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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Monday • July 15, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 284
SYRIA’S CIVIL WAR
WORLD PAGE 28
‘GLEE’ STAR
FOUND DEAD
PAGE 2
FREAK GETS
FIRST NO-NO
SPORTS PAGE 11
Islamist militants leave Pakistan to fight in Syria
www.UNrealestate.info
A blog dedicated to Unreal events in
Real Estate. For buying or selling a home
in the Palo Alto Area,
Call John King at
650•354•1100
By Sally Schilling
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
The recent announcement that
City College of San Francisco
could lose its accreditation next
year means some of its 85,000
students may look to neighboring
districts for their two-year degree.
The San Mateo County
Community College District
already faces high enrollment.
That is a challenge for out-of-area
students, along with transporta-
tion, which means transferring to
the College of San Mateo, Skyline
College or Cañada College may
not be an easy option.
“The students are in a tough
position,” said Barbara
Christensen, director of communi-
ty and government relations for
SMCCCD.
Administrators from the San
Mateo County Community
College District were disappoint-
ed to learn that CCSF could lose
accreditation next year. The dis-
trict is waiting to see if CCSF will
in fact be forced to close its doors
next July before taking any steps
to accommodate an influx of stu-
dents, said Christensen.
The Accrediting Commission
for Community and Junior
Colleges announced July 3 it
decided to terminate CCSF’s
accreditation next year. CCSF is
now appealing that decision.
Some CCSF students may choose
to attend a community college in
San Mateo County in the future,
but getting around will be difficult.
County colleges weigh impact of looming CCSF closure
Wait-and-see approach after San Francisco campuses hit with accreditation decision
See CCSF, Page 20
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Sara Kruzan was assaulted when
she was 11 by a man who forced
her into prostitution at age 13.
After the abuse, Kruzan killed her
captor when she was 16. In 1995,
the Riverside girl was convicted
and sentenced to life without
parole.
Though a convicted murderer,
she is also a victim of sexual slav-
ery.
She could be paroled in the com-
ing months, but state Sen. Leland
Yee, D-San Francisco/San Mateo,
is pushing legislation that would
give other victims more legal
tools to fight incarceration.
Just as the state’s penal code
acknowledges self-defense in
cases of domestic violence or inti-
mate partner battering, Yee’s leg-
islation would address human traf-
ficking survivors as well. Senate
Bill aims to
aid jailed sex
slave victims
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Karen Clapper, the San Carlos
councilwoman appointed last year
to fill out the remaining term of
the resigned mayor, is officially
running this November for a full-
term seat.
Clapper, 61, said she expects
some voters may be uncomfort-
able with her choice because they
believed she took the 18-month
appointment with the express
understanding she not stick around
past the remainder of former
mayor Andy Klein’s term.
However, the former planning
commi s s i oner
says running in
November 2013
was “definitely
not on my agen-
da” when
appointed in
June 2012 and
her original
goal was to
ensure the coun-
cil operated smoothly until the
next person was installed.
However, she said her time on
the council so far and the encour-
agement of a variety of communi-
Interim councilwoman
running for regular seat
By Sally Schilling
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Thanks to modern medicine,
more people are living longer.
Living to be 100 years old is not
the rare feat it used to be.
According to the U.S. Census, the
average life expectancy in 1970
was 70.8 years, and grew to 78
years in 2008. It’s projected to be
almost 80 years old by 2020.
In San Mateo County, the popu-
lation ages 65 and older is grow-
ing rapidly. County service work-
ers and nonprofit groups are work-
ing to meet the needs of this
booming group of older adults.
They have found that many of
them struggle with loneliness and
isolation.
Feeling lonely can have serious
impacts on a person’s health, said
Diane Dworkin, mental health cli-
nician with the San Mateo County
Behavioral Health and Recovery
Services.
The immune system can be
weakened by feelings of isolation,
which can also lead to depression,
she said.
“Social isolation is equivalent
to the health effects of smoking
15 cigarettes a day,” Dworkin
quoted an Australian doctor say-
i ng.
Conversely, making an effort to
connect with the community can
boost health.
“My high blood pressure
improved without medication,”
said Tammy Herrera, 70, who goes
to Fair Oaks Adult Activity Center
in Redwood City for line dancing,
yoga and gardening. “Our health
improves due to the company. ”
There other places you can go
for classes, but you have to pay for
it, said Herrera, of Menlo Park.
The free yoga and tai chi classes
draw people from faraway places,
she said.
“I wish there are more places
like Fair Oaks,” she said, adding
that the center needs more volun-
teers to work in the garden.
The free classes and affordable
healthy meals allow for people
living off of savings or Social
Security to engage with their com-
munity, she said.
Older and isolated
SALLY SCHILLING/DAILY JOURNAL
Tammy Herrera (left), 70, works with other older adults in the Fair Oaks Adult Activity Center garden in
Redwood City.The gardening club meets Fridays from 10 a.m. to noon and is looking for more volunteers.
Victims-turned-offenders could claim
self-defense, DA group in opposition
See SEX, Page 20
Karen Clapper
See SEAT, Page 5
Expanding aging population seeks social interaction
See SENIORS, Page 5
Augustus Bacon, D-Ga., became the
first person elected to the U.S. Senate
under the terms of the recently ratified
17th Amendment to the U.S.
Constitution, providing for popular
election of senators.
Cory Monteith, star of hit
show ‘Glee,’ found dead
VANCOUVER, British Columbia
(AP) — Cory Monteith, the handsome
young actor who shot to fame in the
hit TV series “Glee” but was beset by
addiction struggles so fierce that he
once said he was lucky to be alive, was
found dead in a hotel room, police
said. He was 31.
The Canadian-born Monteith, who
played star quarterback-turned-singer
Finn Hudson on the Fox TV series
about a high school glee club, was
found dead in his room on the 21st
floor of the Fairmont Pacific Rim
Hotel on Vancouver’s waterfront at
about noon Saturday, according to
police.
Acting Vancouver Police Chief Doug
LePard said there was no indication of
foul play.
Vancouver police said Sunday that
an autopsy is expected to take place on
Monday to determine the cause of
death.
Monteith’s body was found by hotel
staff who entered his room after he
missed his check-out time, LePard
said. Monteith had checked into the
hotel on July 6.
“We do not have a great deal of infor-
mation as to cause of death,” said
British Columbia Chief Coroner Lisa
Lapointe. She said further tests would
be needed to determine how Monteith
died.
“The exact nature
of those examina-
tions will depend
on investigative
findings within the
next day or two as
information is
gathered from med-
ical records and dis-
cussions with fami-
ly take place,” she
said.
LePard said Monteith had been out
with people earlier and that those peo-
ple are being interviewed.
Video and electronic records from
the hotel indicate Monteith returned to
his room by himself early Saturday
morning, and he was believed to be
alone when he died, LePard said.
Lapointe said he had been dead for
several hours by the time his body was
found.
Lea Michele, Monteith’s “Glee” co-
star and real-life girlfriend, was asking
for privacy after receiving news of his
death, said her representative, Molly
Kawachi of ID-PR .
“We ask that everyone kindly
respect Lea’s privacy during this dev-
astating time,” Kawachi said in in an
email to The Associated Press.
Reality TV celebrity Kim
Kardashian offered her condolences in
a tweet: “ So sad. Prayers 4 his family.
Praying 4 Lea too! Words can’t
describe what they must be feeling.”
“Glee” cast members and other
celebrities also took to Twitter to
express their feelings.
“I have no words! My heart is bro-
ken,” Dot-Marie Jones, who plays
football coach Shannon Beiste on
“Glee,” said in a post on her Twitter
account Saturday night. She called
Monteith a “hell of a friend” and an
“amazing” man.
Lauren Potter, who plays Becky
Jackson, the cheerleader with Down
Syndrome on “Glee,” tweeted that she
feels “totally heartbroken right now. ”
“I love Cory so much this hurts my
heart,” she wrote. “I hope my Glee
family is OK right now. I love them
all. Cory was always so nice to me. I
have so many good memories.”
“What an absolutely tragic loss of a
very talented young man,” tweeted
Zooey Deschanel, star of another Fox
show, “New Girl.”
Fox and the producers of “Glee,”
including 20th Century Fox
Television, called him an exceptional
performer “and an even more excep-
tional person. He was a true joy to
work with and we will all miss him
tremendously. ”
“We are in shock and mourning this
tragic loss,” his representatives at
Viewpoint Public Relations in Los
Angeles said in a statement.
In April, Monteith checked himself
in to a treatment facility for “sub-
stance addiction” and asked for priva-
cy as he took steps toward recovery, a
representative said at the time.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Monday • July 15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Singer Linda
Ronstadt is 67.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1913
“There are two kinds of worries — those you
can do something about and those you
can’t. Don’t spend any time on the latter.”
— Duke Ellington, American jazz artist (1899-1974).
Actor Jan Michael
Vincent is 69.
Actor Forest
Whitaker is 52.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Women in yukatas, or casual summer kimonos, look at paper lanterns during the Mitama Festival at the Yasukuni Shrine in
Tokyo, Saturday. Over 30,000 lanterns light up the precincts of the shrine, where more than 2.4 million war dead are en-
shrined, during the four-day festival.The festival goes on until Tuesday.
Monday: Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming sunny. Patchy fog in the
morning. Highs in the lower 60s. West
winds 5 to 10 mph.
Monday ni ght: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming mostly cloudy.
Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the
lower 50s. Southwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Tuesday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming
partly cloudy. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the
lower 60s. Southwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Tuesday night: Partly cloudy in the evening then becom-
ing mostly cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the
lower 50s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Wednesday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becom-
ing sunny. Patchy fog. Highs in the lower 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
(Answers tomorrow)
ABOUT SAUTE ASTHMA CLEVER
Saturday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The teenager constantly oversleeping was —
CAUSE FOR ALARM
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
RELED
VALAR
NACTAV
SHIWYM
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
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Answer
here:
On this date:
I n 1870, Georgia became the last Confederate state to be
readmitted to the Union. Manitoba entered confederation as
the fifth Canadian province.
I n 1916, Boeing Co., originally known as Pacific Aero
Products Co., was founded in Seattle.
I n 1932, President Herbert Hoover announced he was
slashing his own salary by 20 percent, from $75,000 to
$60,000 a year; he also cut Cabinet members’ salaries by 15
percent, from $15,000 to $12,750 a year.
I n 1964, Sen. Barry M. Goldwater of Arizona was nomi-
nated for president by the Republican National Convention
in San Francisco.
I n 1976, a 36-hour kidnap ordeal began for 26 school-
children and their bus driver as they were abducted near
Chowchilla, Calif., by three gunmen and imprisoned in an
underground cell. (The captives escaped unharmed.)
I n 1979, President Jimmy Carter delivered his “malaise”
speech in which he lamented what he called a “crisis of con-
fidence” in America.
I n 1983, eight people were killed when a suitcase bomb
planted by Armenian extremists exploded at the Turkish
Airlines counter at Orly Airport in Paris.
In 1992, Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton was nominated for pres-
ident at the Democratic National Convention in New York.
I n 2010, after 85 days, BP stopped the flow of oil from a
blown-out well in the Gulf of Mexico using a 75-ton cap
lowered onto the wellhead earlier in the week.
Ten years ago: The Bush administration dramatically
raised its budget deficit projections to $455 billion for fis-
cal year 2003 and $475 billion for fiscal 2004, record levels
fed by the limp economy, tax cuts and the battle against ter-
rorism.
Author Clive Cussler is 82. Actor Ken Kercheval is 78.
Rhythm-and-blues singer Millie Jackson is 69. Rock musi-
cian Artimus Pyle is 65. Actor Terry O’Quinn is 61. Rock
musician Marky Ramone is 57. Rock musician Joe Satriani is
57. Actor Willie Aames is 53. Actress Lolita Davidovich is
52. Actress Brigitte Nielsen is 50. Rock musician Jason
Bonham is 47. Actress Amanda Foreman is 47. Actor Kristoff
St. John is 47. Rock musician Phillip Fisher is 46. Rhythm-
and-blues singer Stokley (Mint Condition) is 46. Actor-come-
dian Eddie Griffin is 45. Actor Brian Austin Green is 40.
Rapper Jim Jones is 37. Actor Travis Fimmel is 34.
In other news ...
Cory Monteith
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are California
Classic,No.5,in first place;Eureka,No.7,in second
place; and Lucky Charms, No. 12, in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:40.75.
7 9 8
4 5 25 27 51 10
Mega number
July 12 Mega Millions
2 8 22 35 37 6
Powerball
July 13 Powerball
1 13 20 25 32
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
4 0 7 4
Daily Four
2 0 2
Daily three evening
1 2 6 25 40 19
Mega number
July 13 Super Lotto Plus
I
n the 15 years between 1922 and
1937, only two ocean-going dry cargo
freighters were produced in American
shipyards. The United States had built
2,500 ships in World War I and now the
Navy was in shambles.
There were but 10 shipyards in the United
States capable of building ocean-going ves-
sels 400 feet or longer. The U.S. Maritime
Commission was established in 1936 to
oversee and access the needs of the United
States. It, however, did not increase our
naval supply of ships adequately although
there was a war brewing in Europe. We had
an order to build 60 ships for England and
they were the antiquated , slow, obsolete,
coal-burning ships. Immediately after the
war began, we dropped their contract and
converted those vessels to oil burners that
were much faster. Our merchant fleet con-
sisted of 1,150 vessels.
In 1822, William Richardson landed in
the port of Yerba Buena and, when his ship,
a British whaler Orion, left, it sailed with-
out him. It was believed he deserted his ship
because he fell in love with the Presidio
commandant’s daughter, Maria Antonia
Martinez. Pablo Vicente de Sola, the
Mexican governor, granted Richardson per-
mission to stay on condition he give les-
sons in carpentry and navigation to the
youth of California.
He was baptized at the mission and the
couple got married in 1823. They lived at
the Presidio with her father. Their first child
was born April 9, 1826. The year before he
received citizenship, the family moved to
southern California —1829. In 1831 and
1833, two sons were born.
In 1835, Richardson returned to San
Francisco and built the first structure on the
property then called Yerba Buena. Francisco
de Haro was now alcalde (mayor and judge)
of Yerba Buena and he marked the first street,
La Calla de la Foundation (literally the
Street of the Founding) that ran from the
beach (now Montgomery Street) to the
west, turned north and continued to the
Presidio. The section at the right turn is now
Grant Street. Richardson constructed a home
at what is now the corner of Washington
Street and Grant Avenue.
Because of his many talents, Richardson
was appointed port captain by Gov. Jose
Figueroa in 1835 and he played a significant
role in the development of the area. He fre-
quently served as a pilot on vessels entering
and leaving the harbor. During this time, he
developed a lucrative smuggling business
after he was grantee of the 18,000-acre
Rancho Sausalito in Marin County (parts of
Sausalito and Mill Valley). Richardson Bay
was named for him.
3
Monday • July 15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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Police reports
Vertigo?
Someone reported that a traffic signal
was facing the wrong direction at the
intersection of El Camino Real and
Rosedale Avenue in Burlingame before
10:03 a.m. Friday, July 5.
BURLINGAME
Thef t . Someone’s wallet was reported
stolen on the 1100 block of Broadway
Avenue before 11:41 a.m. Friday, July 5.
Di sturbance. Two drivers were involved
in a road rage incident on California Drive
and Oak Grove Avenue before 2:32 a.m.
Thursday, July 4.
Vandal i sm. A house was egged on the
first block of Anita Road before 10:12
p.m. Wednesday, July 3.
Suspi ci ous act i vi t y. Aperson was seen
drinking inside their vehicle on the 3000
block of Trousdale Drive before 8:09 p.m.
Wednesday, July 3.
Di sturbance. A customer refused to pay
for items on the 1800 block of El Camino
Real before 10:49 a.m. Wednesday, July 3.
BELMONT
Vehi cl e burgl ary. Someone reported
finding their vehicle’s window was
smashed and items were taken on
Broadway Street before 12:50 p.m.
Monday, July 8.
Thef t . An electrical panel was broken
into and the wiring was stolen on El
Camino Real before 12:28 p.m. Monday,
July 8.
Suspi ci ous ci rcumst ances. Two men
were taking tires off a car on Old County
Road before 8:42 p.m. Sunday, July 7.
World War II, Marinship, Sausalito
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE SAN MATEO COUNTY HISTORY MUSEUM
Marinship near Sausalito in 1944.
See HISTORY, Page 6
4
Monday • July 15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
STATE
TdP is a perennial highlight of the Bay
Area ride calendar, offering a variety of routes
to suit everyone from kids (2 to 6 miles) and
first time riders (20-mile) to serious cyclists
(31 / 56 / 63-mile options). Based in scenic
Coyote Point Park along the bay in San
Mateo, it’s easy to hangout after the ride with
a picnic lunch, listening to live music and
enjoying family activities, including visiting
the CuriOdyssey Environmental Education
Center. Proceeds benefit San Mateo County
Parks Bicycle Sunday.
August 4
2013
Presented by
S
a
n
M
a
t
e
o
County Parks
Fo
u
n
d
a
t
i
o
n
Info at:
www.supportparks.org ‹ 650-321-1638
Coyote Point
San Mateo
By Paul Elias
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — When the
courts have to figure compensation
for people aboard Asiana Airlines
Flight 214, the potential payouts
will probably be vastly different for
Americans and passengers from
other countries, even if they were
seated side by side as the jetliner
crash-landed.
An international treaty governs
compensation to passengers
harmed by international air travel
— from damaged luggage to crip-
pling injuries and death. The pact is
likely to close U.S. courts to many
foreigners and force them to pursue
their claims in Asia and elsewhere,
where lawsuits are rarer, harder to
win and offer smaller payouts.
Some passengers have already
contacted lawyers.
“If you are a U.S. citizen, there
will be no problem getting into
U.S. courts. The other people are
going to have a fight on their
hands,” said Northern California
attorney Frank Pitre, who repre-
sents two Americans who were
aboard the plane.
Federal law bars lawyers from
soliciting victims of air disasters
for the first 45 days after the crash.
Pitre said his clients called him.
Congress enacted that law in
1996 amid public anger over
lawyers who solicited clients in the
days immediately following the
ValuJet Flight 592 crash in the
Florida Everglades and the crash of
TWA Flight 800 off the New York
coast.
