While growing up in
Oakland, she was raped by an upstairs baby-
sitter at age 5 and sexually abused along
with her cousins for years. She told no one,
instead growing up mad and ashamed and
guilty. She joined gangs in her East Oakland
neighborhood and at her school. Guns and
knives were no strangers. But at age 15, she
played drums with her father, percussionist
Pete Escovedo, and something clicked.
She’d performed with him before but that
time she found her purpose.
The teens at the Youth Services Center in
San Mateo can have that type of purpose,
too, she said. They just need to find it. On
Tuesday afternoon, Escovedo hoped to help
them realize it.
Many of these teens also have trauma as
part of their story and Escovedo expected a
lot to give her reasons why they can’t break
free of the life they’re in — gangs, money,
education, family. But she said, “Anything
they say they’ve done, I’ve probably done.”
She said they need to know their experi-
ence doesn’t have to define their future.
“There’s so much more to life than that,”
she said.
Escovedo’s life included launching a well-
regarded musical career and co-establishing
the Elevate Hope Foundation to give abused
and abandoned children a chance through
music, the arts and programs. Her chal-
lenges were documented in the television
show “Unsung” which Probation Services
Manager Todd Perras watched and felt was a
story to which the county’s incarcerated
teens could relate.
“She has a strong message about getting
through major trauma,” Perras said.
Perras — and even Escovedo herself —
acknowledged the ages of the teens mean
most might not be familiar with her musical
repertoire which includes collaborations
with Prince and in 1988 becoming the first
female bandleader on Magic Johnson’s
short-lived variety show. But Perras said the
similarities between her and the teens will
resonate. And just to help out, the teens
watched the “Unsung” episode Monday
night.
Before her arrival, Escovedo also asked
that the teens write down their names, age
and what they want to be when they grow
up. Perras said most of the answers were
reachable ambitions. Sure, there were a few
rappers and even an astronaut but most were
realistic like lawyer and mechanic, Perras
said.
But who knows? Escovedo said her two
goals as a child were first to be the first girl
on the moon and second to win a gold medal
for track in the Olympics. While her success
took her in another direction, Escovedo said
it is that type of drive she wants to instill in
these teens who might not otherwise see
beyond the four corners of their own block.
“They have a choice,” she said. “There’s
always a choice.”
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
SHEILA
Comment on
or share this story at
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FOOD 17
Wednesday • July 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EXPIRES: July 31, 2013
JACK’S RESTAURANT & BAR: SAN BRUNO
1050 Admiral Court, Suite A
San Bruno, CA 94066
Phone: (650) 589-2222 | Fax: (650) 589-5042
iLoveJacks.com
By Darlene Superville
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Brynna Robert of
Louisiana found out about and entered a
White House contest for kid chefs on dead-
line day. Wisconsin’s Liam Kivirist studied
more than 1,000 entries from the previous
year’s competition before stirring up his
own creation. Devanshi Udeshi of Texas
submitted a healthier version of her all-time
favorite thing to eat.
More than 1,300 recipes in all poured in.
After the batch was painstakingly trimmed
to 54, Brynna, Liam and Devanshi were
among a select group of 8- to 12-year-olds
whose culinary concoctions earned them a
three-course meal at the White House on
Tuesday along with pep talks from President
Barack Obama and first lady Michelle
Obama.
“It feels like I’m in a castle or some-
thing,” said Devanshi, 12, of Sugar Land,
Texas.
Liam, 11, of Browntown, Wis., said the
experience was “awesome” and seeing the
Obamas was “really cool.”
The contest was sponsored by the
Epicurious food website and the federal
departments of Agriculture and Education.
One winner was chosen from each of the 50
states, the District of Columbia and three
U.S. territories: Puerto Rico, the Virgi n
Islands and the Northern Mariana Islands in
the western Pacific.
The recipes had to follow federal guide-
lines for healthy meals.
Michelle Obama, who is spearheading a
campaign to reduce childhood obesity
through diet and exercise, told the winners
they overcame tough odds to land a seat at
one of 12 round and rectangular tables set up
in the East Room, where she and the presi-
dent often hold equally elaborate dinners for
foreign heads of state.
The event, now in its second year, is one
of her favorites, she said.
“We’ve got singers and stars and world
leaders, but this, probably throughout the
entire White House, is one of our favorite
events because we get to see how talented
and creative and brilliant all of you young
First lady hosts ‘dinner’ for top junior chefs
REUTERS
First Lady Michelle Obama hosts the second annual ‘Kids’State Dinner,’to honor the winners
of a nationwide recipe challenge to promote healthy lunches, at the White House.
See DINNER, Page 18
18
Wednesday • July 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FOOD
people can be,” she said, surrounded by
large arrangements of oranges, lemons, and
Granny Smith apples and limes.
“And we don’t just get to see it, we get to
taste it,” the first lady said before highlight-
ing some of the more colorfully named win-
ning recipes, including Confetti Peanut
Ginger Party Pasta from Missouri, Pan
Seared Mississippi Catfish on a Bed of River
Rice and Devanshi’s Slam Dunk Veggie
Burger.
She also singled out a pizza with a gluten-
free crust made of cauliflower, eggs, low-fat
cheese and spices.
During an unannounced visit, Obama
underscored his wife’s message that healthy
meals can be tasty and fun. The president
also told the child cooks they are setting a
good example for their classmates, parents
and others “who sometimes may not always
be eating as healthy as they’re supposed
to.”
“We could not be prouder of you,” he said.
After hearing the first lady tell the kids it
was OK to eat with their fingers, Obama
joked: “Michelle never said to me I can just
pick up something with my fingers at a state
dinner. So that’s not fair.”
Except for the fact that the dresses weren’t
floor-length, none of the boys wore tuxedos
and “dinner” was served at midday, the event
had all the trappings of a real state dinner.
Guests entered through the East Wing and
their names and recipes were announced for
the news media. Then it was off to a receiv-
ing line and photos with the first lady. The
meal was a selection of winning recipes.
Tanya Steel, the Epicurious editor-in-chief
who whipped up the contest and brought it
to the first lady’s attention three years ago,
said Greek yogurt, salmon and kale were
among the most popular ingredients. She
said the choices show that kids’ palates are
more sophisticated than many people
think.
Brynna, 12, of Metairie, La., said she
found out about the contest from her local
paper on deadline day. She scrambled to sub-
mit a recipe for Sweet and Spicy Stir Fry to
which she had added pineapple and chili-
garlic sauce because her mother’s version
was too bland.
Continued from page 17
DINNER
By Alison Ladman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pasta carbonara — richly cheesy, creamy
and studded with crisped pancetta — is easi-
ly one of the most comforting of pasta dish-
es. The only trouble is, with the onset of
warmer weather we tend to crave salads more
than steaming bowls of pasta. So for this
recipe, we decided to have it both ways.
We borrowed the key ingredients from
pasta carbonara — right down to the eggy
sauce and savory pancetta — but remade
them as a picnic-worthy pasta salad. Every
bit as delicious as the traditional dish, but
far more refreshing on a hot day.
And as with most pasta salads, this one is
easily adjusted and added to. Sliced sun-dried
tomatoes, marinated mushrooms, roasted
red peppers, even blanched asparagus all
would make fine additions.
CARBONARA PASTA SALAD
Start to finish: 30 minutes
Servings: 8
16 ounces gemelli or rotini pasta
9 ounces finely chopped pancetta
1 cup fresh peas
3 egg yolks
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1/2 cup mild olive oil
Salt and ground black pepper
1 cup grated Parmesan cheese
3 scallions, thinly sliced
Bring a large saucepan of salted water to a
boil. Add the pasta and cook according to
package directions. Drain well, then spread
on a rimmed baking sheet to cool.
