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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Wednesday • July 17, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 286
ARGENTINA OIL
BUSINESS PAGE 10
BRS TAKES THE
SECTION 3 TITLE
SPORTS PAGE 11
SUMMER SOUP
MADE SIMPLE
FOOD PAGE 17
CHEVRON AND YPF SIGN $1.5 BILLION DEAL
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
856 N. Delaware Street San Mateo
650-348-3680
Rippin ’Tacos
Mondo Burritos
WOW!
STAFF AND WIRE REPORT
California regulators on Tuesday
called on Pacific Gas & Electric
Co. to pay at least $300 million
in fines in connection with a dead-
ly 2010 gas pipeline blast in what
they said would amount to the
largest fine ever levied by the state
Public Utilities Commission.
In an amended brief filed in the
pipeline case, the commission’s
safety division cited the eight
people killed and 38 homes
destroyed in the blast in San
Bruno and said there were steps
PG&E could have taken to prevent
the explosion.
“The tragedy in San Bruno,
which was directly caused by
PG&E’s unreasonable conduct and
neglect for decades, was the worst
disaster in the history of
California electric and/or gas util-
ities,” the safety division said in
its filing.
Regulators had originally called
for a $2.25 billion penalty
against PG&E, though it would
consist entirely of funds the utili-
ty has spent or promised to spend
on pipeline system improvements
ordered by the commission.
Consumer advocates and San
Bruno officials had objected to
that penalty. San Bruno officials
said it was tax deductible and “lit-
tered” with credits and perks to
Record fine for explosion
$300M of PG&E $2.25B penalty recommended to go intostate’s general fund
ANGELA SWARTZ/DAILY JOURNAL
Lifelong Burlingame resident Maureen Byrne,74,sits along Burlingame Avenue during a sunny day of construction.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The former head of the county’s
probation department is a “collec-
tor of child pornography” with a
particular fetish of young, nude
boys tied and spanked, a state
prosecutor told jurors who will
decide if the hundreds of images
discovered at his home and office
was work related or proof of crimi-
nal activity.
The defense for Stuart James
Forrest, 61, didn’t dispute his
client possessed the films from the
Canadian distribution company,
Azov Films, whose 2010-11
i nve s t i ga t i on
led to the former
probation chief
through cus-
tomer transac-
tion records.
But attorney
Jaime Leanos
said investiga-
tors rushed to
judgment about
Forrest’s intent because he was “a
big fish.”
The refusal to accept that Forrest
purchased the films with his own
name and credit card for research
Former probation
head begins child
pornography trial
Prosecutors: Preference for
young boys tied, spanked
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The company that owns the
building in the six-alarm blaze in
Redwood City last weekend that
killed one and left nearly 100 peo-
ple homeless is being sued for
negligence by a couple displaced
by the fire, according to a civil
complaint filed in San Mateo
County Superior Court yesterday.
The blaze was the fault of
Newport Beach-based KDF
Hallmark’s “failure to properly
inspect, maintain and safeguard
the property from a foreseeable
unit fire,” according to the com-
plaint filed by plaintiffs Jorge and
Juanita Chavez, who lived on the
second floor of the 72-unit
Hallmark House Apartments on
Deadly fire prompts lawsuit
Complaint alleges Redwood City
building had inadequate sprinklers
Stu Forrest
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Those who visit Burlingame
Avenue now have two weeks worth
of free Friday parking along the
avenue under their belts. Has this
boosted business, as the City
Council hoped, when they
approved the temporary free park-
ing?
Not so, say some business own-
ers and customers who frequent
downtown Burlingame and have
felt the impact of the Burlingame
Avenue Streetscape project.
Reduced parking, fewer patrons
and a torn-up street, are among the
complaints from business owners.
The new free parking is part of
the city’s plan to alleviate parking
woes in Burlingame during the
revamping and widening of down-
town sidewalks for the 14- to 16-
month construction.
“We did listen to the merchants
and customers and came up with
the free parking on Fridays,” said
Mayor Ann Keighran. “I know [the
construction] is an inconven-
ience, but the final goal is an
upgraded avenue that will be
advantageous to businesses in the
long run.”
At the beginning of July, the
City Council approved making the
89 available metered spots on the
Burlingame mainstay free, under
two-hour time limits, until con-
struction is completed at the end of
next summer.
Ben Nielsen has been one of the
owners of Copenhagen Bakery &
Café at 1216 Burlingame Ave. for
36 years and said for free parking
to make a difference for business,
free lots would need to be included.
“The biggest frustration is that
it’s moving so slow and killing
Construction weighs on merchants
Burlingame Avenue revamp to help business,but short-term impact evident
See FIRE, Page 19
See FORREST, Page 16
See FINE, Page 16
See REVAMP Page 19
FOR THE RECORD 2 Wednesday • July 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
smdailyjournal.com scribd.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal facebook.com/smdailyjournal
Phone:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290
To Advertise: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ads@smdailyjournal.com
Events: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . calendar@smdailyjournal.com
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Actor David
Hasselhoff is 61.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1918
Russia’s Czar Nicholas II and his family
were executed by the Bolsheviks.
“Sometimes it’s worse
to win a fight than to lose.”
— Billie Holiday, jazz singer (born 1915, died this date in 1959)
Actor Donald
Sutherland is 78.
Actor Tom Cullen
is 28.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A 6-day-old newly born giraffe calf is seen next to its parents 6-year-old father Buddy, left, and 11-year old mother Jacky at
their enclosure in Buenos Aires’ zoo in Argentina.
Wednesday: Cloudy in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog in
the morning. Highs in the lower to mid
60s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Wednesday night: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming cloudy. Patchy
fog after midnight. Lows in the lower
50s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Thursday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming partly
cloudy. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the mid 60s.
