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Metro Weekly - 07-11-13 - Summer Music

Metro Weekly - 07-11-13 - Summer Music

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Recruiting Republicans for Equality
With Democrats and mainstream America on board, marriage fight turns to GOP
by Justin Snow
W
HEN THE DECISION
came down from the
Supreme Court strik-
ing down Section 3 of
the Defense of Marriage Act, there was
no call to arms from the man who spent
nearly $3 million defending the federal
government’s definition of marriage as
between a man and a woman.
“Congress passed the Defense of
Marriage Act on an overwhelmingly
bipartisan basis and President Clinton
signed it into law. The House inter-
vened in this case because the consti-
tutionality of a law should be judged by
the Court, not by the president unilat-
erally,” House Speaker John Boehner
(R-Ohio) said in a June 26 statement,
referring to the defense of DOMA in
federal courts by the Republican-con-
trolled Bipartisan Legal Advisory Group
following the Obama administration’s
February 2011 decision to stop defend-
ing the constitutionality of the law.
“While I am obviously disappointed
in the ruling,” Boehner continued, “it
is always critical that we protect our
system of checks and balances. A robust
national debate over marriage will con-
tinue in the public square, and it is my
hope that states will define marriage as
the union between one man and one
woman.”
Although a reaffirmation of his belief
that same-sex couples should not have
the right to marry, it was a subdued
statement from the most visible leader
of the only branch of government par-
tially controlled by a Republican major-
ity. Moreover, it signaled the increasing
divide within the Republican Party over
marriage equality.
“There’s an acknowledgement there
of the direction the country is going
— that this is not a battle they want to
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fight because they know it’s a battle
that they can’t win or, frankly, that they
care to win,” Margaret Hoover, a con-
servative commentator and strategist
and marriage-equality supporter, said
of Boehner’s statement in an interview
with Metro Weekly.
But while Boehner punted the issue
back to the states and away from the
steps of Capitol Hill, other members
of his caucus pushed back. Rep. Tim
Huelskamp (R-Kan.), along with 28 of
the House’s more anti-gay Republican
members, proposed an amendment to
the Constitution dubbed the “Marriage
Protection Amendment.” The proposed
amendment is simple, consisting of just
two sentences: “Marriage in the United
States shall consist only of the union of
a man and a woman. Neither this Con-
stitution, nor the constitution of any
State, shall be construed to require that
marriage or the legal incidents thereof
be conferred upon any union other than
the union of a man and a woman.”
But while a president once campaigned
for re-election on such an amendment
almost a decade ago, the likelihood of
one becoming law today is close to
none.
“Perhaps 10 years ago you would
have seen Republicans walking in lock-
step talking about judicial activism and
the court’s overruling the will of the
people,” Gregory T. Angelo, executive
director of Log Cabin Republicans, told
Metro Weekly. “What you saw instead
was the only individuals who were
speaking out and engaging in histrion-
ics about judicial activism were really
a minority of Republicans who are on
a fool’s errand to try to pass a federal
marriage amendment.“
Indeed, the House last voted on a
similar constitutional amendment in
2006, when the amendment failed to
reach the 290 votes needed for passage
with a 236-187 vote. When that amend-
L
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T
News
Now online at MetroWeekly.com
Poliglot: ENDA heading to full Senate
Foodwise: Cuba Libre’s escabeche
JULY 11, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
Recruiting Republicans for Equality
LGBTNews
6
three avenues. In nearly every case, par-
ticularly for efforts in what Hoover calls
marriage equality’s “final frontier” — the
American South — Republican support
will be a necessity.
That is a reality not lost on activ-
ists. Following the Supreme Court’s June
26 rulings, the American Civil Liberties
Union announced a 50-state and $10 mil-
lion effort to bring Republicans into the
marriage equality fold over the next three
years.
“[F]or a full civil liberties victory, we
need broad-based support from coast
to coast. That’s why the ACLU is join-
ing with Republican leaders to fight to
end state-based limits on the freedom
to marry,” said ACLU Executive Direc-
tor Anthony D. Romero in a statement
announcing the hiring of Steve Schmidt,
a former adviser to Sen. John McCain’s
(R-Ariz.) 2008 presidential campaign and
President George W. Bush; and Jimmy
LaSalvia, co-founder and former execu-
tive director of GOProud, as consultants.
It’s the latest in an outreach cam-
paign by national LGBT-rights organi-
zations that have been emboldened by
polling that not only shows a shifting
nation, but an upcoming generation that
could dramatically change the landscape
for equality. Another Washington Post-
ABC News poll, released in March well
before the court’s rulings, found 81 per-
cent of Americans aged 18 to 29 support
marriage equality with support among
Republicans 18 to 49 years old standing
at 52 percent. Groups like Young Conser-
vatives for the Freedom to Marry, which
operates under the umbrella of Freedom
to Marry, have sought to organize young
conservatives in order to send a clear
message to Republican officials that voter
demographics on marriage equality will
continue to shift rapidly.
“It is a world now where young peo-
ple, they didn’t experience the culture
wars of the ’90s and the horrible atmo-
sphere we had in the conservative move-
ment in 2004,” said LaSalvia. “And now
these kids in college and coming out
of college, they’re conservative because
they never knew it wasn’t okay to be. And
they’re openly gay, because they never
knew it wasn’t okay to be.”
Following the departures of GOProud
cofounders LaSalvia and Chris Barron late
last month, the organization announced a
new leadership team of three, all of whom
are under the age of 30.
“The change in conversation is hap-
pening on both sides,” said Hoover, who
ment was introduced on June 6, 2006, it
had nearly 100 co-sponsors; Huelskamp
had an initial 28.
“Some Republicans have not yet come
to understand that this is the right thing
for all of our country to do,” said Ted
Olson, the conservative half of the star
legal duo who fought California’s Propo-
sition 8, during an appearance on CBS’s
Face the Nation. “I think the day is going
to come, maybe just in a few years, when
the Republican Party, just like the Demo-
cratic Party and all Americans, believes
in equal treatment for all our citizens.”
According to a recent Washing-
ton Post-ABC News poll, 56 percent
of Americans agree with the Supreme
Court’s DOMA ruling and 51 percent
agree with court’s decision to let stand
a lower court’s ruling to allow same-
sex marriages to resume in California.
Those numbers mirror national polls that
consistently show slightly more than 50
percent of Americans support marriage
equality.
Although 93 million Americans —
nearly a third of the U.S. population –
now live in one of the 13 states or D.C.
that permit same-sex marriage, millions
more live in states specifically prohibit-
ing marriage equality.
Human Rights Campaign President
Chad Griffin set an ambitious goal while
speaking to reporters on the steps of
the Supreme Court following June’s two
landmark decisions, vowing to bring
marriage equality to all 50 states within
the next five years. For any such goal
to become reality without a sweeping
Supreme Court ruling, and with marriage
equality already part of the Democrats’
platform, victory now depends on the
Republican Party.
“All of the advances we have made
either federally or in the states have come
with Republican support,” said HRC
spokesman Michael Cole-Schwartz. “It’s
been our strategy from Day One, know-
ing that these issues are not going to be
settled by one party, to work with allies
on both sides of the aisle.”
There are 30 states that have consti-
tutional amendments defining marriage
as between a man and a woman, and the
process for repealing such amendments
varies significantly from state to state.
The three different avenues for enacting
such a repeal generally include a voter
initiative to put the issue on the ballot;
legislation approved by state lawmakers;
and a constitutional convention. Some
states require a combination of those
has advised the American Unity Fund,
formed last year by billionaire GOP donor
Paul Singer to support Republicans who
back marriage equality. “It’s happening
on the side of traditional LGBT activ-
ist groups that are also realizing they
need to engage Republicans. So it’s not
like the onus is only on Republicans to
change. The LGBT community has done
an extraordinary job of adapting its mes-
sage in a way that speaks to the funda-
mental principles of conservatism.”
What’s more, that messaging appears
to be working and is slowly percolat-
ing from the local to the national level.
Although there are a limited number
of Republicans in Congress who sup-
port marriage equality — with Rob Port-
man (Ohio), Mark Kirk (Ill.) and Lisa
Murkowski (Alaska) in the Senate, and
Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (Fla.) and Richard
Hanna (N.Y.) in the House — more than
220 Republican lawmakers at the state
level have supported marriage equality.
Angelo says his experiences in New
York during that state’s marriage-equal-
ity battle demonstrate that an LGBT
rights coalition that includes Republi-
cans will be necessary for a broad range
of issues.
“I was chairman of Log Cabin Repub-
licans of New York at a time when the
common thinking was that in order to get
marriage equality passed in New York
state you were going to have to wrest
control of the state Senate out of Repub-
lican hands and put it in Democratic con-
trol,” Angelo said. But even after that was
achieved, the legislation suffered defeat
in 2009, only to be approved two years
later with the help of four GOP members
of the Republican-controlled Senate.
“I think that unless we, as a move-
ment, want to hit a wall,” Angelo added,
“you’re going to need more Republican
support.” l
JULY 11, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
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LGBTNews
8
eign-born spouse eligible for a green card.
With that barrier lifted, Lal’s partner,
Lindsay Schubiner, suggested getting mar-
ried so that Lal could finally obtain her
green card and stay in the U.S. permanently.
Because Lal has long been an important
leader in the fight to obtain legal status for
undocumented youth – a “DREAMer,” so
named for the proposed Development,
Relief, and Education for Alien Minors
(DREAM) Act – the couple felt it fitting
to combine their wedding ceremony with
the annual “DREAM Graduation,” a sym-
bolic event where youth activists in the
immigration-rights fight gather and re-
ceive diplomas for their work and advo-
cacy on behalf of the cause.
“We’re trying to celebrate the inter-
section of our communities, that some of
us are queer, that some of us can get relief
from deportation by getting married, if
we have bona fide marriages,” Lal said of
her decision to hold a symbolic wedding
ceremony alongside the DREAM gradua-
tion. “Graduation is one of those markers
in life, just like marriage is, so we decided
by John Riley
T
UESDAY WAS A DAY OF
celebration for Prerna Lal.
Not only was it her wedding
day, but she also had the op-
portunity to make a meaningful state-
ment about a pressing issue.
The undocumented, queer-identified,
immigration-rights activist has dedicated
14 years – half of her life – to immigration
advocacy since her family brought her to
the United States from Fiji. During her
family’s residency-application process,
Lal passed the threshold of turning 18,
removing her from her family’s applica-
tion and sending her alone to the back of
the immigration waiting line and a legal
nightmare of deportation proceedings.
But Lal’s fate changed June 26 after the
U.S. Supreme Court ruled Section 3 of the
Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) uncon-
stitutional, paving the way for same-sex
binational spouses to be recognized by the
federal government and making the for-
to combine those two events together and
have a celebration of both.”
Dulce Guerrero, a young DREAMer
from Georgia and one of the organizers
of the July 11 event, said the graduation,
which was sponsored by the National Im-
migrant Youth Alliance, DreamACTivist.
org and the LGBT-focused Immigration
Equality organization at the Lutheran
Church of the Reformation on Capitol
Hill, serves as a chance for young activ-
ists to talk about their accomplishments
working on various initiatives, from stop-
ping deportations to pushing for in-state
tuition rates for undocumented students.
“The wedding came into play after the
Supreme Court ruling on DOMA,” Guer-
rero told Metro Weekly. “It meant a lot to
the immigrant families and partners who
will now be able to sponsor their loved
ones. So we also decided to celebrate the
wedding of Prerna and Lindsay. Prerna’s
very well known and loved by everyone,
so we wanted to celebrate that.”
Surrounded by friends, fellow activ-
ists, and several youth who either donned
caps and gowns or T-shirts reading “I
Am Undocumented,” Lal and Schubiner
exchanged vows following the DREAM
Graduation. As the couple walked down
the aisle to leave the church after the cere-
mony, organizers led the crownd in chants
of “Undocumented! Unafraid!” or “Sin pa-
peles! Sin miedo!” as they had throughout
the preceding graduation ceremony.
Following the event, Lal explained
that Tuesday’s ceremony was merely
symbolic, but added that it would “prob-
ably be more exciting” than her official
state-recognized marriage ceremony, in
which she and Schubiner will be signing a
marriage certificate. She said the symbol-
ism was important to draw attention to
the fact that, due to the recent Supreme
Court decision, some members of the
undocumented and queer communities,
which overlap, can now cement their sta-
tus as citizens.
Lal says she’s already seen some same-
sex binational couples from other states
making treks to the District or the 13
states with marriage equality to wed and
remove the threat of deportation.
“The great thing about immigration is
that place of marriage controls,” Lal told
Metro Weekly. “All you need is a bona fide
marriage. You can live in Utah, travel to
California, get married, and you’re fine.
It’s sad for people who are too old to trav-
el, or too poor to travel, but if you can get
to any of the states that let you marry, you
can get your green card.” l
JULY 11, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
DREAMer’s
Post-DOMA Big Day
Annual DREAM Graduation includes wedding ceremony for
prominent activist and her partner
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SATURDAY, JULY 13
ADVENTURING outdoors group hikes 5 easy
miles in Patapsco River State Park. Bring
beverages, lunch, bug spray, about $12. Carpool 9
a.m. from Greenbelt Metro. Karen, 703-395-3962.
adventuring.org.
D.C. Aquatics Club (DCAC) hosts 22ND ANNUAL
MARYLAND SWIM FOR LIFE, a fundraiser for
HIV/AIDS organizations and for Chester River
Association. Chestertown, Md. swimforlife.
swimdcac.org.
The DC Center’s CENTER GLOBAL holds
monthly meeting. Noon-1:30 p.m. 1318 U St. NW.
202-682-2245, thedccenter.org.
WEEKLY EVENTS
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV
services (by appointment). 202-291-4707 or
andromedatransculturalhealth.org.
BET MISHPACHAH, founded by members of
the LGBT community, holds Saturday morning
Shabbat services, 10 a.m., followed by kiddush
luncheon. Services in DCJCC Community Room,
1529 16th St. NW. betmish.org.
BRAZILIAN GLBT GROUP, including others
interested in Brazilian culture, meets. For
location/time, email braziliangaygroup@
yahoo.com.
DC FRONT RUNNERS running/walking/social
club welcomes all levels for exercise in a fun and
supportive environment, socializing afterward.
Meet 9:30 a.m., 23rd & P Streets NW, for a walk;
or 10 a.m. for fun run. dcfrontrunners.org.
DIGNITY NORTHERN VIRGINIA sponsors
Mass for LGBT community, family and friends.
6:30 p.m., Immanuel Church-on-the-Hill,
3606 Seminary Road, Alexandria. All welcome.
dignitynova.org.
DC SENTINELS basketball team meets at Turkey
Thicket Recreation Center, 1100 Michigan Ave.
NE, 2-4 p.m. For players of all levels, gay or
straight. teamdcbasketball.org.
GAY LANGUAGE CLUB discusses critical
languages and foreign languages. 7 p.m. Nellie’s,
900 U St. NW. RVSP preferred. brendandarcy@
gmail.com.
IDENTITY offers free and confidential HIV
testing in Takoma Park, 7676 New Hampshire
Ave., Suite 411. Walk-ins 12-3 p.m. For
appointments other hours, call 301-422-2398.
SUNDAY, JULY 14
LAMBDA SCI-FI, monthly meeting/social of
GLBT sci-fi/fantasy/horror fans. Bring snack or
nonalcoholic drink to share. 1:30 p.m. 1425 S St.
NW. James, 202-232-3141. lambdascifi.org.
BURGUNDY CRESCENT, a gay volunteer
organization, helps DC Central Kitchen. To
participate visit burgundycrescent.org.
US HELPING US hosts a Narcotics Anonymous
Meeting, 6:30-7:30 p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave. NW.
The group is independent of UHU. 202-446-1100.
FRIDAY, JULY 12
WEEKLY EVENTS
METROHEALTH CENTER offers free, rapid HIV
testing. Appointment needed. 1012 14th St. NW,
Suite 700. 202-638-0750.
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV
services (by appointment). 202-291-4707,
andromedatransculturalhealth.org.
BET MISHPACHAH, founded by members of the
GLBT community, holds Friday night Shabbat
services followed by “oneg” social hour. 8-9:30
p.m. Services in DCJCC Community Room, 1529
16th St. NW. betmish.org.
GAY DISTRICT holds facilitated discussion for
GBTQ men, 18-35, first and third Fridays. 8:30
p.m. The DC Center, 1318 U St. NW. 202-682-
2245, gaydistrict.org.
GAY MARRIED MEN’S ASSOCIATION
(GAMMA) is a peer-support group that meets in
Dupont Circle every second and fourth Friday at
7:30 p.m. gay-married.com or GAMMAinDC1@
yahoo.com.
HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health,
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St.
NW, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 202-745-7000,
whitman-walker.org.
SMYAL’S REC NIGHT provides a social
atmosphere for GLBT and questioning youth,
featuring dance parties, vogue nights, movies and
games. catherine.chu@smyal.org.
SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 3-6 p.m., by
appointment and walk-in, for youth 21 and
younger. Youth Center, 410 7th St. SE. 202-567-
3155, testing@smyal.org.
TRANSGENDER HEALTH EMPOWERMENT
“Diva Chat” support group. 6-8 p.m., 1414 North
Capitol St. NE. Snacks provided. 202-636-1646.
THURSDAY, JULY 11
BURGUNDY CRESCENT, a gay volunteer
organization, helps at Food & Friends. To
participate, visit burgundycrescent.org.
The DC Center’s CRYSTAL METH WORKING
GROUP holds monthly meeting. 6:30-7:30 p.m.
1318 U St. NW. letstalkaboutmeth.org.
WEEKLY EVENTS
METROHEALTH CENTER offers free, rapid HIV
testing. Appointment needed. 1012 14th St. NW,
Suite 700. 202-638-0750.
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV services
(by appointment). Call 202-291-4707, or visit
andromedatransculturalhealth.org.
DC LAMBDA SQUARES gay and lesbian
square-dancing group features mainstream
through advanced square dancing at the
National City Christian Church, 5 Thomas Circle
NW, 7-9:30 p.m. Casual dress. 301-257-0517,
dclambdasquares.org.
The DULLES TRIANGLES Northern Virginia
social group meets for happy hour at Sheraton in
Reston, 11810 Sunrise Valley Drive, second-floor
bar, 7-9 p.m. All welcome. dullestriangles.com.
HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health. The
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St.
NW, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center,
2301 MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Call 202-
745-7000. Visit whitman-walker.org.
IDENTITY offers free and confidential HIV
testing in Gaithersburg, 414 East Diamond Ave.,
and in Takoma Park, 7676 New Hampshire Ave.,
Suite 411. Walk-ins 2-6 p.m. For appointments
other hours, call Gaithersburg, 301-300-9978, or
Takoma Park, 301-422-2398.
SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 3-5 p.m., by
appointment and walk-in, for youth 21 and
younger. 202-567-3155 or testing@smyal.org.
WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE for young
LBTQ women, 13-21, interested in leadership
development. 5-6:30 p.m. SMYAL Youth Center,
410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3163, catherine.chu@
smyal.org
Metro Weekly’s Community Calendar highlights important events in
the D.C.-area LGBT community, from alternative social events to
volunteer opportunities. Event information should be sent by email to
calendar@MetroWeekly.com. Deadline for inclusion is noon
of the Friday before Thursday’s publication. Questions about
the calendar may be directed to the Metro Weekly office at
202-638-6830 or the calendar email address.
LGBTCommunityCalendar
JULY 11, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
ADVENTURING outdoors group hikes 9 strenuous
miles, 2,800 feet elevation gain, for Shenandoah
National Park waterfalls. Bring beverages, lunch,
sunscreen, bug spray, about $20. Carpool 9 a.m.
from East Falls Church Metro Kiss & Ride lot. Jeff,
301-775-9660. adventuring.org.
CHRYSALIS arts & culture group holds bi-monthly
Potluck Social in co-op party room near Courthouse
Metro. Bring dish to share. 7 p.m. Kevin, 703-464-
9040, ext. 1; kgiles27@gmail.com.
WEEKLY EVENTS
BETHEL CHURCH-DC progressive and radically
inclusive church holds services at 11:30 a.m. 2217
Minnesota Ave. SE. 202-248-1895, betheldc.org.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST welcomes all to 10:30 a.m. service, 945 G
St. NW. firstuccdc.org or 202-628-4317.
HOPE UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST welcomes
GLBT community for worship. 10:30 a.m., 6130 Old
Telegraph Road, Alexandria. hopeucc.org.
METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF
NORTHERN VIRGINIA services at 11 a.m., led by
Rev. Onetta Brooks. Children’s Sunday School, 11
a.m. 10383 Democracy Lane, Fairfax. 703-691-0930,
mccnova.com.
NATIONAL CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH, inclusive
church with GLBT fellowship, offers gospel worship,
8:30 a.m., and traditional worship, 11 a.m. 5 Thomas
Circle NW. 202-232-0323, nationalcitycc.org.
11 METROWEEKLY.COM JULY 11, 2013
ST. STEPHEN AND THE INCARNATION, an
“interracial, multi-ethnic Christian Community”
offers services in English, 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m., and
in Spanish at 5:15 p.m. 1525 Newton St. NW. 202-
232-0900, saintstephensdc.org.
UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH OF
SILVER SPRING invites LGBTQ families and
individuals of all creeds and cultures to join the
church. Services 9:15 and 11:15 a.m. 10309 New
Hampshire Ave. uucss.org.
MONDAY, JULY 15
WEEKLY EVENTS
METROHEALTH CENTER offers free, rapid HIV
testing. No appointment needed. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. 1012
14th St. NW, Suite 700. 202-638-0750.
The DC Center hosts COFFEE DROP-IN FOR THE
SENIOR LGBT COMMUNITY. 10 a.m.-noon. 1318 U
St. NW. 202-682-2245, thedccenter.org.
Michael Brazell teaches BEARS DO YOGA, a
program of The DC Center. 6:30 p.m., Green
Lantern, 1335 Green Court NW. No cost,
newcomers welcome. 202-682-2245,
thedccenter.org.
GETEQUAL meets 6:30-8 p.m. at Quaker House,
2111 Florida Ave. NW. getequal.wdc@gmail.com.
KARING WITH INDIVIDUALITY (K.I.) SERVICES,
3333 Duke St., Alexandria, offers free “rapid” HIV
testing and counseling, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 703-823-4401.
SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 3-5 p.m., by
appointment and walk-in, for youth 21 and younger.
Youth Center, 410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3155 or
testing@smyal.org.
12 JULY 11, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
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call Gaithersburg at 301-300-9978 or Takoma Park
at 301-422-2398.
SUPPORT GROUP FOR LGBTQ YOUTH ages
13-21 meets at SMYAL, 410 7th St. SE, 5-6:30 p.m.
Cathy Chu, 202-567-3163, catherine.chu@
smyal.org.
METROHEALTH CENTER offers free, rapid HIV
testing. Appointment needed. 1012 14th St. NW,
Suite 700. 202-638-0750.
US HELPING US hosts a support group for black
gay men 40 and older. 7-9 p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave.
NW. 202-446-1100.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 17
BOOKMEN DC, an informal men’s gay-literature
group, discusses The Ballad of the Sad Café by
Carson McCullers. 7:30 p.m. AFSA, 2101 E St. NW.
All welcome. bookmendc.blogspot.com.
THE TOM DAVOREN SOCIAL BRIDGE CLUB
meets for Social Bridge. 7:30 p.m. Dignity Center,
721 8th St. SE. For a partner, call 301-345-1571.
WEEKLY EVENTS
AD LIB, a group for freestyle conversation, meets
about 7:45 p.m., covered-patio area of Cosi, 1647
20th St. NW. All welcome. Jamie, 703-892-8567.