Meanwhile, heat a medium skillet over
medium-high heat. Add the pancetta and
cook until crispy, about 6 minutes. Use a
slotted spoon to transfer the pancetta to a
paper towel-lined plate to drain and cool.
Add the peas to the skillet and cook just
until tender, 3 to 4 minutes. Transfer to the
plate with the pancetta and allow to cool.
While everything cools, make the dress-
ing. In a blender, or in a medium bowl with
a whisk, combine the egg yolks, garlic,
mustard, vinegar and lemon juice. In a slow
stream, add the oil, whisking or blending
until thick and smooth. Season with salt and
pepper.
In a large bowl, combine the cooled pasta,
pancetta, peas, dressing, Parmesan and scal-
lions. Toss well. For best flavor, cover and
refrigerate for at least 1 hour.
Pasta carbonara remade
as delicious summer salad
Sliced sun-dried tomatoes, marinated
mushrooms, roasted red peppers, even
blanched asparagus all would make fine
additions to this pasta salad.
FOOD 19
Wednesday • July 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
856 North Delaware St. San Mateo, CA 94401
DailySpecials
Double Punch Monday
Two-Fer Tuesday $6.50
Wet N' Wild Wednesday $6.50
Baja Thursday $7
Fish Taco Friday $6
Super Saturday $5.50
Family Day Sunday
By Sara Moulton
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mexican cuisine has been popu-
lar for a long time, but my recent
travels around our country have
persuaded me that fish tacos are
big now in a way they never were
before.
Naturally, perhaps, they are eas-
iest to find in regions with a
strong Hispanic influence — par-
ticularly California, Texas and
Florida — but I’ve also been
bumping into them in Chicago
and New York. Soon enough, they
should be just about as ubiquitous
as falafel. It’s a happy thing.
Folks in Mexico’s coastal cities
— where fresh fish and tacos are
both plentiful — have been enjoy-
ing fish tacos since before the
arrival of the first Europeans. But
if any one individual can take cred-
it for the north-of-the-border
spread of this culinary delight, it
is Ralph Rubio.
On spring break from his studies
at San Diego State University in
1973, Rubio flipped for the fish
tacos in San Felipe, a port town
on the Baja California peninsula.
Ten years later, back in San Diego,
he opened Rubio’s Baja Grill,
which specialized in fish tacos.
Today, there are hundreds of
Rubio’s locations, including one
in Brooklyn, N.Y. !
Traditional fish tacos consist of
battered fish topped with shredded
cabbage, a drizzle of citrus mayo,
all wrapped in a corn tortilla. But
there’s plenty of room for varia-
tion.
These days the fish might be
grilled rather than battered and
fried. Sometimes it’s served on
flour tortillas, sometimes on corn
tortillas. It’s almost always
topped with some kind of creamy
sauce, as well as with shredded
cabbage and/or avocado.
Whatever. I’ve never met a fish
taco I didn’t like.
My version is light on calories,
but heavy on flavor. The fish is
lightly-floured and sauteed rather
than deep-fried. The citrus mayon-
naise sauce went bye-bye in favor
of a puree of avocado and butter-
milk. The avocado contains
healthy fat, and the buttermilk is
as lean as skim milk, but much
tastier. Topping it off is shredded
cabbage, carrots and radishes
tossed with vinegar, salt and a
pinch of sugar.
Fans of chilies will love the
sliced jalapeno garnish. I think
the cilantro is key, too, but if you
were born with the anti-cilantro
gene (a real thing!), you can swap
in basil instead. Finally, those of
you who worry that corn tortillas
are high in calories can relax; two
6-inch corn tortillas, softened up
and toasted without oil in a dry
skillet, weigh in at just 80 calo-
ries.
A note about the fish: I used
tilapia because it is sustainable,
affordable and widely available all
year. But substitute any fish you
like. Just keep in mind that a thin-
ner fish will take less time to
cook.
FISH TACOS
WITH AVOCADO PUREE
Start to finish: 40 minutes
Servings: 4
1 large Hass avocado, peeled,
pitted and cut into eighths
1/3 cup buttermilk
2 cloves garlic, minced, divided
Zest and juice of 1 lime
Kosher salt and ground black
pepper, to taste
3 cups shredded Napa cabbage
1 1/2 cups coarsely grated carrot
1 cup coarsely grated radishes
1/4 cup white wine or cider vine-
gar
1/4 teaspoon sugar, or to taste
Hot sauce, to taste
1 pound tilapia fillets, cut into 8
equal pieces
Whole-wheat flour, for coating
the fish
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
Eight 6-inch corn tortillas
Sliced fresh jalapeno peppers,
to serve
Chopped fresh cilantro, to serve
Heat the oven to 200 F.
In a food processor, combine
the avocado, buttermilk, 1 clove
of garlic, lime juice and salt and
pepper. Puree until smooth, then
set aside.
In a medium bowl, combine the
cabbage, remaining garlic, carrot,
radishes, vinegar, sugar, lime zest
and hot sauce. Season with salt
and pepper and toss well. Set
aside.
Heat a heavy skillet (such as
cast-iron or stainless steel, but not
nonstick) over medium heat. One
at a time, place the tortillas in the
skillet and toast for about 30 sec-
onds per side. As the tortillas are
toasted, stack them on a sheet of
foil. Wrap the foil around the tor-
tillas, then place them in the over
to keep warm. Alternatively, the
tortillas can be held with tongs
and toasted directly over a gas
burner for a few seconds per side.
In a pie plate or other wide,
shallow bowl, combine about 1
cup of flour with 1 tablespoon of
salt and 1 teaspoon of pepper. One
at a time, dredge each piece of fish
through the flour until coated
evenly. Shake off any excess.
In a large nonstick skillet over
medium-high, heat about 1 table-
spoon of the oil over medium-
high. Add half of the fish to the
pan and cook, turning once, until
golden and cooked through, about
3 minutes a side. Transfer to an
oven-safe plate and set in the oven
to keep warm. Repeat with the
remaining oil and fish.
To serve, top each tortilla with a
bit of the avocado puree, then a
piece of fish. Drain the cabbage
mixture, then mound some of that
over each portion. Serve with
jalapeno slices and cilantro on the
side.
Nutrition information per serv-
ing: 500 calories; 190 calories
from fat (38 percent of total calo-
ries); 22 g fat (3 g saturated; 0 g
trans fats); 60 mg cholesterol; 51
g carbohydrate; 10 g fiber; 5 g
sugar; 31 g protein; 370 mg sodi-
um.
Healthy spin onthe popular fish taco
Traditional fish tacos consist of battered fish topped with shredded cabbage,a drizzle of citrus mayo,all wrapped
in a corn tortilla. But there’s plenty of room for variation.
DATEBOOK 20
Wednesday • July 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEDNESDAY, JULY 10
Sons In Retirement, Branch 1, Will
Hold Their General Luncheon
Meeting. Elks Club. 229 W. 20th Ave.,
San Mateo. Speakers are Jim
Codromac and Kevin Kyes, who will
discuss misunderstood government
entitlement programs designed to
protect you from financial devastation
due to critical or chronic illness and
costs for Skilled Nursing Care. Free. For
more information call 341-8298.
RSVP deadline for San Mateo
Newcomers Club. Luncheon on
Tuesday July 16 at Noon. Spices
Restaurant, 929A Edgewater Blvd.,
Foster City. The program for the
luncheon will be a speaker of
Freedom House, San Francisco. This is
an independent, non-profit
organization whose mission is to
bring hope, restoration and new life
to survivors of human trafficking by
providing housing and long-term
after-care services. Checks must be
received by Wednesday July 10. $25.