West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Thursday night: Partly cloudy in the evening then
becoming cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the
lower 50s. West winds 5 to 15 mph.
Friday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming partly
cloudy. Patchy fog. Highs in the mid 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
(Answers tomorrow)
QUIRK PLUME SOCIAL WORTHY
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: Compared to the competition, the losing
poker player didn’t — STACK UP
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
DUWEN
WORLP
NEYGAC
GRITFH
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
J
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Answer
here:
6 6 3
2 8 22 35 37 6
Powerball
July 13 Powerball
1 2 6 25 40
July 13 Super Lotto Plus
Daily Four
12 8 31 36
Fantasy Five
6 0 3
Daily three midday
I n 1763, American entrepreneur John Jacob Astor was born
in Walldorf in present-day Germany.
I n 1821, Spain ceded Florida to the United States.
I n 1862, during the Civil War, Congress approved the
Second Confiscation Act, which declared that all slaves tak-
ing refuge behind Union lines were to be set free.
I n 1936, the Spanish Civil War began as right-wing army
generals launched a coup attempt against the Second
Spanish Republic.
I n 1938, aviator Douglas Corrigan took off from New
York, saying he was headed for California; he ended up in
Ireland, supposedly by accident, earning the nickname
“Wrong Way Corrigan.”
I n 1944, during World War II, 320 men, two-thirds of them
African-Americans, were killed when a pair of ammunition
ships exploded at the Port Chicago Naval Magazine in
California.
I n 1955, Disneyland had its opening day in Anaheim.
I n 1962, the United States conducted its last atmospheric
nuclear test to date, detonating a 20-kiloton device, code-
named Little Feller I, at the Nevada Test Site.
I n 1975, an Apollo spaceship docked with a Soyuz space-
craft in orbit in the first superpower link-up of its kind.
I n 1981, 114 people were killed when a pair of suspended
walkways above the lobby of the Kansas City Hyatt
Regency Hotel collapsed during a tea dance.
I n 1996, TWA Flight 800, a Europe-bound Boeing 747,
exploded and crashed off Long Island, N.Y., shortly after
leaving John F. Kennedy International Airport, killing all
230 people aboard.
I n 1998, Nicholas II, last of the Romanov czars, was for-
mally buried in Russia 80 years after he and his family were
slain by the Bolsheviks.
Jazz singer Jimmy Scott is 88. Actress-singer Diahann
Carroll is 78. Comedian Tim Brooke-Taylor is 73. Rock musi-
cian Spencer Davis is 71. Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, is
66. Rock musician Terry “Geezer” Butler is 64. Actress Lucie
Arnaz is 62. Rock musician Fran Smith Jr. (The Hooters) is
61. Television producer Mark Burnett (“Survivor,” “The
Apprentice”) is 53. Actress Nancy Giles is 53. Singer Regina
Belle is 50. Country singer Craig Morgan is 49. Rock musi-
cian Lou Barlow is 47. Contemporary Christian singer Susan
Ashton is 46. Actor Andre Royo is 45. Actress Bitty Schram
is 45. Actor Jason Clarke is 44. Singer JC (PM Dawn) is 42.
Gangster Al Capone (1899-1947) car-
ried business cards that said he was a
used furniture dealer.
***
American tobacco magnate Pierre
Lorillard (1833-1901) invented the
tuxedo. In 1886, Lorillard attended a
ball wearing formal wear in a new style
that he designed himself. Lorillard
dubbed it a tuxedo, named after Tuxedo
Park, N.Y., where he owned 13,000
acres.
***
The last word in most dictionaries is
zyzzyva, a tropical American weevil
that is destructive to plants.
***
According to a survey of teenagers,
two out of three boys believe they will
make $1 million by age 40. One out of
three girls believe the same thing.
***
Dick Van Dyke (born 1925) plays Rob
Petrie on “The Dick Van Dyke Show”
(1961-1966). Rob writes for a televi-
sion show. Do you remember the name
of the show and his co-workers
names? See answer at end.
***
A wealthy industrialist purchases an
island he wants to develop, but his
plans go awry when he discovers the
island is cursed by voodoo, complete
with man-eating plants and zombies.
It is the plot of the campy B-movie
“Voodoo Island” (1957) starring Boris
Karloff (1887-1969).
***
The tall white hats that chefs wear are
called toque blanche, meaning white
hat in French. The hats are tall, pleat-
ed and rounded at the top.
***
Some tips for cooking cauliflower:
Place a piece of stale bread on top of
the cooking cauliflower to stop the
house from smelling. Cook cauli-
flower with a strip of lemon peel to
keep the cauliflower from changing
color.
***
The average cow produces 90 glasses
of milk per day.
***
Anne Francis Robbins was born in
1921. After her parents were divorced
she took the last name of her stepfa-
ther, Loyal Davis (1896-1982). After
college she became an actress under
the stage name Nancy Davis. She mar-
ried Ronald Reagan (1911-2004) in
1952, and has been named Nancy
Reagan ever since.
***
Both John Travolta (born 1954) and
John Denver (1943-1997) were offered
the lead role in the 1982 movie “An
Officer and a Gentleman.” They turned
it down so Richard Gere (born 1949)
got the part of officer-in-training Zack
Mayo.
***
David Smith Jr., nicknamed “The
Bullet,” set the world record in 1998
for farthest human cannonball flight.
He was shot 181 feet, 1 inch at a speed
of about 70 mph.
***
In the third century B.C., Greek schol-
ar and astronomer Eratosthenes (275
B.C.-195 B.C.) accurately measured,
without instruments, the circumfer-
ence and tilt of the Earth and its dis-
tance from the sun and moon.