IDENTITY offers free and confidential HIV testing
in Gaithersburg, 414 East Diamond Ave. Walk-
ins 2-7 p.m. For appointments other hours, call
Gaithersburg at 301-300-9978.
HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health. D.C.:
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St. NW,
9 a.m.-6 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center, 2301
MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 202-745-7000,
whitman-walker.org.
PRIME TIMERS OF DC, social club for mature gay
men, hosts weekly happy hour/dinner. 6:30 p.m.,
Windows Bar above Dupont Italian Kitchen, 1637
17th St. NW. Carl, 703-573-8316; or Bill,
703-671-2454.
THURSDAY, JULY 18
HRC holds a kickoff party for its 17th Annual
National Dinner, Oct. 5. 6:30-8:30 pm. Policy, 1904
14th St. NW. RSVP via Facebook event page. hrc.org.
SATURDAY, JULY 20
NovaSalud presents EXTRAVAGANZA FOR
LIFE! BREAKING THE CYCLE OF STIGMA
TRANSGENDER FASHION SHOW. 7-10 p.m. $15.
V3 Lounge (Majestic), 6763 Wilson Blvd., Falls
Church. transfashion.eventbrite.com. l
1502 Massachusetts Ave. SE. Charles, 240-764-
5748. ecumenicon.org.
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV
services (by appointment). 202-291-4707,
andromedatransculturalhealth.org.
ASIANS AND FRIENDS weekly dinner in Dupont/
Logan Circle area, 6:30 p.m. afwash@aol.com,
afwashington.net.
Whitman-Walker Health’s GAY MEN’S HEALTH
AND WELLNESS/STD CLINIC opens at 6 p.m.,
1701 14th St. NW. Patients are seen on walk-in basis.
No-cost screening for HIV, syphilis, gonorrhea and
chlamydia. Hepatitis and herpes testing available
for fee. whitman-walker.org.
HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health. D.C.:
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St.
NW, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center,
2301 MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. For an
appointment call 202-745-7000. Visit
whitman-walker.org.
THE HIV WORKING GROUP of THE DC CENTER
hosts “Packing Party,” where volunteers assemble
safe-sex kits of condoms and lube. 7 p.m., Green
Lantern, 1335 Green Court NW. thedccenter.org.
IDENTITY offers free and confidential HIV testing
in Gaithersburg, 414 East Diamond Ave., and in
Takoma Park, 7676 New Hampshire Ave., Suite 411.
Walk-ins 2-6 p.m. For appointments other hours,
US HELPING US hosts a black gay men’s evening
affinity group. 3636 Georgia Ave. NW.
202-446-1100.
WASHINGTON WETSKINS Water Polo Team
practices 7-9 p.m. Takoma Aquatic Center, 300
Van Buren St. NW. Newcomers with at least basic
swimming ability always welcome. Tom, 703-299-
0504, secretary@wetskins.org, wetskins.org.
Whitman-Walker Health HIV/AIDS SUPPORT
GROUP for newly diagnosed individuals, meets
7 p.m. Registration required. 202-939-7671,
hivsupport@whitman-walker.org.
HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health. D.C.:
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St.
NW, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center,
2301 MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. For an
appointment call 202-745-7000. Visit
whitman-walker.org.
TUESDAY, JULY 16
The DC Center’s GENDERQUEER DISCUSSION
GROUP meets for “people outside of the gender
binary.” 7-8 p.m. 1318 U St. NW. 202-682-2245,
thedccenter.org.
WEEKLY EVENTS
A COMPANY OF STRANGERS, a theater chorus,
meets 7:30-9:30 p.m. A GLBTA and SATB looking
for actors, singers, crew. Open Hearth Foundation,
JULY 11, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
FOR MORE CALENDAR LISTINGS
PLEASE VISIT
WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM
15 PURCHASE YOUR PHOTO AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE/
scene
scan this tag
with your
smartphone
for bonus scene
pics online!
Celebrating 35 Years of
Love, Life & Music benefit
for Beautiful U Yes U
Saturday, July 6
Mova
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
WARD MORRISON
17
ONE OF MY FEW
hard and fast rules
of life is “Always
bring a book.”
It fills up all
those interstitial
moments in life
spent waiting for
others. Given that
I rarely venture
out of my house without an iPad or a
Kindle, these days I’m packing a full
library wherever I go.
I’m the type of person who’ll read
just about anything, so it’s no surprise
that I also believe in reading things I
don’t agree with. Although, to be hon-
est, this is more of a general guideline
rather than a rule — given the descent
into crazy town by much of the right
wing since Barack Obama moved into
the White House, I’ve felt comfortable
reducing my dose of wackadoodle from
the once-erudite National Review.
Still, I do try to keep up. That copy of
Jonah Goldberg’s Liberal Fascism isn’t
on my bookshelf for its literary quality.
That’s political reading, though.
When it comes to novels, where I spend
the majority of my off-line reading time,
I have tried not to pick and choose
authors by their political stances. For
example, Iain M. Banks, who sadly died
far too young last month, was far enough
to my political left that he could have
been on one of the fantastical planets
he wrote about. Yet I’ve devoured his
science-fiction novels because they are
radically inventive, beautifully written
and emotionally compelling.
On the other hand, I don’t both-
er with the militaristic, fascist fetish-
ism of Tom Clancy and Brad Thor,
less because of the politics that bleed
through the prose and more because
the prose itself bores me. Life is too
short to read bad books.
Which brings me to Orson Scott
Card. I’ve known his name for decades,
ever since I was kid waiting for my
monthly box of books from the Science
Fiction Book Club to materialize in my
mailbox. But I never read him until the
early 1990s, when I picked up a battered
paperback of his suspense/horror novel
Lost Boys.
While I’m not going to go back and
re-read the novel in order to fully explain
what went wrong with it — the same as
I wouldn’t rip off my own toenail to
better recount the time a motorcycle
fell on my foot — Card’s tale of ghosts
and a pedophilic serial killer managed
to exude a homophobia that ensured I
never picked up another of his books.
It’s not an anti-Mormon thing for
me to avoid spending money on the
Card oeuvre; I’m actually a fan of Bran-
don Sanderson, one of the more suc-
cessful fantasy writers working today
and a Mormon who teaches at Brigham
Young University. Card just happens
to be a special case, in that the antigay
vibes I got from his work have long
been amplified in his hateful screeds
against LGBT rights and his member-
ship on the board of the National Orga-
nization for Marriage (NOM).
For years, Card has meant business
when it comes to fighting gay rights. But
now that the big-budget movie version
of his most famous novel, Ender’s Game,
is set to hit theaters, it’s just business.
Declaring the issue of gay marriage
“moot” (surely a surprise to NOM),
he tells Entertainment Weekly, “Now it
will be interesting to see whether the
victorious proponents of gay marriage
will show tolerance toward those who
disagreed with them when the issue
was still in dispute.”
You don’t spend decades fighting
against equal rights for gays and then
expect a “No harm, no foul” from all
the queers you hope will spend money
to see your movie. Instead, you expect a
full-throated, Dick-Cheney-esque, “Go
fuck yourself.”
Geeks Out is encouraging LGBT
people to pledge not to spend money to
see Ender’s Game. While it may be my
rule to ignore the politics of novelists,
every rule has its exception. Card has
repeatedly shown he has no need for
homosexuals; he shouldn’t have any
need for our money, either. l
Card’s Game
Orson Scott Card pleads for “tolerance” of his anti-gay views,
but what he really wants is your money
JULY 11, 2013
VOLUME 20 / ISSUE 11
PUBLISHERS
Sean Bugg, Randy Shulman
EDITORIAL
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Randy Shulman
ART DIRECTOR
Todd Franson
MANAGING EDITOR
Will O’Bryan
STAFF WRITER
John Riley
POLITICAL EDITOR
Justin Snow
SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER
Ward Morrison
CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER
Julian Vankim
CONTRIBUTING ILLUSTRATORS
Scott G. Brooks, Christopher Cunetto
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Brandon Harrison, Chris Heller, Rhuaridh Marr,
Troy Petenbrink, Richard Rosendall,
Doug Rule, Kate Wingfield
WEBMASTER
David Uy
MULTIMEDIA
Aram Vartian
ADMINISTRATIVE / PRODUCTION ASSISTANT
Julian Vankim
ADVERTISING & SALES
DIRECTOR OF SALES
Randy Shulman
NATIONAL ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE
Rivendell Media Co.
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PATRON SAINT
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COVER PHOTOGRAPHY
Lindsey Byrnes
METRO WEEKLY
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© 2013 Jansi LLC.
LGBTOpinion
by Sean Bugg
METROWEEKLY.COM JULY 11, 2013
THERE ARE A
couple compa-
nies I avoid simply
because my polite
letters regarding
dreadful customer
service went unan-
swered. Although
I steer clear, I’ve
never asked anyone else to avoid these
companies. These are my windmills alone.
Then comes Stolichnaya Vodka and
the question of Russia’s sad devolution
into second-rate state that makes the
LGBT community its No. 1 scapegoat. To
boycott or not to boycott?
The answer may have been easier in
2007, when longtime activist Michael
Petrelis and others launched a Stoli boy-
cott to protest violence against LGBT
there are essentially two iterations of the
same brand. One is wholly Russian. The
other is a multinational product.
SPI’s chief marketing officer, Marco
Ferrari, writing from SPI’s offices in Lux-
embourg, summarized the legal issue in a
July 4 email response to my query about
his company’s history – if any – of sup-
port for Russia’s LGBT community.
“[Y]ou might not be aware that SPI,
the owner of Stoli, does not operate with
the Stolichnaya Brand in Russia,” Ferrari
wrote, in part. “In Russia the trademark
is owned by a State controlled entity
that has nothing to do with SPI. SPI’s
interests in Russia are primarily focused
on farming (wheat and rye fields for our
vodka), sourcing our ingredients and dis-
tillation. … We at SPI firmly oppose the
beliefs supported by the Russian Govern-
ment in relation to the LGBT community
and were we able to operate in Russia we
would actively demonstrate our support
as we do around the world.”
In other words, if you don’t want to
support Russian Stoli, don’t buy it when
you’re in Russia. There might be an argu-
ment to be made for boycotting the brand
of Stolichnaya we get outside of Russia,
considering the ties SPI still has with
that country. As far as I’m concerned,
however, the enemy of my enemy is my
friend whenever possible.
And, as I am a member of the LGBT
community, the Russian government has
clearly shown itself to be my enemy.
Here at home we’ve made substantial
progress, though we’ll always have more
to accomplish. But just as we’ve argued
that we can push for both the passage
of an inclusive Employment Non-Dis-
crimination Act and an executive order
instructing the federal government to
hire only those companies with such
workplace protections, so too must we
work simultaneously inside and outside
our borders for LGBT equality.
From Sexual Minorities Uganda, Leb-
anon’s Helem or the Russian LGBT net-
work, there are any number of foreign
groups to support. The DC Center’s Cen-
ter Global group is a local, grassroots ave-
nue for getting involved with the world
right here. With the lives of our brothers
and sisters on the line, we’ve got to figure
out what we can do, not what we can give
up. Meanwhile, I’ll save the boycott for
Ender’s Game.
Will O’Bryan is Metro Weekly’s
managing editor. Contact him at
wobryan@MetroWeekly or follow him
@wobryan. l
people in Russia.
Six years later, President Vladimir
Putin has signed – as announced by the
Kremlin during the 44th anniversary
weekend of the Stonewall Uprising – the
law against expressing anything that
might be deemed “propaganda of nontra-
ditional sexual relations.”
As the U.K.’s The Guardian newspaper
describes the ban, “Hefty fines can now
be imposed on those who provide infor-
mation about the lesbian, gay, bisexual
and transgender community to minors
or hold gay pride rallies.” Beyond the
law itself, there is also a stomach-turning
record of the violence against those who
protested the legislation outside the State
Duma June 11.
With this level of state-sanctioned
hate, a boycott of anything Russian might
be obvious. Defining Stolichnaya Vodka as
Russian, however, is not as easy as it once
was. Following a court battle between
the Russian government and SPI Group,
18
LGBTOpinion
Protecting Our Pink Planet
Russia’s latest is another call for greater global activism
by Will O’Bryan
JULY 11, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
marketplace
19 METROWEEKLY.COM JULY 11, 2013
20 JULY 11, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
21 METROWEEKLY.COM JULY 11, 2013
22 JULY 11, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
I
T’S ALL FUN. AND GAY ‘TIL SOMEONE LOSES THEIR RIGHTS.”
The phrase comes from a T-shirt sold by the rock band fun. on its website
and at its concerts. The tagline on the shirt, which benefits the LGBT-rights
organization Revel & Riot, reads “LGBTQ Equality Now.”
“The band has just always used whatever platform we had to raise money,
raise awareness and then, as we got bigger and bigger, we realized we could do
even more good work,” says fun.’s guitarist Jack Antonoff.
It’s certainly been a whirlwind year and a half for the New York trio led by
lead vocalist Nate Ruess and also featuring multi-instrumentalist Andrew Dost.
Earlier this year, fun. – the period is to distinguish the group from a punctua-
tion-less Scandinavian noise rock band – won two Grammys, for Best New Art-
ist and Song of the Year, the latter for its towering hit anthem “We Are Young.”
The 29-year-old Antonoff has spearheaded the group’s pro-LGBT activism,
including founding the LGBT-supportive nonprofit The Ally Coalition. He
spoke to Metro Weekly not long after the Supreme Court issued its historic rul-
ings on same-sex marriage late last month.
“When everything does get completely sorted,” Antonoff says, “I will just be
the happiest person to go to a hundred gay weddings, and get married myself
one day. But until that day, getting married is not something that I would feel
comfortable [doing].”
Fortunately the feeling’s mutual. His girlfriend, Lena Dunham of HBO’s
Girls, has publicly said as much. Says Antonoff: “It’s nice to be united in that.”
METRO WEEKLY: What triggered your strong support for the LGBT community?
JACK ANTONOFF: About five or six years ago, I just started thinking about it
more and more, and talking about it more with my group of friends. A lot of
my friends are gay. I was watching their lives and how all these things connect
them. And then I hit a point, which I think a lot of Americans have hit, where
it just became the most obvious thing in the world. It was a complete human-
rights issue, it’s the way we should all be. And then it just grew from there.
MW: I understand you started The Ally Coalition with your sister, Rachel.
ANTONOFF: Yeah. She’s been kind of on the same trajectory as I have on a lot of
these things. We’d been talking about it for years, and it’s just a process that
we’ve gone through together.
MW: Are your parents on board too?
ANTONOFF: Yeah they’re incredibly supportive. I was very lucky to grow up in
a forward-thinking family. I think my parents did a great job of raising me in a
way where homosexuality wasn’t a strange thing at all. When I was a teenager,
gay rights were really starting to be discussed. And in my 20s, it really started
to get out there. I don’t have a lot of, “This is how it’s always been.” I’m from a
generation of fighting against homophobia.
In being for gay rights, I think it’s important to understand where people
are coming from. And my parents are from a time when the government was
reporting that being gay is a mental illness. And
that was an accepted fact – it’s obviously not a
fact. Just watching them have the transforma-
tion of like, “Yeah, equal rights would be great.”
Or, “Sure, I would love it if gay people could get
married the same way we can.” Watching them
go from that sentiment to realizing that it’s the
civil-rights issue of our time; realizing that it’s
massive and it’s not just some sort of casual like,
“Yeah, I support it” – that’s been amazing.
MW: But even among your generation, there are
still some holdouts. There are still some people
who don’t support LGBT equality.
ANTONOFF: Without a doubt. That’s kind of the
scary thing. For the most part I’m very proud of
my generation, but you’re right, there are hold-
outs. And that’s the religious thing.
June 26 was a historic and incredible day, but
The fun.
Activist
Jack Antonoff of fun. is not only a pop-music powerhouse,
but an outstanding advocate for the LGBTQ community
INTERVIEW BY DOUG RULE
23 METROWEEKLY.COM JULY 11, 2013
it also still makes you think of what lies ahead.
And it will be ongoing even when there is full
equality, and there’s no difference in any rights
— there’s still going to be decades of assimila-
tion and people coming to terms and figuring
the whole thing out. It’s definitely tough when
there’s a book out there that calls homosexuality
a sin that a lot of people feel very strongly about.
MW: Explain a bit more about what you do with
The Ally Coalition. I understand you do some sort
of pro-LGBT messaging at concerts.
ANTONOFF: On the very top level there’s just
advocacy for LGBT rights. On social media,
people fill out these signs, “I’m an ally because…
I support marriage equality.” Sometimes it’s as
simple as, “because I believe love is love.” Some-
times it’s as deep as, “because I want my father
to be happy.” When people share that and it goes
out to a hundred of their friends on Facebook, or a thousand, whatever it is —
it’s these small things that just really take fear out of the issue. When people’s
family members or friends who maybe don’t support it, or don’t know where
they stand, they see these things and go, “Oh, so-and-so supports equal rights.”
And even if they don’t necessarily take that as a moment to really get all the
information and find out, it’s just a little bit more familiar.
But then on the much deeper level you have the trickle down of what dis-
crimination really means. One thing we’ve realized is, there’s this massive pop-
ulation of LGBTQ homeless teens. Forty percent of homeless kids are LGBTQ,
and it’s because they’re being kicked out of their homes after coming out. So
we’ve been working with these different centers, like the Ruth Ellis Center in
Detroit. There are great places all over the country that really cater to this very
specifically. We’ll do anything from selling a poster, to a specific show with all
the money going to the Ellis Center, to a dollar from every ticket to a fun. con-
cert going to The Ally Coalition, which then gets divvied up and goes to several
organizations and shelters like this.
MW: You just wrote a song with an explicitly pro-LGBT message with Sarah
Bareilles called “Brave.” Do you think you’ll write such an anthem with fun. in
the future?
ANTONOFF: I do, just because it’s on my mind and it’s very present. And you
know my favorite songs and my favorite artists are the ones that reflect on soci-
ety, in the moment. When Sarah and I wrote “Brave,” we were having this gen-
eral conversation about coming out and the state of marriage equality and the
state of rights. And it just sparked this thing in her when she started exploring
the concept of being brave. I think it takes an unbelievable amount of bravery
to come out. I also think it takes an unbelievable amount of bravery to support
and to be an ally, depending on where you are and who you’re surrounded by.
It’s not easy. It’s getting easier, but even in the context of my life, I realize it’s
not always easy to stand on the right side of history. Sometimes you take a lot
of guff for it.
MW: In addition to “Brave,” there’s also Macklemore having a hit with “Same
Love.”
ANTONOFF: Yeah, it’s incredible to see. The fact that they’re starting to play
“Same Love” on the radio — first of all, that’s just awesome. But second of all,
I think that really shows great progress. I don’t know if that song would have
been on the radio five years ago. I don’t know if people would have heard that
song and been like, “Yeah, this is what I want on the radio.” I think there might
have been more resistance. It’s a great statement to how far we’ve come.
MW: Is there a certain fun. song that stands out or means something special to
you?
ANTONOFF: “Carry On” always means a lot to me, just because you’d have to be
a robot to not, on a daily basis, feel some sense of inadequacy or helplessness. I
love playing that song. I love seeing how it affects people. I love reading online
what people say about it. My favorite songs are the ones that are built to con-
nect large groups of people, and that’s what I get from that song. And seeing
2,000 people shriek back “Carry On” while we’re playing it is an experience
that makes me feel as one with humanity that has no equal.
MW: That is something distinctive about your music — fun.’s songs are mostly big,
joyous, sing-along anthem-style numbers. So it must be a trip to perform them live.
ANTONOFF: It really is. Watching people sing along is the greatest joy. Even a
decade ago, playing really small clubs, the first thing I would always look for is
the one or two people singing a lyric — the greatest feeling on Earth. And that
feeling, whether it’s one or two people, or 20,000 people, it’s just magical every
time.
MW: What can we expect from the concert itself?
ANTONOFF: You can expect a band that’s just been in a complete tornado over the
past two years and has somehow landed on their feet, playing bigger than ever,
happier than ever, and more in touch with why we’re doing what we’re doing
than ever — and that it’s 100 percent reflected in the tour.
Jack Antonoff performs with fun. Saturday, July 20 at Merriweather Post Pavil-
ion, 10475 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia, Md. Doors at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are
$35 to $45. Call 800-551-SEAT or visit merriweathermusic.com. l
L
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24 JULY 11, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
B
ACK IN THE MID-’90S BETTE MIDLER TOOK INSPIRATION FROM
Bernadette Cooper for her popular Diva Las Vegas revue. “They love me, they
hate me, but they all say, I look good,” Midler said, performing a number origi-
nally written by Cooper.
And now Cooper is returning the favor while also, in a sense, reclaiming “I Look
Good,” which the late gay-club superstar DJ Peter Rauhofer further remade as one of
his signature dance hits under the handle Club 69.
“For three or four years now I’ve wanted to do a show, kind of like Bette Midler
on steroids — or acid,” explains Cooper. In Klymaxx featuring Bernadette Cooper: Diva
and A Turntable, Cooper gets into character as an aging diva trying to keep up with two
incredibly talented singers, played by Erin Stevenson and Myra Washington, whom she
teasingly calls “young bitches.” Washington also doubles as a DJ on the titular turn-
table, with additional support from sharp
drummer Del Harrison.
For the amusing show, Cooper and
company perform “I Look Good” as well
as other songs you no doubt know from
Cooper’s repertoire. The focus is chiefly
on her hit-making career as the founder
and leader of the ’80s-era all-girl group
Klymaxx — think sassy funk jams “Meet-
ing In The Ladies Room” and “The Men
All Pause,” or the R&B ballad “I Miss
You.” The band was slightly ahead of its
time in the way that Cooper talked, even
lightly rapped, as much as she actually
sang her lyrics.
A native of Los Angeles, Cooper is
“completely 100 percent devoted to music”
after getting sidetracked by other business
and personal pursuits. She intends to bol-
ster her revue by continuing to tweak its
content as well as adding technology to
allow for graphical projections. She also
wants to make sure the show finds its nat-
ural gay audience. At least during a recent
version of the show in New York, Cooper
included a number criticizing a closeted
“Down-Low” subculture, and she offered
a pro-marriage-equality shout-out to our
now “DOMA-free” country.
“When I first started putting this con-
cept together, I told my promoter I want-
ed to focus on the gay community and do
more gay festivals, ‘cause I just think they
would love it,” Cooper says. “If I didn’t do
anything else but gay events every year,
I’d be fine, because I love to serve the
fabulous energy.”
Bernadette Cooper performs Friday, July
19, and Saturday, July 20, at 8 p.m. and 10
p.m., at Blues Alley, 1073 Wisconsin Ave.
NW. Tickets are $55, plus $10 minimum
purchase. Call 202-337-4141 or visit
bluesalley.com. l
DJ TWiN
TempTation/Nellie’s
1. Axwell - Center of The Universe (Remode)
2. Robin Thicke ft. Pharrell Williams &
T.I. - Blurred Lines
3. Macklemore & Ryan Lewis - Can’t Hold Us
4. Zedd ft. Foxes - Clarity
5. Justin Timberlake - Mirrors
Amusing Klymaxx
Bernadette Cooper describes her new revue as
“Bette Midler on steroids – or acid”
BY DOUG RULE
D
E
A
D
R
A