Sent to Janet Williams, 1168 Shoreline
Drive, San Mateo. For more
information call 286-0688.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon to
1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E. Fourth
Ave., San Mateo. $17 for lunch. For
more information call 430-6500 or go
to sanmateoprofessionalalliance.com.
JVS Orientation and Enrollment
Session.1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Peninsula
JCC, 800 Foster City Blvd., Foster City.
We will provide you with an overview
of the services, programs and
resources that will support you in your
job search. We can help you with
finding a job, making a resume,
interviewing, networking, staying
motivated and writing your summary
for LinkedIn. We work with people
from all backgrounds and all levels of
experience and expertise. Free. For
more information email
jcowan@jvs.org.
DWWilson Magic Show. 2 p.m. San
Mateo Public Library Marina branch,
1530 Susan Court, San Mateo. DW
Wilson’s ultimate magic show
combines audience participation,
comedy and real live animals. Free. For
more information call 522-7838.
Candidate Seminar for November
elections. 2 p.m. Elections Division,
40 Tower Road, San Mateo. Free and
open to the public. For more
information go to
https://www.shapethefuture.org/elec
tions/2013/nov/ or call 312-5293.
Project Zen Massage. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Project Zen Massage, 318 Burlingame
Ave., Burlingame. There will be
complimentary wine, cheese, live
music and massage giveaways. Free.
For more information call 889-5000.
Music in the Park — Bundy Browne
and the Espresso Rhythm Section.
6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Stafford Park, corner of
King Street and Hopkins Avenue,
Redwood City. Free.
The Loudest Man on Earth —
Preview. 8 p.m. Lucie Stern Theatre,
1305 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. The
show will run until Aug. 4.Tickets start
at $19 for ages 30 and under. Savings
available for educators, seniors and
patrons 30 and under. A $5
convenience fee will be assessed for
online and telephone orders. For more
information call 463-1960 or go to
theatreworks.org.
THURSDAY, JULY 11
Retired Public Employees
Association Chapter 46 Meeting.
10:30 a.m. Elks Lodge, 229 W. 20th
Ave., San Mateo. Guest speaker Scott
Yates will share the latest news from
CalPERS and will discuss how we can
protect our pension rights. $14 for
lunch. For more information call 207-
6401.
Free Lecture on Conservatorship.
Noon. San Mateo County Law Library,
710 Hamilton St., Redwood City. Free.
For more information call 363-4913
or go to www.smclawlibrary.org.
Movies for School Age Children:
‘Willy Wonka and the Chocolate
Factory.’ 3:30 p.m. San Mateo Public
Library-Oak Room, 55 W. Third Ave.,
San Mateo. Free. For more information
call 533-7838.
The Cottontails. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Central Park, 50 E. Fifth Ave., San
Mateo. For more information visit
ci.sanmateo.ca.us.
Melissa Peabody’s newfilm— ‘San
Francisco: Still Wild at Heart.’ 6:30
p.m. South San Francisco Municipal
Services Building, 33 Arroyo Drive,
South San Francisco. Following the
showing, Peabody will talk about how
making this film came about and
what impact her film has made. Free.
For more information call 829-3876.
The Loudest Man on Earth —
Preview.7:30 p.m. Lucie Stern Theatre,
1305 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. The
show will run until Aug. 4.Tickets start
at $19 for ages 30 and under. Savings
available for educators, seniors and
patrons 30 and under. A $5
convenience fee will be assessed for
online and telephone orders. For more
information call 463-1960 or go to
theatreworks.org.
FRIDAY, JULY 12
ASDA Northern California 2013
Postage Stamp Show. Westin Hotel,
1 Old Bayshore Highway, Millbrae.
Free. For more information go to
thestamplove.com.
Jewelry on the Square and Surfin
Safari: Beach Boys Tribute. 5 p.m. to
8:30 p.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Music will
begin at 6 p.m. Free. For more
information call 780-7311.
Members’ Exhibit and Taking
Digital Art to the Streets. 5:30 p.m.
to 8 p.m. Pacific Art League, 227 Forest
Ave., Palo Alto. The PAL will host an
opening reception for two new
exhibitions which will be on display
from July 1 to July 25. Free. For more
information call 321-3891 or go to
www.pacificartleague.org.
Summer Concert: Andre Thierry
and Zydeco Magic. 6 p.m. to 8 pm.
Burton Park, 1070 Cedar St., San
Carlos. Free. For more information go
to www.cityofsancarlos.org.
South San Francisco Open Mic. 7
p.m. to 11 p.m. 116 El Campo Drive,
South San Francisco. Free. For more
information call 451-2450.
Art Opening. 7 p.m. Sanchez Art
Center, 1220 Linda Mar Blvd, Pacifica.
‘The Works of Wanxin Zhang,’ an
exhibition of ceramic sculptures
curated by Jerry Ross Barrish. Other
exhibits currently showing are
‘Shifting the Body: Explorations from
the Female Perspective’ and ‘Regrets
Only.’ For more information call 355-
1894.
‘Becky’s New Car’ opens at the
Dragon Theatre. 8 p.m. The Dragon
Theatre, 2120 Broadway, Redwood
City. Ticket prices range from $15 to
$35.The show will run through Aug. 4.
For more information and for tickets
go to
dragonproductions.net/activities/201
3season/beckysnewcar.html.
Broadway By the Bay presents
‘Oliver!’ 8 p.m. Fox Theatre, 2215
Broadway, Redwood City. Come enjoy
the performance that brings Charles
Dickens’ timeless classic of the young
boy who asked for more to life. $35 to
$55. Tickets may be purchased at the
box office located at 2219 Broadway,
Redwood City. For more information
call 369-7770.
The Loudest Man on Earth —
Preview. 8 p.m. Lucie Stern Theatre,
1305 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. The
show will run until Aug. 4.Tickets start
at $19 for ages 30 and under. Savings
available for educators, seniors and
patrons 30 and under. A $5
convenience fee will be assessed for
online and telephone orders. For more
information call 463-1960 or go to
theatreworks.org.
Movies on the Square: ‘Life of Pi.’
8:45 p.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Free. For
more information call 780-7311 or go
to
www.redwoodcity.org/events/movies
.html.
Live Salsa, Bachata, Merengue and
Cha Cha Cha with Avance. 9 p.m.
Club Fox, 2209 Broadway, Redwood
City. $15. For more information call
(877) 435-9849 or go to
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
SATURDAY, JULY 13
Electronic Recycling at Saint Peter
Catholic Church. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 700
Oddstad Blvd., Pacifica. For more
information call 359-6313.
CuriOdyssey’s Reptile Day. 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m. CuriOdyssey, 1651 Coyote
Point Drive, San Mateo. $8 for adults,
$6 for seniors and students, $4 for
children and free for children under
two years of age. For more
information go to
www.CuriOdyssey.org.
Bonnie Lockhart — Feast of Song.
10:30 a.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. For
more information call 591-8286.
San Carlos Historic Walking Tour.
10:30 a.m. to Noon. City Hall Park,
corner of San Carlos Avenue and Elm
Street, San Carlos. Tour historic
locations in downtown San Carlos
with the San Carlos Heritage
Association. There will be activities
for young children and free milk,
cookies and chrysanthemum ice tea.
Free. For more information call 592-
5822.
My Homeland in Colors or The
Photography As a Passion. 11 a.m.
Menlo Park City Council Chambers,
701 Laurel St., Menlo Park. Author and
photographer Guillermo Rivas
presents his photos of Peru, his native
country. Free For more info go to
rlroth@menlopark.org or call 330-
2512.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
enter the building more than two days
after being evacuated. Shoes and socks
and other goods were handed out to
those in need by HSA staff and the
Salvation Army.