National Transportation Safety
Board attorney Benjamin Allen
reminded attorneys of the rules in a
mass email sent Thursday.
“We are closely monitoring the
activities of attorneys following
this accident, and will immediately
notify state bar ethics officials and
other appropriate authorities if
impermissible activity is suspect-
ed,” the message said.
The flight that broke apart
recently at the San Francisco air-
port was carrying 141 Chinese, 77
South Koreans, 64 Americans,
three Canadians, three Indians, one
Japanese, one Vietnamese and one
person from France when it
approached the runway too low and
too slow. The Boeing 777 hit a sea-
wall before skittering across the
tarmac and catching fire.
Three girls from China were
killed and 182 people injured, most
not seriously.
Two girls, Ye Mengyuan and
Wang Linjia, both 16, died right
away. It is unclear, however,
whether Ye Mengyuan died in the
crash or in the chaotic aftermath.
Both girls’ parents appeared at a
vigil Saturday near the airport, and
thanked, through a translator, the
more than 100 people in atten-
dance for their support, KGO-TV
reported. The other victim killed,
15-year-old Liu Yipeng, died Friday
at a hospital where she had been in
critical condition since the July 6
crash.
The dozens who were seriously
injured — especially the few who
were paralyzed — can expect to win
multimillion-dollar legal settle-
ments, as long as their claims are
filed in U.S. courts, legal experts
said.
Courts will treat Asiana passengers differently
NICK ROSE/DAILY JOURNAL
Some passengers of Asiana Flight 214 which crashed last weekend have
already contacted lawyers about possible lawsuits.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — A California
lawmaker wants to help boost
election turnout by giving voters
the chance to cast ballots on
Saturdays.
Legislation by state Sen.
Leland Yee, D-San Francisco,
would require counties to have a
polling place open for early vot-
ing for four hours on at least one
Saturday in the 29 days before
Election Day.
The Sacramento Bee
(http://bit.ly/15dwyaI ) reports
that 25 of California’s 58 coun-
ties already allow Saturday vot-
ing. Nationwide, 32 states and the
District of Columbia allow early
voting in addition to mail voting.
Yee, who is running for
California secretary of state in
2014, said he hopes Saturday vot-
ing will increase voter participa-
tion rates, especially in local
elections.
“In these times, when you have
moms and dads
who are work-
ing two jobs,
coming home
late and taking
care of the
kids, it is
extremely diffi-
cult for many
individuals to
cast their vote
on Tuesday night,” Yee said.
“We ought to find every which
way to get every voter into the
polling place.”
But some believe requiring
polls to open Saturday isn’t nec-
essary because voters already
have the option of voting by
mail.
Sen. Joel Anderson, R-Alpine,
who voted against the bill in
committee last week, said coun-
ties are already allowed to open
polling places on Saturdays.
“I will continue to trust the
secretary of state and the county
registrars to do their job,”
Anderson said.
Anything that makes it easier
for voters to cast ballots is worth
trying, said Dan Schnur, director
of the Unruh Institute of Politics
at the University of Southern
California.
“The state ought to do every-
thing it possibly can to encour-
age voting without compromis-
ing ballot security, and this is
another example of a reform that
accomplishes both of those
goals,” Schnur said.
Yee bill would require Saturday voting option
Leland Yee
5
Monday • July 15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
“You stretch your pennies,” she said.
She stressed that providing older adults
with meaningful social interaction is essen-
tial.
Making the connection
The county’s Mental Health and
Substance Abuse Recovery Commission
recently held a forum called, “Making the
Connection,” focused on loneliness and
isolation in older adults.
Norma Cannon, who lives alone in San
Mateo, came to the event looking for com-
panionship.
“It’s a lot of adjustment,” said Cannon,
whose husband died a year ago. She moved
back to her home in San Mateo to find new
neighbors, and old friends who were too
busy to catch up. She attended a widows and
widowers group with a friend, but the friend
grew too busy to make time for her.
“My supposed friends, they have their
own problems,” said Cannon.
She has a son who lives in Texas who she
talks to on the phone.
“But it’s too far,” she said.
Now she just hopes to adjust and find
peace. She finds solace in going to church.
“The people are very loving,” she said.
She described how one poor family host-
ed a feast for all of the churchgoers, despite
having little resources.
“You begin to find peace when you see
things like that,” she said.
Elders helping each other
The “65 and older” demographic in the
county grew from 83,000 in 2000 to
99,000 in 2011, said Valerie Snook, pro-
gram manager of the Peninsula Family
Service’s Senior Peer Counseling program.
With the rapid growth of the older popula-
tion, service workers are looking for ways
to enhance the sense of community for older
adults who are often left fending for them-
selves.
When older adults are asking themselves
questions like, “Does this pain in my chest
mean something serious?” or “Did anyone
remember my birthday?,” these questions
can create feelings of not being well, said
Snook.
People need a sense of purpose after they
are out of the workforce, she said.
Senior peer counselors serve the needs of
those who need purpose by allowing them
to become an advocate for other older
adults. Volunteers, ages 55 and over, go
through a training and then provide support
for their peers.
“They provide that listening ear, that
open heart, that helps all of us feel
engaged,” said Snook.
Senior peer counselor Dick Edminster is a
retired urban planner with no expertise in
advocating for older adults.
“I can listen, help with problems and just
be there,” he said.
Edminster has worked with several clients
and has discovered that the social needs of
older adults are not uniform.
“The character of isolation varies greatly
by individuals,” he said.
He described one woman in a skilled nurs-
ing facility in San Mateo whose husband
died.
“Her main need was to get out and have
conversation” he said. “She enjoys seeing
my name on her calendar because she
knows I’m coming to visit.”
Another man he works with doesn’t have
family and is gay. Edminster says being
homosexual can add to the feeling isolated,
as was this case for the man with whom he
works.
He was sharing a room with another man
in a skilled nursing facility and the other
man’s wife found out he was gay. She
demanded he be removed, fearing that he
would give her husband AIDS.
Edminster advocated for this man
through this extremely uncomfortable sit-
uation.
“You cannot get AIDS from sharing a
room,” said Edminster. “[And the man]
does not have AIDS.”
Edminster also works with a Muslim
woman, who has family close by, but still
feels isolated. Her isolation is largely cul-
tural, he said.
Edminster meets her at a cafe to talk,
because in her culture, they may not meet
in private. He teaches her about culture in
the United States and listens to her talk
about her struggles with her children, who
do not respect her in the way they would be
expected to in her home country.
“Amateurs have a great role to play,” said
Edminster. “You just have to be a good lis-
tener. ”
Untapped resource
The retired population is “the largest
growing natural resource in this country, ”
according to Deborah Owdom, program
director of RSVP of San Mateo and
Northern Santa Clara counties.
The Retired and Senior Volunteer
Program, or RSVP, matches older adult vol-
unteers with opportunities that match their
skills and interests. There are more than
400 volunteer jobs available in the coun-
t y, said Owdom.
The program is mutually beneficial.
“I get back many times over what I
give,” said Sandi Zicke, an older adult who
volunteers for the Second Harvest Food
Bank brown bag program. “For me, volun-
teering means giving of my time, which I
have, and my skills.”
Zicke bags food and brings it to people
who can’t pick up their own food. For
some people, the delivery is more than just
food. It’s their one human contact for the
day, said Zicke.
Another key benefit of volunteering is
meeting other volunteers from the same
era, who share similar history and inter-
ests, said Zicke.
“The main reward is meeting volunteers of
a similar age,” she said.
Phone from home
For those who are homebound, there are
volunteer and social opportunities avail-
able by phone.
One woman in Oakland found it hard to
meet with her five friends, between the ages
of 75 and 84. She decided to purchase con-
ference calling cards so that she could meet
with them over the phone.
This gave her the idea for Senior Center
Without Walls, a nonprofit that creates an
older adult community via the telephone.
Adults join free conference calls for discus-
sions about literature, movies, pets, health
and travel, and to play bingo games and
trivia. Support groups meet on the phone to
discuss LGBTissues, diabetes and other top-
ics.
One participant said it saved her life, said
Amy Schaible, associate director of Senior
Center Without Walls.
“They call in and can have some fun,” said
Schaible.
For those wanting to volunteer via tele-
phone, Friends of Service to Humanity
(FISH) is always looking for “linemen” to
answer the phones.
FISH, sponsored by St. Paul Episcopal
Church, provides free rides to medical
appointments for older adults. The service
operates with the help of volunteer “line-
men,” who take calls from clients Monday
through Thursday.
“It’s really a matter of answering the
phone and scheduling the rides,” said
Marilyn Ansari, FISH volunteer.
Many of the linemen are older adults,
some homebound, said Ansari.
Continued from page 1
SENIORS
ty members to run made her think
the best way to continue fulfilling
that original commitment was as
an elected councilmember.
“The more I thought about it, I
felt that I really brought some
solid experience and skills and
that the community deserved to
have me as an option,” she said.
Although Clapper said she has-
n’t felt her gender makes a differ-
ence, she was the first woman to
join the council since 2007.
Clapper’s formal announcement
comes as the candidate filing period
begins and joins several others
already confirmed to be running for
three seats on the City Council.
Mayor Bob Grassilli, former plan-
ning commissioner Michael Corral
and Cameron Johnson, Economic
Development Advisory
Commission chair, have already
launched their campaigns publicly.
Councilman Matt Grocott has not
confirmed if he is running for re-elec-
tion. Another confirmed contender is
former mayor Inge Tiegel-Doherty
who also applied for the appointed
seat but withdrew from consideration
because she planned a run this
November. The pledge not to run if
appointed is not legally enforceable
but one often employed by cities
when filling mid-term vacancies.
San Carlos used it not only when fil l-
ing Klein’s term but also the previ-
ous year after the unexpected death of
former mayor Omar Ahmad.
Providing some consistency
after that quick succession of new
faces on the council in such a short
period is another reason Clapper
said she wants to remain.
Clapper, a Bay Area native and
18-year resident, said she brings to
the City Council the same attrib-
utes that made her effective on the
Planning Commission — leaving
personal points of view at the
door, not making decisions just to
satisfy outspoken factions of the
community and looking at the
long-term implications to the
entire city instead of simply short-
term solutions with a narrow focus.
The budget and economic recov-
ery remain important city priori-
ties, she said.
“I continue to be cautious about
budget creep and fiscal stability. It’s
very critical that we don’t let any
core maintenance slip,” she said.
Clapper also wants to continue
building a strong relationship
with the school districts.
Recently, the City Council has
wrestled with some tough deci-
sions like passing on creating a
new zoning district for landmark
properties and working with the
community to fine-tune the reno-
vation of Crestview Park.
The pending Transit Village
development is a project at the
forefront of city issues right now
but Clapper said it is only one
piece of a bigger housing puzzle of
how to encourage private housing
that accommodates a variety of
ages, economics and desires.
“It’s really a shame when people
can't move or stay here as they
make life changes. The Transit
Village is a piece of that but there
is also Wheeler Plaza and other
land use policies to make sure we
are going to do the right mix of
land use for the future,” she said.
Clapper said she will eventually
have a website to share informa-
tion about her campaign but
expects to rely heavily on shoe
leather while going door to door
and meeting residents at events.
“I’ve always found face to face is
best,” she said.
And of the already crowded race
for council?
Clapper said she finds the com-
pany great.
“I’m hoping the community
responds to that by thinking about
how they can get involved in the
community,” she said. “It conveys a
whole message about excitement in
the community. We all have different
points of view but collectively we
want what’s best for San Carlos.”
Continued from page 1
SEAT
Peninsula Family Service Senior Peer
Counselors: Needs volunteers that speak
English, Spanish, Mandarin, Cantonese,
Tagalog and to work with LGBT adults.Call:
(650) 403-4300. Visit: peninsulafamilyser-
vice.org.
Fair Oaks Adult Activity Center: Fitness
classes,meals,health screenings,computer
lab,language classes and more.2600 Mid-
dlefield Road, Redwood City. Call: (650)
780-7525.Visit:peninsulafamilyservice.org.
San Carlos Adult Community Center:
Classes, meals and lectures. 601 Chestnut
St., San Carlos. Call: (650) 802-4384.
San Mateo Senior Center:Fitness classes,
meals, games and more. 2645 Alameda
de las Pulgas, San Mateo. Call: (650) 522-
7490.
Retired and Senior Volunteer Program
(RSVP): 1720 El Camino Real, Ste. 10,
Burlingame.Call:(650) 696-7661.Visit:mills-
peninsula.org/locations/rsvp.html
Friends In Service to Humanity (FISH):
Serving Burlingame, San Mateo, Millbrae,
Foster City and Hillsborough, call: (650)
570-6002.Serving Belmont,Redwood City
and San Carlos, call: (650) 593-1288.
Senior Center Without Walls: Call 1 (877)
797-7299 or (510) 444-5974 to learn more.
Visit:seniorcenterwithoutwalls.org.Email:
info@seniorcenterwithoutwalls.org.
Second Harvest Food Bank Brown Bag
Program:Call 1 (800) 984-3663 to find the
distribution site nearest to you.
Opportunities
for Older Adults:
6
Monday • July 15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
STATE/NATION
San Carlos Parks & Recreation
www.cityofsancarlos.org/pr
650-802-4382
C
A
M
P
REGISTER
TODAY!
U.S. shipbuilder W.A. Bechtel Co.
decided to use the Rancho area for a
new shipyard where an old railroad
repair yard of former Southern Pacific
Railroad was located at the base of
Spring Street. The area became too
small when additional contracts for
emergency needs raised due to exces-
sive sinking of ships. After March
28, 1942, about 42 houses were
removed. Pine Point was dynamited
and more than 800 cubic yards of dirt
was used to fill in the mudflats where
six ways were to be constructed as
well as outfitting docks, subassembly
shops and mold lofts where forms
were made for the ships.
Ferry and bus service transported
the workers to the site. It cost 10
cents to ride on the ferry from the San
Francisco Ferry Building and Hyde
Street terminal. More than 1,800 pas-
sengers rode the ferry each day and
classes were held on the ferry for the
workers. More than 3,800 workers
rode the bus to the Marinship site.
Five lunch sites were set up for food
for the workers. The price of a box
lunch was 35 cents, a pint of milk
cost 11 cents and a cup of coffee was
had for a nickel.
A hot meal was available at the
north end of the site. Across Highway
101 at the north end, facilities were
built for single men to sleep and, to
its south, was built a number of bar-
racks for married couples. Schools
were built as well as a church for the
6,000 that lived there. It was named
Marin City and it still exists.
Marinship’s first Liberty Ship was
launched on Sept. 26, 1942. It was
named for the captain and later land
owner who founded the Port of
Sausalito and name of the Bay on
which it sits. After the first six ships
were launched, the organization built
its first T-2 tanker and the ways were
modified to build oil tankers.
It was a massive undertaking that
had to be built in such a short time.
The war was raging and we were los-
ing ships almost as fast as they were
being constructed. Approximately
15,000 people worked there day and
night. The night shift earned an extra
15 cents an hour. Records were bro-
ken for constructing ships. No longer
did it take a year to complete a new
ship. A record of 33 days was set in
the delivery of a T-2 tanker,
Huntington Hills. At the end of
Marinship’s existence, it was con-
tracted to build a number of barges
called “Dagwoods,” breakwater com-
ponents.
In all, Marinship built 93 ships
with the last ship being named
Mission San Francisco.
Rediscovering the Peninsula by Darold
Fredricks appears in the Monday edition of
the Daily Journal.
Continued from page 3
HISTORY
By Verena Dobnik
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — From New
York to California, outrage over
the acquittal in George
Zimmerman’s murder trial poured
from street demonstrations and
church pulpits Sunday as protest-
ers called for justice for the
unarmed youth he killed and
demanded federal civil rights
charges against him.
Protests were planned later
Sunday in Boston, Detroit,
Baltimore, San Francisco and
other cities over the Florida case,
which unleashed a national debate
over racial profiling, self-defense
and equal justice. One protest in
California hours after the verdict
late Saturday ended with vandal-
ism while police dispersed anoth-
er crowd by firing beanbag
rounds.
In Washington, the Justice
Department said it is looking into
the case to determine whether fed-
eral prosecutors should file crimi-
nal civil rights charges now that
Zimmerman has been acquitted in
the state case.
In a statement Sunday, the
Justice Department said the crimi-
nal section of its civil rights divi-
sion, the FBI and the U.S.
Attorney’s office for the Middle
District of Florida are evaluating
evidence.
President Barack Obama called
the death of Trayvon Martin a
tragedy for the country and urged
calm reflection, a message shared
by religious and civil rights lead-
ers hoping to ensure peaceful
demonstrations in the wake of a
case that became an emotional
flash point.
In Manhattan, congregants at
Middle Collegiate Church were
encouraged to wear hooded sweat-
shirts in the memory of Martin,
the black teenager who was wear-
ing a hoodie the night he was shot
to death in February 2012.
The Rev. Jacqueline Lewis,
wearing a pink hoodie, urged
peace and told her congregation
that Martin Luther King Jr. “would
have wanted us to conduct our-
selves on the highest plane of
dignity. ”
But, she added, “we’re going to
raise our voices against the root
causes of this kind of tragedy. ”
Congregant Jessica
Nacinovich, wearing a hoodie,
said she could only feel disap-
pointment and sadness over the
verdict.
“I just wanted to come and be
here with everybody in solidarity
and talk and pray and sing about
where we go from here,” she said.
At a youth service in Sanford,
Fla., where the trial was held,
teens wearing shirts displaying
Martin’s picture wiped away tears
during a sermon at the St. Paul
Missionary Baptist Church.
Hours after the verdict, demon-
strators gathered on U Street in
Washington, D.C., chanting, “No
justice, no peace.” One protester
carried a sign that read, “Stop
criminalizing black men.”
In Florida, about 200 demon-
strators marched through down-
town Tallahassee carrying signs
that said “Racism is Not Dead”
and “Who’s Next?”
Protesters want justice after Zimmerman verdict
REUTERS
A man walks past a line of Los Angeles Police officers as they try to remove
protesters from the intersection of Exposition and Crenshaw boulevards,
following the George Zimmerman verdict, in Los Angeles Saturday.