B
R
Y
A
N
T
Scientific Songwriter
Chris Pureka offers subtle cues to her
background as a microbiologist
BY DOUG RULE
THE TOP FI VE SONGS OF SUMMER 2013
As submitted by area DJs
W
ILL IT BE ROBIN THICKE OR DAFT PUNK? SELENA GOMEZ OR
Miley Cyrus? Just as last year, there’s no obvious winner at this point
in time for the crown of Song of Summer 2013, at least not based on our
unscientific poll of prominent local DJs. But a consensus is forming around
a few tracks — and Icona Pop’s year-old “I Love It” is most decidedly still in
contention. What’s that, you say you’re tired of it? I don’t care! — Doug Rule
DJ Steve Henderson
Secrets
1. Britney Spears - Ohh La La
2. Chaka Khan ft. LeCrae - It’s Not Over
(Paperchaser Remix)
3. Daft Punk ft. Pharrell Williams - Get Lucky
4. Selena Gomez - Come & Get It
(Dave Aude Club Remix)
5. Katy Tiz - Red Cup (RedOne Mix)
DJ Keenan Orr
Cobalt/Marvin
1. Daft Punk ft. Pharrell Williams - Get Lucky
2. Robin Thicke ft. Pharrell Williams & T.I. - Blurred Lines
3. Beyoncé - Grown Woman
4. Ciara ft. Future & B.O.B. - Body Party (Remix)
5. Ariana Grande ft. Mac Miller - The Way
DJ Joshua
Gay Bash
1. Shanon & The Clams - Rat House
2. The Coathangers - Derek’s Song
3. Hunx & His Punx - Bad Skin
4. Alaska Thunderfuck & Amy Vodkahaus - Hooker Shoes
5. Miley Cyrus - We Can’t Stop
DJ BacK2bACk
Town/Green Lantern
1. Miley Cyrus - We Can’t Stop
2. Robin Thicke ft. Pharrell Williams & T.I. - Blurred Lines
3. Rihanna ft. David Guetta - Right Now
4. Florida Georgia Line ft. Nelly - Cruise (Remix)
5. Selena Gomez - Come & Get It
25 METROWEEKLY.COM JULY 11, 2013
A
LOT OF THE STUFF THAT
they’re making fun of is actu-
ally things that I like about Port-
land,” says Chris Pureka, refer-
ring to the IFC series Portlandia. From
an independent women’s bookstore to a
completely sustainable restaurant, Pure-
ka likes that people in Portland, Ore., gen-
erally speaking, “are aware and conscious
and thinking about the environment and
their culture and their community.”
The folk artist Pureka fits that mold,
though she’s a newbie to Portland, having
moved there from Northampton, Mass.,
and making that cross-country leap only
earlier this year — with a one-year stint in
Brooklyn, N.Y., in between. Lesbian-rich
Northampton was too small and musically
stagnant for the singer-songwriter who
identifies as “gender-queer,” while Brook-
lyn was too big. Portland seems just right.
Pureka has hopes of finding some new
musicians to collaborate with once she
get’s better settled in her new home base.
Of course, Pureka spends a majority
of her time away from home and is cur-
rently on a tour that will stop at Jammin
Java later this month for a show featur-
ing a backing band of two musicians plus
an opening act, Emy Reynolds Band, who
will join in to perform a few songs.
Asked to describe her sound, Pureka
mentions other modern-day songwrit-
ers, everyone from Paul Simon to Patty
Griffin to Gillian Welch — music with a
“definite focus on the lyrics, and kind of
a deeper perspective, a heavier experi-
ence” than standard folk or pop. The
New York Times critic Jon Pareles has
described her output as “folky, sorrowful
songs of loneliness and hurt.” “I defi-
nitely use songwriting to process and get
things out of my system,” Pureka con-
cedes. “Even though a lot of my songs are
sadder, or deal emotionally with kind of
raw material, most of them honestly are
still very hopeful.”
Pureka’s fraught-folk style also reflects
slightly, subtly, on her background in sci-
ence — she was a research microbiologist
at Smith College before becoming a full-
time musician seven years ago. “A lot of
my songs follow a linear trajectory, going
from point A to point B. It’s almost like I
come up with a hypothesis for each song
and then fill it out.”
But, she adds with a chuckle, “It’s not
necessarily causal — it’s a correlation.”
Chris Pureka performs Tuesday, July 30,
at 8 p.m., at Jammin Java, 227 Maple Ave.
E., Vienna. General admission is $12,
or $15 for reserved seats. Call 703-255-
3747 or visit jamminjava.com. l
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Scientific Songwriter
Chris Pureka offers subtle cues to her
background as a microbiologist
BY DOUG RULE
DJ Bil Todd
The NeedlExchange
1. Headless Ghost - Basik Fire
2. Simian Mobile Disco & Bicep - Sacrifice
3. Holly Johnson - Legendary Children
(Hard Ton DeepMix)
4. AnA - Seasonal Daddy (For LUTHER)
5. Chris Burns & Denise Henderson - IYE
DJ David Merrill
Code
1. Sylvester - You Make Me Feel (Mighty Real)
(Ralphi Rosario’s Dub)
2. Deep Fryed - Real Love
3. DJ Mark Brickman - Rhythm Is Love
(Frankie Shakes’s Bring It Back Remix)
4. Gerald Henderson & DJ Vandersames - Rio 2014
5. Nuno E - Voices of Drums
(Alonzo Lost in Tribal Mix)
DJ Wess
Town
1. Icona Pop ft. Charli XCX - I Love It
2. Daft Punk ft. Pharrell Williams - Get Lucky
3. Robin Thicke ft. Pharrell Williams &
T.I. - Blurred Lines
4. Beyoncé - Grown Woman
5. Miley Cyrus - We Can’t Stop
DJ Don T.
Secrets/Nellie’s
1. Robin Thicke ft. Pharrell Williams &
T.I. - Blurred Lines
2. Beyoncé - Grown Woman (Dirty Pop Mix)
3. Major Lazer ft. Bruno Mars, 2 Chainz, T
yga and Mystic - Bubble Butt (Remix)
4. Daft Punk ft. Pharrell Williams - Get Lucky
(Audio Jacker Remix)
5. Fergie ft. Q-Tip & GoonRock - A Little Party
Never Killed Nobody (All We Got)
DJ Chord
Town
1. Icona Pop ft. Charli XCX - I Love It
2. Robin Thicke ft. Pharrell Williams &
T.I. - Blurred Lines
3. Kylie Minogue - Skirt
4. Macklemore & Ryan Lewis - Can’t Hold Us
5. OneRepublic - If I Lose Myself
26 JULY 11, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
9:30 CLUB
815 V St. NW
202-265-0930
930.com
THE BIRCHMERE
3701 Mount Vernon Ave.
Alexandria
703-549-7500
birchmere.com
BLACK CAT
1811 14th St. NW
202-667-4490
blackcatdc.com
BLACK FOX LOUNGE
1723 Connecticut Ave.
NW
202-483-1723
blackfoxlounge.com
JULY
Special Agent Galactica (7/12, 7/26, Black Fox Lounge) • Skylar Grey
(7/14, U Hall) • Jill Scott (7/15, Wolf Trap) • Lee Dewyze — Do you still
remember the winner of American Idol Season 9? (7/16, Rams Head on
Stage) • Alma Tropicalia — ’60s-era Brazilian pop sounds, part of a free
Summer Outdoor Concert Series (7/17, Strathmore) • Marty Thomas
presents Diva — It’s as gay as it sounds, with guest vocalists from
Broadway (7/17 and every Wednesday, Blue Moon) • Jody Watley (7/19,
Howard Theatre) • Klymaxx feat. Bernadette Cooper (7/19-20, Blues
Alley) • Jonathan Butler — Blues Alley presents a concert by this R&B/
jazz fusion artist (7/19, Fillmore Silver Spring) • fun. w/Tegan and Sara
(7/20, Merriweather) • Fantasia — The American Idol winner returns
(7/20, Warner Theatre) • Drop Electric — A more multi-culti, D.C.-based
version of Sigur Ros (7/20, Black Cat) • Debby Holiday — Dive on in to
see this great rock-informed dance singer (7/21, Blue Moon) • Robert
Plant (7/22, Wolf Trap) • Bob Dylan and his Band, Wilco, My Morning
Jacket (7/23, Merriweather) • Elise Testone (7/23, Iota) • Brandi
Carlile — Bear Creek was one of 2012’s best albums, and this lesbian
rocker is defnitely the real deal (7/24, Wolf Trap) • The Lumineers (7/26,
Merriweather) • Loretta Lynn (7/26, 9:30) • Mary Mary — Take the
shackles off my feet so I can dance… (7/26, Howard Theatre) • Mary
Alouette — Local WAMMIE Award-winning gypsy jazz vocalist (7/26,
Strathmore) • Shanice (7/26-28, Blues Alley) • O’Malley’s March —
The band led by Martin O’Malley, Maryland’s marriage-equality-fighting
governor and future presidential candidate (7/26, Rams Head on Stage)
• Dave Matthews Band (7/27, Jiffy Lube Live) • Chopteenth Afrofunk
Big Band (7/27, Iota) • NSO’s Wicked Divas — Steven Reineke conducts
a concert of showstoppers featuring Broadway divas Julia Murney and
Stephanie J. Block (7/28, Wolf Trap) • New Order w/Holy Ghost! (7/28,
Merriweather) • Jonas Brothers (7/29, Jiffy Lube Live) • Chris Pureka
(7/30, Jammin Java)
AUGUST
Natalie Cole (8/1, Strathmore) • Stephanie Mills — The R&B and
Broadway legend returns (8/2, Birchmere) • Cajmere — It’s time for the
Percolator (8/2, U Hall) • Jesse Dee (8/2, Hamilton) • NSO’s Singin’ In
The Rain — The movie musical classic screens while Emil de Cou leads
the orchestra in live accompaniment (8/3, Wolf Trap) • Summer Spirit
Festival w/D’Angelo, Erykah Badu, Busta Rhymes (8/3, Merriweather)
• Benny Benassi (8/3, Echostage) • Maze featuring Frankie Beverly,
Morris Day & The Time (8/4, Pier Six Pavilion) • OneRepublic — You
can opt to see Ryan Tedder’s grandiose pop act in a relatively intimate
outdoor venue, or go big, or ,you know, just go home (8/5, Wolf Trap; 8/9,
Pier Six Pavilion) • Hurray for the Riff Raff — What’s not to love about
New Orleans-based Nuyorican Alynda Lee Segarra’s nom de rock? (8/7,
Black Cat) • Jessie Ware — new British soul-pop singer, like a peppier
Sade (8/7, Rams Head Live) • Gay Men’s Chorus of Washington Open
Mic (8/8, Black Fox Lounge) • Don McLean, Judy Collins (8/9, Wolf Trap)
• Angie Stone (8/9, Howard Theatre) • Mary Chapin Carpenter, Shawn
Colvin (8/10, Wolf Trap) • The Killers (8/10, Merriweather) • Almost
Queen — Broadway performer Joseph Russo portrays Freddie Mercury
in this celebrated tribute band (8/10, State Theatre) • Kesha — The less
said about this, the better (8/12, Wolf Trap) • Diana Ross — What do
you mean you don’t already have tickets to see this Supreme gay diva?
Sadly, only lawn seats remain (8/14, Wolf Trap) Laura Jane Grace — The
front man behind punk rock group Against Me! now tours singing the
“Transgender Dysphoria Blues” (8/14, Rock and Roll Hotel) • Alice in
Chains, Janes Addiction, Coheed and Cambria (8/16, Jiffy Lube Live)
• Above & Beyond (8/16, Echostage) • LeToya Luckett — Beyoncé,
Kelly, LaTavia, LeToya — yep, the forgotten fourth founding member of
Destiny’s Child returns (8/17, Howard Theatre) • Backstreet Boys, Jesse
McCartney, DJ Pauly D (8/18, Jiffy Lube Live) • Blues Traveler (8/18,
Rams Head on Stage) • En Vogue (8/18, Birchmere) • Pat Benatar & Neil
Giraldo w/Cheap Trick — Hit ’em with your cheap shot (8/20, Wolf Trap)
• Toni Braxton (8/21, Pier Six Pavilion) • Jennifer Holliday in Dreamgirls
— And I’m telling you, the gays are going (8/22-25, Wolf Trap) • Gladys
Knight, The O’Jays (8/22, Pier Six Pavilion; 8/24, DAR Constitution Hall)
• Dru Hill: Sisqo, Nokio, Jazz & Tao (8/23, Howard Theatre) • Goodie
Mob: CeeLo Green, Big Gipp, Khujo & T-Mo (8/24, 9:30) • Valerie
Simpson — Performing the music of Ashford & Simpson, carrying on
without her late husband (8/25, Birchmere) • Carly Rae Jepsen (8/28,
Wolf Trap) • Salt-N-Pepa — Salt-N-Pepa’s here, and they’re in effect…
(8/31, Howard Theatre)
SEPTEMBER
Carolina Chocolate Drops — You’ll never hear a better black bluegrass
band (9/3, Hamilton) • AlunaGeorge — Great new British electronic duo
of sweet vocalist Aluna Francis and producer George Reid (9/3, U Hall)
• Les Nubians — The sharp French hip-hop-inspired female duo (9/5,
Birchmere) • Patricia Barber — Lesbian jazz pianist and vocalist (9/6,
Blues Alley) • The Julie Ruin — Wondering what Kathleen “Le Tigre”
Hanna is up to? Why, she’s in a new band with former Bikini Kill cohort
Kathi Wilcox (9/7, Black Cat) • Maroon 5, Kelly Clarkson and Tony
Lucca (9/7, Jiffy Lube Live) • Blondie (9/9, 9:30) • Marc Anthony — The
Latin superstar and former Mr. J-Lo makes his debut at Wolf Trap (9/10,
Wolf Trap) • Muse (9/11, Verizon) • Bootsy Collins (9/12, Strathmore)
• Black Cat 20th Anniversary Party — Some of the venue’s favorite
bands, past and present, come out for a toast or 20 (9/13-14, Black Cat)
• Sharam — The great local Deep Dish progressive house DJ makes an
overdue debut here (9/13, U Hall) • Pet Shop Boys (9/19, Strathmore) •
Imagine Dragons (9/20, Merriweather) • Deerhunter (9/21, 9:30) • MS
MR — New York electro-pop duo returns after a breakout performance at
the 2013 Sweetlife Festival (9/22, Black Cat) • Stereophonics (9/22, 9:30)
• Armin van Buuren (9/28, Echostage) • Kathy Mattea (9/29, Rams Head
on Stage) • Earth, Wind & Fire (9/29, Warner) • Stars (9/30, 9:30) l
SUMMER CONCERT HIGHLIGHTS
Venues
BLUE MOON
35 Baltimore Ave.
Rehoboth Beach, Del.
302-227-6515
bluemoonrehoboth.com
DAR CONSTITUTION
HALL
1776 D St. NW
202-628-1776
dar.org/conthall
ECHOSTAGE
2135 Queens Chapel
Road NE.
202-503-2330
echostage.com
FILLMORE SILVER
SPRING
8656 Colesville Road
Silver Spring
301-960-999
fillmoresilverspring.com
THE HAMILTON
600 14th St. NW
202-787-1000
thehamiltondc.com
THE HOWARD
THEATRE
620 T St. NW
202-588-5595
thehowardtheatre.com
IOTA CAFE
2832 Wilson Blvd.
Arlington
703-522-8340
iotaclubandcafe.com
JAMMIN JAVA
227 Maple Ave. E.
Vienna
703-255-3747
jamminjava.com
JIFFY LUBE LIVE
7800 Cellar Door Drive
Bristow, Va.
703-754-6400
livenation.com
MERRIWEATHER POST
PAVILION
10475 Little Patuxent
Parkway
Columbia, Md.
800-551-SEAT
merriweathermusic.com
PIER SIX PAVILION
731 Eastern Ave.
Baltimore
410-547-SEAT
piersixpavilion.com
RAM’S HEAD LIVE
20 Market Place
Baltimore
410-244-1131
ramsheadlive.com
RAM’S HEAD ON
STAGE
33 West St.
Annapolis
410-268-4545
ramsheadonstage.com
ROCK AND ROLL
HOTEL
1353 H St. NE
202-388-ROCK
rockandrollhoteldc.com
STRATHMORE
5301 Tuckerman Lane
North Bethesda
301-581-5100
strathmore.org
U STREET MUSIC HALL
1115A U St. NW
202-588-1880
ustreetmusichall.com
VERIZON CENTER
601 F St. NW
202-628-3200
verizoncenter.com
WARNER THEATRE
513 13th St. NW
202-783-4000
warnertheatredc.com
WOLF TRAP
1551 Trap Road
Vienna, Va.
877-WOLFTRAP
wolf-trap.org
27 METROWEEKLY.COM JULY 11, 2013
C
ARLY RAE JEPSEN IS RESPONSIBLE
for the song of summer 2012. Maybe
you remember it, the one with the
unforgettable music video in which, as
Jepsen puts it, “The guy that I was pining after
ended up preferring my [male] guitarist.”
Director Ben Knechtel originally thought
Jepsen should create a spinoff video to her
peppy song, “Call Me Maybe,” one in which
presumably the guy calls her number for sure.
Instead, they decided on just one video with
a surprise gay ending.
“It is such a huge issue for some people,
and it shouldn’t be,” Jepsen says of homo-
sexuality in general. “It’s never been an issue
for me. I never grew up with that idea.”
The 27-year-old Canadian grew up in Mis-
sion, British Columbia — “Small but mighty,”
she says, “a little bit hippy-ish and very musical.”
Jepsen knew from age 7 that she wanted to be a
singer. She went to a Fame-like performing-arts
college to become a Broadway-style performer, but
was bitten by the songwriting bug after she moved
to Vancouver. It was also in Vancouver that Jepsen
met Brandon, “one of my very best friends in the
world. We consider each other not just friends but
family.” Brandon’s own family had disowned him after
he came out as gay. “His personal story,” says Jepsen,
“just breaks my heart.”
But it was also partly Brandon’s story that propelled
Jepsen to become a quiet but steady supporter of the
LGBT cause. Earlier this year, Jepsen performed at the
White Party Palm Springs and then revoked plans to per-
form at the National Scout Jamboree once she learned of
the Boy Scouts of America’s policy banning gay leaders.
“That policy is actually different in Canada,” Jepsen says,
referring to Scouts Canada’s nondiscrimination policy
based on sexual orientation.
Jepsen, who was a runner-up for Canadian Idol in
2007, “is interested in one day pursuing the idea of being
involved in a Broadway thing, maybe … writing a Broad-
way musical.” But for now, she’s writing songs for a
future record, as well as taking time out for “domesticated
moments,” such as learning how to make banana muf-
fins — “just in case one day I’ve got to feed somebody,”
she teases, while adding that her childrearing days are
“years from now, far off the way.”
Her current focus is on her first-ever headlining
tour in support of last year’s studio set Kiss, which
also features hits “Good Time” and “Tonight I’m
Getting Over You.” “Kiss was a really fun record to
make,” she says, “but those songs are meant to be
performed live. It’s like pure fun pop.”
Carly Rae Jepsen performs Wednesday, Aug. 28,
at 7 p.m., at The Filene Center at Wolf Trap,
1551 Trap Road, Vienna. Tickets are $30
to $42. Call 877-WOLFTRAP or visit
wolftrap.org. l
Call Girl
Carly Rae Jepsen is a quiet but steady supporter
of the LGBT cause
BY DOUG RULE
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SPOTLIGHT
32ND ANNUAL ARTSCAPE
Billed as the nation’s largest free arts festival, Artscape
attracts more than 350,000 people to Baltimore’s
Bolton Hill and Station North neighborhoods to take
in fine/textile art in every medium — from visual
to fashion to sculpture. There are also four stages
offering performances of live music from regional
and nationally known acts, this year including the
local gay experimental electronica duo/couple
Matmos, Jukebox The Ghost, the Wailers, Kem,
North Mississippi Allstars and the Dirty Dozen
Brass band as well as the Baltimore Symphony
Orchestra. And neighborhood restaurants and bars
also participate in Artscape, co-produced by the
Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts and
the Baltimore Festival of the Arts. Friday, July 19,
through Sunday, July 21. Mount Royal Avenue and
Cathedral Street, Baltimore. Call 410-752-8632 or
visit artscape.org.
CAPITAL FRINGE FESTIVAL
This weekend is the opening weekend of the
8th annual Capital Fringe Festival, featuring 130
performing-arts groups from around the region
and beyond offering quirky theater, live music in
the Baldacchino Gypsy Tent Bar, and especially
unclassifiable and offbeat performances — everything
from clowns to puppets. This year’s festival runs
for two-and-a-half weeks and takes place in 19
venues. Among the LGBT highlights: One Night in
New York!, Eric Tipler’s new musical, directed and
co-choreographed by the GMCW’s Craig Cipollini,
about a 22-year-old gay kid looking for his first
hookup and featuring a full cast of 12 singing and
dancing men; the Obscure Little Musical Theatre
Company’s Songs from an Unmade Bed, subtitled
“a little gay bedtime lyrical workout musical,”
starring Harv Lester as “The Man”; Landless
Theatre Company’s Haute Mess starring “punk
dragstress Lucrezia Blozia and her bitches” in a
silly examination of the fashion industry; Wasington
Improv Theater’s Lore, a grab-bag of spontaneous
tales based on audience suggestion. Runs to July 28.
Fort Fringe, 607 New York Ave. NW. Tickets are $17
plus one-time purchase of a $7 Fringe button, while
multi-show passes range from $30 to $300. Call 866-
811-4111 or visit capitalfringe.org.
I.M.P.’S STARTING LINEUP
AT LINCOLN THEATRE
British folkie Laura Marling, coming on Sept.
4, is the first of five mostly folk-tipped acts that
I.M.P. Productions has lined up as part of its new
management of the historic Lincoln Theatre. Also on
board: milquetoast British pop band Travis on Sept.
20, British anthemic singer/songwriter KT Tunstall
is Sept. 29, American folk-rocker Matt Nathanson
on Oct. 29 and solid Alexandria-born folk-pop artist
Neko Case on Oct. 30. Tickets go on sale Friday, July
12, at 10 a.m., for all shows at Lincoln Theatre, 1215
U St. NW. Call 202-328-6000 or visit tickefly.com.
NSO, WOLF TRAP OPERA COMPANY
The Wolf Trap Opera Company offers a one-night-
only production of Verdi’s popular La Traviata —
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Compiled by Doug Rule
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M TRYING TO MAKE IT GOOD FORTUNE AND NOT BAD FORTUNE,”
Emily Fortune Feimster teases about the family name that she uses as her
first name. “So far so good, I think.”
In fact, Feimster, one of the funniest members of E!’s Chelsea Lately comedian
family, repeatedly refers to herself as lucky. A native of Belmont, N.C., Feimster
has been out as a lesbian from her very first TV appearance, as a contestant on
NBC’s Last Comic Standing in 2010.
“I’m really lucky that people like Ellen [DeGeneres] and other gay comedians
really did make it easier for me and my generation,” she says. Thanks to these
LGBT comic pioneers, Feimster is able to talk about her sexuality, even joke
about female celebrities she’d like to sleep with, without having to hold back or
fear anti-gay backlash.
Of course it also helps that she works for the frank Chelsea Handler.
“If there’s anything about you, anything that happened to you that’s embar-
rassing, she’s going to be the first person to talk about it on TV,” says Feimster,
who serves as a fulltime writer and a regular roundtable panelist for Handler’s
Chelsea Lately, where she also often appears in comedic sketches. “They keep me
pretty busy, putting me in little tiny outfits.” Feimster has no qualms about the
regular ribbing she gets on the show for her physical appearance of wild, frizzy
hair, a plus-sized figure and general laidback look. “I’ve always had a good sense
of humor, and I’ve never taken myself too seriously, so I don’t mind acting or
looking ridiculous.”
Feimster’s healthy self-deprecating self-confidence is further boosted by the all-
around support she gets from her family back home. “My mom has actually become
vice president of PFLAG in my hometown,” she marvels. “She’s just like waving a
rainbow flag even higher than me sometimes. I’m really lucky.” –Doug Rule
Fortune Feimster performs Friday, July 12, at 11:55 p.m., and Saturday, July 13,
at 10 p.m., at Arlington Cinema N’ Drafthouse, 2903 Columbia Pike, Arlington.
Tickets are $10 to $20. Call 703-486-2345 or visit arlingtondrafthouse.com.
JULY 11, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
GOOD FORTUNE
Chelsea Lately’s Fortune Feimster has
luck — and laughs — on her side
30
and not at the Barns but at Wolf Trap’s celebrated
outdoor amphitheater nearby. Grant Gershon
conducts the NSO, while the Washington Chorus
joins soloists from the opera company in a new
production directed by Jose Maria Condemi. In
Italian with English supertitles. Friday, July 19,
at 8:15 p.m. The Filene Center at Wolf Trap, 1551
Trap Road, Vienna. Tickets are $20 to $70. Call
877-WOLFTRAP or visit wolftrap.org.
SPIN
As part of its “siglab” new musical development
program, Signature Theatre, in association with OD
Company, presents a show based on the film Speedy
Scandal, focused on a faded promiscuous pop star
who discovers the value of family over fame when
a surprise daughter and grandson enter his life.
Signature’s Eric Schaeffer directs Spin, featuring
a book by Brian Hill and music and lyrics by Neil
Bartram and starring James Gardiner, Carolyn Cole,
Bobby Smith and Erin Driscoll. To July 27. Signature
Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave., Arlington. Call 703-
820-9771 or visit signature-theatre.org.
THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW
Studio Theatre presents Richard O’Brien’s zany
musical as part of its experimental 2ndStage series.
Keith Alan Baker and Alan Paul co-direct the
production starring Mitchell Jarvis as Frank N.
Furter, Sarah Marshall as the Narrator/Dr. Scott,
Tim Rogan as Brad, Jessica Thorne as Janet and
Matthew McGee as Riff Raff. Now in previews.
Runs to Aug. 4. Tickets are $40 to $45. Studio
Theatre, 1501 14th St. NW. Call 202-332-3300 or visit
studiotheatre.org.
DOUBLE TAKE: WOODY ALLEN
The Washington Jewish Film Festival presents two
off-festival special double features of Woody Allen
films. This Thursday, July 11, Saturday, July 13,
and Sunday, July 14, offers the Depression-era ode
to filmmaking The Purple Rose of Cairo, at 7 p.m.,
followed by Annie Hall, his Oscar-winning classic
co-starring Diane Keaton, at 8:45 p.m. Then Monday,
July 15, through Wednesday, July 17, plus Saturday,
July 20, and Sunday, July 21, at 6:45 p.m., it’s
Manhattan, Allen’s most deliberately artistic film
and an ecstatic love letter to his hometown. That’s
followed at 8:45 p.m. with Crimes and Misdemeanors,
which cleverly intertwines two storylines, about a
man and his disgruntled mistress and a filmmaker
who attempts to profile a man he despises. Thursday,
July 18, also offers a quick game of Woody Allen
trivia, in between the screenings of Manhattan and
Crimes and Misdemeanors, at 8:20 p.m. The Aaron &
Cecile Goldman Theater, Washington, D.C.’s Jewish
Community Center, 1529 16th St. NW. Tickets are
$11. Call 202-518-9400 or visit washingtondcjcc.org.
STAGE
BABY UNIVERSE
Studio Theatre presents what it dubs a “magnetically
whimsical puppet odyssey” by the New York-based
visual theater company Wakka Wakka Productions,
in association with Norway’s Nordland Visual
Theatre. Kirjan Waage and Gwendolyn Warnock’s
Baby Universe is captivating fable about the search
for a new planet on which to sustain human life.
Inspired by real-life scientific events and theory, the
show features 30 puppets, animation, a space-age
score and a robot based on Stephen Hawking. Closes
this Sunday, July 14. Studio Theatre, 1501 14th St.
NW. Call 202-332-3300 or visit studiotheatre.org.
CAESAR AND DADA
WSC Avant Bard offers a world premiere of local
playwright Allyson Currin’s Caesar and Dada,
focused on an acting troupe rehearsing Julius Caesar
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ALIEN VISITATION
New Corcoran exhibit explores our fascination with
classical architecture from a unique perspective
R
IGHT NOW, WASHINGTON IS AWASH WITH TOURISTS.
They’re trying to take in too much in too little time, and will end up
getting at least some of what they see or learn wrong.
In 10,000 years, Ellen Harvey projects aliens might be doing the same.
In a special exhibit at the Corcoran Gallery, the painter and mixed-media
artist imagines a future in which no humans and little of human civiliza-
tion remain — except our seemingly ingrained love for classical and neo-
classical architecture, typified by pillars. “It’s so fascinating that this style
has been so popular for 2,000-plus years,” she says. “It’s that whole symbol
of democracy, harkening back to the Athens ideal.”
“What if aliens came and they too were just infected by this love and
passion for pillars?” Harvey continues, explaining the basic concept for
her exhibition, The Alien’s Guide to the Ruins of Washington, D.C. A Brit-
ish native who lives in Brooklyn, N.Y. Harvey has no formal architecture
background. In fact, her academic degrees were in literature and law. “I’m
sort of a failed lawyer, a long time ago in my misspent youth,” she jokes.
“I tend to be interested in creating experiences for people,” she says, and
with her new exhibition, the experience is one of seeing our everyday world
through the lens of outsiders. With few details to go on about how these
structures were built or what they were used for, “the aliens of course get
everything wrong.” For starters, they reason that the pillars must have all
originally stood in rivers, given the preponderance of water on Earth. They
also romanticize construction, totally glossing over the blood, sweat and
tears and the often less-than-savory power dynamics that built “an architec-
ture of empire.” It’s a kind of history as told by the last ones standing.
Much like overly rosy and patriotic tourists before them, the aliens,
according to Harvey, “think it’s all about this sort of lovely equalitar-
ian society. [They] have an incredibly lovely and optimistic view of what
human society must have been like.” — Doug Rule
The Alien’s Guide to the Ruins of Washington, D.C. runs now to Oct. 6 at
the Corcoran Gallery of Art, 500 17th St. NW. Admission is $10.
Call 202-639-1700 or visit corcoran.org.
JULY 11, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
and seeking to challenge and change the audience’s
expectations and experiences a la Dadaism. Lee
Mikeska Gardner directs a cast including Mario
Baldessari, Megan Dominy and Mundy Spears.