Resident Ray Lavin was waiting to
enter his apartment after being evacu-
ated. He was also hoping to remove his
truck from the garage.
“I’m sure everything stinks like
fire,” Lavin said. He was expecting
many of his belongings to be intact,
however, since the wing of the build-
ing he lived in suffered mostly water
and smoke damage.
Shari Dewart, who lived on the most-
ly-destroyed third floor, was eager to
see if any of her belongings survived
the blaze.
“I’m hopeful,” she said.
Redwood City fire officials are still
trying to figure out what sparked the
blaze at about 2 a.m. Sunday but have
essentially ruled out that it was arson.
About half of the residents at the 72-
unit apartment complex receive hous-
ing assistance from the county such as
Section 8 vouchers or shelter-plus-care
vouchers, said San Mateo County
Department of Housing official Bill
Lowell.
Lowell told the Daily Journal that
the Hallmark House Apartments own-
ers are also quickly returning deposits
and refunding rent for July to the vic-
tims, many who are living at an emer-
gency shelter set up by the Red Cross
near Red Morton Park.
“They are going to need that cash as
housing is difficult to find in the area,”
Lowell said.
Housing officials are also making
sure victims have all the proper paper-
work needed to secure housing, he
said.
The Human Services Agency has pro-
vided social workers on site to provide
for the 14 residents of the complex
who are already active on the county’s
roster for public assistance programs,
said HSAspokesman Edwin Chan.
Many need mental health assistance,
Chan said.
Some HSA staff have taken turns
spending the night at the emergency
shelter set up at the National Guard
Armory on Velota Road, he said.
Fire victims were able to access their
apartments for only about 10 minutes
yesterday. Some returned with bags full
of belongings while others found that
most of their personal effects had been
destroyed in the six-alarm blaze that
was still smoldering in hot spots more
than a day after the fire started.
The fire claimed one life but there has
yet to be an identification. A forensic
dentist examined the victim’s body
last night and the identification should
be available today, San Mateo County
Coroner Robert Foucrault wrote the
Daily Journal in an email.
The building did not have sprinklers
but an internal fire hose that firefight-
ers did not use.
The San Mateo County Health
System has been working closely with
the Red Cross, county Office of
Emergency Services, HSA and other
partners to respond to the victims of
the fire and help them get back on their
feet, Robyn Thaw, spokeswoman for
the Health System wrote the Daily
Journal in an email.
“Initially, our focus was helping the
people who were displaced to identify
their lost medications and working
with pharmacies and providers to refil l
prescriptions as quickly as possible,”
Thaw wrote.
The Health System also sent staff to
provide emotional support for those
residents who were anxious and con-
cerned in the hours following the
event, Thaw wrote in the email.
Yesterday, residents were handed face
masks and gloves and given 10 min-
utes each to enter their former apart-
ments with a fire official providing
escort.
In total, 17 were injured in the fire
that caused 97 people to lose their
homes.
About 25 residents were briefly hos-
pitalized and another 61 were housed at
the evacuation center at the Fair Oaks
Community Center by the Red Cross.
About 30 people stayed the night at
the National Guard Armory on cots
Monday night. The shelter may remain
open until this weekend.
Members of the public seeking to
donate goods or funds should call
(650) 366-2742 to make arrange-
ments.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
FIRE
caught on,” Matsumoto said. “We’re
hopeful.”
The ferry’s expected ridership during
its first year fell below the projected
100,000 trips, Sanchez said.
Ridership has increased over the
past few months due to increased pub-
lic outreach by the Water Emergency
Transportation Authority, said South
San Francisco Mayor Pedro Gonzalez.
“People did not know that we had a
ferry yet,” said Gonzalez, co-chair of
the Water Transportation Advocates of
San Mateo County. “I think it’s
improving.”
Adding public transportation to the
ferry terminal would increase rider-
ship, he said.
“There are shuttles for the compa-
nies, but not for the public,” he said.
To encourage ridership, the ferry
recently added an extra departure time
for commuters who are mostly coming
from Oakland to work in South San
Francisco. Ridership increased with
the recent addition of a departure time,
Sanchez said .
“We’re anxious to see how it fares in
the fall,” he said, hoping that more
commuters will choose to ride the ferry
when they are back to work from vaca-
tion.
Many commuters coming into South
San Francisco take shuttles from the
ferry terminal to their nearby offices,
he said.
During the BARTstrike, ridership on
the South San Francisco ferry line
jumped. The ferry — which stops in
Alameda, Oakland and South San
Francisco during commute times —
normally serves about 255 one-way
trips per day. On July 1, 2 and 3, one-
way trips were boosted to 719, 495 and
571, respectively, according to San
Francisco Bay Ferry.
San Mateo County Harbor
Commissioner Robert Bernardo —
who takes the ferry from South San
Francisco to work in Oakland — was
excited to see a crowd waiting for the
ferry during the strike.
“There was a huge line, which was
really good,” said Bernardo, who
works for the Port of Oakland.
Bernardo was a member of the San
Mateo County Water Transit Advocates
back when it began advocating for the
ferry line in 2004.
“I really want the numbers to go up
because it really is the best way to
commute,” said Bernardo, who enjoys
drinking free coffee and reading the
paper on the ferry. “It gives you the
most beautiful view of San Francisco
and the Port of Oakland.”
He also uses the ferry because of the
free parking and affordable fares, and
so that he doesn’t have to sit in traffic
and contribute to air pollution.
“It’s the most stress-free out of all
the transit options,” he said. “It’s just
sad that not more people are using it.”
When he has talked to fellow riders,
Bernardo found that the few departure
times are a main concern. The one
departure time from Jack London
Square in the evening is 4:55 p.m.,
which is difficult for many workers to
make, he said.
For more information on the South
San Francisco/Jack London Square
Oakland/Alameda ferry schedule visit
sanfranciscobayferry.com.
Continued from page 1
FERRY
COMICS/GAMES
7-10-13
tuesday’s PuZZLe sOLVed
PreViOus
sudOku
answers
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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5 Soak
10 Japanese robe
12 Fission opposite
13 Coquettish ones
14 Not us
15 Crocus bulb
16 Varnish ingredient
18 Many mos.
19 Island welcomes
22 Hunting weapon
25 Inclined
29 Flow out
30 Bring down
32 Comedy routines
33 Justice Kagan
34 Most cunning
37 Merriment
38 Tornado warnings
40 Sonnet cousin
43 Louis —
44 Honeycombed home
48 Suffer from asthma
50 Shoelace hole
52 Theater features
53 Venus’ sister
54 Din
55 Furtive whisper
dOwn
1 Missile shelter
2 Mideast ruler
3 Usual course
4 Explosive ltrs.
5 However
6 Pale
7 Wedding cake part
8 — d’oeuvres
9 Annapolis grad
10 Col. Sanders’ chain
11 Norwegian port
12 — point
17 Happy sighs
20 Microscope parts
21 Like many oaths
22 Hwys.
23 Gets under one’s skin
24 Fall short
26 Apple — (toadies)
27 Pitcher
28 Ding a door
31 Bleacher shout
35 Boxcars, in dice
36 Numerical prefx
39 Festive nights
40 Great Lakes state
41 Hubby of Lucy
42 Morays and lampreys
45 Seine sights
46 Opening for air
47 Depot info
48 Of unnatural pallor
49 Alphabet ender
51 Nope opposite
diLBert® CrOsswOrd PuZZLe
future sHOCk®
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wednesday, JuLy 10, 2013
CanCer (June 21-July 22) -- Your enthusiasm is
likely to be contagious when associates witness
your zest for life. Your joie de vivre helps others feel
much better about their own lives.