Robots to revolutionize
farming, ease labor woes
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SALINAS — On a windy morning in California’s Salinas
Valley, a tractor pulled a wheeled, metal contraption over
rows of budding iceberg lettuce plants. Engineers from
Silicon Valley tinkered with the software on a laptop to
ensure the machine was eliminating the right leafy buds.
The engineers were testing the Lettuce Bot, a machine that
can “thin” a field of lettuce in the time it takes about 20
workers to do the job by hand.
The thinner is part of a new generation of machines that
target the last frontier of agricultural mechanization — fruits
and vegetables destined for the fresh market, not process-
ing, which have thus far resisted mechanization because
they’re sensitive to bruising.
Researchers are now designing robots for these most deli-
cate crops by integrating advanced sensors, powerful com-
puting, electronics, computer vision, robotic hardware and
algorithms, as well as networking and high precision GPS
localization technologies. Most ag robots won’t be com-
mercially available for at least a few years.
In this region known as America’s Salad Bowl, where for a
century fruits and vegetables have been planted, thinned and
harvested by an army of migrant workers, the machines
could prove revolutionary.
Farmers say farm robots could provide relief from recent
labor shortages, lessen the unknowns of immigration
reform, even reduce costs, increase quality and yield a more
consistent product.
NATION 7
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By Philip Elliott
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Proposed
changes to Senate rules would
either ease the way for President
Barack Obama to assemble his
second-term team or permanently
threaten the body’s deliberative
style, the chamber’s top
Democratic and Republican law-
maker said Sunday.
Democratic Leader Harry Reid
and Republican Leader Mitch
McConnell once again strongly
disagreed during separate televi-
sion segments on the eve of a rare
closed-door summit that could
reduce the Senate’s reputation as
deliberative to
the point of
inaction. Reid
and McConnell
— along with
their rank-and-
file members —
have been trad-
ing barbs over
just what the
p r o p o s e d
changes would be, both for
Obama’s current slate of nominees
who are awaiting confirmation and
for future senators who prize their
ability to delay action.
Democrats, who are the majority
in the Senate, are pushing to erode
the rights of minority
Republicans to block confirma-
tion of Obama’s picks for posts
on a labor rights board and a con-
sumer protection bureau.
Republicans previously stalled
confirmation votes for Obama’s
pick for labor secretary and chiefs
of the Environmental Protection
Agency and the Export-Import
Bank, but last week GOP lawmak-
ers stepped aside and said they
would allow those nominees to
move forward.
Reid said the changes were not
about the appointment of judges
or passing legislation. “This is
allowing the people of America to
have a president who can have his
team,” he said.
McConnell called Democrats’
proposed changes contrary to
Senate tradition, which typically
requires 60 votes to end debate and
move forward on nominations or
legislation.
“I hope that we’ll come to our
senses and not change the core of
the Senate. We’ve never changed
the rules of the Senate by breaking
the rules of the Senate,”
McConnell said.
All 100 senators — but not
reporters or the public — have
been invited to a meeting Monday
evening to seek a compromise
that a handful of lawmakers are
now exploring.
“We need to start talking to each
other instead of at each other, ”
McConnell said.
It’s not clear a conversation
would produce any agreement.
Reid calls the changes minor
and narrow. McConnell calls them
unprecedented and overbroad.
Reid says the proposal applies
only to those tapped to serve in
the administration, not for life-
time posts as judges. McConnell
says it would fundamentally deny
senators their prerogative to query
potential officials.
Reid said the nominees would
protect consumers, workers and the
environment. McConnell and his
GOP allies say the picks are pay-
back to Obama’s political base.
Party leaders spar over Senate rule changes
By Julie Watson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN DIEGO — The laughter and
chatter ceased as soon as the two
naval chiefs appeared on the
rooftop deck of the barracks,
where four sailors — three men and
one woman — were having drinks
in a hot tub with a sweeping view
of San Diego Bay.
Chief Petty Officer John Tate
approached the group and asked a
23-year-old in a don’t-try-to-fool-
me tone whether his Gatorade bot-
tle was spiked. Then Tate turned to
the only female in the hot tub:
“You on the same ship? You drink-
ing a little bit, too?”
“I’m just sipping on it,” she said.
There was no mention of the
military’s push to prevent sexual
assaults in its ranks, but those in
the hot tub at Naval Base San
Diego said they knew that’s why
Tate was there. Tate serves on one
of the Navy’s new nightly patrol
units charged with policing bases
to control heavy drinking and
reckless behavior.
The patrols are among a number
of new initiatives the armed forces
is implementing to try to stop
sexual assaults by changing the
military’s work-hard, play-hard
culture. The effort follows a
Pentagon report, released in May,
that estimates as many as 26,000
service members may have been
sexually assaulted last year.
The head of the Army has called
sexual assault “a cancer” that could
destroy the force, while Defense
Secretary Chuck Hagel said the
problem threatens to undermine
troops’ effectiveness in carrying
out missions. But military leaders
have rejected far-reaching con-
gressional efforts to strip com-
manders of some authority in met-
ing out justice, saying that would
undercut the ability of command-
ers to discipline their troops.
Now every branch is scrambling
to demonstrate it can get the situa-
tion under control by instituting
new measures that emphasize a zero-
tolerance message and crack down
on alcohol, which is said to be a
major contributor to the problem.
Military combats culture of rape
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PORTLAND, Maine — The cute
and comical seabirds called puffins
have returned to several Maine
islands and are finding plenty of
food for their young chicks unlike
last summer when many starved.
Young puffins died at an alarm-
ing rate last season because of a
shortage of herring, leaving adults
to try to feed them another type of
fish that was too big to swallow.
Some chicks died surrounded by
piles of uneaten fish.
This summer, the chicks are get-
ting plenty of hake and herring,
said Steve Kress, director of the
National Audubon Society’s
seabird restoration program and
professor at Cornell University.
But researchers remain con-
cerned.
Occupancy of puffin burrows on
Matinicus Rock and at Seal Island,
the two largest U.S. puffin
colonies, are down by at least a
third this season, Kress said. That
likely means many birds died over
the winter and others were too
weak to produce offspring this sea-
son, he said.
With colorful beaks, puffins
look like a cross between a pen-
guin and a parrot. They spend most
of their lives at sea, coming
ashore only to breed each spring,
drawing camera-toting tourists by
the boatload before the birds
depart late in the summer.
Puffins flock home
Barack Obama
WORLD 8
Monday • July 15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
by
Special:
4 Speakers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BAGHDAD — Awave of coordi-
nated blasts that tore through over-
whelmingly Shiite cities shortly
before the breaking of the Ramadan
fast and other attacks killed at least
38 in Iraq on Sunday, the latest in a
surge of violence that is raising
fears the country is sliding back
toward full-scale sectarian fighting.
Insurgents have been pounding
Iraq with bombings and other
attacks for months in the country’s
worst eruption of violence in half a
decade. The pace of the killing has
picked up since the Muslim holy
month Ramadan began Wednesday,
with daily mass-casualty attacks
marring what is meant to be a month
of charity and peaceful reflection.
Violence in Iraq has risen to its
deadliest level since 2008, with
more than 2,800 people killed since
the start of April. The spike in
bloodshed is growing increasingly
reminiscent of the widespread sec-
tarian killing that peaked in 2006
and 2007, when the country teetered
on the brink of civil war.
Insurgents often increased
attacks during Ramadan in the
years following the 2003 U.S.-led
invasion. Pious Muslims go with-
out food, drink, smoking and sex
in the daytime during the holy
month, when feelings of spiritual
devotion are high.
Sunday’s explosions struck
shortly before the evening iftar
meal that ends the daylong fast
during Ramadan.
In the deadliest attack, at least
eight people were killed and 15
were wounded in the southern port
city of Basra when a car bomb and
then a follow-up blast went off
near an office of a Shiite political
party, according to two police
officers. Basra is a major oil indus-
try hub 550 kilometers (340
miles) southeast of Baghdad.
Another car bomb exploded
among shops and take-away restau-
rants in central Kut, 160 kilometers
(100 miles) southeast of Baghdad.
The provincial deputy governor,
Haidar Mohammed Jassim, said five
people were killed and 35 wounded.
Police reported additional car
bomb explosions that left four dead
in a commercial street in the Shiite
holy city of Karbala, five near an
outdoor market in Nasiriyah and six
near a Shiite mosque in Musayyib,
and more than 60 wounded in total.
All of those attacks hit mostly
Shiite communities.
Another blast, this one caused
by a roadside bomb, struck late
Sunday in a commercial street in
the southern Baghdad neighbor-
hood of Dora, killing four people
and wounding 16 others, according
to police and hospital officials.
It was the second night in a row a
deadly bomb went off in the large-
ly Sunni district.
Wave of bombings, shootings kill 38 in Iraq
REUTERS
Iraqi security forces and people gather at the site of a car bomb attack
southeast of Baghdad Sunday.
By Josef Federman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JERUSALEM — Israel’s prime minister
insisted Sunday that he will not allow “dan-
gerous weapons” to reach Lebanon’s
Hezbollah militants, following reports that
Israel recently carried out an airstrike in
northern Syria against a shipment of
advanced missiles.
The airstrike in Latakia reportedly targeted
Russian Yakhont anti-ship missiles, one of
the types of advanced weapons that Israeli
officials have previously said they would not
allow to reach Syria. It would be the fourth
known airstrike against Syria this year.
Asked about the reports on the CBS-TV
show “Face the Nation,” Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu refused to confirm or
deny Israeli involvement in the latest
airstrike.
“My policy is to prevent the transfer of
dangerous weapons to Hezbollah ... in
Lebanon and other terror groups as well. And
we stand by that policy,” he said.
Israel has been carefully watching the
Syrian conflict since it erupted in March
2011. While it has been careful not to take
sides in the civil war, Israel has repeatedly
said it would take action
to prevent what it calls
“game changing”
weapons, including chem-
ical weapons and
advanced guided missiles,
from reaching Hezbollah
or other hostile militant
groups. Syria’s President
Bashar Assad is a key
backer of Hezbollah.
In January, Israeli air-
craft destroyed what was believed to be a
shipment of advanced Russian anti-aircraft
missiles in Syria that were bound for
Lebanon. In May, a pair of Israeli airstrikes
near Damascus targeted advanced Iranian
ground-to-ground missiles also thought to be
headed for Hezbollah. Israel has never con-
firmed involvement in any of the airstrikes.
Following the May attack, Syrian
President Bashar Assad vowed to retaliate if
Israel struck his territory again. Assad has
not commented on the latest alleged
airstrike.
Hezbollah has also been quiet. The group’s
Al-Manar TV station reported on its website
on the day of the July 5 explosions that
blasts were heard in the area.
Israeli leader vows to keep
weapons from Hezbollah
Benjamin
Netanyahu
OPINION 9
Monday • July 15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Is this honest reporting?
Editor,
I have been rightfully chastised for
being critical of the press. The
Trayvon Martin, George Zimmerman
trial is one of the reasons that I am so
harsh. The press has portrayed
Trayvon Martin as an altar boy and
George Zimmerman as a neo-Nazi. In
all probability neither is true. This
has turned simple shooting into a
national racial incident. Even the
president has fanned the flames by
proclaiming “if I had a son he would
look like Trayvon Martin.” As the
case draws to a close the nation
braces for riots. Is this honest report-
ing?
Keith C. De Filippis
San Jose
Obamacare — the latest
Editor,
Recently, employers have been
given a one-year extension on avoid-
ing the mandate to offer insurance to
workers. Just in, last Friday, the
Health and Human Services
Department announced it will no
longer attempt to verify individual
eligibility for insurance subsidies.
Instead, they will rely on “self-
reporting” by applicants who wish
these subsidies.
What this means is no background
check on your application. While
we’re all looking the other way, this
smells the same as all those low-or-
no-documentation mortgages that
were handed out to those who couldn’t
afford a mortgage in the first place.
So, sit back and get ready for the next
congressional train wreck when the
costs of these subsidies spin out of
control. Looks like another hiccup
for Affordable Care. Choose your tar-
get folks: Republican, Democrat, or
both??
Rick Zobelein
San Mateo
Obamacare letdown
Editor,
So I thought I was all taken care of,
until Mr. President, leader from
behind, decided to do the politically
correct thing to save his and his
party’s butt (“Delays in major require-
ment of health law” in the July 3 edi-
tion of the Daily Journal).
Never mind us, the poor tax payers
are being told the government is the
great solution to all our health care
problems. Just a Twitter message of
some sorts told us that they delayed
the whole shebang by one year. In
the meantime, Mr. No-Good
President, my insurance went up this
month by more than 20 percent. I feel
so good. In fact I am really under-
whelmed. I am the only one again?
Harry Roussard
Foster City
To fly or not to fly;
that is the question
Editor,
All pilot and co-pilot training
should be completed before they are
allowed to fly a passenger-filled
scheduled airline aircraft.
On-the-job training during a fully
occupied scheduled airline flight sub-
jecting unaware passengers to greater
risks and danger should be prohibit-
ed. International safety regulations
should enforce the restriction of such
training.
All passengers should be entitled to
know in advance the qualifications of
their pilots and other important
inflight crews.
Perhaps passenger plane pilots
should be required to compile a cer-
tain amount of hours flying cargo
planes before they
are given the responsibility of safe-
guarding human life.
Jerry Emanuel
San Carlos
Letters to the editor
Orange County Register
T
wo-hundred-thirty-seven years
ago, John Adams express-
mailed his wife, Abigail, a
copy of the Pennsylvania Evening
Post, the first newspaper to reprint
the Declaration of Independence.
For John Adams, who would become
the nation’s second president, the
seeds for the American Revolution
actually were sown in 1761, in a legal
dispute with the British crown over
the right to privacy, which came to be
known as “Paxton’s case.”
Paxton was a British customs agent
who held so-called writs of assis-
tance, issued by the Crown, which
authorized him to search the property
of Massachusetts colonists without
specifying a reason.
The writs were challenged by 63
Boston merchants, who were repre-
sented by Boston attorney James
Otis. During a five-hour court hearing,
Otis delivered an impassioned argu-
ment that the writs were a violation of
the colonists’ natural rights and,
therefore, should be null and void.
“Aman’s house is his castle,” said
Otis, “and whilst he is quiet, he is as
well-guarded as a prince in his castle.
This writ, if it should be declared
legal, would totally annihilate this
privilege. Custom-house officers may
enter our houses when they please; we
are commanded to permit their entry.
Their menial servants may enter,
break locks, bars and everything in
their way; and whether they break
through malice, no man, no court may
inquire.”
Otis was rebuffed by the court. But
he left an indelible impression upon
Adams, then a young barrister, who
later declared the Paxton case “the
spark in which originated the
American Revolution.”
In fact, in 1780, Adams authored
Article XIV of the Massachusetts
Declaration of Rights, which
enshrined in the commonwealth’s
Constitution the requirement that all
searches must be “reasonable.”
That language subsequently was
incorporated into the Fourth
Amendment to the U.S. Constitution,
which guarantees: “The right of the
people to be secure in their persons,
houses, papers and effects against
unreasonable searches.”
Two hundred thirty-seven years after
adoption of the Declaration of
Independence, this nation’s leaders
apparently have forgotten the circum-
stances that precipitated this nation’s
separation from Mother England.
They no longer remember the Paxton
case.
Otherwise, we would not have a
president who maintains that a man’s
house is not his castle; that the
Fourth Amendment does not proscribe
the federal government from secretly
monitoring the phone calls of practi-
cally every American, reading their
emails and following their credit card
transactions.
Nor would we have court rulings
declaring that “what a person know-
ingly exposes to the public, even in
his own home or office, is not a sub-
ject of Fourth Amendment protec-
tion.” That includes a person’s bank
records. It even includes the garbage
he or she leaves at curbside for collec-
tion.
This is not the free republic John
Adams and John Otis envisioned
when they opposed the British
Crown. And it is in their memory that
the civil libertarians among us must
vigorously oppose the government’s
abrogation of privacy rights.
Invasions of privacy sparked the original revolution
San Mateo’s
sustainability
advocate
K
elly Moran recently retired from San Mateo’s
Planning Commission. She served there for seven
and a half years following six and a half years on the
Public Works Commission.
In those 14 years, she has
been the outspoken and
effective champion for good
development. Or as she calls
it, sustainability.
What does that mean?
According to Moran, it
means the project doesn’t
pollute; it minimizes green-
house emissions; and it will
be a safe and attractive place
for children to live. On the
other hand, if elected offi-
cials don’t keep their eye on
the ball, our cities could
become inhospitable — not good places to live or work. You
would have to drive everywhere, an expensive proposition
with higher and higher gasoline prices. The air and water qual-
ity would be bad and there might not even be enough water to
meet future needs.
***
To date, San Mateo has made progress in approving sus-
tainable projects, but much more remains to be done. Here’s
the good news and Moran deserves much credit for the results.
Every residential building at the new Bay Meadows develop-
ment will be green-energy efficient and with good indoor air
quality. On the Planning Commission, Moran pushed for
increased set-backs, a little bit of green in front of each build-
ing and the use of more natural materials (wood). Each resi-
dential neighborhood within the complex will have its own
suburban look and, above all, the design will be high quality.
This was very important to every member of the Planning
Commission. The complex will be connected by bike paths
with easy and quick routes for grocery shopping and other
errands, and easy access to the Hillsdale Caltrain station.
Many of the residents are expected to use Caltrain to get to
work. There will be sufficient bike parking to accommodate
the cyclists. At Station Park Green by the Hayward Park
Caltrain station, Moran convinced the developer to remove
the fence between the station and the project. She has not
always been the developer’s favorite, but she has shown a
willingness to listen and get the job done. Despite com-
plaints she might have held up projects because of her ques-
tions and concerns (the late John Lee, the city’s former mayor
and councilman, tried unsuccessfully to stop her reappoint-
ment to the Planning Commission), Moran says she has
probably approved more developments than any other com-
missioner.
***
Moran’s environmental advocacy is in her genes. Her
father, an engineer, founded one of the first solar energy labs
in Colorado. She worked there as a teen and decided to become
a chemist. She received an undergraduate degree at Stanford
University and a doctorate in chemistry from the University
of California at Berkeley. She started her career writing envi-
ronmental impact reports, then was hired by the city of Palo
Alto as manager of its water pollution prevention program.