***
Winston Churchill (1874-1965),
prime minister of Britain during World
War II, won the 1953 Nobel Prize in
Literature for his book “The Second
World War.” The six volume book
series took five years to complete
(1948-1953).
***
Answer: Rob writes for the fictional
Alan Brady Show along with co-work-
ers Buddy and Sally, played by Morey
Amsterdam (1908-1996) and Rose
Marie (born 1923). Petrie’s boss was
Mel Cooley, played by Richard
Deacon (1921-1984). Alan Brady was
played by Carl Reiner (born 1922).
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.
10 14 21 40 53 20
Mega number
July 16 Mega Millions
5 5 8
Daily three evening
2
2
19
Mega number
The Daily Derby race winners are Money Bags,
No. 11, in first place; Gorgeous George, No. 8, in
second place; and Big Ben, No. 4, in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:41.91.
3
Wednesday • July 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
these
outstanding
Events!
Coming
to you
soon
San Mateo County Event Center
1346 Saratoga Drive, San Mateo
650.574.3247
T
o
A
t
t
e
n
d
Your
Chance
D
o
n
t
m
i
s
s
www.smeventcenter.com – Signup for our SMCEC newsletter and enter for a chance to win Free Admission and Parking to shows!
Norcal Auto Swap Meet
July 21, 6 am to 3 pm
This is a traditional auto swap meet FOR people BY people.
Admission: $8, kids 12 and under free
Parking: $10 per vehicle
For more information call (916)363-3400
Aloha Festival
August 3 & 4
www.pica-org.org/alohafest
The Pacific Islanders of the San Francisco Bay Area offer
their talents in music and dance during this free, two-day
festival of arts. Bring the family! Free admission.
BURLINGAME
Burglary. Tools were stolen from a locked
storage unit on the 100 block of Anita Road
before 5:02 p.m. Monday, July 8.
Burglary. Apurse was stolen from a vehicle
on the 300 block of Dwight Road before 3:04
p.m. Monday, July 8.
Theft. Three bicycles were stolen on the
1200 block of Bellevue Avenue before 1:49
p.m. Monday, July 8.
Disturbance. Aman was seen urinating on a
person’s property on the 200 block of
Victoria Road before 1:13 p.m. Monday, July
8.
Disturbance. A person was in a loud argu-
ment on the phone in an apartment on the 500
block of El Camino Real before 11:48 a.m.
Monday, July 8.
Arre s t. A woman was arrested for being in
possession of burglary tools on the 1200
block of Donnelly Avenue before 3:20 a.m.
Monday, July 8.
BELMONT
Suspicious person. Aman was in the park
after hours on Twin Pines Lane before 11:59
p.m. Wednesday, July 10.
Suspi ci ous ci rcumstances. Someone
reported unknown people were in his neigh-
bor’s backyard on Lassen Drive before 8:47
p.m. Wednesday, July 10.
Burglary. Someone reported their jewelry
was stolen on Comstock Circle before 4:20
p.m. Wednesday, July 10.
Suspicious person. Aman was loitering in
the patio area on El Camino Real before 1:12
p.m. Wednesday, July 10.
Vandalism. Autility box was vandalized at
the intersection of Clipper and Treasure Island
drives before 10:14 a.m. Wednesday, July 10.
Police reports
Can’t wait to be older
Aman wearing makeup to make himself
look older was loitering near a medical
center on Redwood Shores Parkway in
Redwood City before 12:02 p.m.
Tuesday, July 9.
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Mi Rancho Market on North B Street
in San Mateo was given approval to grow
its store across the street at a long-aban-
doned laundry facility Monday night but not
before members of the Peninsula Italian-
American Social Club of San Mateo made
several objections to the project.
Club President Daniel Ferlizza told the
City Council the new carniceria will make it
unsafe for members to access the B Street
social hall and also would impact its ability
to make money by renting out the facility
for events.
Currently, an alley separates the social
club and the long-vacant Blu-White Laundry
& Cleaners site that club members frequent-
ly use to access the facility from parking
areas near the downtown Caltrain station.
Minerva Pulido first opened the 4,000
square-foot market in 1995 when the street
only had a couple of shops on it near the
Peninsula Italian-American Social Club.
When she first applied
with the city to build on
the laundry site, some
with the social club
encouraged the city to
dedicate the land for
much-needed parking.
At Monday’s meeting,
the public hearing was
delayed for about 20 min-
utes by Mayor David Lim
to give Pulido and her team a chance to work
out any differences before the council cast
its vote.
After the break was over, the club’s attor-
ney said the two sides were able to reach an
accord.
The council’s vote was 4-0 with
Councilwoman Maureen Freschet abstain-
ing because she is a member of the club.
The new two-story market at the old laun-
dry site will be 12,000 square feet with a full
kitchen and taqueria with 25 parking
spaces. Mi Rancho currently has no parking
spaces.
The former dry cleaner site has been
vacant more than 15 years and needed the
state to approve the demolition since it had
some environmental issues such as chemi-
cals in the soil.
Councilman Jack Matthews thanked
Pulido for investing in the neighborhood at
Monday night’s meeting.
“I am enthusiastically supporting this
project,” he said.
When Pulido first opened the store, it had
four employees. That number is now 25 and
she plans to add an additional 10 employees
when the larger market opens.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Market approved to expand
Long-vacant laundry site to be home for larger Mi Rancho
Minerva Pulido
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
San Mateo County’s ban on firearms in its
parks and recreation areas is legal, accord-
ing to a state appellate court ruling issued
Monday.