Closes this Sunday, July 14. Callan Theatre at the
Catholic University of America, 3801 Harewood
Road NE. Tickets are $31.50 to $36.50. Visit
wscavantbard.org.
ONE NIGHT WITH JANIS JOPLIN
Arena Stage reprises last fall’s successful, regularly
sold-out run of Randy Johnson’s musical event
featuring more than a dozen singers and band
members performing classic songs that shine the
light on Janis Joplin and especially those who
influenced her, from Bessie Smith to Nina Simone
to Aretha Franklin. The show was as close to
an “all standing” concert as it ever gets in the
Kreeger Theater, with concertgoers — err, audience
members — blown away by both Mary Bridget
Davies as Joplin and Sabrina Elayne Carten as the
Blues Singer, who amazingly channels the greats
who influenced Joplin. Both return for the revived
production, although Alison Cusano will substitute
for Davies and Kim Yarbrough for Carten on select
dates. And look at that, a good number of dates have
already sold out. So, you know, as Joplin famously
pleaded: come on, come on, come on…. To Aug. 11.
Mead Center for American Theater, 1101 6th St. SW.
Call 202-488-3300 or visit arenastage.org.
OSCAR WILDE’S SALOME
The Lab Theatre II presents a production of this
Oscar Wilde classic, an exotic, provocative take on
the ancient biblical tale of King Herod. Now to Aug.
11. Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE.
Tickets are $35 to $40. Call 202-399-7993 or visit
atlasarts.org.
PETER PAN AND WENDY
Professional young-adults theater company
Imagination Stage presents Alyn Cardarelli and
Steve Goers’s musical based on J.M. Barrie’s classic
tale. Kathryn Chase Bryer directs a production that
includes opportunities for participation from the
child and child-at-heart members of the audience.
To Aug. 11. Imagination Stage, 4908 Auburn Ave.,
Bethesda. Tickets are $10 to $25. Call 301-280-1660
or visit imaginationstage.org.
RABBIT HOLE
The Keegan Theatre presents David Linsay-Abaire’s
dark, absorbing Pulitzer Prize-winning drama about
the emotions that befall a couple after a tragedy.
Kerri Rambow directs a production starring Keegan’s
own leaders and real-life couple Mark A. Rhea and
Susan Marie Rhea. The show is staged in what has
been long known as the Church Street Theater
off 17th Street in Dupont Circle, but Keegan has
announced it has purchased and renamed the venue
in advance of a massive, two-year renovation. To
July 21. Andrew Keegan Theatre (formerly Church
Street Theater), 1742 Church St. NW. Tickets are
$35. Call 703-892-0202 or visit keegantheatre.com.
THE NO RULES SHOW
The No Rules Theatre Company, in residence at
Signature Theatre, offers a very gay-friendly
madcap variety show this week and next billed as
“half revue, half talk show, all no rules.” No Rules’
talented co-artistic director Joshua Morgan hosts
the show, which each night welcomes different guest
performers. The lineup includes: singer/songwriter
Steve Goodrich and LGBT activist couple Jamie
McGonnigal and Sean Carlson on Friday, July 12; a
night with Washington Improv Theatre’s Lore plus
Capital Pride leaders Ryan Bos and Bernie Delia
and Mr. and Mrs. Capital Pride 2013 Carlton and
Tatiyanna on Wednesday, July 17; NBC4 anchor
Barbara Harrison with comedian Jamel Johnson
31 METROWEEKLY.COM JULY 11, 2013
WOLF TRAP OPERA COMPANY
“Aria Jukebox” features popular opera tunes
selected by the audience and performed by Wolf
Trap Opera Company soloists as accompanied by
company director Kim Witman on piano. Tickets
include a wine and cheese reception starting at 2
p.m. Sunday, July 14, at 3 p.m. The Barns at Wolf
Trap, 1635 Trap Road, Vienna. Tickets are $32 to
$48. Call 877-WOLFTRAP or visit wolftrap.org.
COMEDY
CECILY STRONG
This weekend you could take in not one but two
funny ladies at the Arlington Drafthouse: Fortune
Feimster and Cecily Strong, one of the newer cast
members on Saturday Night Live, dubbed “the
breakout rookie” by Rolling Stone. Friday, July 12, at
7:15 p.m. and 9:45 p.m.; and Saturday, July 13, at 4:30
p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Arlington Cinema N’ Drafthouse,
2903 Columbia Pike, Arlington. Tickets are $15 to
$20. Call 703-486-2345 or visit arlingtondrafthouse.
com.
FORTUNE FEIMSTER
A writer and regular with Chelsea Lately, Fortune
Feimster gives Ross Mathews, Loni Love and
Heather MacDonald a run for their money as the
show’s funniest contributor. Feimster drops by the
Arlington Drafthouse for a night of stand-up that’s
sure to be hysterical. Friday, July 12, at 11:55 p.m.;
and Saturday, July 13, at 10 p.m. Arlington Cinema
N’ Drafthouse, 2903 Columbia Pike, Arlington.
Tickets are $10 to $20. Call 703-486-2345 or visit
arlingtondrafthouse.com.
GALLERIES
A BOOK BEHIND BARS:
THE ROBBEN ISLAND SHAKESPEARE
A Book Behind Bars: The Robben Island Shakespeare
features signatures of 34 political prisoners,
including Nelson Mandela, at Robben Island, off the
coast of Cape Town, South Africa. These prisoners
shared a love of Shakespeare, signing their names
next to passages in a copy of Shakespeare’s Complete
Works. The Folger Shakespeare Library presents
the book, on exhibit for the first time in the U.S.,
along with a series of sketches Mandela made in the
early 2000s, reflecting on his prison life. To Sept. 29.
Folger Shakespeare Library, 201 East Capitol St. SE.
Free. Call 202-544-7077 or visit folger.edu.
A NEW AGE OF EXPLORATION:
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC AT 125
As part of an organization-wide toast to the first
125 years, the National Geographic Museum offers
a visual and interactive exhibition celebrating
modern exploration by featuring some of the most
iconic moments from the institution and its bedrock
magazine. Entered through an archway made of
hundreds of issues of National Geographic magazine,
the exhibition in the complex’s 17th Street gallery
features the work of National Geographic explorers,
photographers, scientists and journalists — everyone
from Jacques Cousteau to James Cameron — and is
sponsored by GEICO, with the North Face a sponsor
of giveaways and events throughout its run. To
June 2014. National Geographic Museum, 1145 17th
St. NW. Tickets are $11. Call 202-857-7588 or visit
ngmuseum.org. l
32 JULY 11, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
JILL SCOTT
A mix of hip-hop, spoken word and tried-and-true
inspirational sanging is what you can expect from
a concert by the Grammy-winning jazzy soul artist
Jill Scott, who got her start with fellow Philly-born
band The Roots. Neo-soul artist Raheem DeVaughn
and slam poets Fiveology open. Monday, July 15, at 8
p.m. The Filene Center at Wolf Trap, 1551 Trap Road,
Vienna. Tickets are $40 to $95. Call 877-WOLFTRAP
or visit wolftrap.org.
JUSTIN TRAWICK TRIO
Cute, local, straight “urban folk” singer Justin
Trawick, one of the region’s best folk/pop acts,
performs with his trio as part of a free show series in
the Loft Bar space of The Hamilton. Saturday, July 13,
at 10:30 p.m. The Hamilton, 600 14th St. NW. Tickets
are free. Call 202-787-1000 or visit thehamiltondc.
com.
NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
As part of its summer Wolf Trap series, the NSO
performs Carl Orff’s popular bombastic choral
masterpiece Carmina Burana featuring soloists from
the Wolf Trap Opera Company and the Choral Arts
Society of Washington. Emil de Cou conducts the
show, which also includes Mussorgsky’s Pictures
at an Exhibition. Friday, July 12, at 8:15 p.m. The
Filene Center at Wolf Trap, 1551 Trap Road, Vienna.
Tickets are $22 to $55. Call 877-WOLFTRAP or visit
wolftrap.org.
NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA’S
SUMMER MUSIC INSTITUTE
Various evenings over the next couple weeks students
participating in this year’s Summer Music Institute of
the NSO perform concerts on the Kennedy Center’s
free Millennium Stage. From Thursday, July 18,
through Monday, July 22, and again Friday, July
26, chamber music students will perform various
classics. And then Sunday, July 14, and Sunday, July
28, offers formal concerts in the Concert Hall by
orchestra students, conducted by Elizabeth Schulze,
plus the July 28 show offers a solo from the winner
of the year’s SMI Concerto Competition. All shows
at 6 p.m. Kennedy Center. Tickets are free. Call 202-
467-4600 or visit
kennedy-center.org.
OMD, DIAMOND RINGS
The influential British new wave group OMD, an
acronym that stands for Orchestral Manoeuvres in
the Dark, may have had only one hit in the U.S., a
whole 27 years ago — but who doesn’t love “If You
Leave,” or always think of it when you remember
John Hughes’s teen rom-com classic Pretty in Pink,
or for that matter star Molly Ringwald? The quartet
reunited several years ago and tours again in support
of new set English Electric. The flamboyant post-
punk Canadian artist John O’Regan, who performs
as Diamond Rings, opens. Saturday, July 13. Doors
at 8 p.m. Nightclub 9:30, 815 V St. NW. Tickets
are $35. Call 202-265-0930 or visit 930.com. Also
visit 930.com/friends to sign up for the club’s new
Friends With Benefits rewards program offering
exclusive deals and discounts on tickets, drinks and
merchandise.
SKYLAR GREY
Skylar Grey hasn’t exactly made a name for
herself just yet, but you definitely know her hip-
hop songwriting work, most notably Eminem and
Rihanna’s “Love The Way You Lie.” Now, after
releasing dance tracks with producers including
Kaskade (“Room for Happiness”) to will.i.am (“Love
Bullets”), the artist born Holly Brook Hafermann in
Wisconsin is gearing up to release a solo set, Don’t
Look Down. Sunday, July 14. Doors at 6 p.m. U Street
Music Hall, 1115A U St. NW. Tickets are $15. Call 202-
588-1880 or visit ustreetmusichall.com.
on Thursday, July 18; and Ryan Hunger Mitchell
of local buzz-worthy band Shark Week and Sticky
Buns Burlesque act Shortstaxx on Saturday, July 20.
Signature Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave., Arlington.
Tickets are $37.85. Call 703-820-9771 or visit
signature-theatre.org or norulestheatre.org.
THE THIRD BREAST
Ambassador Theater International Cultural Center
presents the U.S. premiere of the late Polish
playwright Ireneusz Iredynski’s The Third Breast, a
weighty play exploring the idea of a spiritual quest
to achieve perfection and a problem-free existence.
ATICC founder Hanna Bondarewska directs a
version translated by Sylvia Daneel starring Sissel
Bakken, Christopher Henley and Matthew Ingraham.
Opening night is Thursday, July 11, at 8 p.m. To Aug.
4. Mead Theatre Lab at Flashpoint, 916 G St. NW.
Tickets are $20 to $40. Call 202-315-1310 or visit
flashpointdc.org or aticc.org.
MUSIC
BAD INFLUENCE
Every Friday night throughout the summer Rockville’s
VisArts presents live blues and jazz outdoors, atop
the Arts & Innovation Center in Rockville Town
Center. Next Friday, July 19, the venue welcomes Bad
Influence, a band that blends Chicago-style blues,
swing, American roots and rock. The band performs
until 11 p.m., followed by “deep house and old school
house” music by DJ Cbreeze until 2 a.m. Friday, July
19, at 8 p.m. Rockville Rooftop Life, 155 Gibbs St.,
Rockville. Cover is $10. Call 301-315-8200 or visit
rockvillerooftoplive.com.
BLAKE SHELTON
The country superstar, Mr. Miranda Lambert, comes
to town on a Ten Times Crazier Tour. He’s also
10-times more well-known these days, given his
perch on The Voice. Maybe that’s the reason he
feels crazier? Easton Corbin and Jana Kramer open.
Saturday, July 20, at Jiffy Lube Live, 7800 Cellar
Door Drive, Bristow, Va. Tickets are $29.25 to $87.80.
Call 703-754-6400 or visit livenation.com.
BOHEMIAN CAVERNS JAZZ ORCHESTRA
Every Monday night the 17-piece jazz orchestra
performs a variety of music from the big band
repertoire — including pieces by Duke Ellington,
Count Basie, Billy Strayhorn and Maria Schneider,
plus originals from band members — at its namesake
venue. Founded by baritone saxophonist Brad Linde
and club owner Omrao Brown, features some of
D.C.’s best jazz musicians, including Linde and
trumpeter Joe Herrera, who co-direct. Performances
at 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. every Monday night. Bohemian
Caverns, 2001 11th St. NW. Tickets are $10. Call 202-
299-0800 or visit bohemiancaverns.com.
FANTASIA
The Birchmere presents at the Warner Theatre a
return engagement for the third-season American
Idol winner, who has garnered probably the most
attention since her win in 2004 for her stage work.
(Well, that and an attempted suicide in 2010.) She has
performed as Celie in The Color Purple on Broadway
and on a national tour, including a run at the Kennedy
Center, and later this year she’s intending a return to
Broadway in a show still to be announced, though
likely the revue Cotton Club Parade. For now, she’s
touring in support of her new album Side Effects of
You, featuring the hot new jam with Kelly Rowland
and Missy Elliott, “Without Me.” Saturday, July
20, at 8 p.m. Warner Theatre, 513 13th St. NW.
Tickets are $47 to $87. Call 202-783-4000 or visit
warnertheatredc.com.
FOR MORE OUT ON THE TOWN LISTINGS
PLEASE VISIT
WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM
T
HERE IS ONLY ONE REASON WHY
anybody would want to endure Pacif-
ic Rim. That reason happens midway
through the movie, when a giant robot
faces off against an acid-spitting monster in Hong
Kong. The robot is dragging a cargo ship, as robots
are apparently wont to do. It lifts the ship up, grips
it like a baseball bat, swings, and smashes it against
the monster’s head. The monster staggers and falls.
The audience hoots and hollers. For an instant,
Pacific Rim has matched its cartoonish premise and
its chaotic ambition, and all seems right in the realm
of the fantastic.
Too bad you’ll have to slog through everything
else just to get to that point.
Pacific Rim is precisely as big and dumb as a
movie about monster-fighting robots deserves to be.
It’s colossal, both in size and stupidity. It’s a movie
born of spectacle — towering, massive, unsustainably
titanic spectacle — and, as a result, it reveals how
a filmmaker’s boldest ambitions can often enable
his worst instincts. Guillermo del Toro willed this
ridiculous slug match to life, but he gave it an awfully
fitful existence.
The story opens in the near future, when aliens
known as “kaiju” begin to attack the world’s cities.
These pissed-off monsters don’t arrive from the skies,
but rather through an intergalactic portal resting on
the floor of the Pacific Ocean. Humanity’s last hope
to stop the kaiju is the “jaeger,” an enormous fighting
robot that’s controlled by a pair of pilots who must
literally read each other’s mind to operate it correctly.
The terrible downside to that neural connec-
tion? If your co-pilot dies, you experience their last
moments just as they do. This is what happens to
Raleigh Becket (Charlie Hunnam, perpetually on
the verge of sneering), a jaeger pilot who watched a
kaiju snatch his brother out of the co-pilot’s seat in
a battle gone awry. Raleigh barely survives, and soon
after, retires to work a dismal construction job on
the shores of Alaska. He’s eventually lured back by
his former commanding officer, Stacker Pentecost
(Idris Elba), who wants to launch an all-out assault
against the kaiju with the world’s last remaining
jaegers. (Let’s stop and appreciate that name for a
minute. How great is it? Stacker Pentecost! Say it to
CHRIS HELLER FILM
Entirely spectacle, Pacific Rim is as big and dumb as a movie about
monster-fighting robots deserves to be
Rather mechanical: Pacific Rim
PACIFIC RIM
HHHHH
Starring
Charlie Hunnam,
Rinko Kikuchi,
Idris Elba
Rated PG-13
131 minutes
Opens July 12
Area theaters
33
Monster Mashup
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continues on page 35
METROWEEKLY.COM JULY 11, 2013
34
T
HE AMERICAN ROAD TRIP IS AN INSTITUTION,
a free, open, majestic exploration of this vast, great na-
tion, in which the participants are able to make their
own choices, seek their own experiences, and delight
in the secrets and hidden gems dotted throughout the landscape.
It’s the reason why, when tasked with travelling from Los Ange-
les to Las Vegas this past month, our editor and I chose to drive
through the desert — to have our own miniature road trip.
Our 265-mile journey began in downtown L.A., at a Hertz
rental location. There, we had our own Sophie’s Choice as we
struggled to pick between the models in Hertz’s Adrenaline
Collection, a drool-worthy roster of high-performance muscle
cars that includes the Dodge Challenger R/T, Ford Mustang GT
Premium, Corvette Convertible, and, our selection, the Chevy
Camaro SS — in convertible guise, naturally. We chose the Ca-
maro for its good looks and the 6.2L V8 throbbing under the
hood. What better way to drive cross-country?
After fighting to put our suitcases in the rear seats — the
Camaro sadly lacks any semblance of usable trunk space with
the roof down — it was out onto the open road. The V8 pulled
effortlessly, negotiating the L.A. traffic with ease, aided by the
all-around visibility offered with having no roof. Its suspen-
sion, while on the firm side of comfortable, dispensed with the
scarred road surfaces and pockmarked freeways, combining
with weighty steering that provided confidence at every speed,
but also didn’t hinder maneuverability when parking.
After a pit stop at Rancho Cucamonga on the outskirts of
L.A., where we filled up on the West Coast’s greatest fast-food
stop, In-N-Out Burger, it was into the main portion of our
drive. Putting the Camaro’s roof up to shield from the hot af-
ternoon sun, we started eating through the miles and, emulat-
ing Priscilla, became two queens of the desert — though sadly
without the costumes.
The Camaro made for an exceedingly comfortable compan-
ion. At highway speeds, it’s quiet, smooth, and its 426 horse-
power engine makes overtaking a breeze. It retained its com-
posure right up to… ahem… just 65mph, officer. Efficient air-
conditioning dispatched the worst of the desert heat, leaving
us free to marvel at the view.
And what a view. The Mojave Desert is a sun-scorched, arid,
but also achingly beautiful place. Rocks rise out of the sand,
cacti line the roads, and mile after mile the horizon stretched
in every direction, occasionally broken by bright red, incred-
ibly dramatic mountain ranges, but often uninterrupted save
for sand dunes as far as we could see.
After 150 miles of easy driving, we encountered slow traf-
fic. Then stopped traffic. For 90 minutes we sat in 120-degree
heat, an accident further down the road bringing us to a grind-
ing halt. While frustrating, it also gave us time to explore the
Camaro’s cabin — and it came up somewhat short.
It has a very capable entertainment system, with Bluetooth
audio and calling, and Sirius XM included, but it’s housed with-
in a touchscreen package that feels cheap, like an average af-
termarket effort. Compounding this is the dash, which, while
nice to touch for the most part, devolves into some pretty cheap
plastics the farther you get from the main console. Some sac-
Sleek and powerful, the Camaro SS convertible is the perfect choice for a drive
from L.A. to Vegas — or any classic road trip
Updated American classic: Chevy Camaro
Desert Drive Time
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JULY 11, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
RHUARIDH MARR GEARS
FILM
continued from page 33
35 METROWEEKLY.COM JULY 11, 2013
rifices evidently had to be made to reach the $30,660 MSRP, but
cheaper cars than this have higher-quality plastics. The Camaro’s
saving grace, however, is its seats. Deep buckets, they hugged in
all the right places, holding around tight bends, and keeping snug
on long straights. In our five-hour drive, I didn’t feel any fatigue or
numbing of limbs, and the leather remained cool and comfortable.
When the traffic cleared, the roof came down again for the
final blast toward Vegas. Gradually, mountains and sand dunes
gave way to small pockets of civilization — casinos, motels, the
occasional shopping outlet. As the sun slowly sank, we blasted
down our last long stretch of highway, and Vegas finally came
into view, like a desert oasis in the distance. Just in time, too, as
the Camaro’s engine had liberally drunk almost an entire tank —
though it drains noticeably faster with the roof down, due to the
increased drag.
It was here that we had our most memorable moment — turn-
ing onto the Vegas Strip, in a muscle car, with the roof down, roll-
ing through the lights and crowds and casinos. The Camaro, its
muted V8 roaring between stoplights, had carried us through the
desert with ease. Cargo space and a mismatched interior aside, it’s
an incredible piece of machinery — and it looked effortlessly cool
with the Vegas lightshows bouncing off of its exterior. Our road
trip was a success, and a memorable one at that. And we have the
Camaro, and the stark beauty of the Mojave, to thank for it. l
yourself. Stack-er Pen-te-cost. It sounds like the name a con man
would use if he posed as a Bible salesman.) Of course, that means
Raleigh needs a new co-pilot. A vengeance-seeking rookie named
Mako (Rinko Kikuchi) fills the bill, and after some initial rejec-
tions she finally suits up alongside him to kick some kaiju ass.
To anyone familiar with del Toro’s work, this premise
appears to have all the signs of greatness. A visual maestro with
an uncanny eye for the spacial geography of an action sequence,
del Toro’s idiosyncratic style seems tailored for concocting
Lovecraftian monsters. And here, he was essentially given a
blank check to invent as many horrors as he pleased. This is eas-
ily del Toro’s biggest, most ambitious movie. So, why is it also his
most derivative one?
In a summer chock-full of reboots, sequels and altogether
unnecessary “tent pole” blockbusters, Pacific Rim stands out for
somehow being less than the sum of its many separate parts.
The story only progresses by way of banal action tropes. Each
character can be relied upon to say exactly what he’s thinking
at the exact moment he thinks it. Del Toro borrows a thousand
pieces from a thousand different sources, and yet, lacks the joy
and self-awareness he needed to hold it all together. The result
resembles moviemaking by Lego, not by the inventive director
who made Pan’s Labyrinth and Hellboy II: The Golden Army.
Pacific Rim is the sort of movie where a grown man smiles
knowingly at a dog, and then the dog barks happily in response.
Where people still live in cities along the Pacific Coast despite
a decade’s worth of evidence that there’s nothing a kaiju loves
more than stomping around San Francisco, Hong Kong or Syd-
ney. Where the only thematic consistency is an extraordinary
reliance on cliché, and characters are about as emotional as a
block of wood. (Remember: We’re expected to believe these
characters don’t just want to share a significant mental connec-
tion, but have to if they want to survive!)
Pacific Rim asks us to be fools, but doesn’t bother to step over
its own low intellectual hurdles. Even when we’re lining up to
see something as childishly delightful as robots fighting aliens, a
movie needs to be more than that. Otherwise, we’re simply pay-
ing to watch overactive boys smash their toys together. l
NIGHT
LIFE
37 METROWEEKLY.COM
t
THURSDAY, 07.11.13
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, games, football
on Sundays • VJ Wess
• Expanded craft beer
selection • No cover
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour,
4pm-7pm • $4 Small
Plates, $4 Stella Artois,
$4 House Wines, $4
Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4
Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
COBALT
Ripped Hot Body Contest,
midnight
DC EAGLE
3-Way Thursdays • Bring
Your Buddies – when two
friends buy drinks, yours
are free, rail or domestic
• Club Bar: Eagle Poster
Preservation Project
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Shirtless Men Drink Free,
10pm
JR.’S
Happy Hour, 5-8pm • $15
All You Can Drink Rail
Highballs and Domestic
Drafts ($22 upgrade for a
step-up from rail), 4-8pm
• $5 Rail, $2 JR.’s drafts,
8pm to close
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Active Duty Military Night
• Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15
LISTINGS
Destinations on page 43
38
JULY 11, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
Grab your passport and your suitcase, because Daly is on the move.
The 26-year-old was born in Germany, but started his migration at 5,
living in various places across the United States. Now in Logan Circle,
this server and bartender loves to visit museums, dance, and sing at
open-mike nights at Busboys & Poets. But Daly won’t have much time
for performing this summer, as he plans on traveling. Although he
generally doesn’t go out, you might catch him on one of his nights off
at Cobalt, Aqua Ultra Lounge, JR.’s or Stoney’s.
39
Photography by
Julian Vankim
For addresses, phone numbers and locations of individual clubs, bars, parties,
and special events, please refer to our Destinations on page 43.
Videos with resident
DJ Shea Van Horn •
Expanded craft beer
selection • No cover
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis • Upstairs open
5-11pm
DC BEAR CRUE
@Town • Bear Happy
Hour, 6-11pm • $3 Rail,
$3 Draft, $3 Bud Bottles •
Free Pizza, 7pm • Hosted
by Charger Stone • No
cover before 9:30pm • 21+
DC EAGLE
Happy Hour Specials,
$2 off regular prices,
4-9pm • Jocks and Boots
Friday, Men in jocks and
boots drink free rail and
domestic, 9-11pm
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
PHASE 1
Karaoke, 9pm • Drink
Specials • No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Karaoke in the Lounge
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers
• Shirtless Thursday •
DJ Steve Henderson in
Secrets • 9pm • Cover
21+
FRIDAY, 07.12.13
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-7pm • Friday Night
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
Buy 1, Get 1,
11pm-midnight • Happy
Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm • $5
Coronas, $8 Vodka Red
Bulls, 9pm-close
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
DJ Matt Bailer • Videos,
Dancing • Beat The Clock
Happy Hour — $2 (5-6pm),
$3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-7pm
• No Cover
PHASE 1
DJ Styalo • Dancing •
$5 cover
PHASE 1 OF DUPONT
1415 22nd St. NW
Fuego Latin Dance Party,
9pm
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Drag Show in lounge •
Half-price burgers and
fries
TOWN
Drag Show starts at
10:30pm • Hosted by
Lena Lett and featuring
Tatianna, Shi-Queeta-
Lee, Jessica Spaulding
Deverreoux and Ba’Naka •
Doors open at 10pm • For
those 21 and over, $5 from
10-11pm and $10 after
11pm • For those 18-20,
$10 all night • 18+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
White Party in Secrets •
All male, nude dancers
• Ladies of Illusion with
host Kristina Kelly, 9pm •
Cover 21+
SATURDAY, 07.13.13
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-7pm • VJs BacK2baCk
• Expanded craft beer
selection • No cover
DC EAGLE
$2 off for men with Club
Mugs, Leather Vests,
Harnesses or Chaps •
Club Bar: SigMa • Steve’s
Leather
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Diner Brunch, 10am-3pm
• Crazy Hour, 4-8pm
• Karaoke and/or live
entertainment, 9pm
JR.’S
$4 Coors, $5 Vodka
highballs, $7 Vodka Red
Bulls
NELLIE’S
DJ Twin • Zing Zang
Bloody Marys, Nellie Beer,
House Rail Drinks and
Mimosas, $4, 11am-5pm •
Buckets of Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-7pm
• No Cover
PHASE 1
Dancing, 9pm-close
PHASE 1 OF DUPONT
For the Ladies • DJ Rosie
• Doors at 9pm • 21+

PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Karaoke in the lounge •
t
METROWEEKLY.COM JULY 11, 2013
40
SUNDAY, 07.14.13
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, games, football on
Sundays • Expanded craft
beer selection • No cover
DC EAGLE
New Happy Hours
Specials: $2 off rail and
domestic, 4-9pm • DC
Eagle Beer Bust, 1-5pm
• $15 for Refllable Cup
of Bud and IPA, second
foor • Cookout - Angus’
Famous Ribs BBQ Chicken
with sides and Fixin’s, 2pm
FIREPLACE
Skyy Vodka, $3 • $5 cover
with $1 off coupons
Charity Bingo with Cash
Prizes 3rd Sat. of Every
Month
TOWN
DJ Chris Cox • Live
performance by Crystal
Waters • Go Go Boys
• Drag show starts
at 10:30pm • $8 from
10-11pm, $12 after 11pm
• 21+ • Buy tickets
in advance at Number
Nine and receive priority
admission
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All nude male dancers,
9pm • Ladies of Illusion
with host Ella Fitzgerald,
9pm • DJ Steve
Henderson in Secrets •
DJ Spyke in Ziegfelds •
Cover • 21+
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Champagne Brunch
Buffet, 10am-3pm •
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Drag Show hosted by
Destiny B. Childs featuring
performances by a rotating
cast, 9pm • No cover •
Karaoke follows show
JR.’S
Sunday Funday • Liquid
Brunch • Doors open at
1pm • $2 Coors Lights &
$3 Skyy (all favors), all
day and night
NELLIE’S
Drag Brunch, hosted by
Shi-Queeta-Lee, 11am-3pm
• $20 Brunch Buffet •
House Rail Drinks, Zing
Zang Bloody Marys, Nellie
Beer and Mimosas, $4,
11am-close • Buckets of
Beer, $15
What was your favorite cartoon
when you were a kid?
Rugrats and The Simpsons.
Who’s your greatest influence?
My mother. She really set herself apart from
her family. She was the only person to go
into the military. She’s been in war, she’s
traveled the world. She’s the first person to
marry someone who’s not Jamaican. She was
a single mom most of my life, and one of my
biggest supporters.
What’s your greatest fear?
Dying without influencing or inspiring
somebody through my music.
Pick three people, living or dead, who you
think would make the most fascinating
dinner guests imaginable.
Kathy Griffin, RuPaul and Tyra Banks.
What would you serve?
Traditional Jamaican food, like curry chicken,
plantains, beans and rice, a little Jamaican rum.
JULY 11, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
What’s on your
nightstand?
Random vitamin
pills, cologne,
pocket change.
What’s in your
nightstand drawer?
Bills.
Where do you keep
the condoms
and lube?
Within arm’s reach.
What are your
television favorites?
Scandal and Veep.
My roommate is
trying to get
me hooked on
Game of Thrones.
41
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Decades of Dance • DJ
Tim-e in Secrets • 9pm •
Cover 21+
MONDAY, 07.15.13
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, games, football on
Sundays • Expanded craft
beer selection • No cover
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • $1 Drafts
(Bud and Bud Light)
FREDDIE’S
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
Happy Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm
• Showtunes Songs &
Singalongs, 9pm-close •
DJ Jamez • $3 Drafts
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Poker Texas Hold’em, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Buzztime Trivia
competition • 75 cents off
bottles and drafts
TUESDAY, 07.16.13
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, games, football on
Sundays • Expanded craft
beer selection • No cover
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • $2 Rail and
Domestic, All day • Free
pool till 9pm
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
Underground (Indie Pop/
Alt/Brit Rock), 9pm-close
• DJ Wes Della Volla •
Special Guest DJ Matt
Bailer • 2-for-1, all day
and night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Drag BINGO hosted by
Shi-Queeta Lee, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
75 cents off bottles and
drafts • Movie Night
WED., 07.17.13
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, games, football on
Sundays • Expanded craft
beer selection • No cover
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • Wooden
Nickels Redeemable •
Example: 2 Nickels get
Rail or Domestic
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm • Drag
Bingo, 8pm • Karaoke,
10pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour Prices,
4pm-Close
JR.’S
Trivia with MC Jay
Ray, 8pm • The Queen,
10-11pm • $2 JR’s Drafts
& $4 Vodka ($2 with
College I.D./JR’s Team
Shirt)
Who gets on your nerves?
People who are annoying just to be annoying. I
also don’t like people who are too clingy.
If your home was burning, what’s the first
thing you’d grab while leaving?
My iPad and my passport.
What’s your biggest turn-on?
Nice legs and confidence.
What’s your biggest turn-off?
Arrogance and no sense of style.
What’s something you’ve always wanted to
do but haven’t yet tried?
Skydiving or riding a hot-air balloon.
Boxers, briefs or other?
Briefs and other.
Who’s your favorite musical artist?
Christina Aguilera. She’s my idol.
What’s your favorite website?
YouTube.
What’s the most unusual place
you’ve had sex?
In a park by a Metro station.
What position do you play in the big
baseball game of life?
MVP.
What’s your favorite retail store?
At the moment, American Apparel and H&M.
What’s the most you’ll spend on a haircut?
$200.
What about on shoes?
$350. And I still have them.
What’s your favorite food to splurge with?
Chinese takeout.

