P. 1
Randy Sprick 7-26-2013 H1

Randy Sprick 7-26-2013 H1

|Views: 434|Likes:
Published by Region8ks
Handout #1 for Randy Sprick Seminar at FHSU on July 26, 2013 (Sponsored by Region 8 KS Special Education Coop)
Handout #1 for Randy Sprick Seminar at FHSU on July 26, 2013 (Sponsored by Region 8 KS Special Education Coop)

More info:

Categories:Types, Presentations
Published by: Region8ks on Jul 12, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

10/18/2013

pdf

text

original

Classroom Management for the Beginning of the School Year

Presented by: Randy Sprick, Ph.D.

Northwest Kansas Education Service Center Hays, KS July 26, 2013

For more information contact Safe & Civil Schools 800-323-8819 or info@safeandcivilschools

Introduction Basic Beliefs
A. Behavior can be changed! B. Many teachers depend too much on punitive consequences. C. A more comprehensive approach is summarized by the acronym STOIC: Structure for success. Teach expectations (like a great basketball coach). Observe—circulate and scan. Interact positively with students. Correct misbehavior fluently. D. STOIC can be defined as “someone respected and admired for patience and endurance in the face of adversity.”

Getting Started
Start a list of all the misbehaviors that occur in your class. Secondary teachers might wish to focus on one particular class.

Review your list and identify the top two or three concerns. Developing a plan to address these concerns is the objective of this session.

© Safe & Civil Schools

1

Five strategies will be presented that may be useful in your plan to address the problems you identified a moment ago.  Clarify and re-teach expectations (like a great basketball coach).  Effectively use your classroom rules and expectations for success.  Implement corrective consequences calmly and consistently.  Use positive feedback and your attention strategically (ratios of interactions).  Implement group-based incentive systems for especially tough classes.

STRATEGY 1 ——

Clarify and re-teach expectations (like a great basketball coach).
A. Identify regularly scheduled classroom activities and major transitions. Examples include:  Entering the classroom and opening routines  Teacher-directed instruction  Independent seat work  Transition into groups  Cooperative groups  Tests  End of class wrap-up and exit  Other: _________________________________ _________________________________ B. Be sure to clarify (for each major activity and transition):

Conversation Help Activity Movement Participation

2

© Safe & Civil Schools

C. Use the worksheet on the following page to prepare a lesson for teaching and reviewing expectations for a major instructional activity. D. Plan to teach expectations for at least the first week of school, immediately before and after vacations, and any time quite a few students are chronically exhibiting irresponsible behavior.

ACTION: Re-teach any set of expectations each day until that activity or transition goes perfectly for at least three consecutive days.

© Safe & Civil Schools

3

C

H

A

M

P

S

»
CHAMPS CLASSROOM ACTIVITY WORKSHEET

no.

4.2

Activity _________________________________________________________________

Conversation
Can students engage in conversations with each other during this activity? If yes, about what? With whom? How many students can be involved in a single conversation? How long can the conversation last? Voice Level:

Help
How do students get questions answered? How do students get your attention? If students have to wait for help, what should they do while they wait?

Activity
What is the expected end product of this activity? (Note: This may vary from day to day.)

Movement
Can students get out of their seats during the activity? If yes, acceptable reasons include: pencil sharpener drink other: Do they need permission from you? restroom hand in/pick up materials

Participation
What behaviors show that students are participating fully and responsibly?

What behaviors show that a student is not participating?

Success!
4 © 2009 Pacific Northwest Publishing | Reproducible Form

C

H

A

M

P

S

»
CHAMPS TRANSITION WORKSHEET

no.

4.4

Transition _________________________________________________________________

Conversation
Can students engage in conversations with each other during this transition? If yes, clarify how (so that they keep their attention on completing the transition). Voice Level:

Help
How do students get questions answered? How do students get your attention?

Activity
Explain the transition. What will be different afterwards? (e.g., change in location, use of different materials, etc.). Include time criteria (how long it should take).

Movement
If the transition itself does not involve getting out of seats, can students get out of their seat for any reason during the transition? If yes, what are acceptable reasons? If the transition itself involves out-of-seat movement, can a student go elsewhere (e.g., to sharpen a pencil)?