The California Court of Appeal upheld the
county’s ban over arguments by the Calguns
Foundation and National Rifle Association
that park-goers with permits to carry con-
cealed weapons should be allowed to do so
in any of the county’s 17 parks and recre-
ation areas.
Don Horsley, president of the San Mateo
County Board of Supervisors, praised the
court for its stance, saying that nobody
needs to carry a weapon in places where
non-armed visitors mixing with those
armed could prove dangerous.
“Our parks are a refuge not only for
wildlife but for visitors,” Horsley said. “The
presence of guns ramps up the chances of
deadly accidents and no one should have to
worry that just around the corner some hiker
with a gun is going to mistake you for a
mountain lion.”
The fracas over guns in the parks began in
2011 when ban opponents sued on the basis
it is preempted by state law. Acounty judge
upheld the ban in July 2012 and the suit
backers appealed. Monday’s ruling from
that appeal holds that the prohibition very
narrowly addressed only parks and recre-
ation areas and is therefore different than
other, broader bans that have not held up in
court.
Chief County Counsel John Beiers called
the ruling a “big victory” for all local gov-
ernment agencies statewide that want the
police power to restrict firearms.
“The country has seen that beating the
NRAeven post-Newtown is not easy, so we
are very pleased with the outcome,” Beiers
said in a prepared statement, referencing the
deadly school shooting last year.
Court upholds county parks as gun free
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
4
Wednesday • July 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Wednesday • July 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
* Frescriptians & Bame
MeJicaI 5uppIies 0eIivereJ
* 3 Fharmacists an 0uty
{650} 349-1373
29 west 257B Ave.
{ßear EI 0amina}
5an Matea
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE –
Have you ever
attended a funeral
or memorial service
and felt ill-at-ease,
uncomfortable or
awkward when
talking to the family
of the deceased? Have you ever stumbled
through your words and condolences
because you just didn’t know what to say or
how to say it? Have you even decided to not
approach the family for fear of saying the
wrong thing or making a fool of yourself? If
so you are not alone. Many people in this
situation want to provide some kind of
comfort to the immediate family, but just
don’t have the verbal tools to do so in an
assuring manner.
Learning “Funeral Etiquette” can be
useful. Using the right words at the right
time is an appropriate way to show that you
care, and in situations like this can be of
great help when provided correctly.
Standard condolences such as “I am sorry
for your loss” have become routine and
generic. A personalized phrase can be
welcomed such as “John touched many
lives” or “I will miss John”. DO NOT ask
the cause of death, offer advice or make
comments that would diminish the
importance of the loss such as “Oh, you’re
young and can marry again”.
Other ways to demonstrate your support
include: 1. Listening. The family may feel
the need to express their anxiety, and giving
them that opportunity can be therapeutic; 2.
An embrace. This can show that you care
without the need for words; 3. Offering your
services. This shows the family that you are
willing to give extra time for them: “Please
let me know if there is anything I can do to
help” (be prepared to act if needed).
Even if you don’t feel confident in
approaching the family there are other ways
to show that you care: 1. Attending the
funeral and signing the Memorial Book will
show the family that you took the time to be
there in support; 2. Dressing appropriately
for the funeral will demonstrate your efforts
to prepare for this special occasion (dark
colors are no longer a requisite for funerals,
but dressing in a coat, tie, dress or other
attire that you’d wear to any special event
are considered a way of showing you care);
3. In certain cases friends are invited to
stand up and offer BRIEF personal feelings.
Prior to the funeral write a few key notes
and reflections which will help you organize
your thoughts. Even if there is no
opportunity to speak before a group you
may have a chance to offer your thoughts to
the family following the ceremony; 4. A
personalized card or note will help you
arrange your words better and can be kept
by the family. If you don’t have their
mailing address you can send your envelope
to the funeral home and they will forward it
to the next of kin; 5. Providing flowers is a
long time tradition, or making a charitable
donation in the deceased’s memory will give
the family a strong sense of your regards; 6.
If appropriate a brief phone call can show
your immediate concern, but generally this
should be avoided to give the family the
privacy they may need.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
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By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Leo J. Ryan Park in Foster City should
have a new attraction soon as the City
Council gave preliminary approval Monday
night for bareboat rentals on the lagoon.
Edgewater Marine LLC must first iron out
contract details with the city’s Parks and
Recreation Committee before the council is
expected to give the final OK for the conces-
sion to start at its Aug. 19 meeting, said one
of the company’s owners Michael Terner.
The company will mimic a concession in
Newport Beach in Southern California that is
popular, Terner told the Daily Journal.
“We’re pretty confident it will be very pop-
ular,” Terner said.
The proposal seeks to have tie-ups at Leo
J. Ryan Park near the recreation center to be
rented for a minimum of two hours at a $100
per hour rate from 11 a.m. to dusk.
Councilman Art Kiesel likes the idea of
more people taking the opportunity to get
on the water but hopes the cost will not be
prohibitive. He also has concerns as to what
kind of advertising the boats might display
and where they will be stored at night.
“I don’t want to look out and see a long
line of boats on the lagoon with display
advertising,” he said.
The Duffy electric boats will be 16 feet to
22 feet long and will be captained by the
renter, according to the proposal.
Elegant Lagoon Cruises once provided din-
ner service and a captain on the lagoon but
stopped operating at the end of 2012.
Duffy boats are already popular in Foster
City as Edgewater Marine sells and services
them.
There are at least 260 electric boats on the
water in Foster City and about 85 percent are
Duffy boats, said Terner, who made a count of
all electric boats docked in the city himself.
The Duffy electric boats run clean and quiet
and seat up to 10 people, according to the
manufacturer.
The operators have high hopes for the
boat rental concession.