LeO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Interesting events could
generate additional earnings or income for you.
Chances are, you’ll drum up some new ways to
acquire extra business.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- What makes you such a
good salesperson is that you won’t sell anything that
you don’t believe in. Your prospects will admire your
credibility and will want to do business with you.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Don’t be afraid to allow
your generosity to prevail over your practicality.
Remember the old saying: “From those to whom
much is given, much will be required.”
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Even though you are
likely to feel a strong need for companionship, you
will nevertheless be very careful about whom you
choose to spend time with.
saGittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- If your goals
seem easy to achieve, it will be because you haven’t
been motivated by selfsh urges. Things always
seem easier when we like what we’re doing.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- You might be
able to put something you recently learned to
good use. It could have to do with maintaining a
relationship.
aQuarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- It might take
a second or even a third effort to achieve an
important career objective, but it will be well
worth it. Once you set your sights on your target,
never veer from it.
PisCes (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Your appreciation for
everyone’s point of view places you in the role of
peacemaker. You’ll have plenty of chances to use
your gift.
aries (March 21-April 19) -- Harmony in the work
place will pay off for everyone involved. Once a
positive example is set and the entire crew sees
what comes of it, everyone will happily follow suit.
taurus (April 20-May 20) -- Being the smart
person you are, you’ll know that the best way
to silence a griper is to smother him or her with
affection. It’s one of the most positive motivating
tools you can use.
GeMini (May 21-June 20) -- The greater part of
your efforts will be directed toward providing more
for your family or co-workers. You’ll be a beacon of
strength and compassion.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Wednesday • July 10, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Wednesday • July 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
AUTMOTIVE -
NOW HIRING
SERVICE TECHNICIANS
OILSTOP DRIVE-THRU
OIL CHANGE
•Excellent benefits
•No experience necessary
•Complete training program
•Retirement program
•Advancement opportunities
•Competitive pay
APPLY IN PERSON AT
2009 El Camino Real, San Mateo
Monday-Saturday 8-6
For more info: www.oilstopinc.com
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CLEANING -
HOUSE CLEANERS
NEEDED
Excellent pay. Company car.
Must have valid CDL and cleaning ex-
perience. Call Molly Maids, (650)
837-9788. 1700 S. Amphlett Blvd,
#218, San Mateo
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
CUSTOMER SERVICE/
SEAMSTRESS -
YOU ARE INVITED
Are you:
Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have:
Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for emplployment benefits
Sewiing skills
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available for
Customer Service/Seamstress.
Call for appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo CA, 94402
GREAT CLIPS
@ Sequoia Station
Redwood City
Now Hiring
Stylists & Managers.
Call Flo/Randy
408 247-8364 or 408 921-9994
Grand Opening Soon!
HIRING LINE COOKS - Evenings, Avan-
ti Pizza. . 3536 Alameda, MENLO PARK,
CA (650)854-1222.
HOTEL - Front Desk Agent, Mainte-
nance Person, Night Bellman & House-
keeping Manager positions available. Ex-
perience preferred. Fax resume:
(650)589-7076 or Email: ac@citigarden-
hotel.com
23 Wednesday • July 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RESTAURANT -
Now hiring for Quick Service / Counter
Service positions. Apply in person at
753 Laurel Street, San Carlos
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 521929
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Jodie Faye Schmeltz
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Jodie Faye Schmeltz filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Jodie Faye Schmeltz
Proposed name: Jodie Faye
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on August 13,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 06/20/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 06/10/2013
(Published, 07/10/13, 07/17/2013,
07/24/2013, 07/31/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256305
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Goodlife Co., 180 Sylvester
Road, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Leo Now, same address and
Gilbert Anthony Milam, Jr., 1767 42nd
St., San Francisco, CA 94122. The busi-
ness is conducted by a General Partner-
ship. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
06/13/2013.
/s/ Leo Nowi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256316
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Dryfast, 642 Quarry Rd., Ste.
A, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Geor-
gi Georgiev Atanasov, same address
and Tsvetelina Mircheva, 1776 Camino
Verde #D, Walnut Creek, CA 94597.
The business is conducted by a Married
Couple. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Milena Ivanova /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256618
The following person is doing business
as: K & B Discount Store, 201 S. Del-
ware St. #A, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Eddy Mejia, 1900 S. Norfolk, #350, San
Mateo, CA 94403, Maria Sautizo, 1101
Tilton Ave., Apt. 11, San Mateo, CA
94401. The business is conducted by co-
partners. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Eddy Mejia /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/012013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 522710
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Michele Ann Poulter,
Eva Marie Poulter,
Olivia Poulter & Grant Poulter
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Michele Ann Poulter filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
a.Present name: Michele Ann Poulter
a.Proposed name: Michele Ann Saint
b.Present name: Eva Marie Elizabeth
Poulter
b.Proposed name: Eva Marie Elizabeth
Saint
c.Present name: Olivia Rose Poulter
c.Proposed name: Olivia Rose Saint
d.Present name: Grant Robert Poulter
d.Proposed name: grant Robert Saint
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on August 21,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 07/08/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 07/08/2013
(Published, 07/10/13, 07/17/2013,
07/24/2013, 07/31/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256381
The following person is doing business
as: Plastic Jungle, 100 S. Ellsworth Ave.,
9th Floor, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Cardflo., Inc., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 05/28/13.
/s/ Daniel C. Rogers /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256306
The following person is doing business
as: Pho Vinh, 1065 Holly Street, #A, SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Pho Vinh, Inc.,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Kaitlin Ngan Nguyen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256359
The following person is doing business
as: Advanced Aesthetics Concepts, 295
89th St., Ste. 101, DALY CITY, CA
94015 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Linda Hampton, 209 Melissa
Circle, Daly City, CA 94014. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 06/13/2013.
/s/ Linda Hampton /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256265
The following person is doing business
as: The Bankruptcy Law Firm, 475 14th
St., Ste. 260, OAKLAND, CA 94612 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Kostopoulos Law Group, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Anete Kostopoulos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256194
The following person is doing business
as: Bott & Associates, 1730 S. Amphlett
Blvd., Ste. 215, SAN MATEO, CA 94402
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Chhabra Associates, Inc., CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
07/01/2013.
/s/ Rajesh Kumar/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256408
The following person is doing business
as: Cal Pacific Hydronics, 655 Skyway
Rd., #122, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Dan S. Passanisi, 885 Laurel St., Bel-
mont, CA 94002. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Dan S. Passanisi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256203
The following person is doing business
as: Tony’s Hauling & Moving, 415 Mac
Arthur Avenue, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94063 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Anthony Souffront, 1289 Bal-
boa Ct., Apt. 244, Sunnyvale, CA 94086.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Anthony Souffront /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256424
The following person is doing business
as: Jack’s Car Wash, 3651 S. El Camino
Real, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: HD
Wash, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 05/29/2013.
/s/ Brad Peterson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256412
The following person is doing business
as: 8Z Real Estate, 330 Primrose Rd.,
Ste 412, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
CO Home Finder, Inc., CO. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 06/17/2013.
/s/ Abbie Higashi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/19/13, 06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256490
The following person is doing business
as: La Lacquerie, 262 Club Dr., SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered
by the following owner: La Lacquerie
Corporation, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Susan Aflak /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256356
The following person is doing business
as: Sierra Home Automation, 76 Mission
Dr., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Sha
Consulting, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
06/01/2013.
/s/ Patrick Hagerman /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256318
The following person is doing business
as: Bay Area Metro Group, 21 Airport
Blvd, Ste. H, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: New Metropolitan, Inc.,
CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
06/03/2013.