How would you describe your dream guy?
I think it changes all the time. It depends on
personality. Somebody who’s caring, family-
oriented, a good friend, faithful, and stable
in their job. Somebody who’s confident. And
someone with a nice, eye-catching smile.
Define good in bed.
No words. When it’s so good you don’t even
know how to describe it.
Who should star in a movie about your life?
Ben Savage.
Who was your first celebrity crush?
Does it have to be a guy?
Tell me both, your first female and
male crushes.
My first crush was Tiffani Amber Thiessen
from Saved by the Bell. My first male crush
was A.J. McLean from the Backstreet Boys.
METROWEEKLY.COM JULY 11, 2013
42
THURSDAY, 07.18.13
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, games, football
on Sundays • VJ Wess
• Expanded craft beer
selection • No cover
ANNIE’S/ANNIE’S
UPSTAIRS
4@4 Happy Hour,
4pm-7pm • $4 Small
Plates, $4 Stella Artois,
$4 House Wines, $4
Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4
Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
DC EAGLE
3-Way Thursdays • Bring
Your Buddies – when two
friends buy drinks, yours
are free, rail or domestic
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
SmartAss Trivia, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Free Pool • 75 cents off
Bottles and Drafts
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
New Meat Wednesday DJ
Don T • 9pm • Cover 21+
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
$3 Rail Vodka Highballs,
$2 JR.’s drafts, 8pm to
close • Top Pop Night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Active Duty Military Night
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • No Cover
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Shirtless Thursday • DJ
Tim E in Secrets • 9pm •
Cover 21+ l
What kind of plant would you be?
A black rose. It’s a hybrid, just like me. My
mom is Jamaican and Chinese; my dad is Irish.
What kind of car would you be?
A Volkswagen Bug. You’d be surprised what
comes in small packages.
What are you most grateful for?
The few friends I’ve made in D.C. They’re like
my substitute family.
What’s something you want more of?
Patience. I’m so impatient.
State your life philosophy in
10 words or less.
I don’t want to tiptoe through life only to
arrive safely at death. l
JULY 11, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
Do you have a
particular dish
you like?
I could eat the whole
menu. Anything with
roasted pork, I love.
What’s your
favorite season?
Fall and winter.
I hate summer.
What kind of animal
would you be?
I would say a bird
of paradise. I love
that birds can go
wherever they want
to, plus birds of
paradise are exotic,
like myself.
43
DESTINATIONS
m mostly men w mostly women m&w men and women r restaurant l leather/levi
d dancing v video t drag cw country western gg go-go dancers o open 24 hours s sauna
BARS & CLUBS
METROWEEKLY.COM JULY 11, 2013
MARYLAND
CLUB HIPPO
1 West Eager Street
Baltimore, MD
(410) 547-0069
THE LODGE
21614 National Pike
Boonsboro, MD
(301) 591-4434
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855-N Washington, Blvd.
Laurel, MD
(301) 498-4840
VIRGINIA
FREDDIE’S
BEACH BAR
555 South 23rd Street
Crystal City, VA
(703) 685-0555
Crystal City Metro
m&w r
V3 LOUNGE
6763 Wilson Blvd.
Falls Church, Va.
301-802-8878