“Home values are likely to increase result-
ing from improved community reputation
for ‘quality of life in Foster City,’”
Edgewater Marine owners Terner and Dave
Murdoch wrote in their proposal to the city.
The boats may provide “relaxing and
enjoyable getaway fun for family and
friends” and “unique opportunities for busi-
ness meetings and recognition awards,”
according to the proposal.
Bareboat rentals get preliminary OK
Edgewater Marine owners Michael Terner and Dough Murdoch seek to rent electric boats
on the lagoon in Foster City.The proposal passed a City Council hurdle Monday night.
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
Oakland Police Chief Sean Whent said
Tuesday that the protest Monday night
against the acquittal of George Zimmerman
in the Trayvon Martin shooting case spi-
raled out of control because a small group of
violent people were involved.
Whent said that in comparison to previ-
ous protests Sunday night and Monday
night, the demonstration on Monday night
included “a different crowd that was intent
on more lawlessness, closing the freeway
and engaging in vandalism.”
Police estimated that about 250 people
participated in the protest Monday night and
said that nine people were arrested, most of
whom listed addresses outside of Oakland.
Whent said the number of people arrested
“may appear to be low,” considering the
amount of vandalism and other violent
activity that occurred, but he said police
believe that only “a small group of people
were doing the vandalism, engaging in vio-
lence and breaking windows.”
He said it was “hard to arrest” some of the
people suspected of participating in the
vandalism because they blended into large
groups of people.
The chief said the past week has been
“very challenging” for Oakland police
because a lot of resources already had been
deployed to try to find missing 21-month-
old girl Daphne Viola Webb, who was
reported missing by her father last
Wednesday, and officers have had to respond
to Zimmerman verdict protests the previous
three nights.
Bay Area teacher’s
child molestation trial begins
Prosecutors say a San Jose school teacher
accused of molesting students had blindfold-
ed some of the children and made them per-
form oral sex in his classroom.
Both sides presented opening statements
on Monday in the trial of 36-year-old O.B.
Whaley Elementary School teacher Craig
Chandler. Chandler faces 75 years to life in
prison if convicted by a jury of five counts
of child molestation with multiple-victims
enhancements.
Prosecutors also said investigators found
Chandler’s semen on classroom chairs.
Defense attorneys said the semen came
from Chandler’s consensual sexual relation-
ship with a woman.
Nearly 100 cats killed
in San Jose house fire
Nearly 100 cats died in a San Jose house
fire that also nearly killed the woman who
lived there.
Firefighters early Tuesday had to cut
through metal netting to save the woman in
her 70s who had installed the fencing to
keep the cats from escaping.
The woman is a volunteer cat rescuer who
cares for and neuters the felines for adop-
tion.
She woke up to the sound of her lone dog
barking after her fire alarm failed to sound
and saw smoke billowing from a bedroom.
Oakland chief says ‘a different
crowd’ caused protest problems
Around the Bay
6
Wednesday • July 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Kostantina Theos
Kostantina Theos, 89, of Millbrae died July
13, 2013.
Tina was born in Hahji, Messinias, Greece
and immigrated to this country in 1967. She
married Sam Theos, who preceded her in death
in 1994.
Tina is survived by her two step-children
Lisa Vorgias and Tahnasis Theophilopoulos,
four sisters Theodora Mihalakea, Anna
Vafeas, Christina Tracas and Eleni Bouzala
and her brother Nikos Alevizos. She is also
survived by several nieces and nephews, god-
children and friends.
A Trisagion service will be 7 p.m.
Thursday, July 18 at the Chapel of the
Highlands, 194 Millwood Drive at El Camino
Real in Millbrae. The funeral will be 11 a.m.
Friday, July 19, 2013 at Holy Trinity Greek
Orthodox Church, 999 Brotherhood Way in
San Francisco. Following the service, a
luncheon will take place at
the church with a 2 p.m.
committal service at Greek
Orthodox Memorial Park,
1348 El Camino Real in
Colma.
As a public service, the
Daily Journal prints obitu-
aries of approximately
200 words or less with a photo one time on
the date of the family’s choosing. To submit
obituaries, email information along with a
jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.
Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity,
length and grammar. If you would like to have
an obituary printed more than once, longer
than 200 words or without editing, please
submit an inquiry to our advertising depart-
ment at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Business owner Corri n
Ranki n and Pl anni ng
Commi s s i one r Erni e
Schmi dt pulled nomination
papers Tuesday for the
Redwood Ci t y Counci l
election in November.
Incumbents John Seybert
and Jeff Gee and former councilwoman
Diane Howard pulled papers
Monday.
***
Gary Pol l ard pulled nomi-
nation papers Monday for the
Fost er Ci t y Counci l elec-
tion in November. B i l l
Schwarz pulled nomination
papers Tuesday.
Obituary
CITY GOVERNMENT
• The Foster Ci ty Counci l voted 5-0 Monday night to approve a
primary argument in favor of a ballot measure to increase the city’s
business license tax on the Nov. 5 general municipal election.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO — A Chicago law firm says it
has taken steps to sue aircraft manufacturer
Boeing Co. on behalf of 83 people who
were aboard the Asiana Airlines flight that
crash-landed in San Francisco earlier this
month, claiming in a court filing that the
crash might have been caused by a mechani-
cal malfunction of the Boeing 777’s auto
throttle.
Ribbeck Law Chartered on Monday filed a
petition for discovery — a move meant to
preserve evidence — in Cook County
Circuit Court in Chicago, where Boeing is
headquartered. The law firm said in a news
release that additional pleadings will be
filed against Asiana Airlines and several
component parts manufacturers in coming
days. Ribbeck said that in addition to poten-
tial problems with the auto throttle, some
emergency slides reportedly opened inside
the plane, injuring passengers and blocking
their exit, and some passengers had to be cut
out of their seatbelts with a knife.
