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BA Hons Fashion Promotion 10-11

BA Hons Fashion Promotion 10-11

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Fashion promotion Syllabus
Fashion promotion Syllabus

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FASHION PROMOTION

Bachelor of Arts (Honours) - Course Handbook 2010/11

BA (Hons) Fashion Promotion Taking fashion from the catwalk to the customer.
The BA (Hons) Fashion Promotion course at Rochester provides a creative environment to explore the world of fashion communication. The competitive nature of the global fashion industry requires graduates to be independent, creative and professional. This unique course combines expertise in all forms of communication from creative writing and fashion styling to branding and public relations. STYLING… …instructs those who are passionate and dedicated to fashion, helping avid followers of trend, couture and ready-to-wear to be successful. Understanding of lighting and photographic technology and expanding knowledge is essential to succeed in creating contemporary, relevant and original work. Throughout the course, basic, creative, commercial and interpretive styling techniques are taught and applied to help develop individual creative potential. WRITTEN COMMUNICATION… …encourages the abilities to create, plan, develop and execute creative projects whilst having keen consideration for context, market relevance and originality. The written word is as much an application as a form of communication - how you say something is just as important as what you say. In fashion and other lifestyle industries, students on this pathway can apply and develop their talents not only through journalism, but in publications, new media, project management, creative writing and beyond. P.R. AND MARKETING… …emphasizes the importance of generating unique strategies to promote a brand to both the press and public in an ever-changing world where information is immediately communicated. This pathway examines, compares and encourages innovation in press relations, event management, digital networking, product placement, fashion film, runway and static presentations. Marketing is an integral part of all fashion promotion’s pathways. It instills relevant knowledge as early as possible, from basic principles, the differences between marketing and branding, to consumer research and culture and developing niche brand strategies entirely from scratch. MEDIA… …helps develop skills in fashion imaging, computer aided design and desktop publishing. Students combine a strong conceptual knowledge of digital image production and art direction whilst developing versatile and practical technical ability. The use of moving image as a promotional tool is also investigated and implemented. Visual promotional material is an essential asset for the communication of ideas and concepts within the fashion industry today, and a high degree of creativity as well as strong technical capability are vital.

List of staff
Pro Vice Chancellor (FE/WP) Executive Dean (Kent) PA to Executive Dean Dean Associate Dean Registrar (Kent) Assistant Registrar (Rochester) Resource Manager (Kent) Dianne Taylor Laura Isaacs Francine Norris Colin Gearing Andrew Varley Jean Bryant Sharon Carter

Fashion Promotion Academic Team
Course Leader Sheelagh Wright (1.0) Year 1 Team Year one co-ordinator Kate Scully (0.4) Johannes Reponen (0.4) Pat Francis (sessional) Olle Borgar (0.5) Year 2 Team Year two co-ordinator Bianca Donnelly (0.6) Year 3 Team Dennis Maloney (0.4) Piers Atkinson (sessional) dmaloney.s1@ucreative.ac.uk patkinson.s1@ucreative.ac.uk Room 204B Room 204B ext 8675 ext 867 New Post bdonnelly@ucreative.ac.uk Room 204B Room 202 ext 8690 New Post kscully@ucreative.ac.uk jreponen@ucreative.ac.uk pfrancis@ucreative.ac.uk oborgar@ucreative.ac.uk Room 202 Room 202 Room 202 Room 202 Room 204B ext 8633 ext 8633 ext 8633 ext 8633 ext 8652 swright@ucreative.ac.uk Room 204B ext 8669

Marketing Lectures Sophia Plessas (0.4) Cale Wolf (0.2) splessas@ucreative.ac.uk cwolf@ucreative.ac.uk Room 204B Room 202 ext 8752 ext 8690

uk Room L401 ext 8716 rmunn@ucreative.ac. Research.5) Ann Reimers (1.ac.ac. Fred Butler Prop styling.uk sstacey@ucreative. Styling. Marketing.ac. Course Development and Administrative Duties. Most academics work fractional hours – time has been indicated after each academic: 0.uk Room L403 Ext 8665 Fashion Academics are normally contracted on 50% of their time allocated to Teaching and 50% allocated to their Academic.uk Room L401 ext 8717 jearl@ucreative.2 = 1 day a week.uk Room 217 mejones@ucreative.ac.Cultural Studies Michelle Jones (0.s1@ucreative.ac. Luke Lobley Art Direction. .5) Technician Robbie Munn Faculty Officer Janice Earl Administrator Alison Quinn Fashion Subject Librarian Georgia Wyver gwyver@ucreative. James Van Dykes Styling. 0.0) Sarah Stacey (0.) VISITING FASHION TEAM Maia Adams Lisa Wilkins Karen Millen Kim Howells Journalism.ac. Fashion Business.uk areimers@ucreative.ac.4 = 2 days a week etc. Geraldine SwaineMoving Image.6) Sarah Lloyd (0.uk Library ext 8734 aquinn3@ucreative.uk slloyd.

MARKETING AND BRANDING FASHION PROMOTION REFLECTION I (OPTION 1) RESEARCH METHODOLOGIES INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE (OPTION 2) INTERNATIONAL PLACEMENT (OPTION 3) LIFESTYLE COMMUNICATION DISSERTATION FASHION PROMOTION FASHION PROMOTION REFLECTION II 30 15 15 15 30 15 15 60 60 30 30 45 15 SEMESTER 2 RFPR2006 RFPR2007 TBC RFPR2008 RFPR2009 STAGE 3 SEMESTER 1 RFPR3012 RINS3002 SEMESTER 2 RFPR3003 RFPR3004 .Course Structure COURSE UNIT CODE UNIT TITLE CREDIT BA (Hons) FASHION PROMOTION STAGE 1 SEMESTER 1 RFPR1001 RFAS1001 RFPR RFAS1002 RFPR1004 RFPR1005 RFAS1003 RFPR1006 RFPR1007 STAGE 2 SEMESTER 1 FASHION AWARENESS FASHION HISTORIES STYLE: PAST PRESENT & FUTURE FASHION THEORIES NICHE BRANDS PROMOTION COMPANY ID AND PR PLACEMENT PUBLICATIONS PUBLICATIONS WITH INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 15 15 30 15 15 15 15 15 15 SEMESTER 2 RFPR2001 TBC RFPR2002 RFPR2003 RFPR2004 CREATIVE STYLING MODERNISM AND POSTMODERNISM CREATIVE THINKING (OPTION 1) CREATIVE THINKING WITH INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (OPTION 2) PLACEMENT (OPTION 3) PR.

The balance of creativity. The course is designed to develop the individual’s skills. technical innovation and financial practicalities is also addressed within the mastering of all the elements inherent to developing promotional strategies. . High Street. Students can also progress as qualified specialists in fashion-related fields and a small number of students go on to start up their own companies. colour. Designer Level to Independent Label. managing the critical path of innovative promotional activities from the initial design concept through to practical production outcome. These placement study options give students the opportunity to work in a live industrial environment. original intellectual concept. The team have fostered a wide-ranging network of professional industrial links ensuring that the syllabus is constantly updated to support the development of graduates who are able to function professionally in multi-skilled environments. The course offers study opportunities for students from widening participation. market. market position and visual merchandising. technical specifications. The course team offers specialist experience in supporting students with diverse entry profiles of different ages. design. Students progress to careers in promotional roles on many market levels from Discount/Price Point. The International Studies option gives students the opportunity to combine their specialist Fashion Promotion studies with an international focus . Aims and Outcomes Philosophy of the Course This course aims to provide a focused learning environment where students are able to foster an intellectual individual and innovative approach allied to skill based developments with craft and technological influences. ideas. The combination of all these techniques. ethnic groups and mature students. Niche. ethical considerations and lifestyle demographics. Students interested in teaching can progress onto a PGCHE teaching course to become qualified to teach at schools or colleges. Team building. success of the overall brand image. through Volume.increasing student’s potential to work in multilingual environments. A variety of studio practices underscore concepts. contrasting educational and working backgrounds. Careers also cover a diverse range of promotional areas in style from the fashion business through to the world of music. different nationalities and cultures. The study programme is designed for creators of promotional concepts which support and promote the visual identity of a brand through the creation of strategies and activities which enhance the coherence and commercial. There is no doubt that it is becoming increasingly important to conduct business matters in languages other than our own and consequently students are encouraged to experience second language working practice whilst completing an International Exchange in semester four with one of our International Partners. The cultural and literary underpinning required to create such strategies is combined with analysis and research into trend. research. Students have the opportunity to take a work placement option in year one and a further work placement option in year two which can be abroad. building personal confidence and maturity in their subject area of fashion/style promotion. surface. concepts and technological innovations will communicate the spirit of a designers’ concept. Emphasis is placed on preparing students for work. and craft based skills working alongside technology and CAD. global economy. product adjacencies. interpersonal skills and the relationship between each role within the industry demonstrate to the student an understanding of the practicalities for future employment. form. welcoming applicants from diverse backgrounds and responding to an increasing demand for flexibility within the culture of lifelong learning.Course Philosophy.

Understanding. The validated aims. they have been revised with appropriate additions made in order to prepare students for professional and creative practice and life long learning Course Learning Outcomes Learning Outcomes describe the characteristics and context of learning against which specific assessment criteria can be delivered. They are aligned in order to develop units of study and assign credit for achievement of learning at an appropriate level. all units have been revised to reflect Knowledge.Southern England Consortium for Credit Accumulation and Transfer). Attributes and Skills. Whilst they remain relevant to the period since last review. Learning outcomes must also be “achievable”. These have been meshed to generic level descriptors (SEEC . align them more effectively. it prepares its students for careers in fashion and the related industries. These have been revised and updated in the light of review. and articulate the knowledge. “understand” and “be able to do on successful completion of a unit”. and provide evidence that a student has met the aims of the unit. This continues to be inherent and integral to the philosophy and subject of fashion at Rochester. Aims form part of the integral mapping of the student learning experience. objectives and assessment criteria of the course have been delivered and achieved. developing a broad range of skills and specialist experience resulting in personal and professional development to degree standard. Through continual practice. The learning outcomes echo the revisions to the aims. understanding attributes and skills that those on an honours degree course should be able to demonstrate. Aims relate to the stage learning outcome and assessment criteria and reflect the National Qualification Framework and Benchmark Statement for Art and Design (NFHEQ).Course Aims The course aims describe the intentions of the course. . originally produced in 2002. “observable” and “measurable” in relationship to the intended assessment criteria. This approach is posited on the belief that learning outcomes should explicitly describe what a student will “know”.

Stage 1 FASHION PROMOTION UNITS
STAGE ONE DESCRIPTION (CERTIFICATE) Fashion Promotion The first year provides an opportunity to explore, experiment and evaluate a range of promotional activities. Projects in Styling, Journalism, PR, Branding & Marketing, Music, Art Direction, Event Management and optional Work Placement are each covered in the first year. Work at this level will enable students to have a sound broad knowledge base of the underlying concepts and principles associated with fashion promotions. Course Structure There are five 15 credits and one 30 credit main study units in stage one (refer to Stage One Diagram Overview) which are all project based. Each project aims to develop an ability to conduct basic investigation, evaluate, organise and present creative ideas and solutions, in both practical and theoretical areas. Cultural Studies Cultural Studies (CS) introduces students to the historical and research aspect of promotions and increases your awareness of how promotional activities plunder the past and the recent past for inspiration, style and methodology. The cultural studies units overlap components within promotional ideas such as Cultural Icons where students investigate and analyse icons further expanding your understanding of cultural iconography and imagery within promotion. The theory units support the student in exploring practical methodologies and theoretical processes through lectures and seminars. The two 15 credit historical and cultural studies units run alongside the main fashion promotion study units, throughout the first year. Research Visits International field trips are organised to take place in the first year these normally are: New York, Paris and Barcelona. Fashion trails to London take place throughout the course to support market knowledge in volume, niche and designer levels. The fashion trails provides an understanding of fashion retail, concept stores and visual merchandising. Current museum exhibitions will also be incorporated into the fashion trails. The personal development planning PDP programme is integrated into all stage one units through the PDP aims and learning outcomes (see Stage One Unit Descriptors).

STAGE ONE DIAGRAM

ST STA AG GE EO ON NE E D Dia ia gra gra m mO Ov ve ervi rvie ew w
BA BA ((H HO ON NSS)) FA FASSH HIO ION N P PRO ROM MO OT TIO ION N

S SE EM ME ES ST TER ER 1 1

S SE EM M ES EST T ER ER 2 2

ST STA AG GE E1 1 7 7U Un ni its ts 6 6xx 1 15 5C Cre red di ittss 1 1xx 3 30 0C Cre red di ittss Sta Stagge e1 1= =1 12 20 0 cre cred di its ts

C CO OR RE E O OP PT TIIO ON NSS

Stage 1 Unit Descriptors

Unit Title Unit Code Course Location Level & Credit When taught Duration Learning hours

Fashion Awareness FPR1001 All BA (Hons) Fashion courses Rochester Level 1, 15 credits Semester 1 Weeks 1-5 5 weeks 150

Content This unit is core to all courses and forms the induction elements to the fashion school. This first introductory unit will focus on two areas. The first is to work using a learning journal as a means of documenting your learning journey, your role within the team and developing your initial research ideas into solutions for a professional power point presentation. The second is the process that is completed as a group task and its success relies on effective management and communication skills. This first unit begins the process of investigation and analysis into areas of style; trends, moods and concepts, which are the development of the past and present to initiate the future themes. Student groups will be given a selected fashion & lifestyle Icon to research and present

Also, included within this first unit, all students will be inducted into the use of the computer as a tool for presentation.
Aims 1. To develop awareness of the changing nature of fashion and specific social, economic, technical or environmental changes that will affect the trend direction, colour, fabric and styling. 2. To introduce the students to creative innovation in relation to layout, graphics and imagery combined with the use of computer technology. 3. To develop communication and management skills. PDP Aims General PDP aim: To identify and complete personal, educational and career development plans (PDP). 1. To develop personal skills by understanding own learning style. Learning Outcomes Students who complete this unit should demonstrate: 1. An understanding of the importance of colour, texture and shape in fashion and an ability to review changes in fashion trend & styling through applications of various research methods. 2. An understanding of the importance of professional presentation. 3. An ability to work within a team. PDP Learning Outcomes

441 STE Handbag Chic: Smith 391.413FRI Modern Menswear: Hywel Davies 391. Teaching and Learning Methods Project briefing.413BOS Dr Martens: Martin Roache 391.092 CHA The Corset: Valerie Steel 391.441 SMI Bags: 391.1ROE Sex and Suits: Anne Hollander 391.09HOL MINI: The Design Icon Of A Generation: 629.413VIV Manolo Blahnik: Colin McDowell 391. Assessment Requirement Learning Journal (Individual 50%) Professional Presentation (Group work 50%) Assessment Criteria Creativity & Innovation Critical Analysis & Evaluation Interpersonal & Social Skills Critical Analysis & Evaluation PDP LO LO1.42 SUM Support and Seduction: Beatrice Fontanel 391. Tutorial support throughout.1CIC Gentleman: 391. 09 BRU th Leather Jackets 20 Century Style: Hamlyn 391. Stoles and Scarves: Alice Mackell 391.1 DAV The New English Dandy: Alice Cicolini 391. LO2 & LO3 Reference Material T Shirt Book: Charlotte Brunel Assouline 391. An ability to analyse own learning style. critique and critique de-briefing.235KAT .413ROA The Sneaker Book: 391.09 SUL The Jeans Book: Ruven Feder & J M Glasman 391.TAN The Blue Jean: Alice Harris 391. 42SHE Bound to Please: Summers 391.42 FON Bag a Lexicon of Style: Valerie Steele 391.4833KOS Mobile and Wireless Communication 621.041MAC The Trench Book: Nick Foulkes 391.09 FER Motorcycle Jackets: 391.09FOU The True Story Of The Little Black Dress & Nine Other Favourites:391.413 VAN The Story of Nike: 391.413MCD Roger Vivier: 391.42 STE Corsets: A Visual History: RL Shep 391.09 BAM Black Leather Jacket Mick Ferren 391.SMI Chanel Collections: 391.38456GOW Magic in the Air: Mobile Communication: 302.413BLA Art of the Shoe: 391.09 FIN Print in Fashion: Marnie Fogg 391.09HAR Jeans: James Sullivan 391.1. lectures and demonstrations followed by part-directed and self-directed use of workshops.09 FED Denim: Iain Finlayson 301.441 Shoes: Colin McDowell 391.41BAS Shawls.2222SET Mobile Phone In Action: 303.09 FOG The Scarf: Andrew Baseman 391.441 BAG Carried Away: 391.092CHA Chanel & Her World: 391.

402 BEL 371. Drapers. Viewpoint. 2004 How fashion works Blackwell Science 687 WAD PERIODICALS Bloom. FREEMAN.. S. E.L. D. G. Wear Global TREND BOOKS Trend Union. A. Dressing. Pantone View Colour Planner . 2003 2008 2009 2005 Working in the arts: communication and time management Learning team skills The study skills handbook Inspiring writing in art and design Employability skills BBC2 VIDEO 2166 Prentice Hall Palgrave Macmillan Intellect Business Education 658.. Textile View. H. International Textiles.042 FRA 331.0904 MUL world history of 20th century fashion SEIVEWRIGHT.0112 BRA The meaning of Viking 391 FRE sunglasses MULLER. F. Collezioni Trends. FRANCIS.425 COT 808. COTTRELL. S. Provider. P. Textile Report. Fashion forecasting 2 ed Fairchild 687. Promostyl.BRANNON. 2007 Research and design AVA Academia 687 SEI WADDELL. 2005 2008 nd 2003 BELL. HIND. 2008 Fashion game book: a Assouline 391.114 HIN .