Now she has her own consulting firm. She has been a long-
time member of the Sierra Club, active in the local Loma
Prieta chapter, and a member of its state legislative commis-
sion. And of course, a major player in Sustainable San Mateo
County.
She has left her mark in several interesting ways.
Originally, the new San Mateo library was to have a copper
roof but Moran convinced the city that copper led to water
pollution — dangerous for fish if not for humans. Moran was
an expert on this as a leader in the brake pad partnership. It
was discovered that brake pads were lined with small bits of
copper so the brakes wouldn’t squeak. But that amount con-
tributed to bad water quality. Moran and others worked on leg-
islation to change this and today most brake pads are made
without traces of copper. Then there was ant spray, the kind
contractors spray around one’s property to get rid of ants.
This caused runoff water to be toxic. It was found that contrac-
tors were spraying 7 feet around a building’s perimeter while
only 2 inches was needed to remove the ants. New legislation
resulted which should end water pollution problems from
spraying.
***
Moran is no longer on the Planning Commission but she
is working behind the scenes to see that the city of San
Mateo implements a Sustainability Commission. The council
has approved this in concept but has yet to fill in the details.
According to Moran, the city needs to implement its climate
action plan and make sure our water supply is sufficient for
years to come. She’s planning for the future to make sure her
city remains a place in which it’s good to live and work.
Sue Lempert is the former mayor of San Mateo. Her column
runs every Monday. She can be reached at sue@smdailyjour-
nal.com.
Other voices
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BUSINESS 10
Monday • July 15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Alex Veiga
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — It’s summertime and the
stock market is sizzling.
The market reached an all-time high this
week, torching its previous record set just
before Memorial Day.
Even so, a handful of companies stand out.
Six stocks — Amazon, Starbucks,
UnitedHealth, Visa, Mastercard, and
Discover Financial — notched their own
records this week, helped by the growing
confidence of American consumers.
Would buying these stocks now be a hot-
weather impulse or a coldly-calculated move?
All six have improving earnings out-
looks, analysts say. Credit-card companies
and UnitedHealth appear to be the best bets.
The six companies share similar traits that
make them attractive. They are consumer-
focused, with dominant market positions and
growing revenue streams, says Fred
Dickson, chief investment strategist at D.A.
Davidson & Co.
Visa and UnitedHealth are the most attrac-
tive buys right now, says David Brown, chief
market strategist at Sabrient Systems, an
investment research firm.
The outlook for Discover and MasterCard
is also good, particularly as consumer confi-
dence improves. The companies’ biggest
challenge remains staying competitive in a
crowded field, he says.
Here’s a brief summary of each stock:
UnitedHealth Group Inc.
The stock of the nation’s largest health
insurer has climbed more than 25 percent
this year and hit an all-time high of $68.75
in trading on Wednesday, according to
FactSet.
Like other health insurers, UnitedHealth
stands to benefit from the federal health care
overhaul. The company will be able to par-
ticipate in state-based health insurance
exchanges designed to expand coverage to
millions of uninsured Americans. The com-
pany is also the largest provider of Medicare
Advantage plans, which are privately run
versions of the government’s Medicare pro-
gram for the elderly and disabled people.
Financial analysts, on average, expect the
stock to move higher. Their consensus target
price is $71.47, according to FactSet.
Amazon.com Inc.
Amazon’s stock price is up about 23 per-
cent this year and touched an all-time high of
$307.55 in trading on Friday.
Sales for the world’s biggest online retail-
er have been growing as Americans’ confi-
dence in the economy improves and they
shift to online shopping. A key rival,
Barnes & Noble Inc., is struggling with
weaker sales and big losses driven by its
Nook e-reader, a competitor to Amazon’s
Kindle.
Analysts see Amazon shares moving high-
er still. The average target price on the stock
is $316.79.
Even so, some investment experts sense a
bubble.
Brown has a “Sell” rating on the stock,
which he believes is overpriced. He points
to Amazon’s “forward” price-earnings ratio,
which compares a stock’s price to projected
earnings over the next 12 months. Not all
agree. Amazon has an average analyst rating
of “Overweight,” which indicates the aver-
age broker rating falls between “Hold” and
“Buy.”
Starbucks Corp.
Starbucks’ stock is up 30 percent this year
and reached an all-time high of $69.72 in
trading on Friday. That’s barely above the
consensus target price of $69.62, according
to FactSet.
The coffee chain, with more than 18,000
stores around the world, has delivered strong
growth in the Americas and Asia, where it has
opened more shops. Last year it introduced a
single-serve coffee machine and branched
out beyond coffee by acquiring tea shops and
bakery chains, and a bottled juice company.
MasterCard Inc.
The stock is up 22 percent this year and
reached an all-time high of $602.74 in trad-
ing on Monday.
The credit and debit card company, which
makes money from processing charge card
transactions, thrives when consumers are in
a spending mood.
MasterCard has been focusing on develop-
ing countries, where most transactions are
still done in cash. As shoppers there shift
from paper money to plastic, MasterCard can
tap into that growth.
Aconsensus price target of $614.61 sug-
gests that financial analysts see further
growth ahead for the stock. But those sur-
veyed by FactSet are split between “Buy” and
“Hold.”
Visa Inc.
Visa’s stock is up about 26 percent this
year and reached an all-time high of $192.77
in trading on Monday. Visa remains the
industry heavyweight. It has also taken
steps to make its payment-processing busi-
ness more accessible to mobile-device users.
“Visa has done an amazing job, really, of
capturing revenue and new cardholders and
turning it into earnings,” says Brown.
Analysts see the stock advancing. Its con-
sensus target price is $197.12. Analysts
polled by FactSet are divided between recom-
mending a “Buy” and a “Hold.”
Discover Financial Services
Discover’s stock is up 32 percent this
year. It rose to an all-time high of $50.92 in
trading on Friday — below the consensus
target price of $52.73.
Beyond its namesake credit card, Discover
has moved into auto, personal and student
loans, as well as home equity loans.
The Fed’s signal last month that it could
begin tapering its bond-buying program,
which has helped keep interest rates low, is
potentially good news for Discover and
other credit card issuers. As interest rates
rise, they typically translate into more rev-
enue for card issuers. That’s something
investors are anticipating, says Dickson.
Six stocks that stand out in sizzling market
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Ajudge presiding
over the civil trial of a former
Goldman Sachs trader accused of
misleading investors about the true
prospects of their bet on a package
of mortgage-based securities has
summed up the charges against him
with a fairytale, saying it’s as if
he’s accused of handing Little Red
Riding Hood an invitation to
grandmother’s house while con-
cealing the fact the invitation was
written by the Big Bad Wolf.
In the case against Fabrice
Tourre, U.S. District Judge
Katherine B. Forrest says the vic-
tims weren’t to be “hooded children
but rather large financial institu-
tions, operating in a dog-eat-dog
world.”
The charges stem from a group of
mortgage-based securities that
were marketed in early 2007 when
Tourre worked for Goldman Sachs
as a vice president. Tourre was born
in France and moved to the United
States in 2000 to study at Stanford
University, where he obtained a
graduate degree in science.
The Securities and Exchange
Commission accused Tourre in an
April 2010 lawsuit of making mis-
statements and omissions to
investors in a portfolio of 90 sub-
prime and mid-prime residential
mortgage-backed securities.
The charges accused Tourre of
making false and misleading state-
ments and aiding false statements
and material omissions by his
employer. The SEC sought a decla-
ration that Tourre had violated secu-
rities laws, along with a disgorge-
ment of profits and unspecified
penalties and damages.
In July 2010, Goldman Sachs
settled charges brought against it,
agreeing to pay $550 million. It
still faces private litigation in the
matter, including a federal securi-
ties class action lawsuit.
The SEC’s civil fraud charges
concern the role of a large hedge
fund, Paulson & Co. Inc., and its
billionaire president, John A.
Paulson, in helping to choose the
assets that would decide the value
of the investment.
Ex-Goldman Sachs trader faces NY SEC civil trial
Max and Dave,
Washington’s
power couple
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ST. PAUL, Minn. — Welcome to the “Max and Dave
Show,” a campaign-style swing around the country featuring
two of the most powerful members of Congress rallying sup-
port for their effort to overhaul the nation’s tax laws — and,
just maybe, change the way Washington works.
Sen. Max Baucus, a Democrat from Montana, and Rep.
Dave Camp, a Republican from Michigan, are Washington’s
newest power couple — and an odd one during these politi-
cally deadlocked days in Washington. They are lawmakers
from different states, different parties and they’re a decade in
age apart. Yet, Camp and Baucus are developing a close
friendship as they try to rally other lawmakers to their cause.
Their secret: Burgers, beer and a culture of working toward
public policy answers that Americans seem to want in
Washington — even when there’s no solution in sight.
“Dave’s my buddy,” Baucus told a gathering of workers at
3M, the Minnesota-based maker of everything from Scotch
tape to electronic touch screens. “My comrade.”
These days, you don’t often hear Democrats talk that way
about Republicans, or see campaign-style events for a topic
as dry as tax reform. But the pair have a common goal for an
overhaul they believe is long overdue. And tax policy, to
them, is exciting for all that is wrong and could be improved
about it. Baucus and Camp began barnstorming the country
last week, employing a similar burgers-and-beer strategy
that’s worked for them with colleagues in Washington.
“You have to have some basis to deal with each other to
work together,” Camp said in an interview. “What we’re try-
ing to do is create that foundation so that we are going to be
able to work together on a very important bill that could
have profound beneficial effects for the country. ”
<< Tyson Gay tests positive for banned substances, page 14
• A’s beat Red Sox in extra innings, page 12
Monday, July 15, 2013
TOUR DE FRANCE: FROOME TIGHTENS GRIP ON LEAD >> PAGE 13
By Bernie Wilson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN DIEGO — Tim Lincecum
walked into the San Francisco
Giants’ clubhouse late Sunday
morning and, yes, his right arm
was still attached to his body.
That was no small matter, con-
sidering that Lincecum threw 148
pitches in his first career no-hitter
Saturday night.
The Freak, indeed.
While he was still trying to put
his no-hitter into perspective,
Lincecum said his arm was OK
after his incredible effort in the
San Francisco Giants’ 9-0 victory
against the
last-place San
Diego Padres.
“I haven’t
played catch
yet but right
now I feel
good,” he said,
sitting in the dugout an hour
before the defending World Series
champion Giants tried for a four-
game sweep.
Lincecum looks different now
that he’s cut his long hair, and he
doesn’t throw quite as hard as he
used to. One thing hasn’t changed,
though. Lincecum has never iced
his arm after starts, including his
148-pitch performance.
It turns out there was no ice of
any kind Saturday night.
“Not even in the drinks that I
didn’t have last night,” he said
with a laugh.
“I said to him, ‘One time, can
you ice it?”’ manager Bruce Bochy
recalled.
Lincecum, a two-time NL Cy
Young Award winner, said he had a
low-key celebration. He spoke by
phone with his father and spent
time with his girlfriend and his
two dogs. He said he didn’t get to
sleep until around 3:30 a.m.
“I woke up today, so I’m good,”
he said.
Lincecum said his family and
friends “get more excited than I do
just because it’s hard for me to
kind of realize and take in what’s
going on.”
“It kind of goes back to what my
dad tells me: ‘Don’t get too excit-
ed about the good stuff and don’t
get too down about the bad stuff,”’
he added. “I’m trying to hover in
the middle, and it could be the
plague of me right now. I’m not
really finding a way to enjoy this,
I guess. But being able to share it
with my family and friends was the
best part.”
There was still a buzz in the
Giants’ clubhouse, where 12 hours
earlier Lincecum was doused with
champagne.
“Timmy!” one teammate
hollered when Lincecum walked
Lincecum still the Freak
Tim Lincecum
Timmy gets first no-hitter on 148-pitch night
See TIMMY, Page 16
PHOTO COURTESY OF SF GIANTS
Barry Zito could not pitch out of the third inning against San Diego yesterday as the Giants lost.
After no-
no, Giants
pounded
By Bernie Wilson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN DIEGO — Barry Zito had
another road misadventure, forcing
the San Francisco Giants to be
happy with winning three of four
games against the last-place San
Diego Padres.
Carlos Quentin hit one of San
Diego’s four home runs and drove
in three runs as the Padres routed
Zito and the San Francisco Giants
10-1 on Sunday, a day after being
no-hit by Tim Lincecum.
Nick Hundley had a homer
among his three hits and Chris
Denorfia and Will Venable also
went deep as the Padres avoided a
four-game sweep by the defending
World Series champions heading
into the All-Star break.
The Padres had been outscored
23-3 in the first three games of the
series, including a 9-0 loss
Saturday night when Lincecum
threw his first career no-hitter. San
Diego won for just the fourth time
in 20 games.
Zito (4-7), who went to high
school in San Diego, was chased
without getting an out in the third
inning and dropped to 0-6 with a
9.89 ERA in eight road starts. The
Giants are 0-8 in his road starts. He
allowed four runs and four hits
while walking two and striking out
none.
“He was off, no getting around
it,” manager Bruce Bochy said.
Millbrae Mavs
advance to
Joe DiMaggio
World Series
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
While the stirrups sensation
isn’t quite sweeping the nation,
the old-school uniform staple
seems to be working for the
Millbrae Mavericks.
Millbrae’s Joe D. squad advanced
to the Northern California Joe
DiMaggio World Series with a 5-0
win over San Carlos yesterday at
Marchbank Park in Daly City.
Millbrae starter Joey Carney dealt
a three-hit shutout, and rocked the
old-school stirrups look to boot.
Carney missed Friday’s semifi-
nal win, as he was returning home
from a short summer vacation in
Hawaii. After flying into Oakland
International Airport Friday night,
he went straight home and got 11
hours sleep, then resumed with a
light day of baseball activities
Saturday to get his feet back on the
ground.
The vacation did Carney good,
as the right-hander settled in yes-
terday following a first-inning
double by slugger Brad Degnan.
San Carlos didn’t scratch out its
next hit until Connor Sick led off
the sixth inning with an infield
single. Carney ultimately earned
the win, striking out eight on the
day.
“He was able to throw [his curve-
ball] in any count … and keep
everybody off balance,” Millbrae
co-manager Robby Garrison said.
Carney traded zeroes with San
Carlos starter Jesse Austin through
three innings, but Millbrae got on
the board in the fourth. Austin suf-
fered a momentous bout of wild-
ness, walking Sereno Esponilla
and Carney to start the inning,
before hitting Bryan Hidalgo with
a pitch to load the bases.
Millbrae catcher Sean McHugh
followed with a clutch single
through the middle to score
Esponilla and Carney. The hit
could have easily resulted in a dou-
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Belmont-Redwood Shores Majors Little
League team is making winning look way too
easy.
After a 48-hour break that began with win-
ning their third straight District 52 crown, the
squad managed by Rudy Lopez headed to San
Lorenzo and went 2-0 to start its trek towards a
Section 3 crown. And in disposing of San
Ramon Little League and Mission San Jose (of
Districts 57 and 14 respectively), Belmont-
Redwood Shores did it with a whole lot of
offensive firepower and are now just a win away
from a Section 3 championship.
In Game 1 against San Ramon, Belmont-
Redwood Shores scored 11 runs and won 11-6.
The visiting team, BRS got things rolling in
the first with doubles by Dominic Susa and
Sean Lee, and a single by Taylor Douglis that
accounted for four runs.
With Lee having pitched the District 52
championship game against Redwood City a
couple of days before, Nicolas Lopez was hand-
Two easy wins for Belmont-Redwood Shores
See GIANTS, Page 16
See MAVS, Page 16 See SHORES, Page 16
SPORTS 12
Monday • July 15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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MILLBRAE –
Have you ever
attended a funeral
or memorial service
and felt ill-at-ease,
uncomfortable or
awkward when
talking to the family
of the deceased? Have you ever stumbled
through your words and condolences
because you just didn’t know what to say or
how to say it? Have you even decided to not
approach the family for fear of saying the
wrong thing or making a fool of yourself? If
so you are not alone. Many people in this
situation want to provide some kind of
comfort to the immediate family, but just
don’t have the verbal tools to do so in an
assuring manner.
Learning “Funeral Etiquette” can be
useful. Using the right words at the right
time is an appropriate way to show that you
care, and in situations like this can be of
great help when provided correctly.
Standard condolences such as “I am sorry
for your loss” have become routine and
generic. A personalized phrase can be
welcomed such as “John touched many
lives” or “I will miss John”. DO NOT ask
the cause of death, offer advice or make
comments that would diminish the
importance of the loss such as “Oh, you’re
young and can marry again”.
Other ways to demonstrate your support
include: 1. Listening. The family may feel
the need to express their anxiety, and giving
them that opportunity can be therapeutic; 2.
An embrace. This can show that you care
without the need for words; 3. Offering your
services. This shows the family that you are
willing to give extra time for them: “Please
let me know if there is anything I can do to
help” (be prepared to act if needed).
Even if you don’t feel confident in
approaching the family there are other ways
to show that you care: 1. Attending the
funeral and signing the Memorial Book will
show the family that you took the time to be
there in support; 2. Dressing appropriately
for the funeral will demonstrate your efforts
to prepare for this special occasion (dark
colors are no longer a requisite for funerals,
but dressing in a coat, tie, dress or other
attire that you’d wear to any special event
are considered a way of showing you care);
3. In certain cases friends are invited to
stand up and offer BRIEF personal feelings.
Prior to the funeral write a few key notes
and reflections which will help you organize
your thoughts. Even if there is no
opportunity to speak before a group you
may have a chance to offer your thoughts to
the family following the ceremony; 4. A
personalized card or note will help you
arrange your words better and can be kept
by the family. If you don’t have their
mailing address you can send your envelope
to the funeral home and they will forward it
to the next of kin; 5. Providing flowers is a
long time tradition, or making a charitable
donation in the deceased’s memory will give
the family a strong sense of your regards; 6.
If appropriate a brief phone call can show
your immediate concern, but generally this
should be avoided to give the family the
privacy they may need.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Funeral Etiquette Advice:
Show Up, Be Brief, Listen
advertisement
By Rick Eymer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Josh Donaldson
performed like an All-Star, though
he’ll be spending his break some-
where other than Citi Field New
York.