/s/ Leona Shum /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256545
The following person is doing business
as: Dylan’s Kids Cuts, 939 Edgewater
Blvd., FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Er-
landson & Associates, LLC, CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Lia-
bility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Marc Erlandson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256175
The following person is doing business
as: Sequoia Medical Group, 3400 Data
Dr., Second Floor, RANCHO CORDO-
VA, CA 95670 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Dingnity Health
Medical Foundation, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Thomas Lowry /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256429
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Stella Events, 794 Francisco
St., HALF MOON BAY, CA 94019 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Vanessa Stella, and Rick Stella Po Box
1383, El Granada, CA 94018. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Married Couple.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ Vanessa Stella /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256576
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Abeles and Associates, 2) Balance
Point Group, 624 Cuesta Ave., SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Alan M. Abeles,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/01/2009.
/s/ Alan M. Abeles /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256621
The following person is doing business
as: Park Center Company, 1120 Royal
Ln., SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Paul
Hoffman, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Paul Hoffman /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256452
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Mold Remedies, 2) R & R Con-
struction 320 Vallejo Dr. #41, BURLIN-
GAME, CA 94011 is hereby registered
by the following owner: RPRW, Inc, CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
01/01/2003.
/s/ Richard Wolf /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256173
The following person is doing business
as: Your Life Your Plate Nutrition Con-
sulting, 1600 E. 3rd Ave. SAN MATEO,
CA 94401 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Daniel Anthony Velarde
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Daniel A. Velarde /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256252
The following person is doing business
as: Carlmont Advisors, 751 Laurel St.,
Ste 423, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Flora M. Burke, 22 Club Dr., #A, San
Carlos, CA 94070. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Flora M. Burke /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256375
The following person is doing business
as: Hire10, 3150 Edison Street, SAN
MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Virginia Nikoloff,
1309 Sixth Ave., Belmont, CA 94002.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Virginia Nikoloff /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13, 07/31/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256336
The following person is doing business
as: Your Water Filtration Co., 742 Dart-
mouth Ave., SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
O’Haran Enterprises, CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Bette Haran /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13, 07/31/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256649
The following person is doing business
as: Leslie’s Janitorial Service, 15 S. Nor-
folk St., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Le-
slie Padilla, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Leslie Padilla /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13, 07/31/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256568
The following person is doing business
as: Special Tech DJ, LLC, 572 San Ma-
teo Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Special Tech DJ, LLC, CA. The business
is conducted by a Limited Liability Com-
pany. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
07/01/2013.
/s/ Frank Cuevas /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13, 07/31/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256518
The following person is doing business
as: Fishbusters, 2001 Hastings Shore
Lane, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94065 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
DexCare, Inc., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Dexter Chiang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13, 07/31/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256687
The following person is doing business
as: Starband, 484 Tiller Lane, RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94065 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Maureen
McInerney, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Maureen McInerney /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13, 07/31/13.)
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: June 13, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
Just Food Inc.
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
209 Park Rd,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010-4205
Type of license applied for:
41-On-Sale Beer And Wine-Eating
Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
June 26, July 3,10, 2013
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252527
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Key-
la’s Dollar Store, 201 S. Delaware St.,
#A, SAN MATEO, CA 94401The fictitious
business name referred to above was
filed in County on 09/27/12 The business
was conducted by: Maria L. Santizo.
/s/ Maria L. Santizo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 07/01/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 07/03/13,
07/10/13, 07/17/2013, 07/24/2013).
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, $90.,
(650)610-9765
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIER 5200 BTU window air conditioner
- never used, in box, $95. obo, (650)591-
6842
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
296 Appliances
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WEBER BRAND Patio Refrigerator,
round top load, for beer, soda, and wa-
ter. $30 obo (650)591-6842
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, SOLD!
298 Collectibles
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $75.,
(650)596-0513
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
84 USED European (34) and U.S. (50)
Postage Stamps. Most issued before
World War II. All different and all detach-
ed from envelopes. $4.00, 650-787-
8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MENORAH - Antique Jewish tree of life,
10”W x 30”H, $100., (650)348-6428
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, SOLD!
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500
(650)766-3024
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
24
Wednesday • July 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NOTICE OF ELECTION
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a General Municipal Election will be held in the City of San
Bruno on Tuesday, November 5, 2013, for the following Officers:
For Mayor (Full term of two years)
For 2 Members of the City Council (Full term of four years)
For City Clerk (Full term of four years)
For Treasurer (Full term of four years)
If no one or only one person is nominated for an elective office, appointment to the elective office
may be made as prescribed by § 10229 of the Elections Code of the State of California.
The polls will be open between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m.
This legal notice is being published pursuant to sections 12101, 12102, 12111, 10225, and 10229
of the Elections Code and section 6061 of the Government Code of the State of California.
You may call the City Clerk’s Office at 616-7058 if you need additional information.
/s/ Carol Bonner,
San Bruno City Clerk
July 9, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, July 10, 2013.
ACROSS
1 Urban rails
4 “__ life!”
9 Self-satisfied
14 2002 NBA
Rookie of the
Year __ Gasol
15 Put back to zero
16 Total
17 “ ... book by __
cover”
18 Author Jong
19 Many times
20 Member of a
“joint” military
group
23 “__ evil ...”
24 Time of one’s life
25 Pub. of an oft-
quoted journal
28 Franklin
invention
33 Full of mischief
36 Like much of
King’s work
37 Verbalized sigh
38 Buddhist shrine
41 Injured, in a way
42 Jazzman
Jackson and
cartoonist Gross
44 More easygoing
46 Make a relay
race connection
49 Kalamazoo-to-
Cincinnati dir.
50 Billion-year span
51 Waits
55 Cocktail
accessory
59 Traditional
Islamic garment
62 Dough raiser
63 One of the Khans
64 Words before
“Gave proof
through the night”
65 Clerical
residence
66 Short snooze
67 Incessantly
68 Like one’s big
brother
69 Chowed down
DOWN
1 “Lawrence of
Arabia” and
others
2 Bat maker’s tool
3 “Wake Up,
Little __”
4 Girl Scouts
emblem
5 Protagonist
6 “Yeah, like that’ll
happen!”
7 Sleuths, briefly
8 New York’s __
Island
9 Hardly G-rated
10 Win by trumping,
in bridge
11 Que. neighbor
12 Beehive State
native language
13 Put on
21 Doesn’t need to
be drafted
22 Bush spokesman
Fleischer
25 One-way sign
shape
26 Wavy pattern
27 “Doe, ___ ...”
29 APO mail
recipients
30 FDR’s successor
31 Opposable digit
32 Start the
assignment
33 Moistens
34 Inventor Howe
35 Ballroom dance,
in Burgundy
39 Green veggie
40 Flight stat.
43 Wine list
presenter
45 Maine dish
47 __ polloi
48 Digestive protein
52 Rigg who played
Mrs. Peel
53 Brilliance
54 Internet calling
service
55 One of 16 in a
4x4 tile: Abbr.
56 Enthusiasm
57 Catch, as a fish
58 Being, to Brutus
59 Storage
receptacle
60 Colorful card
game
61 Actress Charlotte
By Joel D. Lafargue
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
07/10/13
07/10/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
HARMON/KANDON SPEAKERS (2)
mint condition, great, for small
office/room or extra speakers, 4 1/2 in.
high, includes cords $8., SOLD!
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
303 Electronics
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center draw locks all comes with
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame SOLD!