Three people were killed when the air-
plane, carrying 307 passengers and crew on
a flight from South Korea to San Francisco
International Airport on July 6, approached
the runway too low and slow. It clipped a
seawall at the end of a runway, tearing off
the tail and sending the plane spinning
down the runway. The impact caused the
plane to catch fire.
“We must find the causes of the crash and
demand that the problems with the airline
and the aircraft are immediately resolved to
avoid future tragedies,” attorney Monica R.
Kelly, head of Ribbeck’s aviation depart-
ment, said in a written statement.
Boeing spokesman John Dern said the
company had no comment.
The petition asks a judge to order Boeing
to identify the designer and manufacturer of
the airplane’s autothrottle and its emer-
gency evacuation slides. It also seeks infor-
mation on the systems that indicate the air-
plane’s glide slope and that warn how close
it is to the ground. Kelly said the firm wants
to protect the wreckage “from destructive
testing” and to obtain maintenance records,
internal memos and other evidence.
The pilots of Asiana Flight 214 have told
investigators they were relying on automat-
ed cockpit equipment to control their speed.
Inspectors found that the autothrottle had
been “armed,” or made ready for activation,
but investigators are still determining
whether it had been engaged, the National
Transportation Safety Board has said.
Two of the plane’s eight slides malfunc-
tioned, opening inside the cabin and pin-
ning two flight attendants underneath.
Law firm says it’s suing
Boeing over Asiana crash
“We must find the causes of
the crash and demand that the
problems with the airline and the
aircraft are immediately resolved
to avoid future tragedies.”
—Attorney Monica R. Kelly
NATION 7
Wednesday • July 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — President Barack
Obama on Tuesday conceded that an immi-
gration overhaul cannot be achieved by his
August deadline. With House Republicans
searching for a way forward on the issue, the
president said he was hopeful a bill could be
finalized this fall — though even that goal
may be overly optimistic.
The president, in a series of interviews
with Spanish language television stations,
also reiterated his insistence that any legis-
lation include a pathway to citizenship for
the 11 million people in the U.S. illegally.
Many House GOPlawmakers oppose the cit-
izenship proposal, hardening the differ-
ences between the parties on the president’s
top second-term legislative priority.
“It does not make sense to me, if we’re
going to make this once-in-a-generation
effort to finally fix this system, to leave the
status of 11 million people or so unre-
solved,” he said during an interview with
Telemundo’s Denver affiliate.
The White House sees the president’s out-
reach to Hispanics as a way to keep up
enthusiasm for the overhaul among core
supporters even as the legislative prospects
in Washington grow increasingly uncer-
tain.
Some Republicans view support for
immigration reform as central to the party’s
national viability given the growing polit-
ical power of Hispanics. But many House
GOP lawmakers representing conservative
— and largely white — districts see little
incentive to back legislation.
The president said the lack of consensus
among House Republicans will stretch the
immigration debate past August, his origi-
nal deadline for a long-elusive overhaul of
the nation’s fractured laws.
“That was originally my hope and my
goal,” Obama said. “But the House
Republicans I think still have to process
this issue and discuss it further, and hope-
fully, I think, still hear from constituents,
from businesses to labor, to evangelical
Christians who all are supporting immigra-
tion reform.”
Obama: Immigration debate will slip into the fall
By Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — When President
Barack Obama first addressed the death of
Trayvon Martin last year, he did so pas-
sionately, declaring that if he had a son, he
would look like the slain 17-year-old. His
powerful and personal commentary marked
a rare public reflection on race from the
nation’s first black president.
But now, with the man who fatally shot
Martin acquitted and the burden of any
future charges squarely on his own adminis-
tration, Obama is seeking to inject calm
into a case that has inflamed passions,
including his own. In a brief statement, the
president called Martin’s killing a
“tragedy” but implored the public to
respect a Florida jury’s decision to clear
George Zimmerman, the man charged in the
teen’s death.
“I know this case has elicited strong pas-
sions. And in the wake of the verdict, I
know those passions may be running even
higher,” Obama said Sunday. “But we are a
nation of laws, and a jury has spoken.”
The president’s restrained response
underscores the complicated calculus for
the White House as it grapples with the
fallout from the racially charged case.
Obama faces inevitable questions about
the verdict, given his previous statements
on the matter and his own race. But as the
head of a government considering levying
federal charges against Zimmerman, he
must also avoid the appearance of influ-
encing an ongoing Justice Department
investigation.
On Martin case, president shifts from passion to calm
REUTERS FILE PHOTO
Barack Obama said the lack of consensus among House Republicans will stretch the
immigration debate past August, his original deadline for a long-elusive overhaul of the
nation’s fractured laws.
NATION 8
Wednesday • July 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By David Espo
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Senate
stepped away from the brink of a melt-
down on Tuesday, confirming one of
President Barack Obama’s long-stalled
nominees, agreeing to quick action on
others and finessing a Democratic
threat to overturn historic rules that
protect minority-party rights.
“Nobody wants to come to
Armageddon here,” said Sen. Chuck
Schumer, the New York Democrat
whose talks with Arizona Republican
John McCain were critical in avoiding
a collision that had threatened to
plunge the Senate even deeper into
partisan gridlock.
McCain, a veteran of uncounted leg-
islative struggles, told reporters that
forging the deal was “probably the
hardest thing I’ve been involved in.”
The White House reaped the first fruit
of the deal within hours, when Richard
Cordray’s nomination to head the
Consumer Financial Protection Bureau
was approved 66-34. He was first nom-
inated in July 2011 and has been in
office by virtue of a recess appoint-
ment that bypassed the Senate.