This unit will also aim to introduce fashion trends to encourage creativity in generating innovative ideas. successful outcome. as well as raising individual perceptions involved in visual communication. for instance.Unit Title Unit Code Course Location Level & Credit When taught Duration Learning hours CONTENT Style: Past Present & Future BA (Hons) Fashion Promotion Rochester Level 1. to note the power of the styling within these images and also to reflect on the power of the titles. which is informed about all things and uses whatever is pertinent to the promotional activity. ethical and environmental trends. The background music to the last fifty years scores have provided visuals and events. 30 credits Semester 1 Weeks 6-15 10 weeks 300 hours The relationship between fashion and music underpins much of the visual reference library which any stylist or journalist will access for communication or inspiration. which may be new to the student will open up a more professional attitude. however without knowledge and in depth understanding of the company. which is further supported by an understanding of marketing. introducing the written word into the visual presentation and researching into music genres. Style tribes from Goth to glam and artists from Prince to Madonna understand the strength and power of visual presentation versus any vocal talent they may or may not possess. There is no short cut to the understanding of the iconography of style and there is no substitute for thorough investigation of the task at hand in relation to both the past and the present. there will be no valid reason to either increase business or even work on a concept. lyrics and descriptive words surrounding music. This unit enables students to understand the relationship between promotional visuals and words as tools and benchmarks across the creative worlds of style and music. client and product. lifestyle. . The trends will relate directly to the product and market both as style trends and as business trends. The combination of research needed for this project offers the opportunity to investigate how creativity and understanding of the fashion market research and brand awareness can add up to a strong. Style & music research that will include primary and secondary visual and written material such as photography and observations plus found imagery and information relating to the music icon. regardless of personal preferences. to analyse why some have lasted as iconic references. demographics and socio economic. Research will play a crucial role in developing both analytical skills and the creative “reading” of trends. Creating images within a short time span. The influence on street styles will be examined through tribes and cults and the trickle up or down effects on designer or high street fashion. The creative side of promotional activity is exciting and stimulating. TASK A Reflective Research Fashion Promotion in any skill area is underpinned by research and knowledge. market research. This unit is designed to research music and style images.

synthesizing and evaluating in order to generate creative ideas. where the trends will lead products during the coming months and years e. The ppromotional material covering visuals and text should include creative and appropriate graphic solutions as well as relevant written material. To investigate. To develop an understanding of the relationship of promotional visuals and words. collecting ideas and information from a range of sources in order to project ideas for future development. 5. Consumer Profile (Who is it aimed at?) Market Positioning (Who are competitors and why?) Marketing Strategy (How is it going to be marketed?) Cultural analysis will inform future positioning. 4. development and management of the styling shoot and presentation. A marketing plan will be produced which will cover marketing positioning and consumer analysis. An ability to study independently. To generate creative ideas through synthesizing acquired knowledge. 6. This is preparation for a styled shoot using appropriate media for a printed or digital publication. An ability to interpret appropriate historical and cultural music genre into a contemporary context. 3. Trends will be iinvestigated across the board through the analysis of the cultural zeitgeist. TASK B Promotional Launch The research will be interpreted and developed into an outcome that might include: music based fashion feature or music advertisement. 2.g. Formative reviews will support the time management of the learning process. To develop a range of time management skills. Teaching and Learning Methods The culture of music and style will be demonstrated through presentations and lectures. Research will inform how the market is evolving. 3. An ability to define the context of style and music in a research book.The Reflective learning journal will document the learning journey through the project and record the process. or music/fashion event promo. manages own workloads and meet deadlines. 7. In conjunction with open discussion forums explaining styling and the use of words in fashion promotions. A reflective summary will be essential element to the unit. set goals. An ability to use visuals to communicate effectively in appropriate format. An ability to apply relevant knowledge and information by selecting. Assessment Requirement Reflective Research 50% =15 credits Promotional Launch 50% =15 credits (Task A) (Task B) Reflective journal Promotional material covering visuals and text . to be able to manage own workloads and meet deadlines Learning outcomes Students who successfully complete this component should be able to demonstrate 1. These will be followed by one to one tutorials. Ability to research past and present. 4. An ability to research and analyze style and marketing trends in relation to a specific market level. 6. To understand the construction of a contemporary visual interpretation of contextualized research. analyse and utilise research To learn to contextualize and annotate research. 7. 2. 5. Aims 1. To develop an understanding of the specific market levels.

8 COO 741.LO7 LO4. BRITISH DESIGN & ART DIRECTION WOLBER. Application of technical and professional Application of technical and professional skills skills LO1 . S. C. Trends Collezioni.LO6. Linking research to the final outcome. CLERK. learning and time management Research Thorough analysis of style icon.L (ed) GEORGINA HOWELL RENARD.S SCHREINER. LO2. View on Colour. consumer analysis Styled shoot for appropriate media and music genre Cultural analysis to inform future positioning Assessment Criteria Understanding through application of Knowledge of contexts. International Textiles. REISS.267 REI KING. COOPER. P. 2001 2002 2000 The look: adventures in pop and rock fashion Madonnastyle Thirty frames per second . Drapers Record. M LEICHER.D 2003 2004 2005 1998 741. Textile View. E. Jeunes Createurs. W. Purple.Summary Analysing personal methods of working. M. LO3. TUMMINELLO.13 ART 2009 2008 2008 1975 2006 Uncovering fashion: fashion communication across the media Bands on the road The Measure In Vogue The last magazine Fairchild Thames & Hudson LCF Conde Nast Rizzoli Periodicals Another magazine.LO5. Abrams Frieze From Here To Fame Thomson / Delmar Rotovision 391. knowledge technologies and processes. Marketing plan covering marketing positioning. Textile Report. Citizen K. Sport & Street Collezioni. Wallpaper. Self Service. V. Tank.LO7 Reference Material GORMAN. Dazed & Confused.6092 SAV 780. Sportswear International.78 GOR 784.61 CLE 780. concepts. musical genre and appropriate communication.58 TUM 659. Zoom on Fashion Trends Websites . W. Fashion Trends. ID.the visionary art of the music video Designed by Peter Saville Hip hop files : photographs 1979 1984 Exploring storyboarding The art direction book Sanctuary Omnibus Press Harry N.M CLARKE.

blogs.coolhunting.Fashion related: www.vogue.designassembly.com/ www.wgsn.cscout.com/ www.com http://runway.uk/ www.businessoffashion.designboom.com/ www.org/ www.dezeen.trendwatching.drapersonline.jcreport.style.com/ www.demos.co.com/ www.com/ Trend related www.nytimes.com www.com/ www.com/ www.com/blog/ www.com/ Design related: www.itsnicethat.com/eng/ .

These challenges will be considered through both the evolution of the other ‘fashion world cities’ of Milan. it is necessary to explore the designs within their cultural. However. Alongside the analysis of haute couture. It has to learn from past techniques and aesthetics and understand how to utilise these sources within a new environment and atmosphere. current and future fashion A2 . as well as looking at the industrial side of clothing manufacture and distribution. 15 credits Semester one-Weeks 1-15 15 weeks 150 26-05-08 Content Sartorial fashion quotes itself relentlessly as it looks back and cites from previous decades and centuries. construction. New York and Tokyo and the rise and development of the mass market and the ensuing fragmentation of fashion. Students will gain an understanding in the methodology of fashion research for both the historical and the recent past. makers and stylists often glance towards fashion’s past to inspire their creativity. Since designers. the unit will debate the challenge to the dictatorial nature of Paris posed by post-war cultural and industrial developments. To develop an awareness of research methodologies and understanding of formal academic writing skills that investigate and evaluate past. cinema. A1 To provide a clear factual grounding in fashion history within its cultural and socioeconomic context and establish a foundation for its study. The focus will be placed on ‘high’ fashion and the establishment and negotiation of Paris as the world’s fashion capital. London. its styling and branding cannot merely be based upon a fleeting glance at that history. based on a series of lectures. inventive and original practice. interpretation and discussion throughout the course. the knowledge of previous styles and understanding of cultural trends provides both points of reference and friction in relation to the development of new clothes. seminars and tutorials is to indicate how fashion relates to other art forms. Ideally it should follow on in an informed spirit rather than merely in appearance and lead to a progressive. In order to understand and question what can be learnt from past trends and innovations.Unit Title Unit Code Course Location Level & Credit When taught Duration Learning hours Date first approved Date of this version Fashion Histories tbc BA ( Hons) Fashion Design Rochester Level 1. Aims This unit. photography. trends and their promotion. innovation. seminars and tutorials. to develop a broad understanding of the culture of fashion. accessories. will introduce the key histories and cultural theories within the development of the fashion industry to establish a foundation for its evaluation and discussion in both its written and oral form. for example. fashion design. architecture. The unit provides an insight into fashion history and its most famous designers and creators. One aim of this series of lectures. theatre as well as the traditional ‘fine arts’ such as painting. aesthetic and socio-political context.

Teaching and learning methods An understanding of the historical perception of sartorial fashion in relation to cultural interpretation will be provided by a weekly lecture and seminar programme. and clear guidelines on essay writing and research sources. The production of the essay and presentation will be supported by academic tutorials and study skills support in academic research. Learning outcomes Students who complete this unit should demonstrate: LO1 An understanding of the history of the Western fashion industry and the links between fashion and other cultural forms. Assessment de-briefing and published feedback support the learning strategy. LO2 An ability to apply research techniques through the collation. writing and presentation .000 words) and research presentation Assessment criteria Knowledge of: Fundamental contextual and theoretical issues and critical concepts and a widening appreciation of historical and contemporary practice (LO1) Understanding through: Demonstrating relevant knowledge through undertaking relevant research (LO1) (LO2) The ability to present ideas and information from a variety of sources in an effective manner (LO2) (LO3) Application of technical and professional skills through: The ability to structure a logical piece of written work that develops clear aims and objectives to effective conclusions (LO2) Skills in the use of written and oral forms of communication and understanding of academic conventions effectively demonstrated (LO2)(LO3). This is supported by a project pack which includes handouts and recommended reading for all lectures. An ability to explore and investigate methods of research. Due to the forward looking nature of this unit updated references will be available in the unit handbook and will comprise up to the minute on-line and media sources. PDP learning outcomes 1.500-2. The following therefore indicates core and definitive texts: . Assessment requirement Essay (1. organisation and evaluation of reference material and to produce a structured essay that respects the academic conventions of research and presentation LO3 The capacity to explore the development of sartorial fashion in its social and cultural context and to organise this material into a formal presentation.A3 To develop verbal presentation and communication skills in a formal academic setting PDP aims 1.available through a taught program and one-to-one tutorials. To develop a range of skills in research methodology.

Berg. Reconstructing Italian Fashion: America and the Development of the Italian Fashion Industry. W. (Palgrave MacMillan. 2003). 2004) Students are also encouraged to take a regular look at academic journals and magazines such as: Fashion Theory. 2000). Cottrell. 2004). Creative Review. Vinken.1994). Another Magazine. Presentation skills for students (Palgrave MacMillan. N. (Berg. 1985). Creative Review. Reconstructing Italian Fashion: America and the Development of the Italian Fashion Industry. Fashion Zeitgeist: Trends and Cycles in the Fashion System. J. Recommended reading Sebag-Montefiore. Purple Fashion.. (Oxford: Berg. Wilson.Essential reading Breward. N. Fashion Zeitgeist: Trends and Cycles in the Fashion System. Wilson. Vinken. Troy. (London: Virago. White. C. Paris Fashion. (Berg. 2004) Adorned in Dreams: Fashion and Modernity. W. Breward. (Princeton University Press. 2000). V. Van Emden. D. (MIT Press. Interview. (Oxford. Wallpaper. . H. Lipovetsky. Costume. 2006) The Study Skills Handbook. E. B. Sight and Sound. White. Costume. Also to be aware of the press cutting files and web search engines for relevant articles on designers or themes. 2003) The Empire of Fashion: Dressing Modern Democracy. 1992). 1988) Couture Culture: A Study in Modern Art and Fashion. Frieze. E. Interview. Draper's Record. Kawamura. Dazed and Confused. (Chapmans Publishers Ltd. The Japanese Revolution in Paris Fashion. S. Fashion’s World Cities. Dazed and Confused. (Oxford/New York. Y. Students are also encouraged to take a regular look at academic journals and magazines such as: Fashion Theory. & Gilbert. 2004) Adorned in Dreams: Fashion and Modernity. (Oxford University Press. Draper's Record. Wallpaper. Purple Fashion. (Oxford. Another Magazine. Steele. Sight and Sound. (Oxford/New York: Berg. Frieze. N. C. 2004) Kings on the Catwalk. Also to be aware of the press cutting files and web search engines for relevant articles on designers or themes. Fashioning London: Clothing and the Modern Metropolis. G. B. 1985). (London: Virago.

K. Whistles. Market research. Roles will play an important part in this unit with primary tasks included within each role and the course specific relationship to these tasks and roles pointing out course differentials With the fashion business changing dramatically in recent years. this area was traditionally known as middle. when the market is flat or in recession. production and promotion to distinguish it from the lower price and higher volume sector of the fashion market. Aims 1. diffusion or bridge market. To understand every component in the promotion of the brand PDP Aims 1. Jigsaw or Karen Millen. In recent years however this area of activity has increasingly developed a personal signature and independent approach to fashion thus positioning it as a new fashion area. also diffusion designer brands such as DKNY or D&G and designers connected with high street retailers such as Debenhams. Task B Brand Strategy . does it buck the trend? The answers to all these questions can be found by research and investigation to pin-point the differences within the successful operations. positioning it between high street and designer. To develop skills in organisation and written communication for career planning. who have far fewer outlets than the “mass brands”. Hobbs. the level is now moved to those brands and labels which aspire to be diverse both in product and price alongside quality. 15 credits Semester 2 Weeks 16-20 5 weeks 150 Content Having examined the volume and high street aspect of fashion with brands from both the UK and Europe. will underpin the understanding of this market sector and the specifics in fabric.Bennett. where and how the successful niche brand has arrived at this position. trousers and soft tailoring (this reflects the traditional Haute Couture methodology of Flou or soft sewing as a separate discipline in the “handling” of the garment). Task A Analysis of Product Differentials Why does one design brand work so well? What separates it from its’ rivals and why. The research in this unit is to discover what. for example Reiss. The process of product development is now revisited through this new level with the development of the soft sewing techniques into dresses. construction and design.Unit Title Unit Code Course Location Level & Credit When taught Duration Learning hours Date of this version Niche Brands Promotion RFPR1004 BA (Hons) Fashion Promotion Rochester Level 1. To research and analyse objectively 2. To understand a brand in depth and its market position 3. including retail reports. At this higher level the product must contain differential elements in product. L. finish.

WADDELL. G. 2002 Silent selling : best practices and effective strategies in visual merchandising 2005 The new boutique : fashion and design 2005 Fashion forecasting 2nd ed 2005 Fashion: from concept to consumer 2004 Market research in practice : a guide to the basics 2001 Mastering fashion buying and merchandising management 2004 Consumer behavior : in fashion 2003 Fashion icon : the power and influence of graphic design 2003 Retail desire : design. J. M.15 BEL LO1 Portfolio 75% BINGHAM. & D. An awareness of career opportunities within the fashion industry. BRANNON. M. FRINGS. Assessment Requirement Research 25% Assessment Criteria Self Management & Professional Knowledge & Understanding Competence Creativity and Innovation LO2 & LO3 Reference Material BELL. TOTH. TUCKER. PDP Learning Outcomes 1. display and visual merchandising 2004 How fashion works : couture. N. G. Teaching and Learning Methods Lectures and discussion groups on the niche market will take place throughout the unit. HAGUE. E.21 BIN 687. etc 3. J. Lectures on PR. T.0688 SOL 741. Students will gain insight into niche brands through shop research planned during tutorials and workshops.The task for the student within this unit is to decide on a strategy which they feel is in keeping with the niche market they have selected and then to develop this brand further.15 TUC 687 WAD .L. Merrell Fairchild Prentice Hall Kogan Page Macmillan Prentice Hall Rockport Rotovision Blackwell 725. JACKSON.83 HAG 658. An ability to de-personalise and analyse investigation 2. An ability to “get under the skin” of a brand and investigate methods of creative branding. P. ready-to-wear.6391 TOT 659. Learning Outcomes Students who successfully complete this unit should be able to demonstrate 1.0112 BRA 687 FRI 658. An ability to research visual merchandising. niche brand promotion and advertising will help to develop new areas of understanding for students during this unit and offer further evidence of the interrelationship between all areas of promotional activity. and mass production Fairchild 659. store lay-out. SHAW SOLOMON.8 JAC 687.

The team strategy will be developed through the promotional member’s emphasis on complete understanding of market position and the handwriting and signature of the brand being developed. Working in conjunction with each member of the team. Mixed course teams are assigned to the project whilst individuals are responsible for tasks appropriate to their specialist study. style. Students will gain further specialist knowledge through analysis of specific UK markets and researching the structure and organisation within a fashion company. The final presentation will demonstrate team building and single company vision as well as the ability to present a concept in a professional and thorough manner. To develop an ability to communicate with team members and plan strategies 3. Aims 1. 3. brand identity and marketing. Learning Outcomes Students who successfully complete this unit should be able to demonstrate 1. Task A Company Profile Once again research and analysis begins the student’s journey towards a successful outcome. From the initial ticket or invitation through to the event itself. branding and marketing for a particular outcome. To develop skills in negotiation when working in a team environment.Unit Title Unit Code Course Location Level & Credit When taught Duration Learning hours Company ID & PR (Semester 2 Option 1) RFPR1005 BA (Hons) Fashion Promotion Rochester Level 1. 15 credits Semester 2 Weeks 21-25 5 weeks 150 Content This project aims to develop an understanding of UK fashion. students will have the opportunity to create a total package of PR management. Task B Public Relations Event management and PR will be the key to the success of the outcome within this unit. fabrics and production methods appropriate to their specific market level and customer attitude. An ability to develop IT skills. An ability to practice working in a team and take responsibility for own learning. the costing and production of the product plays a vital role within the promotional planning. students will be expected to identify design concepts. To further develop IT skills PDP Aims 1. An ability to interpret the Company ID and PR concept 2. culture and consumer behaviour through profile. This unit increases the students’ knowledge of the level of research and understanding necessary to underpin the product to enable all team members to arrive at a successful outcome. Even within promotion. They will also need to investigate trends. To build a Company ID and PR campaign 2. whatever their specific role within the organisation might be. .

to enter into collaboration. workshops and discussion groups will involve both visiting specialists and staff. to negotiate and to exercise leadership skills. to co-operate. 200 Presentation skills for students 4 WHEELER.827 WHE . 200 Beyond traditional marketing : innovations in marketing practice 5 LEVINE.402 BEL Wiley 658. A.8 KAS 659. A. Futuretext 658. 199 Do your own market research 8 KASHANI. K.7 BAK Prentice Hall 658. 200 Designing brand identity 6 AHONEN. P. Students will also be offered specialist support on styling.83 HAG Wiley McGraw-Hill Batsford Palgrave Wiley 658.5 VAN 658. 200 Brands laid bare : using market research for evidence-based brand management 5 HAGUE. K. Tutorials will ensure the groups are functioning and offer open forums for communication and time management planning. 199 Fashion marketing and PR 8 VAN EMDEN. Lectures. T. M. An ability to interact effectively within a group. J.H..PDP Learning Outcomes 1. M.827 FOR Kogan Page 658. E. 200 Guerrilla PR wired 5 COSTANTINO. Teaching and Learning Methods The emphasis throughout this unit is on both PR and event management alongside further IT development. Assessment Requirement Portfolio 75% Information & IT Application Interpersonal & Social Skills LO2 & LO3 Reference Material 200 Communities dominate brands : business and marketing challenges for the 21st 5 century BAKER.8 AHO Research 25% Assessment Criteria Knowledge & Understanding LO1 Wiley 651. photography and CAD for this unit. 200 Learning team skills 3 FORD. 200 Working communication 2 BELL.111 LEV 687 COS 808.

written and verbal communication. To provide evidence of work experience in the form of a written report. Aims 1. To develop good communication skills through oral. 3. 3. which is recorded on video for student reflection. educational and career development plans (PDP). PDP Learning Outcomes 1. To experience working within industry and to develop a greater knowledge of career opportunities. Staff support whilst students are on placement via e-mail and visits to some companies. Study skills support to assist with communication and presentation. The CAD workshop will be available for preparation of the PowerPoint presentation. 2. An increasing awareness of the career opportunities within the fashion industry.To develop skills in negotiation when working in a team environment. An ability to interact effectively within a group. visual and written presentations and to communicate effectively through the use of computer aided design (CAD). The student will select a trial portfolio career direction for their 3-5 week placement. On completion of the placement the student will be required to prepare a report and a verbal presentation documenting and evaluating their experience. lectures and seminars in preparation for the work placement and to assist with reporting of the experience. Teaching and Learning Methods Project briefing.Unit Title Unit Code Course Location Level & Credit When taught Duration Learning hours Placement (Semester 2 Option 2) RFAS1003 All BA (Hons) Fashion courses Rochester Level 1. Assessment Requirement . to negotiate and to exercise leadership skills. to enter into collaboration. 1. Prior to the placement the unit will require the student to research relevant companies. to co-operate. An understanding of professional skills. prepare a CV and apply for work. Learning Outcomes Students who complete this unit should demonstrate: 1. This could be the student’s intended career destination or an opportunity to experience various companies to broaden the student’s career portfolio. PDP Aims General PDP aim: To identify and complete personal. 15 credits Semester 2 Weeks 21-25 5 weeks 150 Content Industrial experience provides the student with experience of a live business environment and the opportunity to start to develop professional skills. The ability to collate and present information and data in the form of visual. 2.