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
304 Furniture
3 MEDAL base kitchen cabinets with
drawers and wood doors $99
(650)347-8061
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR (2), with arms, Italian 1988 Cha-
teau D'Ax, solid, perfect condition. $50
each or $85 for both. (650)591-0063
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COPENHAGEN TEAK dining table with
dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions. 48/88"
long x 32" wide x 30" high. $95.00
(650)637-0930
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
COUCH. GREEN Cloth with end reclin-
ers on both sides. Beverage holder in the
middle, $50 (650)572-2864
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 draw dresser 61" wide,
31" high, & 18" deep $50., (650)592-
2648
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
GLASS DINING Table 41” x 45” Round-
ed rectangle clear glass top and base
$85 (650)888-0129
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
LIGHT WOOD Rocking Chair & Has-
sock, gold cushions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
RECLINER ROCKER - Like new, brown,
vinyl, $99., SOLD!
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR with wood carving,
armrest, rollers, and it swivels $99.,
(650)592-2648
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEAK TV stand, wheels, rotational, glass
doors, drawer, 5 shelves. 31" wide x 26"
high X 18" deep. $75.00 (650)637-0930
304 Furniture
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
WICKER ENTERTAINMENT CABINET -
H 78” x 43” x 16”, almost new, $89.,
(650)347-9920
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
3 PIECE fireplace set with screen $25
(650)322-2814
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, (650)578-9208
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
1/2 HORSE power 8" worm drive skill
saw $40 OBO (650)315-5902
10" BAN Saw $75.00 (650) 347-8367
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
BLACK & DECKER CORDLESS 18 volt
combo drill, vacuum, saw, sander, two
batteries & charger, brand new, $95.
obo, SOLD!
BLACK AND Decker, 10” trimmer/edger
, rechargeable, brand new, $50
(650)871-7200
BOB VILLA rolling tool box & organizer -
brand new with misc. tools, $40. obo,
(650)591-6842
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTMANS PROFESSIONAL car buf-
fer with case $40 OBO (650)315-5902
CRAFTSMAN 14.4 VOLT DRILL - bat-
tery & charger, never used, $35. obo,
SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 3/8” 16.8 volt drill & vac-
uum combo, brand new, with charger,
$45. obo, SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DREMEL HIGH SPEED ROTARY TOOL
- all attachments, never used, $25. obo
SOLD!
ELECTRIC HEDGE trimmer good condi-
tion (Black Decker) $40 (650)342-6345
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LADDER - 24' aluminum 2 section ladder
$20., SOLD
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
308 Tools
MAKITA 21” Belt Sander with long cord,
$35 (650)315-5902
NEW DRILL DRIVER - 18V + battery &
charger, $30., (650)595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SANDER, MAKITA finishing sander, 4.5
x 4.5"' used once. Complete with dust
bag and hard shell case. $35.00 SOLD!
SMALL ROTETILLER 115 Volt Works
well $99.00 (650)355-2996
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
TORO ELECTRIC POWER SWEEPER
blower - never used, in box, $35. obo,
(650)591-6842
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $65 (650)341-8342
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
3 LARGE old brown mixing bowls $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History,
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
5 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $9. for all
(650)347-5104
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEO 75 with jackets 75 with-
out $100 for all, SOLD!
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
AIR CONDITIONER - Window mount,
$50. obo, (650)438-4737
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99., (650)580-
3316
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASTRONOMY BOOKS (2) Hard Cover
Cambridge Encyclopedia of Astronomy,
World of Discovery, $12., (650)578-9208
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14., (650)578-9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, $40,
(650)347-5104
BAY BRIDGE Framed 50th anniversary
poster (by Bechtel corp) $50
(650)873-4030
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection SOLD!
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY Jake AB Scissor Exercise Ma-
chine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
(650)578-9208
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
25 Wednesday • July 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
310 Misc. For Sale
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOOD HEALTH FACT BOOK - un-
used, answers to get/stay healthy, hard
cover, 480 pages, $8., (650)578-9208
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HABACHI BBQ Grill heavy iron 22" high
15" wide $25 (650)593-8880
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model", $250., (650)637-0930
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LAUNDRY SORTER - on wheels, triple
section, laundry sorter - $19., (650)347-
9920
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12” L x
5”W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, (650)341-1861
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW COWBOY BOOTS - 9D, Unworn,
black, fancy, only $85., (650)595-3933
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., (650)578-9208
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SAFETY SHOES - Iron Age, Mens steel
toe metatarfal work boots, brown, size 10
1/2, in box, $50., (650)594-1494
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. White Rotary
sewing machine similar age, cabinet
style. $85 both. (650)574-4439
SLIDE PROJECTOR - Airequipt Super-
ba 66A slide projector and screen.
$50.00 for all. (650)345-3840
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STAINED GLASS panels multi colors
beautiful work 35" long 111/2" wide $79
OBO (650)349-6059
STAINED GLASS,
28”x30” Japanese geisha motif, multi
colored, beautiful. $200 (650)520-9366
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, (650)341-1861
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLKSWAGON NEW Beatle hub cap,
3, $70 for All SOLD!
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
310 Misc. For Sale
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WEBER GO ANYWHERE GAS BARBE-
QUE - never used, in box, $40., SOLD!
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
311 Musical Instruments
GUITAR FOR sale. Fender Accoustic,
with case. $89.00 (415)971-7555
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
MARTIN GUITAR 1971 D-18S Great
shape, Great sound. Price reduced to
$1200. (650)522-8322
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
ATTRACTIVE LADIES trench coat red,
weather proof size 6/8 $35
(650)345-3277
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
IONIC BREEZE quadra, Sharper Image,
3 level silent air purifier. 27”h, energy
saver, original box with video. Excellent
condition. $77. (650)347-5104
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS JACKET - size XXL, Beautiful
cond., med., $35., (650)595-3933
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW! OLD NAVY Coat: Boy/Gril, fleece-
lined, hooded $15 (415)585-3622
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
brand new, never worn for $25
(650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
150 COPPER spades for #6 strand.
Copper wire. $50.00 for all.
(650)345-3840
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
317 Building Materials
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
PVC SCHEDULE 80 connectors and
coupling. 100 pieces in all. $30.00 for all
(650)345-3840
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 AIR rifles, shoots .177 pelets. $50 ea
Obo (650)591-6842
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$25.(650)368-0748.
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
BIKE TRAINER Ascent fluid $85
(650)375-8021
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
FOR SALE medium size wet suit $95
call for info (650)851-0878
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BAG with 15 clubs $35. SOLD.
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
KELTY SUPER TIOGA BACKPACK -
$40., (650)552-9436
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels, $85.
obo, (650)223-7187
ROWING MACHINE. $30.00
(650)637-0930
STATIONARY EXERCISE BICYCLE -
Compact, excellent condition, $40. obo,
(650)834-2583
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
TENT - one man packable tent - $20.,
(650)552-9436
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
THULE SKI RACK - holds 3 pairs, $85.,
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL EXERCISE- Pro Form 415
Crosswalk, very good condition $200 call
(650)266-8025
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40.,
(408)764-6142
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
SLEEP APNEA breathing machine com-
plete in box helps you breathe, costs $$$
sacrifice for $75, (650)995-0012
WALKER - $25., brand new, tag still on,
(650)594-1494
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
515 Office Space
SAN MATEO DRIVE beautiful Medical
Office space for rent only $75/day.
Paulsurinder1@yahoo.com
620 Automobiles
1997 BMW 540I sedan with 120k miles
automatic powerfull luxury sedan lot of
room for 5 people and a great ride clean
Car Fax #5044 on sale for only $5500.00
plus fees, (650)637-3900
1999 AUDI A6 sedan with 116k miles,
Quattro automatic loaded looks and
drives very nice comes with 3000
miles warranty clean Car Fax #4447
priced at $5995.00 plus tax lic,etc.,
(650)637-3900
2000 BMW 323CI coupe with 129 k
miles automatic sport two door great
looking drives excellent all power pack-
age #4518 clean Car Fax on sale for on-
ly $7000.00 plus normal fees, (650)637-
3900
2002 PT CRIUSER limited with 121k
miles she is fully loaded looks and drives
great automatic inexpensive sedan with
clean Car Fax #4515 on sale for
$4995.00 plus normal fees.