Donaldson homered, then
blooped an RBI single with two
outs in the 11th inning as the
Oakland Athletics beat Boston 3-2
Sunday despite a stellar start by
Red Sox rookie Brandon
Workman.
“I got jammed and was able to
dink it in,” Donaldson said. “It
was awesome.”
He heads into the break hitting
.310 with 16 home runs and 61
RBIs. Numbers only AL All-Star
third basemen Miguel Cabrera and
backup Manny Machado can rival.
“In our hearts and minds he’s an
All-Star,” A’s manager Bob Melvin
said. “Not only did he knock in the
winning run, he knocked in all three
runs. That’s a pretty good first half
but there was no room for him.”
Workman took a no-hit bid into
the seventh inning of his first
major league start. Coco Crisp
broke it up with a leadoff infield
single.
He became the first Red Sox
pitcher in 79 years to allow three
or fewer baserunners in his first
major league start.
Workman had pitched in only
one big league game, getting
roughed up over two innings in
relief at Seattle on Wednesday. He
became the third rookie in four
days to pitch no-hit ball into the
sixth inning of his first big league
start — Houston’s Jarred Cosart
and Cleveland’s Danny Salazar did
it in their major league debuts.
Donaldson hit a two-run homer
off Workman to tie it in the sev-
enth, then singled with two outs in
the 11th. Matt Thornton (0-4) lost
in his Red Sox debut.
“That was pretty much all I have
right there,” Donaldson said of his
blast. “He made a mistake. I hit it
hard.”
Ryan Cook (2-2) worked two
innings for the victory.
“It’s kind of our motto since the
end of last year to just keep grind-
ing,” Cook said. “We have a good
feeling every day. ”
Pinch-hitter Chris Young drew a
leadoff walk in the Oakland 11th
and moved up on a sacrifice. After a
two-out walk, Donaldson singled
to right field.
“I know he’s an aggressive hitter
and he’s looking to win the game
right there,” Thornton said. “I’m
looking to make a pitch down and
in. I thought I made a pretty good
pitch and he was able to fist it over
there and drop it right in the per-
fect spot. If you don’t walk the
leadoff guy, that situation doesn’t
come around.”
Dustin Pedroia and Brock Holt
each drove in a run for the Red Sox,
who have not won a series in
Oakland since July of 2006.
Workman gave up two hits,
walked one and struck out five in 6
1-3 innings. The 24-year-old
righty was a combined 8-2 at
Triple-Aand Double-Athis season.
“He was very poised, very good
mound presence, good compo-
sure,” Red Sox manager John
Farrell said. “I thought he had very
good stuff. He stayed out of the
middle of the plate for most of the
day, multiple pitches for strikes.”
All-Star Bartolo Colon gave up
two runs on eight hits over 6 1-3
innings. He did not walk a batter
and struck out four. The Oakland
pitcher will not play in the All-
Star game after starting Sunday.
The Red Sox loaded the bases
with two outs without benefit of a
hit in the 11th before Cook caught
Holt looking at a called third
strike.
Colon retired 14 in a row before
giving up Ellsbury’s single lead-
ing off the sixth. After Daniel
Nava singled, Pedroia followed
with an RBI single to give the Red
Sox a 1-0 lead.
Mike Carp doubled to lead off the
seventh and scored on Holt’s sin-
gle, which ended Colon’s day.
Jonny Gomes was ejected from
the game after striking out to lead
off the ninth. Gomes tried to call
time, but it was not granted and he
took a weak swing for the third
strike.
A’s beat Red Sox in extra innings
SPORTS 13
Monday • July 15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MONT VENTOUX, France —
From now on, let him be called
Chris Vrooooom.
In a display of cycling power
that flabbergasted seasoned
observers of his sport, Chris
Froome tamed the mammoth
mountain climb up Mont Ventoux
in Provence on Sunday to tighten
his grip on the yellow jersey in a
relentless ride toward victory at
the 100th Tour de France.
On France’s national Bastille
Day holiday, he became the first
British stage winner on the moun-
tain where his countryman, Tom
Simpson, died from a lethal cock-
tail of exhaustion, heat and dop-
ing at the 1967 Tour. The final
burst of acceleration Froome used
to shake off his last exhausted pur-
suer, Colombian Nairo Quintana,
was close to a stone memorial to
Simpson on the mountain’s barren
upper reaches.
Mouth agape from the effort,
filling his lungs with the thinning
mountain air, Froome thrust his
right arm upward in victory as he
became the first rider since the leg-
endary Eddy Merckx in 1970 to
win a Mont Ventoux stage while
also wearing
the race leader’s
yellow jersey.
“It was
i n c r e d i b l e
today, incredi-
ble. This is the
biggest victory
of my career, ”
Froome said. “I
didn’t imagine
this, this climb is so historical. It
means so much to this race, espe-
cially being the 100th edition. I
really can’t believe this.”
Froome required oxygen at the
summit, 6,722 feet up, to recover.
But it was his rivals who were
knocked out. The closest four rid-
ers to Froome are now more than
four minutes behind — a lead that
should comfortably carry him
over the last six stages and 520
miles to the finish next Sunday on
the Champs-Elysees in Paris.
“It’s over,” predicted Greg
LeMond, the only U.S. winner of
cycling’s greatest race after both
Floyd Landis and Lance Armstrong
were stripped of their titles for
doping.
In a sport where so many
exploits of recent decades later
proved to have been drug-assisted,
Froome has been asked during this
year’s race if he’s riding clean. Not
only does he insist he is, he also
says his success proves that
cycling’s sustained anti-doping
efforts are working and leveling
the playing field. If so, then the
extravagant superiority, grit,
strength and speed Froome
demonstrated on Ventoux, one of
the most respected and storied
ascents in cycling, deserve a spe-
cial place in the sport’s collective
memory. Because this was, as
Froome said, “an epic ride.”
More impressive than the size
of Froome’s race lead is that at no
point over the past two weeks,
even at times when his Sky team-
mates wilted around him, has he
looked physically vulnerable in
the way he made his rivals look on
Ventoux.
Quintana said he got a nosebleed
during the climb and “I didn’t feel
well when I got to the top.”
Froome said it was the first time
he’d needed to breathe oxygen at
the end of a climb. He coughed
violently at the top and his voice
sounded croaky.
“It really was a full-gas effort up
until the finish,” he said. “I was
feeling quite fainted and short of
breath at the top.”
Alberto Contador, the 2007 and
‘09 champion stripped of his
2010 win for a failed doping test,
stamped on his pedals but immedi-
ately understood he couldn’t keep
up when Froome accelerated away
as though he was on a motorbike.
That was below the tree line, still
four miles from the moonscape
summit of white rocks and an old
weather station.
After riding past the words
“Sky” and “Froome” painted in
big yellow letters on the asphalt,
and after his wingman Richie
Porte pulled to one side having
led him up part of the ascent,
scattering their rivals with the
exception of Contador, Froome
put his head down and, still sit-
ting on his yellow saddle, franti-
cally whirred his pedals.
Contador rose out of his saddle
and tried to match Froome’s
acceleration, but he was gone.
Commentators on French public
television said they’d never seen
an attack like it.
“As Richie started coming to
the end of his turn, I thought,
‘OK, now’s the time. I don’t want
to start playing games, and sit-
ting up, and looking at each
other,”’ Froome said.
Soon, he was catching
Quintana, who had ridden off
ahead. The crowds were huge, tens
of thousands of strong, with
spectators’ camping vans strung
out like a long white necklace on
the roadsides up to the summit.
With under a mile to go,
Froome rose out of the saddle and
accelerated again, leaving
Quintana. He then pedaled solo to
the line.
“He thought I was stronger than
I was really feeling, and that’s
why he talked to me, telling we
should keep pushing to leave
Contador behind, and he’d let me
win the stage,” said Quintana,
who rode in 29 seconds after
Froome. “I knew it was a bit of
‘fake agreement’, because I saw
how strong he was and I had to
fool him a bit to get that far into
the climb.”
Froome has said he under-
stands, given the doping marred-
history of his sport, why there
have been questions about his
performances and says he is
happy to answer them. The Team
Sky boss, Dave Brailsford, said he
expects renewed scrutiny follow-
ing Froome’s Ventoux exploit.
Froome tightens grip on lead at Tour de France
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WATERLOO, Ontario — Hee Young
Park and Angela Stanford both put up
birdies on their first three tries at the
18th hole at Grey Silo Golf Course on
Sunday.
Stanford finally blinked on the
deciding playoff hole and Park kept
her birdie streak alive for the victory at
the Manulife Financial LPGAClassic.
Both players tied the LPGA Tour
record for lowest total score at 26-
under 258. It would take three playoff
holes — all on the 471-yard, par-5 fin-
ishing hole — before Park ended the
drama by hitting a short putt for her
second career LPGAvictory.
“When we started (the) final round, I
just kept reminding (myself) this is just
another round,” Park said. “It doesn’t
matter (if it’s the) final round or a first
round, keep it simple and just think
about always (hitting) my target.”
She hit the target when it counted,
reaching the green in two on the deciding
hole. Stanford, meanwhile, needed three
shots to get on the back fringe and her
long birdie putt ended up a few feet short.
Park hit her 45-foot eagle putt to
within a few feet of the cup. She hit the
birdie, raised her fist in the air and later
threw the ball into the grandstand sur-
rounding the green.
The effort capped a remarkable week
for the 26-year-old South Korean, who
recorded a career-best 61 on the par-71
course a day earlier. Stanford closed
with a 64, while Park, who had a one-
shot lead on the American after three
rounds, had a 65.
“If somebody would have told me
you’re going to shoot 64 today and not
win, I would have thought they were
crazy,” Stanford said. “So for me to
shoot 64-64 on the weekend, you
know, it’s good for me but it’s not a
‘W’, so you play to win.”
Hee Young Park wins Canada LPGA event
Chris Froome
SPORTS 14
Monday • July 15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Eddie Pells and Pat Graham
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The list reads like a Who’s Who
among the world’s best sprinters:
Jamaican Asafa Powell, the for-
mer world-record holder at 100
meters.
American champion Tyson Gay,
who went out of his way to pro-
mote himself as an anti-drug ath-
lete.
Jamaican Sherone Simpson,
who has a gold and two silver
Olympic medals to her credit.
Word came Sunday that all three
had failed drug tests. “A sad day, ”
one former track official called it
— and certainly a day that punc-
tured the myth that the oft-trou-
bled sport has cleaned up its act.
“I am not now — nor have I ever
been — a cheat,” Powell said in a
message released through his
Twitter account.
The 30-year-old Powell, whose
1 0 0 - m e t e r
record of 9.74
stood until
Usain Bolt beat
it in 2008, was
calling for an
i nves t i gat i on
as to how a
stimulant called
o x i l o f r i n e
entered his sys-
tem and caused a positive test at
Jamaica’s national champi-
onships in June.
Simpson, who tested positive
for the same stimulant, said she
“would not intentionally take an
illegal substance of any form into
my system.”
Gay, the American-record holder
in the 100, was more contrite,
though he wasn’t taking full
responsibility.
“I don’t have a sabotage story. I
don’t have any lies. I don’t have
anything to say to make this seem
like it was a mistake or it was on
USADA’s hands, someone playing
games,” said Gay, who fought
back sobs in a telephone inter-
view. “I don’t have any of those
stories. I basically put my trust in
someone and I was let down.”
Gay, who won the 100 and 200
meters at U.S. nationals last
month, said he would pull out of
the world championships.
The 30-year-old, who won the
world championship in the 100,
200 and 4x100 relay in 2007,
took part in the U.S. Anti-
Doping Agency’s “My Victory”
program — in which athletes vol-
unteer for enhanced testing to
prove they’re clean — and his
results never raised red flags.
Until, that is, an out-of-competi-
tion test May 16, where results
came back positive for a banned
substance, the identity of which
neither he nor USADACEO Travis
Tygart would reveal.
Gay said his “B” sample will be
tested soon, possibly as early as
this week.
Generally, first-time offenders
are hit with two-year bans, though
reduced penalties are sometimes
given if there are extenuating cir-
cumstances, which both Gay and
his coach, Lance Brauman, said
there were.
“He mentioned that he (trusted)
someone and that person was
untrustworthy at the end the day, ”
Brauman told The Associated Press
in a phone interview. “Maybe I’m
naive, but I believe him.”
Max Siegel, the CEO of USA
Track and Field, said in a state-
ment: “It is not the news anyone
wanted to hear, at any time, about
any athlete.” He said he looked to
USADAto handle the case “appro-
priately.”
Siegel’s predecessor at USATF,
Doug Logan, called it “a sad day. ”
“But I don’t see anything on the
horizon that says this will be
abated in any way,” Logan told AP.
The former CEO recently wrote a
column arguing the fight against
performance-enhancing drugs in
sports should be ceded because, in
his view, anti-doping rules make
very little headway against a prob-
lem that never seems to disappear.
He said he wasn’t surprised when
he heard about Sunday’s onslaught
of failed tests and didn’t put much
credence into the excuses and
apologies from those who came up
positive.
“Over the course of time, culture
has bred certain defenses,” Logan
said. “The reality is, people are
using substances to reengineer
their bodies or heal better. That’s
reality. ”
Four-time Olympic medalist and
sprint analyst Ato Boldon also
called it a “difficult day because
track and field fans are left not
knowing what to believe.”
Gay, Powell test positive for banned substances
Dodgers close 1st half
with 3-1 loss to Rockies
LOS ANGELES — Hoping for a nice push
going into the All-Star break, the Dodgers’
hitters sputtered in the final three games of
their series against the Rockies, with Los
Angeles held to two runs in that span.
They lost 3-1 Sunday to split the series
and fall back to .500 at 47-47.
“It seemed like we had a little bit of a funk
the last couple days,” manager Don
Mattingly said.
Still, the Dodgers won 17 of their last 22
games to climb into second-place in the NL
West, 2 1/2 games behind Arizona. They
were a season-worst 12 games under .500 on
June 21.
The Dodgers’ lone run Sunday came on
Adrian Gonzalez’s single with two outs that
scored rookie Yasiel Puig, who had a pinch-
hit single in the fifth.
Sports brief
Tyson Gay
SPORTS 15
Monday • July 15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 54 41 .568 —
Washington 48 47 .505 6
Philadelphia 48 48 .500 6 1/2
New York 41 50 .451 11
Miami 35 58 .376 18
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 56 36 .609 —
Pittsburgh 56 37 .602 1/2
Cincinnati 53 42 .558 4 1/2
Chicago 42 50 .457 14
Milwaukee 38 56 .404 19
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 50 45 .526 —
Los Angeles 47 47 .500 2 1/2
Colorado 46 50 .479 4 1/2
San Francisco 43 51 .457 6 1/2
San Diego 42 54 .438 8 1/2
Sunday’s Games
Washington 5, Miami 2, 10 innings
Philadelphia 4, Chicago White Sox 3, 10 innings
Cincinnati 8, Atlanta 4
N.Y. Mets 4, Pittsburgh 2
Colorado 3, L.A. Dodgers 1
Milwaukee 5, Arizona 1
San Diego 10, San Francisco 1
St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, late
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 58 39 .598 —
Tampa Bay 55 41 .573 2 1/2
Baltimore 53 43 .552 4 1/2
New York 51 44 .537 6
Toronto 45 49 .479 11 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 52 42 .553 —
Cleveland 51 44 .537 1 1/2
Kansas City 43 49 .467 8
Minnesota 39 53 .424 12
Chicago 37 55 .402 14
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 56 39 .589 —
Texas 54 41 .568 2
Los Angeles 44 49 .473 11
Seattle 43 52 .453 13
Houston 33 61 .351 22 1/2
Sunday’sGames
Cleveland 6, Kansas City 4
Minnesota 10, N.Y.Yankees 4
Detroit 5,Texas 0
Philadelphia 4, Chicago White Sox 3, 10 innings
Baltimore 7,Toronto 4
Tampa Bay 5, Houston 0
Oakland 3, Boston 2, 11 innings
AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Kansas City 9 5 6 33 29 19
Montreal 9 5 4 31 31 29
New York 9 7 4 31 29 24
Philadelphia 8 6 6 30 32 30
Houston 8 6 5 29 22 19
New England 6 6 6 24 22 16
Columbus 6 8 5 23 23 23
Chicago 6 9 3 21 20 28
Toronto FC 2 9 7 13 17 27
D.C. 2 13 4 10 8 29
WESTERNCONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake 11 5 4 37 32 18
Portland 8 2 9 33 30 18
Vancouver 9 5 5 32 32 26
FC Dallas 8 5 7 31 27 27
Los Angeles 9 8 3 30 30 24
Colorado 7 7 6 27 23 22
Seattle 7 7 3 24 21 20
San Jose 6 9 6 24 21 32
Chivas USA 3 11 5 14 17 35
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
———
Sunday’s Games
Vancouver 3, Chicago 1
MLS GLANCE
7/13
7/10 7/9 7/11 7/13 7/12 7/14
vs.Dbacks
7:15p.m.
NBC
7/19
7/14 7/13
@Angels
7:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/19
@Angels
6:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/20 7/12 7/9 7/10
vs.Norwich
City
7:30p.m.
7/20
vs.Portland
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/27
vs. Chivas
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/4
BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX — Optioned OF Jackie
Bradley Jr.to Pawtucket (IL).Recalled LHP Drake
Britton from Pawtucket.
CHICAGOWHITE SOX— Sent RHP Jake Peavy
to Birmingham (SL) for a rehab assignment.
CLEVELANDINDIANS— Sent RHP Zach McAl-
lister to Akron (EL) for a rehab assignment.
Optioned RHP Blake Wood to Columbus (IL).
Assigned C Omir Santos outright to Columbus.
KANSAS CITYROYALS— Optioned LHP Don-
nie Joseph to Omaha (PCL).Recalled LHP Everett
Teaford from Omaha. Reinstated RHP Wade
Davis from the paternity list. Designated RHP
J.C. Gutierrez for assignment.
MINNESOTATWINS — Reinstated LHP Caleb
Thielbar from the bereavement list. Optioned
OFs Oswaldo Arcia and Chris Parmelee and INF
Eduardo Escobar to Rochester (IL).