Little Black Book. VERITY. J.Written report 75% Verbal report 25% Assessment Criteria Information & IT Application Self Management & Professional Competence Communication & Presentation Interpersonal and Social Skills LO3 Reference Material LO1 & LO2 Essential BILLINGHAM. SHARP. CULLEN. Fashion Monitor. 2003 Giving presentations OUP On Order CC4 On Order CC3 SIAD 2004 Creative CV guide 2005 Letter writing Chambers 2002 Career opportunities in the fashion Checkmark industry DIRECTORIES File FX. M. VOGT. LeBook London PERIODICALS Drapers Recommended GRANGER. MIDDLETON. 2004 The fashion intern 2005 High impact CVs 2002 A guide to working in fashion 2004 Succeeding at interviews : give great answers and ask the right questions Fairchild On Order Infinite Ideas CC4 Heinemann How To Books CC3 CC4 . COLE. K. G. P. J. J. J.

To further develop students critical and analytical skills.Unit Title Unit Code Course Location Level & Credit When taught Duration Learning hours Publications (Semester 2 Option 3) RFPR1006 BA (Hons) Fashion Promotion Rochester Level 1. The written word will be combined with strong visuals to further develop students’ computer skills. This unit will complete the fashion circle by focusing on the highest level of designer fashion through the catwalk and the “big names” and key players of the International fashion circuit. 2. In this unit students will both investigate publications and their impact on the dissemination of fashion information and also the written word in newsprint. the styles vary a great deal across both the publication and the presentation of the written element within the magazine. glossy magazines and niche publications. write to a set word count. students will discover and analyse the world of magazines. from Vogue Nippon to Vogue US and from Another Magazine to Wonderland. supplement. and the written word in particular. 15 credits Semester 2 Weeks 26-30 5 weeks 150 Content Journalism generally. The first task will be to research and develop an understanding of these differentials and to select a paper for the first task. To develop a range of personal skills to become reflective in own work. play a key role within the Promotional Business. how it balances its’ content and what the style philosophy is behind the publication. The unit is designed to cover the widest possible options of journalism and writing across the media at a variety of market and style levels. To undertake journalism with an understanding of the technical requirements e. section or page aims itself at a market. Hilary Alexander in The Telegraph has a totally different approach and readership to that of Lisa Armstrong in The Times. check and proof read. Task B Magazine Journalism As with newspapers.g. Balenciaga. The second task focuses on the specifics of writing for magazines and their individual style and signature approach to journalism. PDP Aims 1. Westwood. Combining this with visuals creates a signature or handwriting style for a publication at whatever market level it might be. etc. This is the chance for students to investigate the style of Prada. Task A Newspaper Journalism Writing for a newspaper is a different writing genre and is especially defined by the identity of each individual paper. The tasks will take them into the heart of publications and show them how each style magazine. From Visionaire to The Mirror. Lanvin and others who they admire or of whose work they wish to develop a deeper understanding. . To understand publication specific requirements and styles. Aims 1. 3.

An ability to analyse the content of style journalism. Additional workshops on writing styles and skills though other methodology will also be part of this unit. J. R. WRAY.9422 JOB On order 741. One to one tutorials will enable students to focus on their personal areas of both strengths and concerns.2. 2. To communicate orally in an effective manner and be able to formulate independent judgements Learning Outcomes Students who successfully complete this unit should be able to demonstrate 1. 2002 KEEBLE. Workshops on writing and the skills needed to support written work within any area of journalism from Press Release to glossy magazine will be part of this unit.65 V 778. An ability to communicate orally by organising and preparing material for a formal presentation Teaching and Learning Methods Specialist lectures on writing and journalism will be given.65 PAP Journalism 50% JOBLING. An ability to adapt their personal style to a specific publication and word count 3. A JACKSON. WATT. P. An ability to collect and critique articles and information from publications. P. GOUGHYATES. 2005 1999 2003 2001 2001 741. C.65 TAN On order 391 WAT 050 GOU 050 JAC 741. PDP Learning Outcomes 1. 2. Assessment Requirement Research 50% Assessment Criteria Technical Knowledge Critical Analysis and Evaluation LO1 & LO2 LO3 Reference Material 2005 1999 2003 2004 V Best : five years of V magazine Fashion spreads Writing for magazines 20 years of style : the world according to Paper Tank book The newspapers handbook The Penguin book of twentiethcentury fashion writing Understanding women's magazines Making sense of men’s magazines Smile i-D: fashion and style Edition 7L Berg McGraw-Hill Harper Design International Thames & Hudson Routledge Penguin Routledge Polity Press Taschen 741.65 JON . An ability to analyse information and experiences in own work to formulate independent judgements through reflective.

From Visionaire to The Mirror. Magazine Journalism As with newspapers. In this unit. section or page aims itself at a market. the styles vary a great deal across both the publication and the presentation of the written element within the magazine. Journalism This unit will complete the fashion circle by focusing on the highest level of designer fashion through the catwalk and the “big names” and key players of the International fashion circuit. The unit is designed to cover the widest possible options of journalism and writing across the media at a variety of market and style levels. Newspaper Journalism Writing for a newspaper is a different writing genre and is especially defined by the identity of each individual paper. play a key role within the Promotional Business. and the written word in particular.Unit Title Unit Code Course Location Level & Credit When taught Duration Learning hours Content Publications with International Studies (Semester 2 Option 4) RFPR1007 BA (Hons) Fashion Promotion Rochester Level 1. Westwood. • Bi-lingual International PowerPoint Part 1 – this presentation will provide the opportunity to present the initial research evidence completed by the student in preparation to the exchange/placement application. Lanvin and others who they admire or of whose work they wish to develop a deeper understanding. students will both investigate publications and their impact on the dissemination of fashion information and also the written word in newsprint. style and life style within the country of their choice will be researched and analysed and can be further developed in semester three prior to the exchange/placement visit. The International investigation and understanding of fashion. . supplement. Combining this with visuals creates a signature or handwriting style for a publication at whatever market level it might be. how it balances its’ content and what the style philosophy is behind the publication. Hilary Alexander in The Telegraph has a totally different approach and readership to that of Lisa Armstrong in The Times. The first task will be to research and develop an understanding of these differentials and to select a paper for the first task. This is the chance for students to investigate the style of Prada. from Vogue Nippon to Vogue US and from Another Magazine to Wonderland. students will discover and analyse the world of magazines. Balenciaga. The written word will be combined with strong visuals to further develop students’ computer skills. The tasks will take them into the heart of publications and show them how each style magazine. glossy magazines and niche publications. 15 credits Semester 2 Weeks 26-30 5 weeks 150 Journalism generally. The second task focuses on the specifics of writing for magazines and their individual style and signature approach to journalism International Studies Students wishing to visit an International country in semester 4 will need to start the process of preparation in year 1.

4. etc. An ability to analyse the content of style journalism. write to a word count. An ability to communicate orally by organising and preparing material for a formal presentation Teaching and Learning Methods Specialist lectures on writing and journalism will be given. To develop a range of personal skills to become reflective in own work.g. Assessment Requirement International Studies Part 1 50% Bi-lingual International PowerPoint International designers research + International exchange application portfolio Bi-lingual presentation Assessment Criteria Technical Knowledge Research Integration & Synthesis Information & IT Application LO1 & LO2 LO3 & LO4 Journalism 50% Reference Material . PDP Aims 1. integration and synthesis skills. CV and samples of student course work Aims 1. An ability to analyse information and experiences in own work to formulate independent judgements through reflective. To develop presentation and bi-lingual communication skills in order to research. 3. An ability to adapt their personal style to a specific publication and word count 3. To understand publication specific requirements and styles. To undertake journalism with an understanding of the technical requirements e. An ability to source. 2. The portfolio must contain a letter of application. An ability to collect and categorise ideas and information from International publications 4.• International exchange application portfolio.the student application for exchange or placement must be prepared and accepted by the exchange/placement provider for successful completion of this unit. To further develop students research. To communicate orally in an effective manner and be able to formulate independent judgements Learning Outcomes Students who successfully complete this unit should be able to demonstrate 1. 2. One to one tutorials will enable students to focus on their personal areas of both strengths and concerns. 2. Workshops on writing and the skills needed to support written work within any area of journalism from Press Release to glossy magazine will be part of this unit. select and evaluate research material in a edited PowerPoint presentation PDP Learning Outcomes 1. Additional workshops on writing styles and skills though other methodology will also be part of this unit. 2. check and proof read. plan and prepare for the International exchange semester abroad in semester four.

WATT. J.65 JON .65 TAN On order 391 WAT 050 GOU 050 JAC 741. R.JOBLING. A JACKSON. C. P. GOUGHYATES. P. 2005 1999 2003 2004 V Best : five years of V magazine Fashion spreads Writing for magazines 20 years of style : the world according to Paper Tank book The newspapers handbook The Penguin book of twentiethcentury fashion writing Understanding women's magazines Making sense of men’s magazines Smile i-D: fashion and style Edition 7L Berg McGraw-Hill Harper Design International Thames & Hudson Routledge Penguin Routledge Polity Press Taschen 741. 2005 1999 2003 2001 2001 741.65 PAP 2002 KEEBLE.9422 JOB On order 741.65 V 778. WRAY.

reflect or even inform them. industrial design. gestures etc. a motivating force which informs both the production and consumption of fashion.Unit Title Unit Code Course Location Level & Credit When taught Duration Learning hours Date first approved Date of this version Content Fashion Theories tbc BA(Hons) Fashion Design Rochester Level 1. seminars and tutorials will focus on a variety of ideas surrounding identity in order to deepen. broaden and complicate the basic grounding achieved in the first semester. political and aesthetic) are made to sustain fashion’s influence on culture and society. This lecture and seminar series will demonstrate that apart from the most fundamental concern of protection. A1 A2 To provide a clear. what people think they gain from wearing certain clothes and accessories and what changes (economic. This unit will focus on how these theories can be applied to fashion within both its historical and contemporary practice. ethnicity. 15 credits Semester two -Weeks 16-30 15 weeks 150 26-05-08 Fashion and dress culture plays a defining role within the formation of different individual and collective identities. Clothes are the most ‘intimate’ commodities in a consumer society. they are worn directly on the human body and define not only the physical (mobility. interior decoration. The styles in fashion are not simply plucked out of thin air by some ‘ingenious’ designer. questions of gender. sexuality. To introduce the students to techniques in the critical evaluation and textual analysis of theories relating to fashion practice. To develop understanding of the ways clothes formulate socio-cultural notions of the self. The theoretical analysis of fashion has repeatedly been concerned with explanations of why and how styles in dressing originate. postures. The weekly lectures. social. After looking – in the first semester – at the various stylistic and social changes that haute couture. initial grounding in a theoretical body of thought to stimulate research between cultural Studies and studio projects. but very much reflect and adopt styles in the fine arts. It is often the role of those working within the fashion industry to tailor these developments to both appeal to and assist in the construction of an individual’s sense of self and social identity.) but also the psychological state of a person. Aims Throughout this unit. the aim is now to explore theories that accompany these changes. the students will be confronted with theoretical approaches to the history of fashion design. decorative art and the media at large. morality. prêt-a-porter and mass market clothing underwent. social position and individual representation immediately influence the wearer’s choice of a garment or accessory – whether it is a conscious process or not. .

LO2 An understanding of the importance of critical analysis.) of fashion. LO3 The ability to produce a theoretically informed and structured essay that respects the academic conventions of research and presentation. broaden the discussion to non-western dress and provide a forum to discuss ideas about fashion in a different language. and theoretical texts for discussion within each of the seminars.500-2. The production of the essay will be supported by bookable academic and study skills tutorials. To develop a range of written communication and object and visual analysis skills. Teaching and learning methods The lecture and seminar programme will provide a critical assessment of clothing the human body and illustrate the various interpretations (psychological.000 words) & Seminar / Object Analysis Documentation 100% (LO1/2/3) Assessment criteria Knowledge of: fundamental contextual and theoretical issues and critical concepts and a widening appreciation of historical and contemporary practice (LO 1/ LO2) Understanding through: Demonstrating relevant knowledge through undertaking relevant research (LO 1/ LO2) The ability to present ideas and information from a variety of sources in an effective manner (LO 3) Technical and applied skills through: The ability to structure a logical piece of written work that develops clear aims and objectives to effective conclusions (LO 3) Skills in the use of written forms of communication and understanding of academic conventions effectively demonstrated (LO 3) Due to the forward looking nature of this unit updated references will be available in the unit handbook and will comprise up to the minute on-line and media sources. etc. Learning outcomes Students who complete this unit should demonstrate: LO1 A clear and basic knowledge of theoretical approaches that can be seen to inform the practice of fashion. PDP aims 1. It will introduce feminism and gender debates in regard to dress and status. This is supported by a project pack which includes handouts and for all lectures. PDP learning outcomes 1. Assessment requirement Essay (1. The following therefore indicates core and definitive texts: . provide a discussion of the context of subculture. sociological. evaluation and the connection between cultural and theoretical notions and practical work. An ability to demonstrate written communication skills by writing essays and reports. Assessment de-briefing and published feedback support the learning strategy.A3 Introduce theoretical methodologies to extend formal essay writing skills.

2003) Craik. (Berkshire: Open University Press. 2003) Maffesoli. 1992) Marshall L. Fashion and its Social Agendas. S. 1992) Edwards. 1978) . The Face of Fashion (London: Routledge. Gender and Identity in Clothing (Chicago: University of Chicago Press. H. Fashioning the Feminine. C. 2001) Garber. F. thinking critically. 1997) Entwistle. Writing logically. M. Representation and Women’s Fashion from the Fin de Siecle to the Present (London: I. 1994) Said.J. Tauris. 2000) Recommended reading Davis. (Pearson Longman. A Guide to Learning Independently. Class. Fashion as Communication (London: Routledge. Welcome to the Jungle: New positions in black cultural studies (London: Routledge./Wilson./Fawcett. M. 1996) Mercer. The Time of Tribes: The Decline of Individualism in Mass Society (London: Sage.E. M. 1996) Buckley. Body Dressing (Oxford: Berg. Men in the Mirror: Men’s fashion. masculinity and consumer society (London: Cassell. Culture and Identity (Chicago: University of Chicago Press. E. Fashion. Vested Interests: Cross-Dressing and Cultural Anxiety (London: Penguin.Essential reading Barnard. K. 1994) Crane. J. D. Orientalism: Western conception of the Orient (London: Routledge. 2002) Cooper. T.B.

The two 15 credit historical and cultural studies units run alongside the main study units.Stage 2 units STAGE 2 DESCRIPTION (INTERMEDIATE LEVEL) Stage Two of the course define develop and detail from the first stage enabling students to expand their expertise at the same time as adding new skills and enhancing their understanding of how the promotional world works. Team working projects will develop the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment and progression to other qualifications requiring the exercise of personal responsibility and decision-making. Creative Styling is examined in much greater depth with a ten-week unit which enables students to investigate styling one of the key areas for image and image communication in contemporary promotional activity. Further units encompass PR. Branding and Marketing and Publications. analyses and interpretations based on their knowledge of fashion. throughout the stage two. Personal Development Planning PDP continues through stage two by the completion of the on line tutorial form and through the introduction of unit Fashion Reflection 1 (see Unit Descriptor) . Students will learn to evaluate the appropriateness of different approaches to solving problems. including the live workplace. They will have an understanding of the limits of their knowledge and how this influences. Cultural studies continues throughout the second year but gradually focuses on the Pilot Essay leading to Dissertation with promotions students using this as a strong support element to their chosen direction for the final year rather than as a separate element. Options within the current curriculum include a moving image project called The Cut. This stage of the courses allows the student to move away from a staff led schedule to a more student directed approach in which the student is encouraged to be increasingly self-motivated and self-reliant. This unit is a moving image unit related to Marketing and Branding. The student moves into the course specific nature of ‘promotions’ in stage two. Work at this level will enable students to gain knowledge and a critical understanding of the well-established principles in promotions and an ability to apply these principles outside of the context in which they were first learnt. Stage two is the experimental and developmental stage that encourages the student to investigate the taught theories and methodologies taught in year one. The unit combines moving image and a real live event.