Participation
What behaviors show that students are participating in the transition fully and responsibly?

What behaviors show that a student is not participating appropriately in the transition?

Success!
© 2009 Pacific Northwest Publishing | Reproducible Form 5

STRATEGY 2 ——

Effectively use your classroom rules and positive expectations for success. Posted Classroom Rules
Three to five specific expectations you will enforce
 Specific enough that you will correct  Like speed limits and stop signs  Can be unique to your classroom or  Teach the rules and how you will

Posted Guidelines for Success
Three to five goals or values you will inspire students to achieve
 Broad goals that take a lifetime to  Like “drive safely” and “drive

infractions consistently your teaching team

learn

enforce the rules using corrective consequences

defensively”  Can be schoolwide  Use the Guidelines as the basis for positive feedback, corrective feedback, class discussions, integrate with lessons, and so on  Refer to these over and over— PREACH!

ACTION: Analyze how each of the major misbehaviors will be corrected. If it is a rule violation, enforce consistent corrective consequences (the next topic). If it is not a rule violation, correct it using one of your Guidelines for Success—inspire.
6 © Safe & Civil Schools

STRATEGY 3 ——

Implement corrective consequences for rule violations calmly and consistently. 
Establish consequences that fit the nature of the problem but are as mild as possible.  Discuss consequences in advance with students.  Implement the consequence calmly and consistently.

Sample Menu of Classroom Corrections                Give a gentle verbal reprimand. Use a proximity correction. Keep a record of the behavior. Use planned ignoring. Reduce points (if using a point system). Implement a response cost lottery. Assign time owed from recess or after class. Assign time owed after school. Assign a timeout at the student’s desk. Assign a timeout at another location in the classroom. Assign an interclass timeout. Issue a demerit (3 demerits = afterschool detention). Have student fill out a Behavior Improvement Form. Require restitution by the student. Referral.

ACTION: Evaluate whether you have a plan for responding consistently to all misbehavior that is on your list from page 1.

© Safe & Civil Schools

7

From Interventions: Evidence-Based Behavioral Strategies for Individual Students (2nd ed.). Copyright © 2008 Randall S. Sprick and Mickey Garrison. All rights reserved.

8

© Safe & Civil Schools

STRATEGY 4 ——

Use positive feedback and your attention strategically to improve student behavior (Ratios of Interactions). 
Recognize that some students are starved for attention.  Be aware of Ratios of Interactions. Strive for at least a 3-to-1 ratio of attention to positive behavior versus attention to negative behavior.  Four types of attention to positive behavior:  Noncontingent attention (e.g., greetings)  Positive feedback— verbal and written  Intermittent rewards  Systems-level rewards (Strategy 5)  Positive feedback should be specific, descriptive, contingent, and nonembarrassing.

ACTION:
a. For each misbehavior on page 1, identify a behavior or attitude that is the “positive opposite” of that misbehavior. b. Make a recording of your interactions during the thirty minutes of your school day when you are the most negative. c. Count and analyze your interactions and make a plan to be consistently more positive during that time period.

© Safe & Civil Schools

9

C

H

A

M

P

S

»
rATIO OF INTERACTIONS MONITORING FORM
(During a Particular Time of Day)

no.

6.2

Teacher _________________________________________________________ Time of Day ________________________

Date ________________________

Coding System Used (if any):

Attention to Positive

Attention to Negative

Analysis and Plan of Action:

10

© 2009 Pacific Northwest Publishing | Reproducible Form

STRATEGY 5 ——

Implement group-based incentive systems for especially tough classes. 
Common questions about reward systems:  Isn’t this bribery?  Shouldn’t students be responsible without needing rewards?  Won’t the students get “hooked” on the reinforcement?  Can I ever get rid of the reinforcement system?  Systems are more closely analogous to college or a job.  Types of classroom systems include:  Whole-Class Points or Team Competition

Various Point Charts

© Safe & Civil Schools

11

100 Squares

Lottery systems

 Reinforcement Based on Reducing Misbehavior

For additional ideas on group and individual reinforcement systems, see the Teacher’s Encyclopedia of Behavior Management, The Tough Kid Book, and The Tough Kid Toolbox.

ACTION: Determine whether a group-based system would motivate most students in the class to be gently intolerant of misbehavior: “Stop that or you are going to cost us a point.”