NEWYORK YANKEES — Announced 1B Travis
Ishikawa declined outright assignment and
elected free agency.
National League
SF GIANTS — Optioned INF Nick Noonan and
RHP Jean Machi to Fresno (PCL). Designated
RHP Chris Heston for assignment. Reinstated
RHP Santiago Castilla from the 15-day DL. Se-
lected the contract of OF Jeff Francoeur from
Fresno.
TRANSACTIONS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOUDON, N.H. — Stuck in a
hospital bed, Brian Vickers want-
ed to live another day.
Once he recovered, he hungered
for a competitive ride.
And once he landed a solid seat,
well, Vickers simply had to win.
Even when life tossed obstacles
in Vickers’ path, his determined
spirit never waned. After four
years of health scares and unem-
ployment put his promising
career in doubt, Vickers kept push-
ing toward the finish line. He got
there Sunday as the surprise win-
ner at New Hampshire Motor
Speedway.
“Coming here and sitting in
Victory Lane, just makes it one of
the most special events in my
life,” Vickers said.
He had plenty of drivers in the
series pulling for this comeback.
One by one, they saluted Vickers
with a wave from the car or a back
slap on the way to Victory Lane.
Close friend Jimmie Johnson, a
five-time Cup champion, pumped
his fist out the window in pure
happiness as if he’d won a sixth
title.
Vickers did all he could to savor
the unforgettable scene.
“When you have so much love
and support around you,” Vickers
said, “it makes all the difference in
the world.”
Vickers even tried to celebrate
with the fans, though the New
Hampshire gates wouldn’t open to
the grandstands. That’s OK. He
had a pretty big mob waiting for
him — even his fiancee, who had
left the track to catch a ride home,
only to reverse course and make it
back just in time to greet him.
About the only key cog missing
was owner Michael Waltrip.
Waltrip and co-owner Rob
Kauffman were in Europe this
weekend for the 20th annual
Goodwood Festival of Speed in
England.
Brian Vickers a surprise winner at New Hampshire
16
Monday • July 15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
650-354-1100
“He had trouble hitting his spots. Three
home runs, you get short at that point, par-
ticularly when you have a full bullpen and
you’re off for four days. I try to look at it,
hey, it’s a good series, the boys did well
down here.
“This series put us back on course.
Hopefully this is how we’ll play when we
come out of this break.”
The defending World Series champion
Giants came into this series in a free-fall,
having lost four straight games and 19 of
24.
Zito gave up San Diego’s first three
homers. Denorfia hit a solo shot an estimat-
ed 417 feet into the second deck in left field
with one out in the first while Hundley and
Venable connected back-to-back with two
outs in the second. It was the third time the
Padres hit consecutive homers this season.
“My concentration wasn’t where it should
be,’ said Zito, who wasn’t upset with the
early hook. “I knew our bullpen was fresh
and Boch has done that before. That’s his
style if the starter doesn’t have a feel for the
game. I support his decision. I have to be
better out there. I have to have my concen-
tration where it should be.”
It was Denorfia’s seventh, Hundley’s
sixth and Venable’s 11t h.
Quentin’s two-run homer with two outs in
the fifth hit the balcony on the second level
of the Western Metal Supply Co. brick
warehouse in the left-field corner. It was his
12th and came off George Kontos. Everth
Cabrera was aboard on a walk.
Quentin also hit an RBI double in the
four-run third. Hundley and Venable hit con-
secutive RBI singles that inning.
San Diego lefty Eric Stults (8-7) allowed
one run and five hits in six innings, struck
out five and walked two.
All-Star Marco Scutaro singled in San
Francisco’s only run, in the first.
NOTES: The cap Lincecum wore in his no-
hitter is on its way to the Hall of Fame.
Giants officials will probably also send a
ball from the game. ... Giants closer Sergi o
Romo was added to the NLAll-Star team by
his manager, Bruce Bochy. He’ll join team-
mates Buster Posey, Madison Bumgarner
and Scutaro at New York’s Citi Field on
Tuesday night. ... San Diego’s lone repre-
sentative is Cabrera.
Continued from page 11
GIANTS
in, wearing a beanie and glasses. Another
Giants player gave the slightly built pitch-
er grief about the fanny pack he was wear-
i ng.
“It’s momentum. It’s exciting,” said
right fielder Hunter Pence, whose sensa-
tional diving catch of Alexi Amarista’s
sinking liner in the eighth inning pre-
served the no-no.
Pitching coach Dave Righetti — who
threw a no-hitter for the New York Yankees
on July 4, 1983, a year before Lincecum
was born — said the Freak’s pitch count
became an issue in the sixth inning.
“The only way he was staying in was if he
didn’t give up a hit,” Righetti said.
“He wanted it. You could tell. He was def-
initely in his zone, so to speak,” Righetti
said.
“It goes without saying how badly a guy
wants it when it’s going like that,”
Lincecum said. “You just hope they give
you a leash to do so and you do so with the
slack that you’re given. I think it just turns
into an internal focus and you try to take
advantage of the pitches you have left and
you know that every pitch that you throw is
that much more worrisome, I’m pretty
sure.”
Bochy said he was impressed with how
Lincecum got locked in when he had thrown
about 100 pitches.
“Sure, that’s a lot of pitches, but there’s
days when a guy gets in a groove, he’s not
putting a lot of effort in it and you let the
dog run. ... There’s no way I could have
taken that kid out,” Bochy said. “First of
all, he probably wouldn’t have talked to me
the rest of the season. But he was still
going strong.”
Lincecum struck out 13, walked four and
hit a batter.
He struggled this year and last, although
he’s also been plagued this season by poor
run support.
Lincecum’s no-hitter for the Giants fol-
lows Jonathan Sanchez’s no-no in 2009 —
also against the Padres — and Matt Cain’s
perfect game last year.
Righetti recalled that early in Lincecum’s
career, his stuff was so good that it wasn’t
uncommon to think, “Uh oh, this is the
day. ”
“I don’t know that he’d say this publicly,
I think he maybe felt his time was past,”
Righetti said. “I knew he watched Jonathan
get his, and then Cain, and you know he’s
thinking about it.
“For him to get it, I had tears in my eyes.
I know what he’s been through, back and
forth, and being the guy, and people pick-
ing him apart. I’m proud of him. I told him
that the last game — the way he’s been han-
dling it all, and the way he’s gone through
this wave that every guy’s got to go
through.”
Continued from page 11
TIMMY
ed the ball and surrendered a pair of runs to
San Ramon to make it 4-2.
Then, Lopez got into major trouble in
the second and allowed San Ramon to take
a 5-4 lead.
But just like they’ve done all postseason
long, the Belmont-Redwood Shore bats all
seem to awaken at just the right time.
In the third, Jake Stulbarg hit a double,
while Susa and Daniel Friis singled to get
the comeback going. Then, Noah Marcelo,
arguably the hottest Belmont bat at the
moment, continued his Player of the
Summer pace with a three-run bomb that
capped a five-run inning for the visitors.
Brad Shimabuku took the mound to
relieve Lopez starting the third frame.
San Ramon got one run back to make it
9-6 heading into the sixth. But, once
again, the offensive force that is Marcelo
struck, this time for a two-run shot that
capped the Belmont-Redwood Shores scor-
i ng.
The offensive groove carried over to
Sunday’s game for Belmont and this time,
Shimabuku was just as dominant on the
mound as BRS was with the bats.
As a result, Belmont beat Mission San
Jose with a 11-1 decision in just four
innings of play. San Jose scored its lone
run in the top of the first. But all that
seemed to do was ignite the Belmont-
Redwood Shores fire.
In the bottom of the first, Lopez hit a
single and that knock was followed by
back-to-back jacks courtesy of Shimabuku
and Lee that helped Belmont take a 4-1
lead.
In the second, Marcelo was up to this old
self, picking up his third home run of the
weekend — this one of the two-run variety
— to make it 6-1 in favor of BRS.
In the bottom of the fourth, Lopez got in
on the home run action with a two-run tater
that Lee replicated shortly after to make it
10-1. Then, with two out, Stulbarg stepped
up to the plate and hit a double. He’d later
scored the game-winning run on a Douglis
single to centerfield.
Belmont-Redwood Shores is now a per-
fect 7-0 this postseason.
District 52 hasn’t had a 11/12 Majors
champion in Section 3 since 2006 when
Palo Alto National won. Locally, the his-
tory is worse — San Mateo County is with-
out a winner since 1994 when Alpine/West
Menlo took the title. Before then, there
was a 20-year gap — 1974 with San Mateo
National.
With its win on Sunday, Belmont-
Redwood Shores advances to the Section 3
title game with an opponent that is yet to
be determined.
Continued from page 11
SHORES
ble play, as the groundball with eyes bound-
ed over the mound, skipping just out of the
outstretched backhand of Austin. McHugh
would later score an unearned run on an
infield error to extend Millbrae’s lead to 3-
0.
In the fourth, Millbrae added to its lead.
Michael Svozil led off the inning with a
single to left. With one out, Carney walked,
and both base runners advanced on a wild
pitch. Hidalgo produced a sacrifice fly to
score Svozil, before McHugh doubled to left
to plate Carney to cap the day’s scoring.
With the win — the Mavericks’ 20th of
the year — Millbrae advances to the Joe
DiMaggio World Series in Yountville for
the first time since 2006 – a team powered
by now coach Dan McCarthy.
The current squad has rallied for quite a
winning streak, having dropped its last
league game nearly a month ago to Pacifica.
The Mavericks’ only loss since came in
non-league action at last week’s Napa
Tournament, also at the hands of Pacifica.
Both teams are now headed to Yountville,
with Pacifica earning an automatic berth by
capturing the Peninsula League pennant.
“We haven’t been to the state playoffs in
quite a while,” Garrison said. “So, their
determination to get to the playoffs … it
showed today. ”
Although the offense has been its calling
card this summer, Millbrae has a solid start-
ing rotation lined up for Yountville.
Hidalgo – the 2012 Peninsula Athletic
League Ocean Division Player of the Year –
returned to form in just his second start of
the summer Friday, earning the win in
Millbrae’s semifinal playoff against San
Bruno. Right-hander Robert Thorgersen
will round out the rotation.
Carney has been Millbrae’s ace though,
and yesterday’s performance left no doubt
the right-hander is fully healthy after a bro-
ken pitching hand cost him the second half
of his freshman season at Skyline College
earlier this spring.
“This was definitely one of my best starts
(of the year),” Carney said.
The 47th Annual Joe DiMaggio World
Series at Cleve Borman Field gets underway
Saturday, with Millbrae slated for a 2:15
p.m. start. Play in the eight-team, double-
elimination field runs through July 24.
Continued from page 11
MAVS
DATEBOOK 17
Monday • July 15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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L
ast week, Peninsula Humane Society
learned our organization had been
designated a California Volunteer
Service Enterprise by the governor’s office.
What’s that mean? No, Gov. Brown did not
check out our facility personally. And, as far
as I know, this wasn’t a responsibility of
the lieutenant governor, though no one
really knows what a lieutenant governor
does, so it’s possible. Our takeaway was
this: we have a solid program. More than
solid, in fact. The recognition means we
have demonstrated to our supporters, staff,
volunteers and our community that we value
volunteers and effectively engage them in
our mission. It says we provide excellent
training and communicate openly with vol-
unteers, we motivate them and recognize
their work and commitment. To the commu-
nity, we hope it says we are a place they
might want to consider if they have a few
extra hours of time. And, the commitment is
just that. We like our volunteers to give a
few hours per week and stay with us for at
least a year, mostly because we put a great
deal of time into training. Perhaps you want
to help, but don’t want to be around animals
or are allergic. We have a half dozen roles
where you won’t have to see animals,
including positions at our secondhand store
in Burlingame. Love cats, but don’t care for
dogs? You can enter our building and go
right to the cat floor, without seeing a dog.
Do you have a special skill you would like
to share, like construction, event planning
or photography? We very likely have a
need. Orientations are free; they cover all
our volunteer opportunities and are offered
every month. Call 650/340-7022, ext. 328
or visit our website to get started. Did I
mention we throw the best holiday party for
volunteers? That was not among the criteria
for which we were graded — just a nice
bonus!
Scott oversees PHS/SPCA’s Customer
Service, Behavior and Training, Education,
Outreach, Field Services, Cruelty
Investigation, Volunteer and Media/PR pro-
gram areas and staff. His companion,
Murray, oversees him.
By Ryan Nakashima
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Universal’s
minions ran away with the box
office for the second week in a row.
With $44.8 million in domestic
ticket sales Friday through
Sunday, the animated sequel
“Despicable Me 2” outdid the
debuts of the Adam Sandler come-
dy “Grown Ups 2” and director
Guillermo del Toro’s monsters-
versus-robots action flick “Pacific
Rim.”
The weekend’s No. 1 movie fea-
turing Steve Carell as ex-supervil-
lain Gru made another $55.5 mil-
lion overseas. That brought its
global two-week total to $472.4
million, according to studio esti-
mates Sunday.
“This has become the July film
to beat right now,” said Paul
Dergarabedian, president of the
box office tracking division of
Hollywood.com. “There’s some-
thing about the minions that audi-
ences just love.”
Sony was pleased with Sandler’s
second-best movie opening of his
career with $42.5 million in sales
in the U.S. and Canada (His best
domestic opening was “The
Longest Yard” from 2005 with
$58.6 million over four days).
Overseas, the comedy brought in
$1.7 million.
The movie brings together for-
mer NBAstar Shaquille O’Neal as a
bumbling police officer with a
host of comedy All-Stars includ-
ing Chris Rock and David Spade
playing awkward parents.
The third-place finish of “Pacific
Rim,” with $38.3 million in
receipts, represented a disappoint-
ing start domestically for Warner
Bros. and partner Legendary
Entertainment. Figures released
by the studio showed it doing bet-
ter overseas.
The movie took in $53 million
from 38 markets outside the U.S.
and Canada, representing about
half its overseas footprint. It has
yet to open in China or Japan,
the home of the movie’s co-star,
Rinko Kikuchi.
Warner Bros. said the debut of
“Pacific Rim” in several coun-
tries such as Russia and South
Korea was better than that other
films that have gone on to gross
more than $300 million interna-
tionally, like “Transformers 2”
and “Prometheus.”
The movie had an estimated
production budget of $185 mil-
lion, not including the millions
spent on marketing, so there is
still the opportunity for it to
make its money back.
Fizziology, a company that
tracks buzz on social networks
like Twitter and Facebook, said
that 82 percent of posts on
“Pacific Rim” were positive
ahead of the opening, with only 6
percent negative as some people
drew negative comparisons to the
“Power Rangers” or “Godzilla.”
The film draws heavily on
Japan’s “Kaiju” movie monster
tradition.
Fizziology President Ben
Carlson said the appeal of “Pacific
Rim” to 3-D moviegoers and the
fact it is one of the most-hyped
films of the summer could help it
with Asian audiences, he said.
“This movie’s really pre-wired
to do well in those territories,” he
said.
Disney’s “The Lone Ranger, ”
starring Johnny Depp as Tonto,
took in $11.1 million domestical-
ly in its second week, falling into
fifth place behind “The Heat” star-
ring Sandra Bullock and Melissa
McCarthy, which brought in
another $14 million in its third
week.
Stock market analysts predict
Disney to book a big loss on the
film.
The film was temporarily halted
in July 2011 to rein in its budget,
but production expenses alone are
estimated to have exceeded $200
million. So far, it has pulled in
just $119.1 million worldwide,
roughly half of which is kept by
theater owners. Eric Wold, an ana-
lyst with investment bank B.
Riley & Co. pegged Disney’s pos-
sible loss on the film at about
$100 million.
‘Despicable Me 2’ holds top spot
1.“Despicable Me 2,” $44.8 mil-
lion.($55.5 million international).
2.“Grown Ups 2,” $42.5 million.
($1.7 million international).
3.“Pacific Rim,”$38.3 million.($53
million international).
4.“The Heat,” $14 million. ($8.1
million international).
5.“The Lone Ranger,”$11.1 mil-
lion.($12.7 million international).
6. “Monsters University,”$10.6
million. ($30.2 million interna-
tional).
7. “World War Z,” $9.4 million.
($22.4 million international).
8.“White House Down,”$6.2 mil-
lion. (41.8 million international).
9.“Kevin Hart:Let Me Explain,”$5
million.
10.“Man of Steel,” $4.8 million.
($13.3 million international).
Top 10 movies
18
Monday • July 15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
June 6 was named Sustainable Foster City Day by the City Council to highlight the city’s sus-
tainable Economic Development Strategic Plan. Pictured are Curtis Banks, Community
Development Director,city of Foster City,Joe Fazio,Field Representative,Assemblyman Kevin
Mullin’s Office, Art Kiesel, Councilman, city of Foster City, Steve Toler, Assistant City Manager,
city of Foster City, Carole Groom, Supervisor, County of San Mateo Board of Supervisors,
Joanne Bohigian, CEO, Foster City Chamber of Commerce, Marc Hershman, District Director,
Senator Jerry Hill’s Office,Pam Frisella,Mayor,City of Foster City,Steve Okamoto,Councilman,
city of Foster City, Lory Lorimer Lawson, Chair, San Mateo-Foster City School District Board of
Directors (Trustees), Kevin Miller, Director of Parks & Recreation, city of Foster City.
Sustainable Foster City
The Rotary Club of Foster City awarded $600 scholarships to each of three high school stu-
dents at its luncheon last month.The scholarships were based on Service to the School and
Community. Pictured are (left to right) Claire McNally, Aragon High School; Rotary President
Noemi Avram;Rotarian Martha Bronitsky;Shriel DeGracias,Hillsdale High School;and Michael
Calmis, Hillsdale High School.
Scholarship winners
Man helps save two who drove into canal
FRESNO — A Fresno man is being praised for pulling
over and helping to save two people who almost drowned
when their car accidentally went into a canal.
Richard Llewellyn, 53, was driving in central Fresno
around 4 a.m. Saturday when he saw a woman yelling by the
side of the road, according to the Fresno Bee.
Llewellyn pulled over and saw her husband trying to res-
cue another woman from a car that was underwater in the
canal near Olive and Blackstone avenues.
“She was frozen and I was dragging her up that slick con-
crete,” Llewellyn said. “I said, ‘We’ve got to do this. It’s
better than being dead.”’