In a written statement, Obama said
he was pleased by the developments
and that he hoped Congress would
“build on this spirit of cooperation” to
pass immigration legislation and rein
in interest rates on student loans,
among other measures.
As part of the Tuesday’s agreement,
both parties preserved their rights to
resume combat over nominations in
the future, Republicans by delaying
votes and Democrats by threatening
once again to change the rules govern-
ing such delays. Still, officials in both
parties said they hoped the deal would
signal a new, less acrimonious time for
the Senate, with critical decisions
ahead on spending, the government’s
borrowing authority, student loan
interest rates and more.
Under the agreement, several of
seven stalled nominees would win con-
firmation later in the week, including
Labor Secretary-designate Tom Perez;
Gina McCarthy, named to lead the
Environmental Protection Agency,
and Fred Hochberg to head of the
Export-Import Bank.
Senate steps back from
brink in nominations fight
Liz Cheney: Time for
‘new generation’ in U.S. Senate
CHEYENNE, Wyo. — Saying it’s time for a new genera-
tion of leaders in Washington, Liz Cheney, the daughter of
former Vice President Dick Cheney,
announced Tuesday she will run against
Wyoming’s senior U.S. senator in next
year’s Republican primary.
Cheney is taking on popular Sen.
Mike Enzi, who announced almost
simultaneously on Tuesday his plans to
seek a fourth, six-year term.
Cheney’s announcement is a political
challenge unlike anything Wyoming has
seen for years, maybe decades.
Republicans in the state rarely challenge incumbents of
their own party in national office. All three members of the
state’s congressional delegation and all statewide elected
officials are Republican.
Liz Cheney, 46, is the elder of the two Cheney daughters.
Married with five children, she was a resident of Virginia
until recently. She and her husband bought a home last year
in the posh northwest Wyoming community of Jackson
Hole.
Asked why voters should oust a powerful incumbent in
favor of a rookie, Cheney said seniority isn’t necessarily
an attribute.
South Dakota’s Corn Palace renovations get city OK
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. — A quirky eastern South Dakota
landmark dedicated to all things corn is undergoing a multi-
million-dollar renovation, including new lit domes resem-
bling ears of corn, in an effort to draw in more maize-curi-
ous visitors.
The Corn Palace bills itself as the world’s only palace
dedicated to the grain plant. New murals using about
275,000 ears of corn of various sizes and colors decorate
the exterior and interior of the sprawling building each year
in the small town of Mitchell. About 200,000 tourists visit
the attraction annually.
Originally established in 1892 for settlers to display the
fruits of their harvest, the Corn Palace has undergone sever-
al changes over the years and is now used for a variety of
local activities, including graduations, proms and basket-
ball games. But local officials are looking for something
more exciting.
Around the nation
“Nobody wants to
come to Armageddon here.”
— Sen. Chuck Schumer
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — There’s a bit of a
domino effect undercutting President
Barack Obama’s health care law.
Enforcement of the overhaul’s cen-
tral mandate — that individual
Americans must have coverage —
could be weakened by the Obama
administration’s recent delay of a
requirement that larger employers pro-
vide medical insurance.
That’s because the delayed rule also
required companies to report health
insurance details for employees.
Without employers validating who’s
covered, a scofflaw could lie, and the
government would have no easy way
to check.
The Treasury Department said
Tuesday it expects any impact to be
minor, since most people will not risk
telling the government a lie. Still, it’s
another incentive for uninsured people
to ignore a new government require-
ment that for many will cost hundreds
of dollars.
“If Americans begin to figure out that
the individual requirement is toothless
for 2014 ... younger, healthier unin-
sured people will stay away in droves,”
said Edward Fensholt, director of com-
pliance services for the Lockton
Companies, a benefits consulting firm
that advises employers. With fewer
healthy people in the pool, premiums
in new health insurance markets com-
ing this fall could rise.
Health law’s rule delay could hamper enforcement
Liz Cheney
OPINION 9
Wednesday • July 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Rage
Editor,
Some unlucky businesses will be
picked out at random and vandalized
during these days of rage to protest
the verdict in the Trayvon Martin
trial. It’s unfortunate for them, as
they had absolutely nothing to do
with the verdict. Unfortunate ... but
necessary I’m afraid to register out-
rage at an injustice committed against
an innocent man. As much as is pos-
sible during these ad hoc protests, our
Raised Fist Committee will try to
profile the businesses in advance to
ensure the destruction is appropriate-
ly directed.
John Dillon
San Bruno
Mr. Caggiano and Israel
Editor,
I found Mr. Caggiano’s letter,
“Israel and our independence day” in
the July 4 edition of the Daily
Journal, to be a bit dubious, if not
satirical. I’ve noticed that his usual
diatribes about “awful Israel” are get-
ting a bit ridiculous.
First, suggesting that Ariel is “ille-
gal” is outrageous, if not incredulous.
By whose definition? Certainly not
by that of its 18,000 residents who
have called it home for more than 30
years (notwithstanding the U.S.
Department of State lacking the
moral and political courage to accept
Israel’s decision that Jerusalem is its
capital).
Second, Israel is a sovereign state
and does not need the U.S. govern-
ment, Vice President Biden or
Secretary of State Kerry’s acquies-
cence or approval to determine where
and what to build anywhere within its
controlled areas. I doubt Mr.
Caggiano would dare to suggest a
similar proposition to China, Russia
or any other nations except his
favorite bashing boy, Israel.
Last, there is no “scary monster
lobby” in the American Jewish com-
munity closet. It might exist in Mr.