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To understand and recognise the generic workings of fashion styling. communicated and launched within current industry practice. 30 credits Semester 2 Weeks 1-10 10 weeks 300 Content This unit thoroughly investigates the vocation of ‘styling’ as a practice. ‘Creative Styling’ gives a firm grounding in all aspects of a stylists practice. advertising and TV. 3. 5. finding a location. shooting in studios and locations. hair and makeup). styling for different markets. getting an agent. model. market awareness. Creativity. Through core lectures and industry speakers. To successfully produce a fashion shoot and ensure ideas and execution are of a professional level. managed.Stage 2 Unit Descriptors Unit Title Unit Code Course Location Level & Credit When taught Duration Learning hours Creative Styling RFPR2001 BA (Hons) Fashion Promotion Rochester Level 2. PR companies. 4. fashion genres. celebrity. Aims A stylist is more than a dresser. opportunities as a stylist. investigate and critique current and future trends within fashion styling and media. To further develop the ability to research. The diverse content of this unit will extend the student’s knowledge of fashion styling both on a practical and conceptual level. the student has the opportunity to investigate current issues affecting and influencing fashion styling. analyse. As a result. sourcing garments. pinpointing trends. vision and extensive industry contacts are paramount to success in this field. the student then has the background knowledge to interpret the styling theory and produce their own fashion shoot. By disseminating this information. how to achieve different moods (the difference between commercial and edgy). knowledge of key trends and practice. props. students will develop an understanding of the inter-relationship between fashion theory. Learning Outcomes . To develop creative and imaginative ideas through layout and the exploration of digital media and photography. The creation of image and the communication of style are of paramount importance within the arena of fashion promotions. The last twenty years have witnessed an explosion of ‘image creators’ who are responsible for creating a specific look. the army of professionals involved in the process and to demonstrate awareness of the importance and application of the profession within the fashion industry. catalogue. still-life. hair and make-up. 6. To develop the student’s practical understanding of the processes involved in organising a successful shoot whilst simultaneously improving key interpersonal and networking skills through sourcing their own creative team (photographer. 2. styling for editorial. real-life. beauty. returns. booking models. After the core lectures. going freelance or working for a newspaper/magazine. 1. Core lectures include fashion photography and lighting. organisational skills. To facilitate multi-structural learning and demonstrate the ability to respond intellectually to define key concepts of styling in terms of how it is organised. how to organise a team.

Thames & Hudson 2006 . ed. by Rachel Moseley. BFI Publishing. understand the process behind the glossy image and determine which consumer market these photographs aim to attract. 1998 . supervised studies and workshop demonstration where discussion and debate will be encouraged. An ability to promote and communicate analytical skills through the process of a developmental learning journal. LO5 & LO6 • • • Reference Material Essential Fashioning film stars: dress. An ability to deliver a styled shoot.. 5. P. Elements of style: from the portfolio of Hollywood's premier stylist. trends. fashion promotion. An ability to ‘read’ and analyse fashion images in the media. Professional practice and self developmental skills will be utilized. model choice) Research folders/sketchbooks • Art Direction/Graphics Assessment Criteria Knowledge & Understanding Creativity & Innovation Technical Knowledge LO1. Self and peer appraisals will be encouraged through the critique process. photography. lighting. 1996 Recommended Tank Too. 2.Cent (issue 4: the Judy Blame issue) Mastering Fashion Styling by Jo Dingemanns. 3. Warner Books.Students who complete this unit should demonstrate: 1. further developing student’s autonomy and ability to work in a self-directed capacity. 1999 Photo Styling: How to build your career and succeed by Susan Linnet-Cox. An ability to provide evidence of self reflection through the learning journal. The project brief will concentrate on contemporary creative styling. Macmillan. 6. Assessment Requirement Theory 50% Styling 50% Learning Journal • Verbal presentation Contemporary context (understanding • Styling work (shoot. showing evidence of applicable fashion genres and competence in putting a ‘story’ together. LO2 & LO3 LO4. identity. critical and analytical knowledge of fashion styling as a discipline. An ability to produce creative styling shoot layouts through the use of digital media and computer aided design. Teaching and Learning Methods The conceptual creative styling principles and information will be imparted through lectures. of styling as a genre) location. An ability to widen the methods of research. 4. video. culture. seminars. assessment de-briefing and published feedback support the learning strategy. culture. clothing. Management study skills support is available through bookable tutorials. 2005 Bloch. Allworth Press. Study Skills Development Learning Outcomes 1. and socio-economic references. An ability to negotiate all production aspects of shoot organisation and confidently assemble a creative team. Critiques.

Harper Design International and Paper Magazine. Elein Fleiss. Pixel surgeons.. S. Thames & Hudson. Mitchell Beazley. 1997 Market a La Mode: Fashion. Johns Hopkins University Press. V. Tank. Amelias Magazine. 2005 Worst Fashions . 2004 Smile ID: fashion and style: the best of 20 years of ID. Edition 7L.. Citizen K . ed. 2005 (Digital image manipulation/photography/fashion illustration) Hastreiter. Harry N.. But Did by Catherine Horwood.. Wonderland.Image Makers: Professional Styling Hair and Makeup by Lee Widdows and Jo Mc Guinness. ed. 2003 Dawber.What We Shouldn't Have Worn. Abrams. Paris Purple Institute.1-6 2001) Michael Thompson Images by Dennis Freedman. 10. Steidl various dates (Nos. 2004 Normant. Taschen. 2005 Tank Book. Sutton 2005 Fashion Images de Mode. K.. Thames & Hudson 2002 Purple 6. 2000 Periodicals: Viewpoint. M. Self Service. L. 2001 V Best: Five years of V magazine. Metamorphosis: transforming the world's most famous women. Another. Commodity and Gender in the "Tatler" and the "Spectator" by Erin Mackie. 20 years of style: the world according to Paper. Pop. i-D. Flaunt. Lovatt-Smith. Batsford.

inspire or even anger the reader. . excellent journalistic insight and strong interview skills. laid out in a professional format. grammar. 4. demonstrating IT skills. newspapers and periodicals to research. Students are actively encouraged to make use of primary research and will be identifying London based companies. To further develop critical knowledge of fashion writing and enable students to read and analyse texts. Inspiration can be found anywhere! Students will be encouraged to analyse and evaluate different styles of writing in magazines.Unit Title Unit Code Course Location Level & Credit When taught Duration Learning hours Creative Thinking (Semester 1 Option 1) RFPR2002 BA (Hons) Fashion Promotion Rochester Level 2. 4. To expand and strengthen journalistic skills. This is an opportunity to analyse the area of fashion journalism and improve grammar. 3. 2. Students will be encouraged to think instinctively and note emerging trends around them from art. it can delight. 1. thus identifying the importance of writing for a specific market. vocabulary and analytical skills. Vox pops. 15 credits Semester 1 Weeks 11-15 5 weeks 150 Content In order to be a competent journalist. This unit thoroughly investigates the area of primary and secondary research and creative journalism. The ability to give a journalistic piece a good. interiors. market level. fanzines. 3. newspapers and the internet. The ability to read and analyse fashion journalism for a variety of different markets. A strong understanding of the application of extensive research along with the need to investigate and be aware of cultural trends. Aims The pen is mightier than the sword! Good journalism is a particularly strong method of communication and in fact propaganda (at times). technology and social shifts to generic fashion and beauty issues. inform. fashion terminology. The onus is to allow students to explore investigative journalism and interview techniques. interview construction (question and answer formats and traditional text) and creating an angle are subjects to be addressed within this unit. readership. strong angle ensuring an interesting and thought provoking read. The ability to write good copy utilizing clear grammar. 2. Students will be encouraged to examine and discover cultural trends in order to approach writing their article. catwalk reports. grammar and interview technique. designers. along with layout technique Learning Outcomes Students who complete this unit should demonstrate: 1. To comprehend how to give journalistic work an angle. To develop existing research skills and go beyond simply referencing the internet. one has to master the art of research. Historical and contemporary knowledge of genres are as important here as is keeping an eye on the zeitgeist. music. The importance of good research cannot be underestimated and it is this aspect which will enhance the students’ promotions vocabulary.

Tabloid Britain : constructing a community through language. • Evidence of primary and secondary • Art Direction and layout research (encompassing creative graphics. Visionaire publishing. R. 2001 CONBOY. 1(3). Fashion spreads.. styles of writing and their editorial policies Assessment Criteria Research Integration & Synthesis Information & IT Application Critical Analysis & Evaluation LO1 & LO2 LO3 & LO4 Reference Material Essential 10 (short article on fashion language by Hadley Freeman in issue 19) CRAIG. Allyn and Bacon. Routledge. T. Anna Piaggi’s fashion algebra.. assessment debriefing and published feedback support the learning strategy. 2001 ESTEN. Thames and Hudson. 1999 KEEBLE. supervised studies and workshop demonstration where discussion and debate will be encouraged. 2005 Fashion Theory [especially nos. Routledge. Visual journalism: a guide for new media professionals. Critiques. Polity Press. 2004 DE BURGH. 2003 BRYANT.. Assessment Requirement Creative Research 60% Innovative Journalism 40% • Research folders/sketchbooks • Written journalistic piece. Smile i-D. V & A Publications. R. Management study skills support is available through bookable tutorials. 2000 WRAY. 1999 Recommended GOUGH-YATES. 2001 GAN. S. Understanding women’s magazines. Universe... P.. fashion writing. Routledge. Taschen.. 2003 JONES. BROOKS... trends. P.Teaching and Learning Methods The Creative Thinking principles and information will be imparted through lectures. The project brief will concentrate on research. A. Thomson Wadsworth. 2002 JACKSON.. The newspapers handbook. H. Dreaming in Print. WWD illustrated: 1960s -1990s. 1998 WATT. Berg. Self and peer appraisals will be encouraged throughout. RUSHTON. J. reviews. Diana Vreeland: Bazaar years. C.. 2006 HARRIS. Writing for magazines. & S.. 2001 JOBLING. 10(1/2)] FRANKEL.W. Visionaries. Fashion now 2: i-D selects. M. form and typography) • Clear analysis of different publications. 2003 PIAGGI. S. Fairchild. Taschen. 2002 . & K. 5(2). 2005 JONES. seminars. N. M. T.. layout. contemporary fashion related publications. 8(1). Investigative journalism: context and practice. Online journalism: reporting. writing and editing for new media. A. Routledge. Penguin book of twentieth century fashion writing. video. J. McGraw-Hill.. interviews. C. STEVENSON. cultural and socio-economic references. Penguin.. Making sense of men’s magazines..

Unit Title Unit Code Course Location Level & Credit When taught Duration Learning hours

Creative Thinking with International Studies (Semester 1 Option 2) RFPR2003 BA (Hons) Fashion Promotion Rochester Level 2, 15 credits Semester 1 Weeks 11-15 5 weeks 150

Content This unit familiarizes the student with the fashion, lifestyles and culture of the country about to be visited on their European Exchange. Whilst main study Fashion Promotion students are producing an ‘Innovative Journalism’ piece – this option offers students the chance to produce a ‘Creative European Journalistic piece,’ including bi-lingual journalism. Research, analysis and commentary on the lifestyles, culture and sartorial styles of the country in question will be included. Students may wish to reference fashion houses within France and Italy in a historical sense within their research. In order to be a competent journalist, one has to master the art of research. This unit thoroughly investigates the area of primary and secondary research and creative journalism within the arena of European fashion houses and publications. The importance of good research cannot be under-estimated, and it is this aspect which will enhance the students’ promotions vocabulary. Inspiration can be found anywhere! Students will be encouraged to analyse and evaluate different styles of writing in magazines, newspapers and the internet. Students are also encouraged to take study visits to the European country of their choice to obtain valuable primary research. The onus is to allow students to explore investigative journalism and interview techniques. Vox pops, grammar, fashion terminology, catwalk reports, market level, readership, interview construction (question and answer formats and traditional text) and creating an angle are subjects to be addressed within this unit. Students are actively encouraged to make use of primary research and will be identifying European based companies, shops, boutiques, designers, fanzines, newspapers and periodicals to research. Historical and contemporary knowledge of genres are as important here as is keeping an eye on the zeitgeist. Students will be encouraged to think instinctively and note emerging trends around them from art, music, interiors, technology and social shifts to generic fashion and beauty issues. International Studies Exchange/Placement Students: Students preparing for their exchange or placement abroad will complete a written journalistic piece which is written in a bi-lingual format. The journalistic piece must encompass creative graphics, layout, form and typography. On their return students should be able to demonstrate a developmental knowledge from their exchange which will be present within their work completed in their final year Aims The pen is mightier than the sword! Good journalism is a particularly strong method of communication and in fact propaganda (at times); it can delight, inform, inspire, or even anger the reader. This is an opportunity to analyse the area of fashion journalism within the

International country of the students choice and improve grammar, vocabulary, bi-lingual and analytical skills. 1. To develop existing research skills and go beyond simply referencing the internet. Students will be encouraged to examine and discover cultural trends in order to approach writing their article. 2. To further develop critical knowledge of fashion writing and enable students to read and analyse texts thus identifying the importance of writing for a specific market. 3. To comprehend how to give journalistic work an angle. 4. To expand and strengthen bi-lingual writing skills, generic journalistic skills, grammar and interview technique. 5. To develop presentation and bi-lingual communication skills in order to research, plan and prepare for the International exchange semester abroad Learning Outcomes Students who complete this unit should demonstrate: 1. A strong understanding of the application of extensive research along with the need to investigate and be aware of cultural trends. 2. The ability to read and analyse fashion journalism for a variety of different markets. 3. The ability to give a journalistic piece a good, strong angle ensuring an interesting and though provoking read. 4. The ability to write good copy utilising clear grammar, excellent journalistic insight and strong interview skills combined with evidence of bi-lingual writing. 5. An ability to communicate in the language of the student’s chosen exchange visit. Teaching and Learning Methods The Creative Thinking with European Studies principles and information will be imparted through lectures, seminars, video, supervised studies and workshop demonstration where discussion and debate will be encouraged. The project brief will concentrate on research, contemporary fashion related publications, fashion writing, interviews, reviews, trends, cultural and socio-economic references. Self and peer appraisals will be encouraged throughout. Critiques, assessment de-briefing and published feedback support the learning strategy. Management study skills support is available through bookable tutorials. Assessment Requirement Creative Research 60% International Studies Part II 40% Research folders/sketchbooks • Written journalistic piece – written in a bi-lingual format. Evidence of primary and secondary research relating to the students’ chosen • Art Direction and layout International country. (encompassing creative graphics, layout, form and typography) Clear analysis of different publications, styles of writing and their editorial policies Assessment Criteria Research Integration & Synthesis Communication & Presentation Critical Analysis & Evaluation Information & IT Application LO1 & LO2 LO3, LO4 & LO5

• • •

Reference Material CRANE, R. GOWLAND, D. TUCEK, M. 2000 2000 2002 European business cultures The European mosaic Europe at the gates of the union : A dataPearson Education Longman KMR

LORD, R. ADAMSON TAYLOR, S. GRAFF, M.L. FLOWER, R. SETTEMBRINI, L. STEELE, V. KAWAMURA, Y. KURZ, C. Periodicals

2001 2003 2002 2001 2001

based assessment of markets and consumer lifestyles across Eastern and Western Europe Culture shock : Germany Culture shock : France Culture shock : Spain Culture shock : Italy Made in Italy

Kuperard Kuperard Graphic Arts Center Graphic Arts Center Skira

Fashion houses

LANGUAGE WEBSITES

2003 Fashion, Italian style Yale University Press 2004 The Japanese revolution in Paris fashion Berg 2003 Berliner style Booth-Clibborn Vogue Paris, Vogue Italia, Vogue Deutsch, Vogue Espana, Vogue Uomo, Elle French, Elle Italian, Elle German, Elle Spanish, Collezioni (uomo, sport & street, ...), Citizen K, Jalouse, Form (Germany), Officiel de la couture et de la mode, Self service, Textile report, Crash, b-guided, Zoom on fashion trends; Fashion Theory [especially nos. 1(3), 5(2), 8(1), 10(1/2)]; 10 (short article on fashion language by Hadley Freeman in issue 19) Dior, Chanel, Lanvin, Yves Saint Laurent, Jean Paul Gaultier, Louis Vuitton, Cacharel, Chloe, Balenciaga, Givenchy, Christian Lacroix, Sonia Rykiel, Valentino, Ungaro, Moschino, Pucci, Prada, Versace, Armani, Gucci, Benetton, Dolce & Gabbana, Roberto Cavalli, Alberta Ferretti, Krizia, Missoni, Maison Martin Margiela, Dries van Noten, Raf Simons, Viktor & Rolf, Bernhard Willhelm, … BBC Languages: http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/languages (French, German, Italian, Spanish) UniLang: http://home.unilang.org/main/index2.php Real French: http://www.realfrench.net Tex’s French grammar: http://www.laits.utexas.edu/tex/ Italica: http://www.italica.rai.it/ Learn Spanish: http://www.studyspanish.com/index.htm

Learning Outcomes Students who complete this unit should demonstrate: 1. Work placement provides the student with experience of a live business environment prior to the final year. Student to negotiate and write their own learning outcome. team skills. written presentation. To provide evidence from the work placement experience that will demonstrate verbal. Aims 1. 4. . To experience working within industry to develop interpersonal and social skills. The work placement tutor will remain in regular contact with the student throughout the placement period via e mail. To increase knowledge and understanding of how important personal development planning (PDP) is in becoming a ‘reflective practitioner’. written and visual communication skills. 4. Student to negotiate and write their own learning outcome Teaching and Learning Methods Project briefing will be organised in Block 5 to enable the student to prepare and plan for the placement. 2. The student’s personal development plan (PDP) will progress through the work placement by demonstrating a higher level of evidence in oral presentation. A copy of the learning agreement must be forwarded to the contact person at the placement organisation. Student to negotiate and write their own learning outcome 3. A learning agreement will be negotiated between the placement tutor and the student prior to the commencement of this unit. This short 3/4 week placement is an opportunity to seek sponsorship and to start the process of researching for the final collection in an industrial environment. To further develop personal skills in building a personal network of support for the final year and potential employment. Student to negotiate and write their own learning outcome 2. time management and research skills but mostly in further developing a network of support for the final year and potential employment.Unit Title Unit Code Course Location Level & Credit When taught Duration Learning hours Placement (Semester 1 Option 3) RFPR2004 All BA (Hons) Fashion courses Rochester Level 2. The placement learning agreement must be completed prior to the placement with the agreed learning outcomes written for the assessment of the unit. The PDP reflective analysis will be completed back at the University after the short placement to enable the students to present the learning outcomes of the placement and PDP component for assessment. 15 credits Semester 1 Weeks 11-15 5 weeks 150 Content This option can not be selected by students taking the 60 credit exchange or placement unit in semester four. 3. PDP workshops will support the student on their return to the University in preparation to the final year.