Llewellyn, who collects wooden shipping pallets for
extra cash, grabbed a rope from his truck and used it to pull
the woman out of the canal. He then ran downstream to find
a man clinging to the canal’s concrete wall. Police soon
arrived and helped carry the man out of the water.
State brief
19
Monday • July 15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
]
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Monday • July 15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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MONDAY, JULY 15
Russell Bede School Tour.442 Turner
Terrace, San Mateo. Russell Bede
School, which has been serving
children with learning differences for
30 years, will offer a tour of its facility for
interested families. Free. For more
information and to reserve spots call
579-4400.
Lecture: Breaking Point: Happy
Memories or Household Hazards. 10
a.m. to 11 a.m. City of San Mateo Senior
Center, 2645 Alameda de las Pulgas,
San Mateo. Josie Vicera, of Home
Instead, will explain the signs of ‘clutter
creep’ as well as the top 10 reasons we
hang on to stuff and what to do about
it. Free. For more information call 522-
7490.
Summer Enrichment Series: Lego
Week. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Belmont Library,
1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Free. This event will run until July 17.
Registration is required. For more
information and to register call 591-
8286.
CraftstoCash—HowtoGet Started
in the Business of Art.5 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Dragon Theater, 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. Free. To RSVP email
artsrwc@gmail.com. For more
information email hoodr@smccd.edu.
Talent Spectacular Auditions. 6 p.m.
to 7 p.m. King Community Center, 725
Monte Diablo Ave., San Mateo. Free. For
more information call 522-7470.
TUESDAY, JULY 16
San Mateo Newcomers Club,
Luncheon. Noon. Spices Restaurant,
929A Edgewater Blvd., Foster City.The
program for the luncheon will be a
speaker of Freedom House, San
Francisco.This is an independent, non-
profit organization whose mission is
to bring hope, restoration and new life
to survivors of human trafficking by
providing housing and long-term
after-care services. Checks must be
received by Wednesday July 10. $25.
Sent to Janet Williams, 1168 Shoreline
Drive, San Mateo. For more information
call 286-0688.
What’s the buzz? 3 p.m. San Mateo
Public Library Marina, 1350 Susan
Court, San Mateo. Learn all about
honeybees and beekeeping from
beekeeper Kendal Sager. Free. For more
information call 522-7848.
Serramonte Center Kids Club Luau.
5:30 p.m. Serramonte Center — Grand
Court, at Serramonte and Gellert
boulevards, off Interstate 280, Daly City.
Children will enjoy Hawaiian-themed
activities and more. Membership is free
and open to all children ages 12 and
younger. For more information call
(415) 380-8390.
Veterans Aid and Attendance
Seminar. 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Atria Daly
City, 501 King Drive, Daly City. Mr. Jeffrey
Young of the San Mateo County
Veteran’s Service Office will present a
seminar that will help veterans and
their surviving spouses navigate the
process of applying financial support
and maintaining their non-service
pension. Free. For more information
and to RSVP call 878-5111.
‘All That Echoes Artist Cut’ Coming
toSelect U.S. Cinemas. 7:30 p.m. PST.
Select Cinemas. Prices vary. For more
information go to www.
FathomEvents.com.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 17
Free Diabetes Screening.9 a.m. to 11
a.m.Twin Pines Senior and Community
Center, 20 Twin Pines Lane, Belmont.
For best results, a four-hour fast is
suggested. No reservations needed.
For more information call 595-7441.
Tips from Bay Area Job Search
experts. 10 a.m. to noon. Foster City
Community Center, 1000 E. Hillsdale
Blvd., Foster City. Free. For more
information go to
www.phase2careers.org.
“Step Back in Time” — Music and
Costume of the 1920s. 5:30 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. 86 Cañada Road, Woodside.
Tickets go on sale June 18. Advance
ticket purchase required. $35 for
members, $40 for non-members.To
purchase tickets go to
www.filoli.org/country-estate-evening
or call 364-8300, ext. 508.
Music in the Park - Funky Latin
Orchestra. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Stafford
Park, corner of King Street and Hopkins
Avenue, Redwood City. Free.
TheRoadtoConqueringDiseases of
theBrainwithDr.DaleSchenk. 7 p.m.
Oshman Family JCC, 3921 Fabian Way,
Palo Alto. $10 members, $15 for non-
members and $7 students with valid
ID. For more information and tickets
go to
www.commonwealthclub.org/events/
2013-07-17/dale-schenk-road-
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
“The issue here is that there is
not really good public transporta-
tion, whereas they could take
BARTto the East Bay” Christensen
said.
The San Mateo County district is
also pretty full.
Limited capacity
“We just don’t have capacity to
accommodate thousands more stu-
dents from San Francisco,” she
said.
The SMCCCD Board of Trustees
is busy preparing for their own
reaccreditation, said Trustee Dave
Mandelkern, who feels for the
CCSF community.
“My heart goes out to the stu-
dents at CCSF,” said Mandelkern.
“It’s a very serious situation.”
Mandelkern said the idea that sur-
rounding districts would be able to
take on 85,000 students is incon-
ceivable.
“We pretty much have full capac-
ity right now,” he said.
California community colleges
have open enrollment, meaning
San Mateo County community col-
leges already enroll students from
outside of the county.
“Clearly students can make
choices,” said SMCCCD
Chancellor Ron Galatolo.
The district will do everything it
can to accommodate students from
anywhere, but resources are limit-
ed, he said.
“There’s only so much we can
do,” he said, adding that the district
serves 40,000 to 45,000 students
per year. “We’ll do whatever we can
within our power.”
Commission’s decision
Galatolo was shocked and disap-
pointed by the accrediting commis-
sion’s decision on CCSF. He said
the commission calling for the
closing of a college overly aggres-
sive.
“The outcome levied by the
ACCJC was terrible,” he said. “The
issues that the ACCJC raised don’t
warrant terminating the institu-
tion, not even close.”
The students coming out of CCSF
and into the workforce or other
learning institutions in San Mateo
County are capable and competent,
he said.
“What’s occurring in the class-
room is still effective teaching and
learning,” he said.
“While CCSF has some issues,
they’re just not that bad of an insti-
tution.”
The commission’s rate of plac-
ing sanctions — which are mostly
warning or a “show-cause” sanc-
tions — has been above 60 percent
for the past decade, said Galatolo.
The ACCJC’s rate of sanctioning is
far above that of other regions in
the nation which only sanction
one to six percent of colleges each
year, he said.
The ACCJC said in a press release
that CCSF has only managed to
address two of the 14 recommenda-
tions the commission made to col-
lege during the “show-cause” sanc-
tion period.
The commission said in the press
release the main reasons for its
decision were CCSF’s “lack of
financial accountability as well as
institutional deficiencies in the
area of leadership and governance.”
“An institution that does not
meet accreditation standards cheats
its students and its community,”
read a statement by Molly Corbett,
president of the American Counsel
on Education, which oversees the
accrediting commission. “It is
apparent that dramatic change is
needed so that City College of San
Francisco can better serve its
85,000 students.”
‘Ebb and flow’
The ACCJC’s decision was too
severe, said Teeka James, president
of the American Federation of
Teachers Local 1493, which repre-
sents San Mateo County communi-
ty college teachers.
“I think the commission’s deci-
sion to sanction CCSF at the
‘show-cause’ level was ridiculous.
If anything, CCSF should have
received a warning or other lesser
sanction,” James wrote in an email
to the Daily Journal. “To go from
‘all is well’ to ‘explain why you
shouldn’t be shut down’ is unfair
and harsh.”
James said she is not worried
about the extra students that the
San Mateo County district may
need to take on if CCSF closes.
“We are nimble enough to adjust
to the ebb and flow of enroll-
ments,” she wrote. “But I do have
concerns for the students in San
Francisco. Transportation between
San Francisco and San Mateo coun-
ties is expensive and cumber-
some.”
Continued from page 1
CCSF
bill 327 would affect victims of human
trafficking incarcerated for committing
serious felonies resulting from their
abuse and who were convicted prior to
1996.
These victims-turned-offenders would
be allowed to use the battered woman’s
syndrome defense when submitting a
special writ of habeas corpus requesting
a reevaluation of their sentencing or
ability for parole. The burden of proof
will fall on prisoners to establish evi-
dence of their abuse. In Kruzan’s case,
Yee said there is a substantial probabili-
ty the resulting proceedings would have
been different had expert testimony been
submitted during trial.
The California District Attorneys
Association opposes Yee’s bill. Cory
Salzillo, director of legislation for the
CDAA, believes it is inappropriate to
legislatively direct the Board of Parole
Hearings to express a bias toward evi-
dence of human trafficking, especially if
such evidence was unconvincing during
previous court hearings. Salzillo also
argues that the bill is trying to augment
a section of the penal code that was cre-
ated specifically for victims of intimate
partner battering, not human trafficking.
But U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San
Mateo, believes the law is always evolv-
ing to reflect the current understanding
about the motivation behind crimes and
it’s time for victims of human trafficking
to be recognized under these circum-
stances.
Next to drug trafficking, human traf-
ficking is the second largest worldwide
criminal enterprise. According to the
FBI, San Francisco, Los Angeles and San
Diego have been declared three of the
nation’s highest child sex trafficking
areas.
Amajority of those forced into sexual
slavery are children, many under 14.
Although a major belief is that many of
these exploited women come from for-
eign countries, there is actually a long-
standing history that victims are often
U.S. citizens, Yee said.
“What we’re finding in recent years is
that many of the victims of human traf-
ficking are no longer foreign, many of
the victims of human trafficking are indi-
viduals that live in our own communi-
ties. And that is the sad part, because
these are our children, they are family
members, our neighbors,” Yee said.
Prior to Kruzan’s conviction, the psy-
chological and sociological effects of
being sexually enslaved didn’t take much
precedence in court, Yee said. Kruzan’s
case motivated then-governor Arnold
Schwarzenegger to reduce her sentence to
25 years with the possibility of parole.
However, as victims of human traffick-
ing, Kruzan and similar women could
now be allowed to present evidence of
this type of abuse in requesting resen-
tencing or at their parole hearings.
“This (bill) would be limited to those
early cases. Because the cases now
would, in fact, be taking the more
enlightened position that if in fact you
are a victim of domestic violence or
human trafficking, you can use that dur-
ing your sentencing and find a more fair
and just verdict,” Yee said.
Speier hopes SB 327 could be a model
for future federal legislation. The
extreme actions of these women often
resulted from their attempt to free them-
selves from enslavement, Speier said.
Federal, state and local agencies are all
working to address the exploitation of
young women long term, Yee said.
The federal government has recently
given California a six-month extension
to reduce costly prison overpopulation.
State prisons are operating at an average
of 150 percent above design capacity
and are required to reduce that to 137.5
percent. This bill could assist in meeting
federal mandates while providing further
protection to human trafficking victims,
Speier said.
“These are not individuals that would
be placing the general population at
risk. Many of these women are convict-
ed of a, quote, crime, when in fact it was
self-defense or trying to respond to an
abuse that they were victims of,” Speier
said.
Nonetheless, these defensive criminal
acts are heinous crimes that deserve pun-
ishment, Yee said. But for those who
were forced into commercial slavery and
made to live in horrid conditions, evi-
dence of such should be given weight in
court proceedings, Yee said.
“What we’re saying now is that given
the history and the knowledge base and
the psychological literature about these
women who have been trafficked or
abused over the years, that we need to
take into consideration all of that back-
ground so that we can give punishment
in a more just way,” Yee said.
In early June, Kruzan received a parole
grant giving the California Parole Board
120 days to approve her recommenda-
tion for parole. Should the board
approve her parole, Gov. Jerry Brown
will have 30 days to allow or deny her
release.
SB 327 passed the Senate and, on July
3, was sent to the Assembly
Appropriations Committee suspense file
where it awaits a final hearing after the
state’s enacted budget has been reviewed
furthe
Continued from page 1
SEX
COMICS/GAMES
7-14-13
weekend’s PUZZLe sOLVed
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Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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5 Scary shout
8 Memo abbr.
12 Fall birthstone
13 Ms. Merkel
14 Center
15 Stoic founder
16 Commuting time (2 wds.)
18 Pirate fag emblems
20 Had a cough
21 Moonbeam
22 Opposite of max
23 Stares rudely
26 Suit materials
29 — Marian
30 Sorrowful wail
31 201, to Ovid
33 Mil. noncom
34 Eager
35 Filth
36 Grilled a steak
38 Heavy sounds
39 Razor brand
40 NASA counterpart
41 Fine violin, briefy
44 Dined at a restaurant
(2 wds.)
47 Some canines
49 Quaker pronoun
51 Light blade
52 Court
53 Jot
54 Downy fungi
55 911 responder
56 “Mermaids” star
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1 Relative, informally
2 Mimics
3 Rangy
4 Dusted the cake pans
5 Strapping
6 Burden
7 Western treaty grp.
8 Sore
9 Wrench or hammer
10 False opposite
11 Brainy one, maybe
17 Barber sweepings
19 Refrain syllables
22 Honey wine
23 Mantra chants
24 Jokes
25 Lo-cal
26 Glided
27 Pantyhose color
28 Missile type
30 With, to Henri
32 SSNs, e.g.
34 Hitch — —
35 Disorganized
37 Lessened
38 Mao — -tung
40 Cultural values
41 Appear
42 Spelling error
43 Stagger
44 Fermi split it
45 Klutz’s cry (hyph.)
46 Pierre’s noggin
48 Fleece giver
50 Flair for music
diLBerT® CrOsswOrd PUZZLe
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PearLs BefOre swine®
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MOndaY, JULY 15, 2013
CanCer (June 21-July 22) -- Just because you’re
anxious to wrap up an important matter, there’s
no reason to be rash or impulsive about it. Positive
results should take precedence over speed.
LeO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- When it comes to a
business matter, don’t tip your hand prematurely.
Keep your aces close to the vest and don’t play them
until you’re sure you can win.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- If you’re able, try to
take a breather from your workaday concerns and
enjoy some of the wonderful things life has to offer.
There’s a lot more to living than just making money.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- One of the quickest
ways to wear out your welcome is to be dictatorial.
You must be pleasant at all times, even as you’re
champing at the bit.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Your drive for
accomplishment could cause you to manipulate your
friends. Strive to keep a sense of perspective about
what really counts in life.
saGiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Overly
aggressive individuals could quickly turn you off.
If this happens, you can avoid confrontation by
responding in a strong manner.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Be careful not
to respond too harshly in a public disagreement
between you and your mate. You as well as
everyone else could end up very embarrassed.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Although you
might take the time to carefully analyze a situation,
you could still make a bad judgment owing to a
preconceived notion. Keep an open mind.
PisCes (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Even if asked, think
twice before getting involved in a problem that a
friend has brought on him- or herself. This situation
could be more tangled than it appears.
aries (March 21-April 19) -- Even if you aren’t the
one who starts an argument with a friend, bite the
bullet and do what you can to make amends, for the
sake of the relationship.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) -- A friend might be
willing to help you out, but don’t press your luck by
demanding it. Ask nicely and be sure to show the
proper gratitude.
GeMini (May 21-June 20) -- Get out, look around
and do a lot of comparison shopping before making
a major purchase. If you don’t, you’ll regret your
haste.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Monday • July 15, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Monday • July 15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
IRISH HELP AT HOME
HIRING NOW
Caregivers wanted for a variety of posts
in the South Bay area
Transportation preferred
Work one-on-one in the client’s home
Competitive rates of pay
Call (650) 347-6903
Website: irishhelpathome.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
Employment Services
110 Employment
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
HIRING LINE COOKS - Evenings, Avan-
ti Pizza. . 3536 Alameda, MENLO PARK,
CA (650)854-1222.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CARLMONT GARDENS
NURSING CENTER
2140 CARLMONT DRIVE
BELMONT
Immediate openings. CNA’s
and Housekeeping/Laundry.
Must have solid identifica-
tion and the ability to work
“4-On, 2-Off” schedule.
Please apply in person,
Monday thru Friday.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
JANITORS - Part time, Foster City area.
Call Jerry (707)344-3678
110 Employment
CUSTOMER SERVICE/
SEAMSTRESS -
YOU ARE INVITED
Are you:
Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have:
Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for emplployment benefits
Sewiing skills
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available for
Customer Service/Seamstress.
Call for appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo CA, 94402
GREAT CLIPS
@ Sequoia Station
Redwood City
Now Hiring
Stylists & Managers.
Call Flo/Randy
408 247-8364 or 408 921-9994
Grand Opening Soon!
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. All shifts
available. Call (650)703-8654
23 Monday • July 15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
HOTEL - Front Desk Agent, Mainte-
nance Person, Night Bellman & House-
keeping Manager positions available. Ex-
perience preferred. Fax resume:
(650)589-7076 or Email: ac@citigarden-
hotel.com
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RESTAURANT -
Now hiring for Quick Service / Counter
Service positions. Apply in person at
753 Laurel Street, San Carlos
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256463
The following person is doing business
as: The Lighthouse, 734 El Camino Real,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: DJ EN-
lightened, Inc, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on .
/s/ Dan Samuelsen/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/24/13, 07/01/13, 07/08/13, 07/15/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256195
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Sky Investments, 788 Masson
Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Paulo
W. Langi and Sosefo Ikuna, same ad-
dress . The business is conducted by a
General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Paulo Langi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/01/13, 07/08/13, 07/15/13, 07/22/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256597
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Pure Tech, 2) Pure Pom Stars,
321 37th Ave. SAN MATEO, CA 94403
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Julie Sam, 1061 Tekman Dr., San
Jose, CA 95122. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 06/13/2013.
/s/ Richard A. Fivis /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/08/13, 07/15/13, 07/22/13, 07/29/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256551
The following person is doing business
as: Queensway Food, 1611 Adrian Rd.,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Queens-
way Food Corporation. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Chizn Hua Shih /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/08/13, 07/15/13, 07/22/13, 07/29/13.)
LIEN SALE - On 07/15/2013 at 1548
MAPLE ST., REDWOOD CITY, CA, a
Lien Sale will be held on a 1973 FIBER-
FOAM HULL: FBF22287M73DZS, 22.6ft
STATE: CA CF# 6992KH at 1 PM.