12

© Safe & Civil Schools

C

H

A

M

P

S

»

no.

8.1

Develop anD /or revise Your classW iD e M otivation sYsteM

(1 of 2)

Teacher ______________________________________

Grade _______

Room ________

School Year _________

Step 1

Preparation

1. What problem(s) are you trying to solve?

2. Describe the goal(s) of your system; limit your objective to one major category of behavior (e.g., reduce disruptions and name-calling, increase work completion, or decrease apathy—increase motivation).

3. At the present time, the level of structure I need is:

❏ High

❏ Medium

❏ Low

4. Decide whether you need a nonreward-based or a reward-based system. (See pages 310–312 to help with this decision.) ❏ Nonreward-based ❏ Reward-based

Step 2

Select a system (one or more) and prepare to implement it

1. Read through the different systems to find one appropriate for the level of structure your class currently needs. The system I will implement (one from the CHAMPS book or something else) is:

2. Describe the system.

3. Identify materials needed to monitor behavior and record progress (e.g., tickets, charts, Mystery Behavior Envelopes).

© 2009 Pacific Northwest Publishing | Reproducible Form

13

C

H

A

M

P

S

»

no.

8.1

Develop anD/or revise Your classWiDe Motivation sYsteM

(2 of 2)

Step 2 (continued)

4. Identify the rewards to be used. If you will involve the students in generating the list of rewards, describe how.

5. Identify when and how you will explain the system to the students and the date for implementation.

Step 3

For reward-based systems, identify how you will maintain, modify, or fade the system

1. How will you keep your energy and excitement about the system at a high level?

2. How will you make the system more challenging as the class reaches a high level of consistent success?

3. Once the system is fairly lean, how will you move to increasingly intermittent rewards?

4. When appropriate, fade the system by having a discussion with the students about abandoning the system and/or switching to goal-setting systems.

14

© 2009 Pacific Northwest Publishing | Reproducible Form

References and Resources
Materials in the Safe & Civil Schools Library are now listed on SAMHSA’s National Registry of Evidencebased Programs and Practices. To view details on the Safe & Civil Schools Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports Model, visit: www.nrepp.samhsa.gov/ViewIntervention.aspx?id=242

Books
Sprick, R. S. (2012). Teacher’s encyclopedia of behavior management: 100+ problems/500+ plans (2nd ed.). Eugene, OR: Pacific Northwest Publishing. Wise, B. J., Marcum, K., Haykin, M., Sprick, R. S., & Sprick, M. (2011). Meaningful work: Changing student behavior with school jobs. Eugene, OR: Pacific Northwest Publishing. Sprick, R. S., Knight, J., Reinke, W., Skyles, T., & Barnes, L. (2010). Coaching classroom management: Strategies and tools for administrators and coaches (2nd ed.). Eugene, OR: Pacific Northwest Publishing. Sprick, R. S. (2009). CHAMPS: A proactive and positive approach to classroom management (2nd ed.). Eugene, OR: Pacific Northwest Publishing. Sprick, R. S. (2009). Stepping in: A substitute’s guide to managing classroom behavior. Eugene, OR: Pacific Northwest Publishing. Sprick, R. S. (2009). Structuring success for substitutes. Eugene, OR: Pacific Northwest Publishing. Sprick, R. S., Booher, M., & Garrison, M. (2009). Behavioral response to intervention (B-RTI): Creating a continuum of problem-solving and support. Eugene, OR: Pacific Northwest Publishing. Sprick, R. S., & Garrison, M. (2008). Interventions: Evidence-based behavior strategies for individual students (2nd ed.). Eugene, OR: Pacific Northwest Publishing. Sprick, R. S. (2006). Discipline in the secondary classroom: A positive approach to behavior management (2nd ed.). Eugene, OR: Pacific Northwest Publishing. Sprick, R. S., & Garrison, M. (2000). ParaPro: Supporting the instructional process. Eugene, OR: Pacific Northwest Publishing.

Multimedia
Sprick, R. S. (2010). CHAMPS DVD inservice series (2nd ed., DVD program). Eugene, OR: Pacific Northwest Publishing. Sprick, R. S. (2008). Discipline in the secondary classroom DVD inservice series (DVD program). Eugene, OR: Pacific Northwest Publishing.