CULLEN. J. VERITY. M. COPE. J. PERRY.. COLE.L. TAIN. P. Assessment Criteria Self-Management & Professional Critical Analysis & Evaluation Student to select own assessment criteria Competence Student to select own assessment criteria LO1 & LO2 LO3 & LO4 Reference Material BARON. 2004 2004 2003 2005 2005 2004 2005 2003 2004 2004 Designing a digital portfolio Creative CV guide Personal networking : How to make your connections count Letter writing High impact CVs Marketing your creativity : New approaches for a changing industry Portfolio presentation for fashion designers Effective communication for arts and humanities students Presentation skills for students Succeeding at interviews : give great answers and ask the right questions New Riders SIAD FT Prentice Hall Chambers Infinite Ideas AVA Fairchild Palgrave Palgrave How To Books . MIDDLETON.Assessment Requirement Placement Portfolio 50% Personal Development Planning 50% Placement learning agreement Student to negotiate the vehicle for demonstrating PDP. J. M. VAN EMDEN. J. C. VAN EMDEN. K. J.

sociology. cultural and social change. The first two semesters demonstrated that clothing acts as a signpost for aesthetic. this unit will examine the theoretical notions of modernism and postmodernism by looking at their visual manifestations in both high and low culture (i. fine arts. It is important for every designer nowadays to be able to work with an understanding of the concepts of modernity and post-modernity. The lectures and seminars will acquaint students with the ideas of what is considered a modern cultural expression and how it can be ‘read’. The examination of a body of work that seeks to explain.) The debates surrounding Modernism and Postmodernism are at the core of cultural studies. The understanding of the roots of modernity and its growth. theorise and philosophises cultural change will extend this understanding to a wider area of aesthetic practice. which are often vital for the final dissertation and to bring conceptual underpinning to projects within the student’s main studies. These two areas of knowledge have formed the background of cultural production for the last hundred years. To enable the analysis of fashion in more depth. not only in cultural studies. and that these transformations can be realised directly on the consumer’s body. This ensures a thorough understanding of the connection between fashion and culture and the relevance of clothes to modern life.Weeks 1-15 15 weeks 150 Content The theories that originate. which will then be applied to the theoretical reading of fashion in the fourth semester. film. A3 To extend the range of theoretical research methodologies within essay writing and ability in textual analysis and evaluation. the unit will therefore expand the student’s spectrum of analysis by introducing these concepts.e. but in diverse fields such as. magazines etc. media and film studies and art and design history clearly demonstrate that the analysis of clothing can and must use sources and research material from outside its own discipline. A2 To present and discuss images from throughout the period of modernity and debate the changing perceptions of both high and low culture. across a variety of cultural areas provides opportunity for further development of research skills and promotion of discussion. the third semester is devoted to the investigation of a broader spectrum of cultural production. After a year of looking at fashion specifically. Learning outcomes . Aims A1 To introduce the major theories surrounding aspects of modernity and Modernism in contrast to the present notion of post-modernity and postmodernism. 15 credits Semester 3 .Unit Title Unit Code Location Course Level & Credit When taught Duration Learning hours Date first approved Date of this version Modernism & Postmodernism TBC Rochester BA (Hons) Fashion Textiles: Print Level 2. design. psychology. architecture.

Assessment debriefing and published feedback support the learning strategy. The production of the essay will be supported by bookable academic and study skills tutorials. 1983). C. (ed. Fashion and modernity. Betterton. Assessment requirements Essay (2. M. 2005) . (ed) Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance.): Berman. 1987). (University of Chicago Press. The programme will also focus on the development of skills in textual and visual analysis. Jr. (London: Pandora. modernism and postmodernism. R. LO2 the capacity to recognise and critically assess images that display the concepts of modernism and postmodernism within the conceptual and theoretical parallels of both high and low culture. evaluate and synthesise a variety of sources (LO 3) Application of technical and professional skills through The ability to structure a logical piece of written work that develops clear aims and objectives to effective conclusions (LO3) Skills in the use of written and oral forms of communication and understanding of academic conventions effectively demonstrated (LO /3) Due to the forward looking nature of this unit updated references will be available in the unit handbook and will comprise up to the minute on-line and media sources. Teaching and learning methods The lecture and seminar programme will provide an insight into design and cultural history in the context of modern and post-modern aesthetics.500 words) & Seminar Documentation 100% (LO 1/2/3) Assessment criteria Knowledge of : Fundamental contextual and theoretical issues and critical concepts and their relationship to historical and contemporary practice (LO 1/2) Understanding through: Demonstrating ability to explore and interpret relevant knowledge (LO 2/3) The ability to analyse. LO3 the ability to edit and analyse textual material to a higher level and organise this into both formal discussions and an articulate and structured essay. A. 1987) Looking On: Images of Femininity in the Visual Arts and Media.: Breward. This is supported by a project pack which includes handouts and recommended reading for all lectures and theoretical texts for discussion within each of the seminars. (Oxford:Berg. The following therefore indicates core and definitive texts: Essential reading Baker.Students who complete this unit should demonstrate: LO1 the ability to understand and communicate intellectual concepts that underpin the historical and contemporary perception of modernity. All that is Solid Melts Into Air: The Experience of Modernity (London: Verso. progressive and part of the avantgarde.000-2. It will illustrate the historical development and contemporary quotation of what is seen as modern.

Mass. Jameson. After the Great Divide: Modernism. Visual and Other Pleasures. A. (ed. Slater. 1993). D. (Basil Blackwell. C. 1989) Huyssen. Sarup. 2006) . U.2005) Recommended Reading Greenhalgh.: Tigersprung: Fashion in Modernity (Cambridge. (London: Macmillan. (V & A Publications. 2000). L. Mulvey.) An Introductory Guide to Post-Structuralism and Postmodernism. 1990).: The MIT Press. Wilk. Harvey. Consumer Culture and Modernity (Polity Press 1996) Modernism 1914-1939: designing a new world. M. (Indiana University Press 1986). (Ed. P. F. Critical thinking skills: developing effective analysis and argument (Palgrave. Mass Culture and Postmodernism. 1989). (Atlanta: University of Georgia Press. The Condition of Postmodernity.) Modernism in Design (New York: Reaktion Books. S. D.Cottrell. Postmodernism or the cultural logic of late capitalism (Verso 1991) Lehmann.

To appreciate film as a genre and learn different camera angles and techniques. 5. and knowledge of fashion/music/lifestyle marketing and branding. subsequently PR activity is generated. marketing and branding in both theory and practice. styling. Students begin the project investigating PR. direct. 4. Marketing and Branding are essential facilitating tools in the mechanism of Fashion Promotions. 3. This unit thoroughly investigates the area of these three disciplines. To develop an understanding of how fashion/lifestyle/music products and brands are developed. An ability to communicate using the moving image as a promotional tool. micro-communities and consumer behaviour are also covered. then market it. street teams. Learning Outcomes Students who complete this unit should demonstrate: 1.W. along with the ability to create strong press packs and dossiers. and written techniques. 1. Strategies such as pop-up retailing. projected costings. The ability to extend methods of research. 3. Marketing & Branding RFPR2006 BA (Hons) Fashion Promotion Rochester Level 2. youth trends. To understand the importance of the moving image as a promotional tool. Event management skills are key. . To build on existing PR techniques and research skills by promoting a collection through film and photography work. vision and knowledge of semiotics and consumer behaviour will aid success in this field. market awareness. They work in teams and produce a film promoting a fashion designer. Students will also develop their understanding and application of marketing and branding. 6.T. Aims Creativity. budgets. guerrilla and targeted marketing are all discussed within the unit. To respond intellectually and target a campaign to a specific market. To learn about the process of Event Management.O. The ability to produce a sophisticated DVD package which demonstrates appropriate camera angles/techniques. viral. students will develop an understanding of the inter-relationship between PR. analysis workshops. 5. writing questionnaires. An ability to successfully utilize Event Management skills through organising a film screening event. What is a brand and how is it marketed? S.Unit Title Unit Code Course Location Level & Credit When taught Duration Learning hours PR. 2. 4. The ability to promote a designer’s collection and generate fashion imagery/PR through a variety of techniques utilized in Public Relations. 30 credits Semester 2 Weeks 21-30 10 weeks 300 Content PR. organisational skills. They are all linked – first you brand a product. pitched and promoted. Through core lectures and industry speakers. 2.

LO2. Perry. O’Reilly.style. 2004 Exploring Storyboarding by Wendy Tumminello. Teaching and Learning Methods The PR. culture. technologies and processes • Application of technical and professional skills LO1. Salzman.vogue. Wiley 2003 Viral Marketing by R. event management.com www.showstudio.com www. 2002 Viral Marketing in a week by R.LO3 LO4. conceptual idea applying core principles of professional practice.LO5.LO6 Reference Material Essential www. 2002 Buzz: harness the power of Influence and create demand by M. Thomson / Delmar Learning. Pearson Education. The ability to communicate a company/brand with an original. and socio-economic references. Goldsmith. Management study skills support is available through book-able tutorials. 2005 The Rough Guide to cult movies (2nd Edition) by Paul Simpson. The project brief will concentrate on PR. assessment de-briefing and published feedback support the learning strategy.com Film Directors A – Z: The Art of the World’s Greatest Film-makers by Geoff Andrew. Rough Guides. 2005 Guerrilla PR Wired by M. Levine.6.imdb. Critiques.com The Art of Watching Films by Joe Boggs and Dennis Petrie. 2004 Guerilla Marketing in 30 days by J. Entrepreneur Press. Assessment Requirement Visual Promotional Communication 50% Research and Context 50% • Individual film (demonstrating • Demonstration of contextual creativity and technical knowledge) knowledge & research through tutorials and presentations • Press Release • Organisation of the screening event Assessment Criteria • Understanding through application • Knowledge & Understanding of of knowledge contexts. supervised studies and workshop demonstration where discussion and debate will be encouraged. Marketing & Branding principles and information will be imparted through lectures. McGraw-Hill. Matathia & A. Hodder & Stoughton.lovefilm. video. 2002 Recommended www.com . Helen Rodiss and Michaela Bushell. Carlton. I. Levinson. Self and peer appraisals will be encouraged throughout. marketing and branding trends and technique. McGraw Hill 2004 www. seminars.

Hutchison. GREEN. D. Harper Collins 2000 BEGLEITER.b check out the chapter on New Media Promotion) Record Label Marketing by T. C. Rosen. Elsevier 2006 The Anatomy of Buzz by E. WHEELER. M. Allen. J. GUNDLE. DRAKE FOSTER. 2001 PATMORE. HENSLOWE. D. A. J. Elsevier/Focal Press 2006 (n. M. KIRBY. edit. A. S. share Brand culture Michael Wiese Productions Kogan Page Kogan Page Kogan Page Palgrave Macmillan Kogan Page Portfolio ButterworthHeinemann HarperCollins Faber & Faber Michael Wiese Productions A & C Black Kogan Page Rotovision Sybex Routledge KLEIN. Klein. 2004 A. D. Macy & P. SCHROEDER. Journal of Fashion Marketing & Management . SADUN. C. Periodicals 2005 2001 2005 2003 2006 Designing brand identity 2006 Wiley Viewpoint. transfer. Cable & the Internet by S. & A. Brand Strategy. N. 2000 MACKENDRICK. E. A. P. Ferguson & R. NEWTON. Eastman. BURTON. J. RIVERS. Marketing. 2001 2004 2005 2001 2006 2003 2005 2005 From word to image: storyboarding and the filmmaking process Hitting the headlines in Europe Effective writing skills for public relations Creativity in public relations The glamour system Public relations: a practical guide to the basics Buzzmarketing Connected marketing No logo On film-making: An introduction to the craft of the director Digital filmmaking 101 Get started in short filmmaking Online public relations DVD art: innovation in DVD packaging design Digital video essentials: shoot. C.Media Promotion & Marketing for Broadcasting. PHILLIPS. HUGHES.

Historical and contemporary knowledge of genres are as important here as is keeping an eye on the zeitgeist. music. 3. The project brief will concentrate on research. video. trends. To increase knowledge and understanding of how important personal development planning (PDP) is in becoming a ‘reflective practitioner’ 4. The magazine marketplace is tough – publications fold for a variety of reasons. reviews. Students will be encouraged to think instinctively and note emerging trends around them from art. Student to negotiate and write their own learning outcome. 4. fashion writing. Students will be encouraged to analyse and evaluate different styles of writing in magazines. Learning Outcomes Students who complete this unit should demonstrate: 1. weeklies. Students are encouraged to consider what really makes a publication innovative. CD Rom and moving image. 15 credits Semester 2 Weeks 26-30 5 weeks 150 Content This unit thoroughly investigates the area of Fashion Publications and how we define innovation. To visualize. mp3. technology and social shifts to generic fashion and beauty issues. newspapers and the internet. interviews. Student to negotiate and write their own learning outcome Teaching and Learning Methods The Fashion Publication principles and information will be imparted through lectures. seminars. Contemporary innovation can be conceptual or even a commercial concept – this project gives students the opportunity to explore the area of magazine publication intensively. Aims The fashion/lifestyle publication is a complex thing. cultural and socio-economic . Reflective analysis will also be evident from the learning journal. 2. contemporary fashion related publications. Student to negotiate and write their own learning outcome. 2. To further develop students’ knowledge of consumer markets and how to compile a consumer profile. internet. fanzines.Unit Title Unit Code Course Location Level & Credit When taught Duration Learning hours Fashion Promotion Reflection I (Semester 2 Option 1) RFPR2007 BA (Hons) Fashion Promotion Rochester Level 2. To develop an ‘innovative’ fashion publication considering the current media climate and consumer behavior. newspapers and internet publications to research. supervised studies and workshop demonstration where discussion and debate will be encouraged. bi-monthlies. 3. interiors. Formats are investigated in terms of print. Student to negotiate and write their own learning outcome. 1. Students are actively encouraged to make use of primary research and will be identifying glossies. The student’s PDP (personal development plan) will progress further by enabling them to write their own learning outcomes for this project. research and develop ideas related to innovative fashion/lifestyle publications.

g. Betty Jackson & Molly Molloy) Elle Girl First Point (subscription) GQ Style IT Fashion Forecast (subscription) Lula Found Refill Mixte Mood Pap Rojo Rubbish Sam Super boy Super girl Wonderland (subscription) (Also DOT and AMPHIZ. e. Martin Margiela. LO2 & LO3 LO4 Reference Material Essential ANDERSSON. Zines. Self and peer appraisals will be encouraged throughout. 2002 FARRELLY. PDP workshops will support the student in preparation to the final year. Haider Ackerman.. Judy Blame. L. P. • Database of contacts within the magazine industry Assessment Criteria Self-Management & Professional Creativity & Innovation Student to select own assessment criteria Competence Student to select own assessment criteria LO1..Cent (each issue edited by a different guest editor. 2001 New magazines (sample issues mostly) A magazine (each issue curated by a different designer.references. publication outcome styles of writing and their editorial policies.g. Inside magazines : independent pop culture magazines. Thames & Hudson. Yohji Yamamoto) Amelia’s magazine Another Man . Booth-Clibborn. assessment debriefing and published feedback support the learning strategy.. Critiques. magazines produced for publication by two former MA fashion students) Recommended . Assessment Requirement Personal Development Plan PDP 50% Publication Outcome 50% • Learning Journal demonstrating a • Student to negotiate the vehicle for clear analysis of different publications. Management study skills support is available through bookable tutorials. e.

com) for market/consumer research The Penguin Book of 20th Century Fashion Writing 391 WAT Mallarme on fashion: A translation of the fashion magazine La Derniere Mode 391.09 SHE) Beauty. 2003 SAMARA.9422 LOV Look at Me: Fashion and Photography in Britain 1960 to the present 778. H. Vols. 77809422 COT The impossible image / Sanders. J.65 CRO Dreaming in Print: A decade of Visionaire 741. C.65 BRY Magazine Covers 741.9422 WIL Imperfect beauty / Cotton. 2003 LESLIE.mintel. M. Designing for newspapers and magazines. Romeike Ltd. 778. 391. 2005 Willings Press Guide 2006.09 PIA Diana Vreeland: Bazaar Years 391..9422 SAN .65 GAN Smile ID: Fashion and style: the best 20 years of i-D 741. 2005 SOCIETY OF PUBLICATION DESIGNERS. M.9422 LI Fashion: Images de Mode 778.MOSER.6391 SAS Fashion Icon: The Power and influence of graphic design 741. The Art Directors' handbook of professional magazine design. spirit.92 BEN Fashion Spreads: Word and Image in fashion photography since 1980 778.001 MAL Fruits 391. style / Bensimon.9422 JON Fashion Publication: Exposing meaning in fashion through presentation 778. Routledge. G. Publication design annual (40th).6391 TOT Alexey Brodovitch 741. Laurence King. T. 1-3.9422 JOB Joe’s: second issue 778.65 BRO WWD Illustrated: 1960’s – 1990’s 741.9422 HOA (Stylemakers / Sherrill.65 JON Tank Book 741. Magculture : new magazine design. Publication design workbook.9422 JOE Catching the moment 778.. Rockport..09 VRE The Best of Fashion Advertising 741. Thames and Hudson. 2006 MINTEL (www.09 AOK Anna Piaggi’s Fashion Algebra 391.65 TAN Talking Fashion 778.. 2003 FROST. C. 778. Rockport.reports..