LIEN SALE - On 07/15/2013 at 1548
MAPLE ST., REDWOOD CITY, CA, a
Lien Sale will be held on a 1998 SEAS-
WIRL HULL: BRCR025B1798, 20.8ft
STATE: CA CF# 8312PE at 1 PM.
LIEN SALE - On 07/29/2013 at 823 N.
SAN MATEO DR., SAN MATEO, CA, a
Lien Sale will be held on a 2006 MER-
CEDES VIN: WDDDJ75X56A018046,
STATE: CA LIC: 6GJB188 at 9 AM.
LIEN SALE - On 07/31/2013 at 1548
MAPLE ST., REDWOOD CITY, CA, a
Lien Sale will be held on a 1985 STEEL
VIN: 1BTASRM29G1K09449, STATE:
CA LIC: 4HT6633 at 1 PM.
LIEN SALE - On 07/31/2013 at 1548
MAPLE ST., REDWOOD CITY, CA, a
Lien Sale will be held on a 1997 VAN-
PRO VIN: 1V3BG1929V1006451,
STATE: CA LIC: 1GT1836 at 1 PM.
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
210 Lost & Found
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, $90.,
(650)610-9765
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIER 5200 BTU window air conditioner
- never used, in box, $95. obo, (650)591-
6842
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
296 Appliances
WEBER BRAND Patio Refrigerator,
round top load, for beer, soda, and wa-
ter. $30 obo (650)591-6842
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, SOLD!
298 Collectibles
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $75.,
(650)596-0513
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo SOLD!
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
84 USED European (34) and U.S. (50)
Postage Stamps. Most issued before
World War II. All different and all detach-
ed from envelopes. $4.00, 650-787-
8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MENORAH - Antique Jewish tree of life,
10”W x 30”H, $100., (650)348-6428
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
298 Collectibles
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $35 (650)341-8342
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, SOLD!
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500
(650)766-3024
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HARMON/KANDON SPEAKERS (2)
mint condition, great, for small
office/room or extra speakers, 4 1/2 in.
high, includes cords $8., SOLD!
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center draw locks all comes with
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame SOLD!
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3 MEDAL base kitchen cabinets with
drawers and wood doors $99
(650)347-8061
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR (2), with arms, Italian 1988 Cha-
teau D'Ax, solid, perfect condition. $50
each or $85 for both. (650)591-0063
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet with 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
COPENHAGEN TEAK dining table with
dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions. 48/88"
long x 32" wide x 30" high. $95.00
(650)637-0930
COUCH FOR SALE reclines fabric mate-
rial, $50 (510)303-0454
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 draw dresser 61" wide,
31" high, & 18" deep $50., (650)592-
2648
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
24
Monday • July 15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
304 Furniture
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
GLASS DINING Table 41” x 45” Round-
ed rectangle clear glass top and base
$85 (650)888-0129
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
LIGHT WOOD Rocking Chair & Has-
sock, gold cushions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
RECLINER ROCKER - Like new, brown,
vinyl, $99., SOLD!
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR with wood carving,
armrest, rollers, and it swivels $99.,
(650)592-2648
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEAK TV stand, wheels, rotational, glass
doors, drawer, 5 shelves. 31" wide x 26"
high X 18" deep. $75.00 (650)637-0930
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WICKER ENTERTAINMENT CABINET -
H 78” x 43” x 16”, almost new, $89.,
(650)347-9920
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
3 PIECE fireplace set with screen $25
(650)322-2814
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
306 Housewares
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, (650)578-9208
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
1/2 HORSE power 8" worm drive skill
saw $40 OBO (650)315-5902
10" BAN Saw $75.00 (650) 347-8367
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
BLACK & DECKER CORDLESS 18 volt
combo drill, vacuum, saw, sander, two
batteries & charger, brand new, $95.
obo, SOLD!
BLACK AND Decker, 10” trimmer/edger
, rechargeable, brand new, $50
(650)871-7200
BOB VILLA rolling tool box & organizer -
brand new with misc. tools, $40. obo,
(650)591-6842
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTMANS PROFESSIONAL car buf-
fer with case $40 OBO (650)315-5902
CRAFTSMAN 14.4 VOLT DRILL - bat-
tery & charger, never used, $35. obo,
SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 3/8” 16.8 volt drill & vac-
uum combo, brand new, with charger,
$45. obo, SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DREMEL HIGH SPEED ROTARY TOOL
- all attachments, never used, $25. obo
SOLD!
ELECTRIC HEDGE trimmer good condi-
tion (Black Decker) $40 (650)342-6345
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LADDER - 24' aluminum 2 section ladder
$20., SOLD
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 21” Belt Sander with long cord,
$35 (650)315-5902
NEW DRILL DRIVER - 18V + battery &
charger, $30., (650)595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SANDER, MAKITA finishing sander, 4.5
x 4.5"' used once. Complete with dust
bag and hard shell case. $35.00 SOLD!
SMALL ROTETILLER 115 Volt Works
well $99.00 (650)355-2996
308 Tools
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
TORO ELECTRIC POWER SWEEPER
blower - never used, in box, $35. obo,
(650)591-6842
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
3 LARGE old brown mixing bowls $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History,
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
5 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $9. for all
(650)347-5104
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
AIR CONDITIONER - Window mount,
$50. obo, (650)438-4737
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99., (650)580-
3316
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASTRONOMY BOOKS (2) Hard Cover
Cambridge Encyclopedia of Astronomy,
World of Discovery, $12., (650)578-9208
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14., (650)578-9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, $40,
(650)347-5104
BAY BRIDGE Framed 50th anniversary
poster (by Bechtel corp) $50
(650)873-4030
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection SOLD!
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY Jake AB Scissor Exercise Ma-
chine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
(650)578-9208
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOOD HEALTH FACT BOOK - un-
used, answers to get/stay healthy, hard
cover, 480 pages, $8., (650)578-9208
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
310 Misc. For Sale
HABACHI BBQ Grill heavy iron 22" high
15" wide $25 SOLD!
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model", $250., (650)637-0930
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LAUNDRY SORTER - on wheels, triple
section, laundry sorter - $19., (650)347-
9920
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12” L x
5”W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, (650)341-1861
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW COWBOY BOOTS - 9D, Unworn,
black, fancy, only $85., (650)595-3933
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., (650)578-9208
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS & CD un-
opened, “Calculate with Confidence”, 4th
edition, like new, $34., (650)345-3277
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS - “Human
Physiology Mechanisms of Disease”, 6th
edition, $15., and “Pathphysiology Bio-
logic Basics”, 4th edition, $32., (650)345-
3277
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SAFETY SHOES - Iron Age, Mens steel
toe metatarfal work boots, brown, size 10
1/2, in box, $50., (650)594-1494
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. White Rotary
sewing machine similar age, cabinet
style. $85 both. (650)574-4439
SLIDE PROJECTOR - Airequipt Super-
ba 66A slide projector and screen.
$50.00 for all. (650)345-3840
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STAINED GLASS panels multi colors
beautiful work 35" long 111/2" wide $79
OBO (650)349-6059
STAINED GLASS,
28”x30” Japanese geisha motif, multi
colored, beautiful. $200 (650)520-9366
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, (650)341-1861
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VHS MOVIES and DVD's. (20) Old to
current releases. $2 per movie. Your
choice. South San Francisco
(650) 871-7200
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WEBER GO ANYWHERE GAS BARBE-
QUE - never used, in box, $40., SOLD!
311 Musical Instruments
GUITAR FOR sale. Fender Accoustic,
with case. $89.00 (415)971-7555
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
MARTIN GUITAR 1971 D-18S Great
shape, Great sound. Price reduced to
$1200. SOLD!
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
COAT - Dressy ladies short trench coat,
red, brand new, weather proof, light-
weight, size 6/8, $35.,(650)345-3277
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
IONIC BREEZE quadra, Sharper Image,
3 level silent air purifier. 27”h, energy
saver, original box with video. Excellent
condition. $77. (650)347-5104
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS JACKET - size XXL, Beautiful
cond., med., $35., (650)595-3933
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NEW! OLD NAVY Coat: Boy/Gril, fleece-
lined, hooded $15 (415)585-3622
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
brand new, never worn for $25
(650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
150 COPPER spades for #6 strand.
Copper wire. $50.00 for all.
(650)345-3840
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
317 Building Materials
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
PVC SCHEDULE 80 connectors and
coupling. 100 pieces in all. $30.00 for all
(650)345-3840
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 AIR rifles, shoots .177 pelets. $50 ea
Obo (650)591-6842
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$25.(650)368-0748.
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
FOR SALE medium size wet suit $95
call for info (650)851-0878
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
KELTY SUPER TIOGA BACKPACK -
$40., (650)552-9436
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels, $85.
obo, (650)223-7187
ROWING MACHINE. $30.00
(650)637-0930
STATIONARY EXERCISE BICYCLE -
Compact, excellent condition, $40. obo,
(650)834-2583
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
TENT - one man packable tent - $20.,
(650)552-9436
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
THULE SKI RACK - holds 3 pairs, $85.,
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL EXERCISE- Pro Form 415
Crosswalk, very good condition $200 call
(650)266-8025
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40.,
(408)764-6142
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $65.,
(650)342-8436
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
SLEEP APNEA breathing machine com-
plete in box helps you breathe, costs $$$
sacrifice for $75, (650)995-0012
WALKER - $25., brand new, tag still on,
(650)594-1494
25 Monday • July 15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Baglike structure
4 Frozen drinks
9 Perp’s fake name
14 “__ before
beauty”
15 Religious
doctrine
16 Island nation
near Fiji
17 Nothing
18 Banner passed
from host city to
host city
20 Right-angle pipe
joint
21 More than trot
22 Take turns
23 Issue a new copy
of
25 Female sib
26 Soggy
27 Unclear, as the
future
28 Stale-smelling
30 Make amends
32 Taxi customer
33 Unreturned
tennis serves
37 Venom dispenser
38 Things
associated with
18- and 57-
Across and 3-
and 34-Down
39 Fair-weather
system
40 Arborist’s
concern
41 Formerly
42 “__ and Bess”
43 Pass along
45 Swamp reptile,
for short
46 “Oh, sure!”
49 Every bit
50 Take for granted
53 Melodious piece
55 Historic periods
56 Prodigal __
57 A bride and
groom may write
their own
59 Malt brew
60 Genuflect
61 Grocery walkway
62 Pic taker
63 Having a lot of
cheek
64 Post-sneeze
word
65 Attempt
DOWN
1 More rational
2 Like a
twinkletoes
3 Samsung
product
4 Place on a
pedestal
5 One of the
original 13
6 Land of pharaohs
and pyramids
7 Plus-size
supermodel
8 Plant juice
9 For no profit
10 Barn story
11 Relative by
marriage
12 Striped stone
13 TV comedian
Bob
19 Showy spring
flowers
24 The Lone __
25 Storm-caused
sea rise
28 __ Feast: cat
food
29 Yokels
30 Sternward
31 Driveway
covering
32 Critical test
34 Big top
performance
35 Breakfast staple
36 Bashful
38 Deodorant type
42 Removes
wrinkles from
44 Without difficulty
45 Moves like a
baby
46 Keen-sighted
birds
47 Gladiators’
venue
48 Keeps out of
sight
50 Ordinary
language
51 Grinding tooth
52 Nemesis
54 “To a” poems
55 Black-hearted
58 Chatterbox’s “gift”
By MaryEllen Uthlaut
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
07/15/13
07/15/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
470 Rooms
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
1999 AUDI A6 sedan with 116k miles,
Quattro automatic loaded looks and
drives very nice comes with 3000
miles warranty clean Car Fax #4447
priced at $5995.00 plus tax lic,etc.
(650)637-3900
2000 BMW 323CI coupe with 129 k
miles automatic sport two door great
looking drives excellent all power pack-
age #4518 clean Car Fax on sale for on-
ly $7000.00 plus normal fees.s normal
fees. (650)637-3900
2002 PT Criuser limited with 121k miles
she is fully loaded looks and drives great
automatic inexpensive sedan with clean
Car Fax #4515 on sale for $4995.00 plus
normal fees. (650)637-3900
2003 AUDI A6 Quattro with 79k
miles,sports luxury sedan fully optioned
in excellent conditions and 3000 miles
free warranty clean Car Fax #4424 on
sale for $7995 plus fees. (650)637-3900
2003 FORD MUSTANG GT deluxe con-
vertible with 102k miles automatic and
loaded with lots of options comes with
power top and 3000 miles free warranty
clean Car Fax #5031 priced at $7995.00
plus, fees (650)637-3900
2004 CHEVY MALIBU Classic automatic
sedan with 87k low miles clean car fax all
power package and 3 mounths warranty
#4437 on sale for $5850.00 plus fees.
(650)637-3900
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
620 Automobiles
2004 FORD Explorer Eddie Bauer SUV
with 146k miles auto all wheel drive with
third row seat room for 7 people looks
and drives like new car clean car and
warranty #4330 at $7995.00 plus fees.
(650)637-3900
2004 HONDA CIVIC LX sedan with 154k
miles 4 door automatic with power pack-
age tilt and cruise new trade in which
comes with warranty #4517 on sale for
$5995.00 plus fees. (650)637-3900
2008 HYUNDAI Accent GLS 4 door se-
dan with only 49k miles automatic great
on gas cold air condition and 3000 miles
free warranty #4512 on sale for low price
of $7995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
ACCURA 1997 3.0 CL CP Black, Auto-
matic $3300, (650)630-3216
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
620 Automobiles
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBIL”79Royal Delta 88, 122k
Miles, in excelleny Condition $1,800
(650)342-8510
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
1997 BMW 540I sedan with 120k miles
automatic powerfull luxury sedan lot of
room for 5 people and a great ride clean
Car Fax #5044 on sale for only $5500.00
plus fees.(650)637-3900
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $50. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35., (650)670-
2888
NEW MOTORCYCLE HELMET - Modu-
lar, dual visor, $69., (650)595-3933
WANTED-HONDA 90 or 350. Any
condition (831) 462-9836
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
670 Auto Service
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $60 for all
(650)588-7005
2 BACKUP light 1953 Buick $40
(650)341-8342
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPEAR tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
670 Auto Parts
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Bath
TUBZ
Over 400 Tubs on display!
World’s Largest “Hands-On, Feet-In”
Showroom
4840 Davenport Place
Fremont, CA 94538
(510)770-8686
www.tubz.net
Asphalt/Paving
AIM CONSTRUCTION
John Peterson
• Paving • Grading
• Slurry Sealing • Paving Stones
• Concrete • Patching
We AIM to please!
(650)468-6750
(408)422-7695
Lic.# 916680
Cabinetry
Contractors
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Contractors
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Home repairs &
Foundation work
Retaining wall • Decks • Fences
No job too small
Gary Afu
(650)207-2400
Lic# 904960
26
Monday • July 15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Cleaning
Concrete
CHETNER CONCRETE
Lic #706952
Driveways - Walkways
- Pool Decks - Patios - Stairs
- Exposed Aggregate - Masonry
- Retaining Walls - Drainage
- Foundation/Slabs
Free Estimates
(650)271-1442 Mike
Construction
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Cleaning service.
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
Painting
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets,
Also, Electrical, Hauling
Carpet, Tile & Stucco
(650)461-0326
Lic# 983312
HAMZEH PLUMBING
5 stars on Yelp!
$25 OFF First Time Customers
All plumbing services
24 hour emergency service
(415)690-6540
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
27 Monday • July 15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Cemetery
CRIPPEN & FLYNN FUNERAL
CHAPELS
Family owned & operated
Established 1949
Personalized cremation &
funeral services
Serving all faiths & traditions
Woodside chapel: (650)369-4103
FD 879
Carlmont chapel: (650)595-4103
FD 1825
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)868-0082
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
UNION SPA & SALON
Grand Opening
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT
SENIOR LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
Video
ADULT VIDEOS $99 (415)298-0645
WORLD 28
Monday • July 15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ISLAMABAD — Suleman spent
years targeting minority Shiite
Muslims in his home country of
Pakistan as a member of one of the
country’s most feared militant
groups. Now he is on his way to a
new sectarian battleground, Syria,
where he plans to join Sunni rebels
battling President Bashar Assad’s
regime.
It is a fight he believes will boost
his reward in heaven.
The short and stocky Pakistani,
who identified himself using only
his first name for fear of being tar-
geted by authorities, is one of an
increasing number of militants who
have left Pakistan for Syria in
recent months. The fighters have
contributed to a growing presence
of Islamic extremists and compli-
cated U.S. efforts to help the rebels.
Many fighters like Suleman
believe they must help Syria’s
Sunni majority defeat Assad’s
Alawite regime — an offshoot of
the Shiite sect. Radical Sunnis view
Shiites as heretics.
The presence of Islamic extrem-
ists in Syria looms large over U.S.
efforts to help the rebels, especial-
ly when it comes to providing
weapons that could end up in the
hands of America’s enemies. The
extremists have also sparked
infighting with more secular rebels
concerned about the increasing
power of the Islamists.
Most of the foreign fighters in
Syria are from Arab countries,
including al-Qaida militants from
Iraq on the rebel side and Hezbollah
fighters from Lebanon on the
regime’s side. The flow of militants
from Pakistan adds a new element to
that mix.
Pakistani Interior Ministry
spokesman Omar Hamid Khan said
provincial authorities throughout
Pakistan deny that militants have
left the country for Syria.
But three Pakistani intelligence
officials based in the tribal region
that borders Afghanistan, as well as
militants themselves, say the fight-
ers leaving Pakistan for Syria
include members of al-Qaida, the
Pakistani Taliban and Suleman’s
group, Lashkar-e-Jhangvi.
The fighters fall mainly into two
categories. One includes foreign
combatants from places like
Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan and like-
ly the Middle East who came to
Pakistan’s tribal region to fight
U.S.-led forces in neighboring
Afghanistan and are now heading to
Syria because they view it as the
most pressing battle, said the
Pakistani intelligence officials,
speaking on condition of anonymi-
ty because they were not authorized
to talk to the media.
Militants leave Pakistan to fight in Syria
REUTERS
A Free Syrian Army fighter shows fellow fighters a new weapon he re-
ceived in Deir al-Zor Saturday. The flags on display mark the month of
Ramadan, the holiest month in the Islamic calendar.

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