HRC
ACTION CENTER
& STORE
1633 Connecticut Ave. NW
(202) 232-8621
Dupont Circle Metro
THE FIREPLACE
22nd & P Streets NW
(202) 293-1293
Dupont Circle Metro
m v
FUEGO
Aqua
1818 New York Ave. NE
m&w d t
GLORIOUS
HEALTH CLUB
2120 W. VA Ave. NE 20002
(202) 269-0226
m o s
GREEN LANTERN
1335 Green Court NW
(behind 1335 L St.)
(202) 347-4534
McPherson Square Metro
m l
JR.’S
1519 17th Street NW
(202) 328-0090
Dupont Circle Metro
m v
LACE
2214 Rhode Island Ave. NE
(202) 832-3888
w r d
MOVA
2204 14th Street NW
(202) 629-3958
U Street / Cardozo Metro
NELLIE’S
SPORTS BAR
900 U Street NW
(202) 332-6355
U Street / Cardozo Metro
m&w r
D.C.
18th & U
DUPLEX DINER
2004 18th Street NW
(202) 265-7828
Dupont Circle Metro
r
9:30 CLUB
815 V Street NW
(202) 265-0930
U Street / Cardozo Metro
BACHELOR’S MILL
1104 8th Street SE
(202) 546-5979
Eastern Market /
Navy Yard Metro
m d
COBALT/30 DEGREES
17th & R Street NW
(202) 462-6569
Dupont Circle Metro
m d t
CREW CLUB
1321 14th Street NW
(202) 319-1333
McPherson Square Metro
m o s
DC EAGLE
639 New York Ave. NW
(202) 347-6025
Convention Center /
Gallery Place /
Chinatown Metro
m l
DELTA ELITE
3734 10th Street NE
(202) 529-0626
Brookland Metro
m d
NUMBER NINE
1435 P Street NW
Dupont Circle Metro
PHASE 1
525 8th Street SE
(202) 544-6831
Eastern Market Metro
w d
PHASE 1 of DUPONT
1415 22nd Street NW
(Formerly Apex)
Dupont Circle Metro
w m d
REMINGTON’S
639 Pennsylvania Ave. SE
(202) 543-3113
Eastern Market Metro
m cw d v
TOWN
2009 8th Street NW
(202) 234-TOWN
U Street/Cardozo Metro
m d v t
ZIEGFELD’S /
SECRETS
1824 Half Street SW
(202) 863-0670
Navy Yard Metro
m d v t gg
RETAIL
44 SEE MORE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
scene
Shelby Blake-Stephyns’s
Miss PW’s Step-Down
Friday, July 5
PW’s Sports Bar
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
WARD MORRISON
scan this tag
with your
smartphone
for bonus scene
pics online!
W
HEN MIKEY TORRES
decided to start
a queer-focused,
performance-based party,
he didn’t want to just copy
what he liked about Town’s
holiday-Sunday party, WTF,
or more recently the Black
Cat’s Gay Bash.
“I wanted to take things
a step further,” Torres says.
ShockTart is also “kind of
like the next level of an
open mike,” he explains.
“I would love for people to
come to this and get inspired
by it, and then they come
back to the next ShockTart
as one of the performers.”
Whether starting a new band
or a performance-art act, the
ultimate goal of ShockTart “is
about inspiring and creating.”
Torres will have a trunk of
makeup and art supplies on
hand, just in case people
feel spontaneous, but the
main performances will be
selected in advance.
The party launches
Saturday, July 20, at Phase
1, with a lineup that includes
edgy drag performer Heidi
Glüm and bold dance music
DJ David Merrill. But the
focus is chiefly on avant-
garde acts you haven’t seen,
at least not regularly, giving
these new or underrated
acts a platform for wider
exposure. The headliner for
the debut ShockTart is the
local duo Pleasure Curses,
which Torres initially heard
at the Rock and Roll Hotel.
“They remind me a lot
of New Order,” he says.
“It’s just two guys — one
guy sings and the other guy
plays all the instruments.
It’s just very cool and very
danceable, catchy synth-
pop, but with sort-of a dark
vocal style.”
Also on tap is the drag
king group the Nancy Boys,
women portraying and
covering ’80s-era mournful
Brit-pop — think the
Cure, the Smiths and Joy
Division.
Torres will also perform,
but not in his well-known
role as lead singer of glam-
rock band Glitterlust. “That
was a conscious decision,”
he says. “It’s not about me,
it’s not about Glitterlust.
I really want the party to
be about the kids that are
coming to it.” Instead,
Torres will be nearly
unrecognizable, performing
a “boy-lesque performance
art routine.”
“I’m really just doing
this as an experiment to
see if it’ll work,” concedes
Torres, who intends to make
ShockTart a monthly party
and one that hops around
from venue to venue. He
hopes it finds appeal among
a diverse group of people —
all genders and orientations.
“I think that the type
of person that would be
into this,” he says, “is the
kind of person that’s sort
of looking for something
different, and is interested in
a more cerebral, interactive
experience.”
ShockTart Vol. 1 is Saturday,
July 20, starting at 7:30 p.m.
Phase 1, 525 8th St. SE.
Tickets are $10. Call
202-544-6831 or visit
phase1dc.com. l
B
Y