Learning Outcomes On completion of this Unit. the Exchange Unit Leader. that will inform future work. Increased understanding of the practice of your main subject(s) in a European or International context. acquiring fresh perspectives.e.any variation must be approved in advance and in writing by your Course Leader at UCCA. A broadened and deepened understanding of your subject(s). Development of your communication skills. 60 credits Semester 2 Weeks 16-30 15 weeks 600 This Exchange Unit is designed to broaden your educational experience and to deepen your understanding of cultural diversity. you will be able to provide evidence of: LO1 LO2 LO3 LO4 LO5 Increased confidence in your ability to cope with new and unfamiliar situations and environments. This Unit will also develop your communication and linguistic skills and your command of a foreign language. Assessed Components The exchange is assessed by UCCA tutor(s) designated with this responsibility by your Dean i. The content of this programme will be closely related to the subject matter of your UCCA course. and the report which you are required to produce. It will enable you to study within a different cultural context and gain fresh perspectives of your subject(s). Reflective analysis of the learning achieved through the exchange. reflecting on the learning that has resulted from your experiences.Unit Title Unit Code Course Location Level & Credit When taught Duration Learning hours Aims Exchange (Semester 2 Option 3) RINS2004 All BA (Hons) Fashion courses Rochester Level 2. where you will follow and complete a suitable programme of study provided by that institution. Content Following a period of preparation for study abroad. The assessment will take account of marks/grades awarded to you by the host institution. you will be based for the duration of the Exchange Unit in a non-UK higher education institution. Course work : Report : 75% 25% . You must follow the agreed programme of study as specified in your learning agreement . but may include some elements which do not form a part of the provision at UCCA.

(LO4) Application of technical and professional skills • Ability to anticipate and accommodate change. R. Participating students must be prepared to bear a substantial portion of the costs and expenses which they will incur. M. S. GOWLAND. Italy. Assessment Criteria Understanding through application of knowledge • Application of knowledge and skills in different contextual frameworks and situations. (LO2) • Evidence of acquisition of further knowledge and understanding. 2000 1988 2000 HOWE.You must achieve at least a pass mark in both components. development of personal attributes and mastery of essential skills related to your own creative practice. which fall outside the Socrates-Erasmus scheme.) Rough guide to … series Time Out guide … series Culture shock! … series Vacation Work CC6 CRANE. in particular the ability to interact effectively with others. will be considered and are subject to the approval of the Course Leader and Director of Studies.1094 structures. Pre-requisites All students wishing to participate in the Exchange Unit must provide evidence to their Course Leader that they have undertaken the available preparation for exchanges and have at least a basic command of the language in which the provision of the host institution will be delivered. Reference Material Various authors Live and work in … series (France. 2003 Rough Guides Penguin Graphic Arts Center European business cultures Pearson 382 CRA Dictionary of fashion: terminology of London College fashion in four languages of Fashion The European mosaic : Longman 940. (LO3) • Ability to reflect. will be restricted to those students who meet the prevailing requirements for this scheme. economics GOW and culture Retailing in the European Union : Routledge 381. Spain. and to work within contexts of uncertainty and unfamiliarity. D. Exchanges with other institutions. Germany. analyse and evaluate own learning and experiences. (LO5) Maximum number of students to be registered Exchanges.55 contemporary politics. competition and HOW performance . etc. DEVINE. which are supported through the Socrates-Erasmus scheme. (LO1) • Development of interpersonal and social skills. Scandinavia.

German. REBMANN. Schiele & Schon Capstone 658.8 TRO . G. 2004 Marketing across cultures F. Italian TROMPENAARS. French.1990 Dictionary of garment terminology: English.

through a period of working within an appropriate professional or social context. subject discipline and courses. Alternatively. unit learning outcomes. the student may propose a suitable host institution or organisation. Aims . unit assessment requirements and the unit assessment criteria. Alternatively. • The unit assessment requirements. The precise form and content of the placement unit may therefore vary between Faculties. All students must follow the agreed programme of study as specified in the learning agreement .will be negotiated between the Placement Tutor or Course Leader and the student prior to the commencement of this unit. an individual programme of work . Content A placement offers an opportunity to study and learn in an alternative context. 60 credits Semester 2 Weeks 16-30 15 weeks 600 This unit descriptor provides the generic template for credit-rated placements that are recognised for awards within the Common Undergraduate Credit Scheme. evidenced through the achievement of the unit aims and learning outcomes. A copy of the learning agreement must be forwarded to the contact person at the host institution/organisation. The Learning agreement must contain: • The unit aims. • Submission dates for all assessable requirements • Specific preparation undertaken by the student before commencement of the placement.a learning agreement . the placement may be located where the student can learn from the experience of practising in a social or community context.any variation must be approved in advance and in writing by the Placement Tutor or the Course Leader at the University. The workload will be based on the Common Undergraduate Credit Scheme guideline that 60 credits require an average of 600 hours total learning time. Given the wide range of contexts in which placement experience may occur. and to increase the students’ appreciation of working with diversity (or diverse groups of people).Unit Title Unit Code Course Location Level & Credit When taught Duration Learning hours International Placement (Semester 2 Option 3) RFPR2008 All BA (Hons) Fashion courses Rochester Level 2. This unit will also help the student to develop an ability to study independently and to enhance their interpersonal and social skills. The Placement Tutor or the Course Leader will inform the student of the placement opportunities already established. • The assessment requirements. This Placement Unit is designed to extend the students’ knowledge and understanding of the specialist subject and to develop practical and conceptual skills. which must be submitted to the host institution before the submission deadline for formal assessment. This may be in 'the world of work' in a location which offers 'first-hand' experience of professional practice in a specialist subject.

To further develop inter-personal and social skills. Promote the skills of essay writing and the theoretical formulation methodologies Learning Outcomes On completion of this unit. students will be able to provide evidence of: Placement Course Work 1. Increased confidence to cope with new and unfamiliar situations and environments. Outline various forms and ideas in the representation of fashion that theoretical and conceptual reflection within research both for written and projects. Broaden the students educational experience and to deepen the students understanding of cultural diversity. Develop communication and linguistic skills and a command of a foreign language. 8. 4. 6. To further develop critical and evaluative skills within the subject discipline. 5. To manage and meet deadlines as stated on the individual learning agreement. 5.This unit aims to: Placement Course Work 1. Reflective analysis of the experience and the learning achieved through the placement. Development of the students’ practical and conceptual skills. Staff at the host institution/organisation may also contribute to the formal assessment process . The ability to recognise and critical assess contemporary fashion within its cultural and visual representation and to reflect on the connection between written assignments and practical studio work. Assessment Requirement Placement Course work 75% Written Report (Pilot Essay) 25% encourage a studio based contemporary of research . 2. 4. 8. 3. Examine aspects of the cultural progression and erratic changes within fashion. An understanding of the intellectual concepts that underpin the historical and contemporary representation of fashion – both in its production and consumption as well as in its wider cultural configurations. 9. An articulated and structured academic essay that provides scope for and understanding of the research requirements for the final year dissertation. 3. 9. 6.any such involvement will be specified in the learning agreement. Development of inter-personal and social skills and (where relevant) include the ability to collaborate with people from diverse backgrounds. Achievement of all additional learning outcomes set out in the individual learning agreement for this unit. Written Report (Pilot Essay) 7. Assessment Requirement Students’ performance for the placement unit will be assessed by the Unit Leader and any other University tutors designated with this responsibility by the Director of Studies. 2. Written Report (Pilot Essay) 7. Increased understanding of the practice of their subject in a professional or social context. Enable the student to study within a different cultural context and gain fresh perspectives of their subject specialism.

LO4. LO8 & LO9 Students must achieve at least a minimum pass mark in both components to pass the whole unit and achieve the 60 credits. Additional Requirements The student must be available to work at the host institution/organisation on the days and times agreed with the host . LO2. All placements are subject to the requirements set out in the prevailing University policy guidelines associated with working at external locations and the University Equal Opportunities Policy. subsistence during the period of the placement. Pre-requisites Placements take place during Stage Two of the course and are credit rated at level two. the student may be asked to undergo a CRB check prior to the placement.500-3. This includes the costs of travel to and from the host institution/organisation. LO3.Learning Agreement & placement course Essay of 2. Reference Material . • been awarded a provisional grade of at least the minimum pass in all level two units completed prior to the placement.000 words work Assessment Criteria Critical Analysis & Evaluation Self-Management & Professional Communication & Presentation Competence Knowledge & Understanding Research Integration & Synthesis Interpersonal & Social Skills Research Integration & Synthesis LO1. LO5 & LO6 LO7. Maximum number of students to be registered The number of students who can undertake placements will be limited to the number of suitable hosts that the University has been able to confirm. If the placement is with a host organisation which works with under-18s who come under the Children Act.these may not be the same hours and days that they would normally be expected to attend the University. The Placement Tutor/ Course Leader must confirm whether this is necessary and ensure that it is included in the 'Specific Preparation' section of the learning agreement. and the costs of any materials or equipment supplied by the host for which they may require reimbursement. Please note that the University is not able to offer the student any financial support for the additional expenses that may incur during the placement. The pre-requisites are that students have: • satisfactorily progressed from stage one to stage two without trailing any level one units. All students must fulfil the Health and Safety requirements of the institution/organisation hosting the placement and abide by the Equal Opportunities framework of the host organisation.

Fashion Monitor. VOGT. SHARP. 2003 Giving presentations OUP On Order CC4 On Order CC3 2004 Creative CV guide SIAD Chambers 2005 Letter writing 2002 Career opportunities in the fashion Checkmark industry DIRECTORIES File FX. J. J. COLE. 2004 The fashion intern 2005 High impact CVs 2002 A guide to working in fashion 2004 Succeeding at interviews : give great answers and ask the right questions Fairchild On Order Infinite Ideas CC4 Heinemann How To Books CC3 CC4 . G. Little Black Book. J. K. VERITY.Essential BILLINGHAM. M. J. MIDDLETON. P. CULLEN. LeBook London PERIODICALS Drapers Recommended GRANGER.

art history. Now the lectures and seminars extend the analysis of the contemporary fashion system to examine its theoretical and cultural relevance.Unit Title Unit Code Location Course Level & Credit When taught Duration Learning hours Date first approved Date of this version Research Methodologies tbc Rochester BA (Hons) Fashion Promotion Level 2. in photographs. The previous discussions of contemporary design have already identified the proximity of today’s fashion/style to self-referential reflection in notions of ‘post’-modernity. in the magazine. but now the focus moves onto how these can be used to explore the representation of style and fashion. By looking at and by’ ‘reading’ films. . Throughout the fourth semester.Weeks 16-30 15 weeks 150 Content The previous semester was devoted to the description and investigation of theories grouped around modernism and postmodernism: how the terms could be defined. Apart from this.e. In these instances it appears that the fashion image becomes more important than the actual creation. we aim to show you possible methods that you yourself may adopt in developing your own dissertation. that originate in diverse fields. sociology. a certain style and how these theoretical concepts relate to the visual and cultural landscape that surrounds us. knowledge on developments in the industry and new design is gained largely from fashion’s mediation. on the catwalk. the student will gain an understanding of the visual language of signs and images. i. and also the appropriate methods to approach these areas of study. video-clips. The lectures series will cover both substantive areas of cultural representation and contemporary fashion. media and film studies. on the Internet. In outlining different approaches that academics have taken in creating their research projects. as well as the ideological role that clothes and accessories can play within these images and within modern culture as a whole. how they produce a certain aesthetic. cultural theory. on video. which have become the hallmark of many designer’s collections. The unit therefore utilises and extends the theoretical debates previously covered to reflect on the way in which fashion is seen in modern culture and its mass media. 15 credits Semester 4 .primarily on the high street – remains the only direct way in which they enter into a tangible relation with the sartorial product. photography and. the various forms in which the dress is seen. For most consumers acquiring clothing in a shop . and this semester is devoted to an exploration of the spectacularisation of the sartorial product and the problems arising from such contemporary configurations. in the museum or within film and theatrical performance. theatre design. quotes from past clothing styles. appropriations from other art-forms and ‘cultural borrowing’. of course. fashion design that is displayed and used in the media. the lectures continue the themes from the previous semester.

post-modernity and the sartorial representation of their tenets. concepts and processes in regard to the ability to analyze and evaluate complex ideas. A2 Examine aspects of the cultural progression and erratic changes within contemporary fashion. design and cultural history in the context of modern and post-modern aesthetics and theory. The production of the research journal will be supported through briefing and workshop sessions. The focus of both the lectures and seminars will be on the development and understanding of research methodology. Study skills support will be available through bookable tutorials Assessment de-briefing and published feedback support the learning strategy and prepare the student for the final year dissertation option. This will be supported by scheduled one-to-one tutorials and research workshops for the dissemination and support of student research. LO3 An articulated and structured academic essay that provides scope for and understanding of the research requirements for the final year dissertation.000 words) & Research Journal 100% (LO 1/2/3) Assessment Criteria Knowledge of: Contexts. A1 Outline various forms and ideas in the representation of fashion that encourage a theoretical and conceptual reflection within research both for written and studio based projects. Each lecture demonstrates a methodologically based case study of specific examples of fashion in its mediated form. Technical and applied skills through: An understanding of the principles of focused and methodological research and its formulation into an articulate academic essay (LO3). The utilisation of theories of representation will continue the investigation into modernity. Assessment requirement Essay (2. This will be presented through case studies which demonstrate theoretically based examinations of contemporary fashion. A3 Promote the skills of research from a diverse range of sources and raise an understanding of the links between particular methodologies and research questions. . LO2 An understanding of the intellectual concepts that underpin the historical and contemporary representation of fashion – both in its production and consumption as well as in its wider cultural configurations.500-3.Aims The unit extends the understanding of the cultural and representational arena of the fashion industry. Teaching and learning methods The lecture series will provide an insight into how to view fashion. Understanding through: An individual and creative approach to the communication of ideas surrounding contemporary cultural production (LO 2 LO3). Learning outcomes Students who complete this unit should demonstrate: LO1 The ability to recognise and critical assess contemporary fashion within its cultural and visual representation and to reflect on the connection between written assignments and practical studio work. and apply these to specific examples drawn from personal research and/or related studio practice (LO 1 LO2).

The society of the spectacle. Fashion Spreads. Jobling. (University of Michigan Press 1994) Blaxter.Due to the forward looking nature of this unit updated references will be available in the unit handbook and will comprise up to the minute on-line and media sources. 1999). (Berg. L. J... S. (Routledge. How to Research. The System of Objects. sex. Fashion at the Edge. (Open University. (London: Routledge. 1997). 2003). speaking and writing critically. (Wadsworth. (London: Picador. 1962) Bourdieu. Eco. C. The Image: A Guide to Pseudo Events in America. The following therefore indicates core and definitive texts: Essential reading Baudrillard.. . 1986) Bruzzi. 1994). (New York: Vintage. (Verso. 199)7 Simulcra and Simulation. P. Evans. Undressing Cinema: Clothing and Identity in the Movies.. P. Reel to real: race. Recommended reading Campbell. G. Travels in Hyper-reality. 2002) Boorstin. 1996). (Zone Books. and class at the movies. U.. 1986). 2003) Debord. K. Hooks.. Daniel.. (Yale University Press. Word and Image in Fashion Photography since 1980. Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste (Routledge. B. The rhetorical act: thinking.

at least some of which is at or informed by. Students will gain the conceptual understanding necessary to devise and sustain arguments. Typically Honours degree graduates will have the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility. and/or to solve problems.Stage 3 units STAGE 3 DESCRIPTION (HONOURS LEVEL) At this final stage of the course the student will be able to consolidate their acquired knowledge and understanding by selecting to study on their specialist career pathway. including acquisition of coherent and detailed knowledge. the forefront of defined aspects of the discipline. The presentation of the students’ conceptual ideas will be formally presented to a panel of academics at project reviews throughout the final year. . Pathway choices are: Styling Journalism PR/Marketing Work at this level will develop students systematic understanding of key aspects of promotion. Studies will enable students to deploy established techniques of analysis and enquiry. using ideas or techniques. decision-making in complex and unpredictable contexts and the learning ability to undertake further education or training of a professional or equivalent nature.

STAGE THREE Diagram Overview BA (HONS) FASHION PROMOTION SEMESTER 5 SEMESTER 6 STAGE 3 3 Units 2 x 30 credit units 1 x 45 credit unit 1 x 15 credit unit Total 120 credits CORE OPTIONS .

and £15 billion worldwide. The project brief will be a student negotiated brief based upon a marketing campaign for a perfume launch. 30 credits Semester 5 Weeks 1-30 15 weeks 300 hours The final year of the BA (Hons) Fashion Promotion course will provide the student a choice of three pathways to specialize in. and even at the most popular time of the year for fragrance. British women spend £640 million on perfumes. in 2009. With every major fashion house. However. which will provide the foundation for students to select a pathway or a mix of pathways. There are over 200 new launches each year. press fragrance advertising revenue fell by £15 million. and men. £350 million. The UK Fragrance market is worth an estimated £1. Task A Concept and Market Research Research will start over the summer prior to the final year. Christmas. and celebrity developed/endorsed fragrance having a vested interest.Stage 3 Unit Descriptors Unit Title Unit Code Course Location Level & Credit When taught Duration Learning hours CONTENT Lifestyle Communication BA (Hons) Fashion Promotion Rochester Level 3. independent designers. never has it been so important to develop innovative and successful strategies to promote and market fragrance. the market has to be sustained. Task B Launching a perfume brand Using a spritz of an unlabelled scent as inspiration students will be encouraged to develop a fragrance promotional campaign to a market of their choice. The student will create a promotional campaign for their fragrance – this can involve ad . an area with its own trends (eg Rose-derived fragrances were by far the most popular in 2009) and its own high level of consumer preference (eg 88% of women choose a fragrance simply for its ‘smell’. and 3% after three years. fragrance editorial fell by almost 15%. whereas 40% of men do not view fragrance as a grooming essential).6 billion in the UK. • Visual Communication-Styling • Written Communication-Journalism • Verbal/ Promotional/ Communication-PR/Marketing This unit will act as a test run for the student’s pathway choice prior to the major project in semester six. of which only 5% are still on the market after two years. As a huge part of the fashion promotion and lifestyle industry.

through establishing self discipline and autonomous learning by taking increased responsibility for the learning. To examine up to date business and marketing factors and information that may influence the success of a product. visual methods and verbal methods an effective marketing plan. An ability to produce and communicate a marketing strategy. 4. which reflects the market context and environment. to establish self-discipline and autonomy by increased responsibility of their own schedules. To organise. An ability to promote written. visual data and provide effective solutions within the context of business marketing and current professional practice. manage and work without close supervision. promotional placements. . 2. To increase the understanding of the process involved in planning a campaign through research across a broad range of sources. 4.campaign styling. still life styling. event design and written word. business factors and information through market research. PR. An ability to work without close supervision. organise and communicate through both written. 2. An ability to analyse and synthesize research material to support the creation of a focused and targeted product. To analyse marketing. marketing and branding. product design. 3. 3. market intelligence. lifestyle/culture. To develop. 5. 5. casting. An ability to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of business factors in relationship to development of lifestyle brand promotion. products and consumer trends. graphic design. Aims 1. Learning outcomes Students who complete this unit should demonstrate: 1.

self and peer appraisal will be encouraged throughout the learning process. lectures. The project will be heavily led by decision-making. seminars. A presentation.000 words] Assessment Criteria Understanding through application of Knowledge of contexts.000 to 5. knowledge technologies and processes. concepts. to a panel of academics and fashion experts will encourage clarity of communication.LO4. PDP has been integrated throughout the course and now these skills will further support the student in becoming a ‘professional’ within their chosen career path. in the style of a pitch. Student negotiated project brief will enable the student to complete all work by themselves. or to commission fellow students as they wish. Promotional portfolio [4.LO5 Reference Material . project managing. Specialist workshops in In Design will be prioritised for the final year students on set days. The complexity of the project is down to the individual. Application of technical and Application of technical and professional professional skills skills LO1 . Assessment Requirement Concept & Marketing Research 50% Promotional Outcome 15 credits (Task A) (Task B) Research: Specific focused research Promotional campaign relevant to the fragrance and pathway option. Formative reviews. planning. self motivation and organisation.Teaching and Learning Methods Autonomous learning is central to the student’s final year learning strategy. The project briefing. campaign direction and purpose. LO5 LO3. group/individual tutorials will all support the student throughout this unit. Personal develop planning. LO2.