2003 AUDI A6 QUATTRO with 79k
miles,sports luxury sedan fully optioned
in excellent conditions and 3000 miles
free warranty clean Car Fax #4424 on
sale for $7995 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2003 FORD MUSTANG GT deluxe con-
vertible with 102k miles automatic and
loaded with lots of options comes with
power top and 3000 miles free warranty
clean Car Fax #5031 priced at $7995.00
plus fees, (650)637-3900
2004 CHEVY MALIBU Classic automatic
sedan with 87k low miles clean car fax all
power package and 3 mounths warranty
#4437 on sale for $5850.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
2004 HONDA CIVIC LX sedan with 154k
miles 4 door automatic with power pack-
age tilt and cruise new trade in which
comes with warranty #4517 on sale for
$5995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2008 HYUNDAI Accent GLS 4 door se-
dan with only 49k miles automatic great
on gas cold air condition and 3000 miles
free warranty #4512 on sale for low price
of $7995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
ACCURA 1997 3.0 CL CP Black, Auto-
matic $3300, (650)630-3216
620 Automobiles
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBIL”79Royal Delta 88, 122k
Miles, in excelleny Condition $1,800
(650)342-8510
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
2004 FORD EXPLORER EDDIE BAUER
SUV with 146k miles auto all wheel drive
with third row seat room for 7 people
looks and drives like new car clean car
and warranty #4330 at $7995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo Rob SOLD!
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $50. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35., (650)670-
2888
NEW MOTORCYCLE HELMET - Modu-
lar, dual visor, $69., (650)595-3933
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $60 for all
(650)588-7005
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPEAR tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
670 Auto Parts
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Home
&
Garden
Bath
TUBZ
Over 400 Tubs on display!
World’s Largest “Hands-On, Feet-In”
Showroom
4840 Davenport Place
Fremont, CA 94538
(510)770-8686
www.tubz.net
Asphalt/Paving
AIM CONSTRUCTION
John Peterson
•Paving •Grading
•Slurry Sealing •Paving Stones
•Concrete •Patching
We AIM to please!
(650)468-6750
(408)422-7695
Lic.# 916680
26
Wednesday • July 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Cabinetry
Contractors
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Home repairs &
Foundation work
Retaining wall •Decks •Fences
No job too small
Gary Afu
(650)207-2400
Lic# 904960
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
Concrete
CHETNER CONCRETE
Lic #706952
Driveways - Walkways
- Pool Decks - Patios - Stairs
- Exposed Aggregate - Masonry
- Retaining Walls - Drainage
- Foundation/Slabs
Free Estimates
(650)271-1442 Mike
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed •Insured •Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Solas
Electric
Best Rates
On all electrical work
7 days a week
Free Estimates
(650) 302-7906
CA License 950866
Bonded and Insured
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
JOSE’S
COMPLETE GARDENING
Complete gardening &
Landscaping
Commercial & Residential
Licensed
Free Estimates
(650)315-4011
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
•Fences •Decks •Patios •
Power Washes •Concrete
Work •Maintenance •
Clean Ups •Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior•Roof
Repair •Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors •Plumbing •Tile •
Mirrors •Chain Link Fence •Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
Handy Help
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets,
Also, Electrical, Hauling
Carpet, Tile & Stucco
(650)461-0326
Lic# 983312
HAMZEH PLUMBING
5 stars on Yelp!
$25 OFF First Time Customers
All plumbing services
24 hour emergency service
(415)690-6540
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
•Tile •Mosaics
•Natural Stone Countertops
•Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Coverings
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Painting Remodeling
27 Wednesday • July 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Cemetery
CRIPPEN & FLYNN FUNERAL
CHAPELS
Family owned & operated
Established 1949
Personalized cremation &
funeral services
Serving all faiths & traditions
Woodside chapel: (650)369-4103
FD 879
Carlmont chapel: (650)595-4103
FD 1825
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6•M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)868-0082
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AUTO •HOME •LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
UNION SPA & SALON
Grand Opening
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes •Multi-family •
Mixed-Use •Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT
SENIOR LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
Video
ADULT VIDEOS $99 (415)298-0645
WORLD 28
Wednesday • July 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
these
outstanding
Events!
Coming
to you
soon
San Mateo County Event Center
1346 Saratoga Drive, San Mateo
650.574.3247
T
o
A
t
t
e
n
d
Your
Chance
D
o
n
t
m
i
s
s
www.smeventcenter.com – Signup for our SMCEC newsletter and enter for a chance to win Free Admission and Parking to shows!
Discover the Dinosaurs
July 5, 6, 7 and July 12, 13, 14
www.discoverthedinosaurs.com
Come experience up to 60 replica dinosaurs and
moving museum quality dinosaurs.
(651)-766-2800
My Favorite Bead Show
July 12, 13, 14
www.intergem.com
Our exhibitors provide an exciting, and ever changing selection of
jewelry from all over the world. Our jewelers represent quality
crafsmanship, industry knowledge and trust.
One low ticket price for all 3 days ($8) or advance online
tickets www.ticketderby.com
Nor Cal Auto Swap Meet
July 21
www.norcalswapmeet.com
Admission $8.00, kids 12 and under free
REUTERS
Supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi shout anti-army slogans during
a protest in Cairo, Egypt.
By Maggie Michael and Lee Keath
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO — Egypt’s military-backed interim
leader named a new prime minister and won $8
billion in promises of aid from wealthy Arab
allies in the Gulf on Tuesday in moves aimed
at stabilizing a political transition less than a
week after the army deposed the Islamist pres-
ident.
The armed forces warned political factions
that “maneuvering” must not hold up its
ambitious fast-track timetable for new elec-
tions next year. The sharp message underlined
how strongly the military is shepherding the
process, even as liberal reform movements
that backed its removal of Mohammed Morsi
complained that now they are not being con-
sulted in decision-making.
The Muslim Brotherhood denounced the
transition plan, vowing to continue its street
protests until ousted Morsi, the country’s first
freely elected president, is returned to power.
The appointment of economist Hazem el-
Beblawi as prime minister, along with the
setting of the accelerated timetable, under-
lined the military’s determination to push
ahead in the face of Islamist opposition and
outrage over the killing of more than 50
Morsi supporters on Monday.
Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates
provided a welcome boost for the new leader-
ship. The two countries, both opponents of
Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood, celebrated his
ouster by showering the cash-strapped
Egyptian government with promises of $8
billion in grants, loans and badly needed gas
and oil.
Russia: Syrian rebels
made, used sarin nerve gas
UNITED NATIONS — Russia’s U.N.
ambassador said Tuesday that Russian
experts determined that Syrian rebels made
sarin nerve gas and used it in a deadly chem-
ical weapon attack outside Aleppo in
March.
Ambassador Vitaly Churkin blamed
opposition fighters for the March 19 attack
in the government-controlled Aleppo sub-
urb of Khan al-Assal, which he said killed
26 people, including 16 military person-
nel, and injured 86 others.
The rebels have blamed the government
for the attack. The U.S. Britain and France
have said they have seen no evidence to
indicate that the opposition has acquired or
used chemical weapons.
In Washington, White House spokesman
Jay Carney said “We have yet to see any
evidence that backs up the assertion that
anybody besides the Syrian government
has had the ability to use chemical weapons
or has used chemical weapons.”
Egypt pushes transition,
naming prime minister
Around the world

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