Sprick, R. S. (2008). Interventions audio: Evidence-based behavior strategies for individual students (2nd ed., audio CD program). Eugene, OR: Pacific Northwest Publishing. Sprick, R. S. (2008). When every second counts: Mini-inservices for handling common classroom behavior problems (CD and DVD program). Eugene, OR: Pacific Northwest Publishing. Sprick, R. S., Swartz, L., & Schroeder, S. (2006). In the driver’s seat: A roadmap to managing student behavior on the bus (CD and DVD program). Eugene, OR: Pacific Northwest Publishing and Oregon Center for Applied Sciences. Sprick, R. S., Swartz, L., & Glang, A. (2005). On the playground: A guide to playground management (CD program). Eugene, OR: Pacific Northwest Publishing and Oregon Center for Applied Sciences. Sprick, R. S. (2003). START on time! Safe transitions and reduced tardiness in secondary schools (CD program). Eugene, OR: Pacific Northwest Publishing. Sprick, R. S., Garrison, M., & Howard, L. (2002). Foundations: Establishing positive discipline and school-wide behavior support (CD program). Eugene, OR: Pacific Northwest Publishing.

Articles
Sprick, R. (2010). Shaping student behavior. SEEN Magazine, 12(2), 90–91.

Sprick, R., & Daniels, K. (2010). Managing student behavior. Principal Leadership, September, 18–21. Sprick, R. (2009). Doing discipline differently. Principal Leadership, 9(5), 19–22.
Sprick, R. (2009). Positive behavior support: A powerful vehicle for preparing 21st century citizens. SEEN Magazine, 11(3), 94. Sprick, R. (2009). Schoolwide discipline: Can you make it work? SEEN Magazine, 11(2), 102. Sprick, R., & Daniels, K. (2007). Taming the tardies—Every minute counts. Middle Ground, 11(2), 21–23. Sprick, R. S. & Booher, M. (2006). Behavior support and response to intervention: a systematic approach to meeting the social/emotional needs of students. Communique, 35(4), 34–36. Sprick, R.S. (2004). Civil schools are safe schools: But are they attainable? Instructional Leader, 17(6), 3–5.

The Council of Administrators of Special Education (CASE) has endorsed three Safe & Civil Schools resources: • Foundations • CHAMPS • Interventions For more information, visit: www.casecec.org

Report on Graduation Rates in the U.S.
A revised report, commissioned by the Black Alliance for Educational Options, found that the overall graduation rate nationally in 2003 was 71%. Graduation rates by race/ethnicity in 2003 were: African-American 56% Native American 57% Asian 79% White 78% Hispanic 54% Education Week reported that in 2010 the graduation rate was again 71%. To access the historical information regarding graduation rates, log onto: http://www.safeandcivilschools.com/research/graduation_rates.php

Report on School Connectedness
"Increasing evidence shows that when adolescents feel cared for by people at their school and feel like a part of the their school, they are less likely to use substances, engage in violence, or initiate sexual activity at an early age." This article demonstrates an association between connectedness and effective classroom management, effective disciplinary policies, small school size and involvement in extracurricular activities McNeely, C.A., Nonnemaker, J.A., Blum, R.W.; (2002). Promoting School connectedness: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, Journal of School Health, 72(4), 138-146.

“Research has shown that students who feel connected to school do better academically and also are less likely to be involved in risky health behaviors: drug use, cigarette smoking, early sex, violence and suicidal thoughts and attempts. This report summarizes what is known about school connectedness.”
Blum, Robert, School Connectedness: Improving the Lives of Students. Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, 2005. http://www.jhsph.edu/bin/i/e/MCI_Monograph_FINAL.pdf

Randy Sprick's Safe and Civil Schools
Visit http://www.safeandcivilschools.com/ for information on Safe and Civil Schools products and services to help improve behavior, discipline and school climate, improve school connectedness and reduce suspensions/expulsions.

_______________________________________________________ Your Name: __________________________________________ Your state code (e.g. OR) _______ Your email (optional): ________________________________________________ Please print neatly! If you provide your email, Safe and Civil Schools will NEVER sell or give out your address. We will occasionally send you up-dates on workshops, tips, or new products.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->