To increase students’ knowledge and understanding of the practice and theory of the specialist subject in its contemporary and/or historical contexts. 2. 5. 30 credits Semester 1 Weeks 1-15 15 weeks 300 hours Content The student will determine the subject matter of their dissertation through negotiation with the designated unit tutor. criticism or practice of design. 6. This unit offers the opportunity to study in depth something that really interests the student. 4. or related aspects of cultural or media studies. Teaching and Learning Methods At the beginning of the unit. 3. The subject matter must be such that lends itself to a breadth and depth of research. This must allow for critical analysis. The ability to formulate and apply research methodologies to the chosen subject and develop and articulate ideas and information in written form. 3. However it is expected that the topic be relevant to the student’s area of specialisation and builds upon their educational experience during the last two years. evaluation and the integration and synthesis of ideas and theory which develops reasoned arguments and conclusions. To demonstrate ability to engage in sustained and informed critical analysis. The confidence and flexibility to identify and define complex ideas and arguments through the application of appropriate knowledge and awareness. It is anticipated that the research topic will support the development of the student as a practitioner within their chosen field.Unit Title Unit Code Location Level & Credit When taught Duration Learning hours Dissertation (Semester 1 Option 1) RINS3002 Rochester Level 3. 5. Aims 1. Learning Outcomes 1. interpret and formulate research in a creative and independent manner. the student will be allocated a personal dissertation tutor to offer advice and ensure that a suitable subject and title has been identified for the dissertation. To select. theory. To demonstrate the ability to organise a coherently structured discussion. 4. 2. 6. embracing both primary and secondary sources. A critical awareness and ability to present a coherent analysis and exploration of examples. A comprehensive and independent awareness and understanding of the chosen topic. To develop advanced levels of research. The cultural studies team aim to be as accommodating as possible to the wide range of student interests. The dissertation topic should fall within the broad area of the history. The ability to employ recognised academic conventions of research and presentation and to work within constraints. Dissertation preparation sessions and lectures will also be provided by dissertation and study . To develop the ability to work in a sustained and independent manner. themes and issues related to the subject. The ability to work in an autonomous manner with minimal supervision within agreed guidelines. art.

(Ashgate. 2002) The rhetorical act: thinking. J. together with illustrations etc.000-10. R. (Pearson Longman. K. the student will receive feedback on a rough draft: a typed version of the dissertation in progress. B. Rudestam. Assessment Requirement Dissertation 100% 8. LO2. K. 2004) Excellent dissertations! (Open University. LO3. Mounsey. L. (Palgrave Macmillan. to demonstrate ability to study independently and the student will be expected to work under their own initiative and direction for most of the Unit. The student will be expected to punctually attend all lectures. The draft is vital to ensure thorough guidance. Cooper.000 words Assessment Criteria Knowledge & Understanding Research Integration & Synthesis Creativity & Innovation Critical Analysis & Evaluation Communication & Presentation Self-Management & Professional Competence LO1. (Northumbria University. 2002) Visualizing research: a guide to the research process in art and design. Cambell. 2003) Writing logically. Gray. Levin. Orna. and a full list of references. 2004) Surviving your dissertation: a comprehensive guide to content and process. (Wadsworth/Thomas Learning. Gillam. (Open University. (Oxford University Press. S. S. Cottrell. Blaxter. At key points during the Unit. 2003) Critical thinking skills: developing effective analysis and argument. 2005) Essays and Dissertations. LO5 & LO6 Students will be penalised for exceeding or falling short of this range of words. there are set dissertation tutorials at which students receive advice on their progress and feedback on the dissertation draft. 2002) Managing information for research. C. It is there for the tutor to informally assess progress.skill tutors and librarians to help formulate a research methodology and identify relevant texts and other sources. where appropriate. P. speaking and writing critically. LO4. They must submit two hard copies of a word-processed dissertation. E. Pears. (Sage. and ensure effective time management. 2001) . Reference Material Individual advice on the chosen topic will be given in the tutorials. thinking critically. however. 1995) Cite them right: referencing made easy. One of the main aims of the Dissertation Unit is. workshops and tutorials as arranged. 2005) Developing a questionnaire (Continuum. K. How to research (Open University. give full advice. Half way through the unit.

presentation. Rarely in the creative world does one have carte blanche for full self expression of ideas and ideals. Such a moment occurs at the end of the three year BA (Hons) degree courses at Rochester. is amongst the most complex. To succeed in a highly competitive and ever changing business. The communication of this concept and the planning. an informed and innovative approach is vital. specific brand positioning and client. Building on the students’ specialist study units will also further personalise the project and support their personal philosophy as well as providing the opportunity to demonstrate their individual skills. and indeed. not only to the team immediately . product. Appropriate Professional Industry sponsorship and support during the final project. And that air is free for all” “Success in fashion means having a finger on the pulse of the times” Content The Promotion Process The development of promotional activity. 45 credits Semester 2 Weeks 16-25 10 weeks 450 MAJOR PROJECT INTRODUCTION The Fashion Promotion unit is delivered through a student negotiated project agreement. This applies to all aspects of the fashion industry. This final major self-negotiated project must reflect this within contemporary and developing fashion trends in every element of the creative process. yet most rewarding tasks within the fashion industry. in discussion with the final year tutor is possible. from pattern cutting to styling and at all levels of product. Technology. The major project will draw upon all of the students’ previous experience and skills to demonstrate their understanding of these challenges. for whatever product and at whatever level of the market. time scale and methodology must be communicated via presentation. The initial thoughts and concepts which become the first underpinning and starting point of the promotion are vital. production.Unit Title Unit Code Course Location Level & Credit When taught Duration Learning hours Fashion Promotion RFPR3003 BA (Hons) Fashion Promotion Rochester Level 3. All these components will be in relation to professional standards and based on research and understanding of the specific area of fashion that the student is focusing towards.Editor Harpers Bazaar US 1934-1958: “Elegance is good taste plus a dash of daring” “Inspiration comes out of the air we breathe. market awareness. analysis and a challenging approach within the final response to the self negotiated project must also contribute to the outcomes. encouraged. The brief will be constructed to enable the student to focus on their specific career and skill aims. research. including trend. Carmel Snow . as well as their personal strengths in learning outcomes.

The outstanding element to be considered as paramount within this work is appropriateness.both core and accent Surface Paper and Print –print. Successfully managing a product from concept to catwalk. design and promotion and can then be presented as a final outcome both to those who worked through the process and to those now taking it forward to designers. knowledge. size. a student will be able to demonstrate clearly their personal style attitude and thought process when working in the promotions business in whatever role that might be. buyers. DVD. whatever form that may take. where possible. that is you the promotions expert. The final semester focuses on the formation of the creative activities which also involves planning and time management. showroom or exhibition. underpinning the entire operation. their strengths and their career ambitions through creative communication of the style and methodology with which they approach promotion. PowerPoint. by combining this with the necessary research. thus enabling the student to demonstrate and convey their ideas on a professional level. One person must have the vision to hold the entire procedure together and one person must have the final say on what does and does not contribute to the overall success of the promotion. marketing and promotion. size. The overall premise behind the construction of this unit is to rationalize all previous personal promotional approaches. Teamwork will support the outcomes and within the business. attitudes and understanding into an overall coherent statement. • • • • • • • • • • • Research Trend/Market Level Market Position. but also to those in design. The work may involve. Students will be expected to exercise their intellectual capacity by demonstrating and identifying innovative forms of communication. Virtual Reality. management and planning to act as the culminating statement of each individuals flair. reflecting the specialist areas of the subject selected by the student as their signature reflection of their work.involved in the physical production of the promotion. specialists and craftspeople will be involved within specific areas. Film. consumers. This unit aims to consolidate both the theoretical and practical skills required to produce the necessary methods of promotional activity. management. individual style.Consumer Concept and Mood Colour . in turn. etc Copy . using their creative skills to plan how they will communicate their written and visual ideas. etc Form and Shape Prototype Methods Presentation – Portfolio. This. New methods combined with tradition. in turn. CDROM. font. The unit is based on total integration of self development. investigation and original thought. This is to enable students to truly reflect their personal signature. through to consumer is a complex business involving many decisions to which the creative director. ethical and global factors are just some of the elements the student must weigh up in the balance of this unit. The importance of relevant research underpinning all projects and their outcomes must be emphasized within the final outcomes and the presentation of work. historical awareness allied to contemporary considerations and cultural. surface. presentation. intuition. live projects or work experience related investigation. research. completes the process and the communication of the product. support is vital since technicians. Books etc Technical Methods –Flash. retail and promotion as the first step. must have the answers. Clarity of purpose and the methods which will achieve this outcome will also lead to the successful realisation of the promotional activity. and understanding of promotions.

illustrations. dossier. management skills and effectiveness in communicating knowledge. sketches. The BA (Hons) Fashion Promotion students will negotiate. New trends and styles of promotion move at an unprecedented speed. it is essential that the students are able to identify and implement new forms of communication to ensure that their work promotes forward thinking strategies. These projects will demonstrate to a future employer the diversity and breadth of projects the students are capable of undertaking and will reflect their personal style. This semester is the culmination of the course offering the opportunity to express through this unit the creative director’s individual signature style. portfolio. The student will take on the role of “Creative Director” for the completion of this component and will embrace all the tasks which this implies. time management and professional diary must be included within the promotional package. Therefore. In business. through tutorials. up to date skills necessary for successful employment. The promoter will communicate their vision through a series of promotional activities demonstrating a range of solutions and a spectrum of statements behind the creative process and develop a portfolio demonstrating an understanding of market levels. The opportunity to further investigate personal projects in consultation with staff and evolve exciting and innovative solutions to promotional activities is the key to this unit. Every detail must be considered to support the overall image and to communicate exactly what is in the promotional director’s mind in the creation of the activity.• • Marketing & Branding Event Management Successful promotional presentations attend to each and every component of the concept from the creative overview to the type of customer targeted. format and manipulation of images. when combined with handcrafted techniques. etc. These processes. in terms of typeface development. . This will draw on all previous projects to demonstrate the students acquired creative experience in concept building around a set market level in an innovative. The Promotion Specialism To succeed in a highly competitive market and ever changing business an informed approach to the final “portfolio” of promotional work is vital. Communicating the collection in visual form will be through research. colour/surface. form/shape and books. etc. event. their personal approach and philosophy to the work they wish to produce. challenging and appropriate way. Creative skills are developed through managing oneself and by managing others. style and professionalism. which will all be employed within this communication process. questions will need to be answered and an unclear concept or a confused creative statement will result in both an unsuccessful presentation and a loss of respect from the team and the management. The use of computer-aided design (CAD) can open up new possibilities for the student as the promoter. should contribute and enhance a contemporary outcome. All these elements will support the promotional direction and philosophy. the positioning and re-positioning of layout. mood/concept. The portfolio plan. All projects should underline the skills and ability to create and innovate new methods of media presentation. They will employ all the knowledge and expertise developed through previous semesters and also add new elements specific to their chosen style.

To increase the understanding of the process of research and planning involved in conceptualisation and promotional outcomes with a professional attitude. Assessment Requirement . The ability to present innovative solutions in specialist promotional outcomes. Specialist workshops in CAD will be prioritised for the final year students on set days. To organise. 8. PDP has been integrated throughout the course and now these skills will further support the student in becoming a ‘professional’ within their chosen career path. The Specialist Aims 6. 5. The ability to manage a range of outcomes. group/individual tutorials will all support the student throughout this unit. lectures. Student to negotiate and write their own aim. The ability to select appropriate specialist focus. 4. To present a series of specialist promotional solutions . The ability to research and time manage a series of projects in a professional manner. which reflect the product. The ability to develop. organise and communicate with appropriate methods a personal response and signature to promotional activities. To demonstrate a specific promotions focus. The ability to integrate a variety of global issues into their work. 3.Aims Promotion Aims 1. Personal development planning. To illustrate an informed view of external promotions factors such as ethical. To integrate a variety of methodologies with the creative outcomes. The Specialist Learning Outcomes 6. seminars. 5. 3. Autonomous learning is central to the student’s final year learning strategy. The ability to demonstrate a range of methods within a specialist promotional area. 7. Student to negotiate and write their own brief. climatic. 8. To demonstrate an innovative and informed approach to the specialist area. 2. Student to negotiate and write their own aim. 9. Teaching and Learning Methods The Fashion Promotion Major Project unit is delivered through a student negotiated project agreement. Critiques. through establishing selfdiscipline and autonomous learning by taking an increased responsibility for one’s own learning. To develop. manage and work without close supervision. self and peer appraisal will be encouraged throughout the learning process. The ability to manage self directed work and to take increased personal responsibility for self promotion through creative work. 10. 9. 4. Learning Outcomes Promotion Learning Outcomes Students who complete this unit should be able to demonstrate: 1. market and brand context whilst also developing a personal identity. 7. environmental. 2. Student to negotiate and write their own aim. global and sustainable issues. organise and communicate effective creative promotional concepts. The project briefing. 10.

R. B.Styling. Proposal and preparation for each project. D. story board or other appropriate preparation work. A range of responses to the promotional subject area with planning and a demonstration of time management. GILL. LO3. LO4 & LO5 LO6. G. SIMMONDS. S. 2005 2006 2003 2004 2003 2005 1998 2005 2004 1999 The complete guide to digital graphic design Visualizing ideas : from scribbles to storyboards Graphic design as a second language 1000 graphic elements RSVP : the very best of invitation and promotion design Fashion : from concept to consumer Essential managers manual Hidden track: how visual culture is going places How to be a team leader How we write : writing as creative design Thames & Hudson Thames & Hudson Images Rockport RotoVision Prentice Hall Dorling Kindersley Die Gestalten Verlag Hamlyn Routledge Portfolio 75% Research to support each project component. Journalism 25% • • Creative elements within the specialist area to be covered/considered: • • Colour • • Surface • Format • Production • Market/marketing • • Global positioning • Competitors • Ethical issues • Time scale • Costing • Team Assessment Criteria Knowledge & Understanding Communication & Presentation Technical Knowledge Information & IT Application Research Integration & Synthesis Creativity & Innovation Interpersonal & Social Skills Critical Analysis & Evaluation Self Management & Professional Competence LO1. LO7. FRINGS. LO8. KLANTEN. R. KRISZTIAN. LO9 & LO10 Reference Material GORDON. HELLER. B. G. mock-up. M. SHARPLES. MANUELLI. Sketchbooks. PR. LO2. dummy. . & M.

Unit Title Unit Code Course Location Level & Credit When taught Duration Learning hours Fashion Promotion Reflection II RFPR3004 BA (Hons) Fashion Promotion Rochester Level 3. will be an integral component for all areas of study. A final summative presentation of all key works in a contemporary format. Aims 1. This will support the student in their future employment or further study. research skills and methods. how appropriate is the learning when the risk taking is so vital in Art and Design? “All journeys have secret destinations of which the traveller is unaware” Martin Buber The seeking out of the ‘secret destination within a journey’ must be encouraged in a student. They provide ‘a statement of what a learner is expected to know. Professional/reflective practice is a phrase with deep resonance for both staff and students. will enable students to gather together all the separate strands within their PDP work to arrive at a Summative Dossier. whether classic portfolio or some other format. understand and be able to do at the end of a period of learning. This common fashion final unit of study provides the student with the opportunity to reflect and to write their own learning outcomes for their final year journey. historical and theoretical understanding. 2. 15 credits Semester 2 Weeks 26-30 5 weeks 150 hours Content The Fashion BA (Hons) courses have firmly embedded learning outcomes into all units within the curriculum. 4. The work produced for this component of the final year will prepare the student in becoming a ‘Reflective Practitioner’ which will support the student in the necessary preparation for job applications and interviews. team skills. The focus provided by this work will enable students and staff to produce an edited and focused final reflective summary of the final major project as well as the journey which was taken to arrive there through the documentation of the production dossier. time management. The reflective analysis of their specific philosophy and how they achieved it.’ But if learning outcomes prescribe the results of a period of learning before the outset of the ‘journey’. IT software. To consolidate communicating fashion visual images and written texts in the presentation of a final ‘summative dossier’. To be able to act autonomously with minimal supervision or direction within agreed guidelines. written presentation. students demonstrate how well they truly understand these words and how they have demonstrated their personal development plan (PDP) through evidence in oral presentation. with reference to current professional practice. 3. conceptual development/ideas generation and materials and technical knowledge and skills. To present all forms of communication to document professional practice. as well as being an important element of their final assessment/exhibition of work. . To consolidate the philosophy of personal development planning PDP. Within this final unit of the BA (Hons) Fashion courses at Rochester.