D
O
U
G

R
U
L
E
Art Party
C
L
U
B
L
I
F
E
S
45
Glitterlust’s Mikey Torres launches ShockTart, an avant-garde performance party at Phase 1
METROWEEKLY.COM JULY 11, 2013
46 JULY 11, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
47 PURCHASE YOUR PHOTO AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE/
scene
scan this tag
with your
smartphone
for bonus scene
pics online!
RuPaul’s Drag Racer
Battle Royale:
Coco Montrese vs
Alyssa Edwards
Saturday, July 6
Town
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
WARD MORRISON
48 SEE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
49 METROWEEKLY.COM JULY 11, 2013

Now it will be interesting to see
whether the victorious proponents of gay marriage will
show tolerance toward those who disagreed with them
when the issue was still in dispute.

— Science-fiction author, Mormon and anti-gay activist ORSON SCOTT CARD in a statement pleading for “tolerance” when it
comes to buying tickets to the upcoming movie version of his famous novel, Ender’s Game. Card, who sits on the board of the
anti-gay National Organization for Marriage, says gay marriage is now “moot.”
(Entertainment Weekly)

I’ve watched all but two seasons of Big Brother and have never seen players
so vocal and unapologetic about their bigotry.”
— RAGAN FOX, an associate professor of communication studies at California State University, Long Beach, on the current season
of the CBS reality series Big Brother, in which live feeds have caught contestants making racist and anti-gay statements.
(The New York Times)

If a couple has been married or together for a long period of time,
a gay divorce usually costs double what it does for a hetero-
sexual marriage. …
Having kids triples the cost.

— CAROLYN SATENBERG, a family-law attorney in New York City, on how the legal system is even further behind
on gay divorce than it is on gay marriage.
(Reuters)

This is who I am. People tell me
I am the most real pageant contestant
they have ever met.

— ANALOUISA VALENCIA on being the first, as far as she knows, out lesbian to compete for the title of Miss South Carolina.
(The Augusta Chronicle)

[T]he flying of this flag is
a poke in the eye of a way of life.”
— From a letter sent by a veteran to Lafayette City, La., Councilman Andy Naquin that convinced him to draft a proposal to
ban the flying of the rainbow flag on any government property.
(Raw Story)
50 JULY 11, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM

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