TAIN. BARON. M. VAN EMDEN.L. MIDDLETON. PDP workshops will support the student in the preparation for the mock career interview and job applications. 2003 Personal networking : How to make your connections count 2005 High impact CVs 2004 Presentation skills for students 2004 Designing a digital portfolio 2005 Portfolio presentation for fashion designers 2002 Working communication 2006 Fashion computing : design techniques and CAD 2005 Digital fashion photography FT Prentice Hall Infinite Ideas Palgrave New Riders Fairchild John Wiley Burke Publishing Thomson 2006 Colors for modern fashion 9 Heads Media 2004 Fashionize : the art of fashion illustration Happy Books selected by Delicatessen . P. integrated to final degree work or as a the exhibition/fashion show. & TAN. Student to negotiate and write their own learning outcome 3. C. E. 4. Student to negotiate and write their own learning outcome Teaching and Learning Methods Regular supporting tutorials and advisory sessions will be held to discuss the student’s personal development plan. BAKER. Student to negotiate and write their own learning outcome 2. separate style statement Mock career interviews (normally videoed) Assessment Criteria Student to select own assessment criteria Student to select own assessment criteria LO1 LO2 LO3 & LO4 Student to select own assessment criteria to demonstrate their own philosophy of PDP Reference Material COPE. S. J. Student to negotiate and write their own learning outcome. TARANTINO. BURKE. RIEGELMAN. N. C. employability skills and career opportunities. K. Assessment Requirement Summative Dossier 50% Personal Dossier 50% Management.Learning Outcomes Students who complete this unit should demonstrate: 1. Planning for the final destination. J. planning and organising a Negotiated “Personal PR” in a format either portfolio.

The assessment scheme is designed to recognise and credit achievement rather than to penalise failure. The purpose of assessment Assessment measures your performance in completed units. allows you to consider your work in relation to that of your peers. Summative assessment Summative assessment is that carried out at the end of a unit. written critical evaluations. Assessment Criteria/learning outcome specific to each unit and level generic Grading Descriptors ensure a consistency of approach to assessment. reflective learning journals and international studies assessed work placements. student presentations. A range of assessment strategies is used: formal examinations. to determine your suitability to progress to the next stage of the course. by passing units). • to determine the award of an appropriate qualification. individual. It is therefore retrospective and should not necessarily be taken as a guide to future success. and is designed to help you improve your performance. essays. Assessment methods used on the course Assessment practices adopted by the course are consistent with the University Assessment Policy. and confirms the conditions for referral and retake. The Assessment methods employed are effective in permitting students to demonstrate course outcomes. It provides an indicative measure of your progress. You progress from stage to stage of your course by accumulating sufficient credit (i. generates a unit mark. helping you to identify strengths and weaknesses. individual production projects. and a dissertation. production simulations to deadline. If you fail a unit you will have a further chance to improve your work and pass. The Student Regulations Handbook contains more detailed information on the assessment scheme and regulations. allows you to agree with staff any adjustments you need to make in order to satisfy course requirements. The final award requires students to accumulate credit in the same way. Assessment can have the following purposes: to measure your performance over a specified part of the course by published criteria against a stated requirement. It does not contribute to the final unit mark. . group production projects. It provides an evaluation of your progress during the unit. to provide you with feedback about your performance.How your work is marked Assessment Methods Formative assessment Formative assessment is an interim review of your work undertaken at key points during particular units.e.

They may include reviews of coursework. assessments are integrated into the teaching and learning: extended production projects give scope for tutor guidance week by week. or a final summative assessment will be based closely on earlier formative assessments which have given students scope to steadily build and develop skills assisted by tutor feedback.8). Unit information will include a timetable for assessment and a clear statement of assessment requirements. Where appropriate it may form the basis for the recommendation of an award. The credit value of each unit is proportional to its study time. Throughout the course a range of assessment methods will be used. Care is taken by lecturers to try to ensure that all students engage in assessed group work.On practical units. Individual performance in group work is formally recognized in the assessment criteria for group assessments. You will also receive verbal and written feedback from your tutors. This increases student engagement and motivation and means that the course. to enable you to achieve an increasingly self-critical view of your work. The purpose of stage assessment is to consider the overall performance of students within a stage of a named course. Exceptionally assessment may extend beyond the unit but a deadline will be set for the release of marks and the return of work. Stage assessment is the major summative assessment point which allows progression between stages of a course. Peer and self-assessment are also used at appropriate points. Formative review Formative review is also operated on some courses. This is a major review of progress at the end of the first semester of each year. On some individual group assignments. On such group assessments. while focusing on core skills. individual student logs/reflective learning journals of activity are required and tutor observations of individual student contribution are recorded on assessment feedback sheets. Units will normally be assessed within their duration. whenever possible. can appeal to students who have ambitions in particular specialties. to award credit where appropriate and to set any conditions for progression or retrieval of failure. Each unit is assessed on completion and given a percentage mark. Its purpose is to allow students: • • to take stock of performance to agree with staff adjustments to their course of study that may be necessary to meet the requirements of an award or for progression at the year end . written submissions. presentations’. there is scope for negotiated briefs so that students’ particular interests and favoured specialisms can be accommodated. unit marks contribute proportionately to the Stage mark. Unit assessment and Stage assessment Unit assessment is the basic unit of assessment. These grades are subject to confirmation by the Unit Assessment Board at the end of the academic year (see 6. assessment criteria and assessment methods appropriate to its learning outcomes and length of study. Stage assessment collates the weighted marks from units to produce a single end of stage mark.7 and 6. for example. This provides weighting for the unit.

Difficulties with work You may experience difficulties associated with practical projects. or your classification of award. However. but if you have problems you must help the course team to help you. Student Services may also be able to provide help. with staff. the University will then consider how it can best assist you. you will be notified of the date and time by which work must be submitted for assessment.• to consider. the Chief External Examiner(s) and the Faculty Registrar. Further information about the Mitigating Circumstances Policy is contained within your Student Regulations Handbook. the Head of Registry Services or nominee. Its membership includes the Pro-Vice Chancellor or nominee (Chair). This should be done by completing a Mitigating Circumstances claim form prior to submission so that such issues may be taken into account during assessment. It is your responsibility to make known to your Course Leader any circumstances which may have seriously affected your performance in assessment. . Confirmation of marks External examiners are appointed by the University’s Academic Board. Make a note of the date and name of the person to whom you submitted your work. Assessment Boards The Unit Assessment Board is responsible to the Progression & Award Board for the conduct of all assessment associated with the course. the advisability of any change of course available at this point. research methods or writing. advice and support. The full Progression & Award Board normally meets annually at the end of the academic year. Final responsibility for determining marks rests with the Unit Assessment Board. You should also disclose any health problems which might have implications for your course of study. external examiners do not need to see you personally or your individual work in detail for the Unit Assessment Board to reach a decision on your marks. They moderate internal marks (where appropriate). ensure correct procedures are followed and proper standards maintained. the Associate Dean. If you have such problems. The external examiner will consult with internal examiners and may examine samples of work submitted. as this will make it easier to resolve any issues that may arise regarding submission. Submission and return of work You are advised to keep a copy of all work submitted for assessment. wherever feasible and appropriate. you should inform your tutor at the earliest opportunity. or meet with students. There can be a variety of causes ranging from dyslexia to nerves. the relevant Dean. At the beginning of each unit. The course is designed to help you succeed in what you undertake.

Where your project involves processes. how the work is installed during displays or the end of year show and how to minimise any risk to those viewing your work. you should as part of your professional development consider the impact of your work on others. If your course includes time in Workshops or Studios please listen to the valuable safety instructions and advice given to you by the Academic Staff and Technicians. you will need to assess the way in which you produce the project work safely. materials or elements of risk.Health & Safety Throughout your studies you will be presented with information which should help you to stay safe and healthy throughout the duration of your course. You have a responsibility to conduct yourself in a manner which does not harm the safety of yourself and others. you must attend a health and safety induction before you are able to work in these areas. When undertaking project work. . Please ensure health and safety is integral to your studies. Academic and Technical staff can support you in undertaking these risk assessments. The University is here to help facilitate and develop your project work safely.

Level I-Intermediate Level. and Honours Level): Project Briefs therefore place emphasis on learning outcomes. . (level C-Certificate. The notes on submission and assessment given one ach project explain clearly the way in which the requirements/submissions for a project and the formative assessment process itself is a demonstration of what they have learned. understanding. explaining to the student the experience. The general marking descriptors are as follows. All Fashion unit learning outcomes are mapped to the stage marking descriptors/and are grouped under the three generic levels of criteria.Marking Descriptors The marking descriptors show you what you need to achieve in your work to gain each grade. knowledge and skill the project is designed to help them acquire.

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• Lectures Lectures are the principal teaching method used for the presentation and discussion of theoretical issues. It is important that you attend all taught sessions. please alert your tutor who will be able to help. How will I be taught on my course? Several different learning and teaching methods are used at the University. for example. making arrangements to cover material from any session which you are unable to attend (e. and may be used on your course. this may involve an introduction to safe working practices through technical demonstrations that you must attend before commencing personal practical work. They are used to focus on issues central to a unit and are often used in conjunction with seminars to extend and examine the issues raised. They may be initiated by staff. Your course is designed to give you maximum responsibility for the management of your own learning. processes and techniques to generate research and an understanding of theoretical principles. Depending on the equipment and processes used. it may be a slide presentation. Your lecture notes are a valuable adjunct to other information sources and may prove useful to you long after completion of your course. The skills and abilities that will support you after graduation extend beyond your subject knowledge. What is a Unit Handbook? A Unit Handbook will be given to you at the introduction of each unit. or jointly between staff and students. Each project culminates in some form of review or critique. .g. It is essential that you organise your time so that you can carry out the required amount of independent study. a written report or a product. The outcomes of projects vary according to courses. through illness). Failure to do this is likely to result in your being unable to complete the work required in the time available. Teaching & Academic Guidance for your course What do I need to know about this in relation to my course? All courses at the University are founded on the principle that the most effective educational experience combines structured teaching and your own independent study. staff will explain to you what work you are expected to cover in self-managed study time.Learning. additional research and reference material that you may need in order to complete the unit. These are defined as follows: • Projects Projects combine formal teaching and independent study on a focused task with a defined outcome. or may be central to practical delivery. timetable/schedule. Seminars may be used to support lectures. using materials. How can I manage my independent study time? During each unit. assessment deadline and any further information such as technical notes. If you feel you need further information or help with managing your studies. • Seminars Seminars provide an opportunity for dialogue and interaction between staff and students. This will require a high degree of commitment and personal organisation from you. Practical Work projects will be set in a practical workshop situation. It will include a project brief.

They may be used to address specific issues in your work. • Self-managed independent study Self-managed independent study forms an essential part of your course. • Study visits Study Visits may involve organised visits to any of the following: buildings. design practices. museums and galleries. stores. It is important that you develop an organised and effective approach to independent study to enable you to complete and extend projects and take full advantage of learning resources at the University and elsewhere. You should retain a copy of the tutorial form for your own records so that you can assess your progress over a period of time. Your Project Proposals and study plan will form part of the Unit Handbook for relevant units. • Project Proposals Project Proposals are used on many courses. This enables students to share their experiences and learning. Each student is assigned a personal tutor. exhibitions. They may take place in the UK or overseas. trade fairs. It is suggested that you keep a record of private study undertaken for discussion with staff. in which case you will be notified of any costs well in advance of the visit. at museums or exhibitions). the policy identifies the appropriate commitment the University makes to students to guarantee they receive sufficient opportunities for guidance on their progress through their courses. Assessment aims to balance the merits of group achievement and individual performance. • Student presentations Student presentations comprise one student or a group of students giving an illustrated talk on an agreed subject to a group of their fellow students. Following a tutorial. companies and organisations. within the scope of the course. Informal and formal tutorials are held with each student. Academic Guidance The University has identified threshold standards of academic guidance and support across all five campuses. a copy of the tutorial form is given to you which records the discussion. . to follow up assessments or to discuss other factors affecting your progress. and may require financial contribution from you. While Faculties can quite rightly exercise local decisions on how these standards are supported. Independent study may take place at your home. Project Proposals are one way of helping you to negotiate and plan your studies with staff. • Group work Group work is recognised as an important educational experience in its own right and is valued by many employers.• Tutorials Tutorials provide an opportunity to discuss your progress and to agree a further course of action. and develop the knowledge and understanding of the group as a whole. in the Library) or externally (for example. agreeing the aims of your work. Project Proposals make it possible to focus your course in a way which reflects your own interests and aspirations. A primary function of presentations is to develop your skills and ability in verbal communication. at the University (for example.

Faculties will: • • • C Ensure that a date and time for a tutorial is provided in all referral and retake letters. the University has established Threshold Standards for Academic Guidance in three areas: a) Unit choice and change of unit b) Progress within units c) Progress within the course A Unit choice and change of unit Threshold Standard: i) Faculties will provide students with timely and appropriate advice on unit choice Method: To meet this standard. All students will be provided with the opportunity to attend one scheduled personal tutorial to review their overall academic progress in Semesters I and 2 of each academic year. Progress within the course Threshold Standard: i) The course leader is responsible for monitoring the students’ overall progress within the course.Accordingly. Faculties will be required to: • Provide clear information on how students can request assistance with a unit. Faculties will be required to provide: • • B Advance information and advice about unit options including the process of making a choice. the method of and timescales for logging and changing choices. Method: To meet this standard. staff availability and locations for advice. and how the outcomes will be notified Clear indication of the latest advisable times by which a change of unit can be made Progress within units Threshold Standards: i) Students are entitled to know what additional support is available to them in the course of a unit in addition to timetabled teaching. Note attendance or non attendance at such tutorials on the student’s file Record the content of the tutorial on tutorial forms and log these forms appropriately. each Faculty will: . surgeries. Method: To meet this standard. Method: To meet this standard. prioritising choices. which includes information on any scheduled tutorials. ii) Students on referral and/or retake should be provided with a timetabled personal tutorial to discuss what they need to do in order to retrieve failure.

and access to tutors and additional tutorial advice.• • Ensure that a course specific personal tutor system is in place. Monitoring Course leaders will be asked to comment on. . and evaluate the efficacy of the Academic Guidance Policy during Annual Academic Monitoring. Inform students about tutorials.

Peer and Self-assessment requires you to assess your own work and that of fellow students. and is designed to help you improve your performance. Aims are course-related and express the course's intentions at particular points. The formal procedure whereby prior learning which has taken place outside the University. and confirms the conditions for referral and retake. generates a unit mark. The University has a 2-tier assessment system. sets out the intended purpose of the unit. although the feedback provided by marks and comments should be of assistance. It provides an evaluation of your progress during the unit. allows you to consider your work in relation to that of your peers. comprising Unit Assessment Boards and Progression & Award Boards. The processes and mechanisms through which the quality and standard of your work is measured and evaluated. certificated or experiential. Formative assessment is an interim review of your work undertaken at key points during particular units. Summative assessment is that carried out at the end of a unit. A sample of marks from all units will be verified to ensure the quality of marking. The academic qualification conferred upon a student who has successfully met and completed the requirements of a specific course of study. allows you to agree with staff any adjustments you need to make in order to satisfy course requirements.Glossary Aims The purpose behind your work. whether relating to individual projects. Details about the appeals procedure are contained within the Student Regulations Handbook. Assessment Criteria Assessment Requirement Award The particular characteristics against which your work will be assessed. The formal procedure whereby you challenge a decision made regarding your performance in assessment. Disagreement with academic judgement does not constitute grounds for appeal. stages of your course or indeed the course as a whole. assists you to become an autonomous learner. Assessments are retrospective and do not credit future potential. It encourages a sense of ownership of the process of assessment. In each unit a list of aims. helps to develop a range of transferable skills and makes assessment part of the learning process rather than an adjunct to it. It provides an indicative measure of your progress. coded ‘A’. AP(E)L Appeal Assessment Assessment Board The generic term for a board of examiners at the University. . It does not contribute to the final unit mark. What needs to be done as a means of demonstrating attainment of a unit’s learning outcomes. is accredited by the University for the purpose of admission to or progression on a course of study.

acquisition and application of subject-specific and generic knowledge and skills. The level rating does not necessarily coincide with the year/ stage of full-time study. All students in stages 1 and 2 are assigned a Personal Tutor. Personal tutors meet with their tutor groups following the publication of stage assessment profiles. life-long learning and sustainable employment in a changing and competitive world. Each unit carries a credit rating: a unit is rated at 15 credit points. training. either academic or professional. A list of learning outcomes coded ‘LO’ is set out for each unit. the level and where appropriate the title of the award to be received. this Assessment Board has responsibility for determining the progression of students and. Personal Tutor Reference material The information which supports the aims of a unit and which students are advised to consult. as well as key personal qualities. when students have met the requirements for the award. from outside the University who moderate the assessment of students and contribute to the maintenance of academic standards in all courses of study of the University. The Board also determines Retake requirements.Progression & Awards Board A sub-committee of the Academic Board. Grading Descriptors An indicative framework which sets out the typical levels of performance required to achieve grades at each level. Personal tutors also meet individually with any student who is perceived to have potential problems. textual. the grading descriptors are set out in section 6 of this Handbook. a double unit is rated at 30 credit points. Course Leader Credit Employability External Examiners Relevant subject experts. Materials can take any form including visual. Learning Outcomes That which has been learned or a student is able to do as a result of study or Level Each unit carries a Level rating. The role of the personal tutor is to maintain an overview of an individual student’s profile and provide advice on a student’s overall progress. A common framework applies across all undergraduate courses at the University. The awareness. The member of staff responsible for the management and organisation of a course of study. related to the learning outcomes and the notional time judged necessary to achieve them. which denotes the classification of the relative academic complexity of learning outcomes associated with units. . They may also be identified by the student or suggested by staff as work develops. to maximise potential through successful university study including postgraduate study. The personal tutor may refer students to other sources of advice and support as appropriate. websites etc. A numerical value ascribed to a unit of study.

Visits in the UK or overseas selected for specific educational and cultural purposes. Retake Stage Study Visits The period of time leading up to a formal point of progression or award. If a unit is failed due to the non-submission of an assessment requirement. The member of staff responsible for the management and organisation of a designated unit. there is no opportunity for referral. Syllabus Unit Unit Leader . Where they require a financial contribution. The unit leader is responsible for organising group and individual tutorials. This opportunity is subject to qualifying conditions. A self-contained unit of study. following initial failure.Referral The means whereby a student is granted a further opportunity to be assessed in a unit. Each unit has a set of specific learning outcomes. you will be notified of any costs well in advance. The means whereby a student is able to retrieve failure following Referral. to provide you with advice and guidance on progress on the unit. The list of topics or points to be covered by a block of study. The opportunity is subject to qualifying conditions. and so may not be available to every student (see Student Regulations Handbook). and may not therefore be available to all students (see Student Regulations Handbook). and a student will receive an automatic retake (this opportunity is also subject to qualifying conditions). as appropriate.

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