Caggiano’s vivid imagination, but
this is something for him to deal with
rather than blame AIPAC (which is a
legal American lobby independent of
Israel and not different than thou-
sands of other lobbies in
Washington, D.C. — including the
powerful Saudi lobby and oil lobby).
Sam Liron
Foster City
Love and faith
Editor,
Ms. Dimitre’s column July 10 on
faith contends that “things that can’t
be proven … were anything but fig-
ments of their imagination and wish-
ful thinking.” For her benefit, I have
compiled a list of other things that
can’t be proven: Love, the value of
art, a tomorrow and high-speed rail
profitability.
I love my family, I love literature, I
love life. But can this thing call love
be proven scientifically? Sure some
will point to melatonin surges in
your brain, but that cannot prove
love exists. In that regard, most non-
profit organizations are faith-based:
because they have faith in our,
unproven, capacity to love.
Is a pair of movie tickets worth
$30? Is a Picasso worth millions of
dollars, thus more than one life-sav-
ing vaccine for Africa? No scientist
can prove that. Will the sun rise
tomorrow? Experience and astronomy
tell me so. But can you prove that an
asteroid won’t kill us all at 1830
GMT? I can only wish.
“I applied my reason at every
moment. Reason is excellent for get-
ting food, clothing and shelter.
Reason is the very best tool kit.
Nothing beats reason for keeping
tigers away. But be excessively rea-
sonable and you risk throwing out the
universe with the bathwater.” — Life
of Pi.
We are human precisely because we
are able and free to believe in things
that can’t be proven. Without love,
faith and the belief that tomorrow
will be, the world consists of nothing
but food, shelter or mortal danger. Yet
despite anecdotal experiences, and
broken hearts, that tell us not to
believe, or to love, we do. And the
world is beautiful.
George Yang
Menlo Park
Letters to the editor
T
he word audit typically
invokes fear and loathing
amongst anyone having it
directed to them. It usually connotes
that something is wrong.
So it is understandable why San
Mateo city officials would be appre-
hensive about having a management
audit conducted of themselves.
But it can be a good thing, and the
City Council should be applauded for
moving forward with an external audit
of its Community Development
Department.
It could be argued such an audit is
unnecessary since the city manager’s
office has already implemented sever-
al key steps to ensure proper practices
in the department — including a poli-
cies and procedures manual for each
division and ways to better track the
planning application process and
associated project files. These steps,
combined with the recent departure of
three key Community Development
officials, most notably the director,
are obvious precursors to change.
However, having an outside man-
agement audit will yield several
things. First, it may create new ideas
and economies of scale yet to be seen
while also providing a certain amount
of public perception that the city, and
this particular department, is heading
in the right direction.
The push for such an audit originat-
ed from the controversial 7-Eleven on
San Mateo Drive having its building
permits approved. The council ruled
after the permits were issued that they
were done so in error. The result of
this confusion is court proceedings,
upset neighbors and a certain lack of
trust. We understand that this was one
project amongst many that traveled
through the city pipeline with nary a
problem. However, another complete-
ly separate proposal was tainted by
the 7-Eleven situation simply because
it had the same planning official
attached to it. That separate proposal,
of course, was the closure of the Ice
Center at the Bridgepointe Shopping
Center and the possibility of a differ-
ent recreational use elsewhere. The
closure of the Ice Center was contro-
versial for its own reasons, but it got
tangled in distrust. There is a very real
possibility that other projects,
innocuous or controversial for their
own reasons, will also get tangled
unless the city takes whatever steps
possible to remedy that distrust. And
that can be accomplished by a thor-
ough audit of the Community
Development Department.
Once completed, there may even be
an opportunity to take the informa-
tion such an audit provides and corre-
late that to other departments, per-
haps improving the communication,
management and procedural systems
for the entire city. The cost, estimated
to be between $40,000 and $120,000
depending on the scale of work, is
minimal compared to what it could
buy. Better systems, better communi-
cation, better departments and most
importantly, trust.
Audit will help city in more ways than one
Just asking
“N
ormal times may possibly be over forever.” —
Ashleigh Brilliant.
Watching television, reading the newspaper, or just driv-
ing around town can evoke many questions — at least to a
busybody like me. The following are some things I have
been curious about recently.
1). Why, oh why, is any-
one rewarded for stuffing 69
hot dogs down their throat in
10 minutes? That has to be
one of the most disgusting
competitions ever. And the
fact that people get their jol-
lies from watching such an
outrageous glorification of
gluttony is unbelievable. It’s
hard to fathom that in this
day and age when we are all
being advised to eat health-
fully and especially avoid
such processed meats as hot
dogs, people are rewarded for such voraciousness. Is there
anything that more exemplifies the detrimental diets of so
many Americans? Who sponsors this atrocity?
2). Why are disreputable television shows such as
“Family Guy” and “The Simpsons” allowed to be aired at
all, but especially during the afternoon when impression-
able children (young and older) could very well be watching
and drawn to them because they are animated? Though it
comes with a cautionary warning that reads, “This program
contains materials that many parents would not find suit-
able for children under 14,” how many kids do you think
have their television viewing monitored by an adult who is
there to turn it off? How many adults who relish such drivel
will deprive themselves for the sake of their children?
3). Why were the supposed “experts” in charge of build-
ing the new east span of the Bay Bridge so irresponsible?
Their incompetence or deliberate skimping (or both) has
the potential to jeopardize thousands of lives. What hap-
pened to accountability, integrity and honesty? Wouldn’t
you think that when the job is as huge and important and
expensive as the Bay Bridge, that there would be so much
supervision that in no way could Caltrans let something
like defective bolts slip by? How many other problems
have slipped by that we don’t know about?
4). Are the bizarre “sculptures” (or whatever) on the cor-
ner of El Camino Real and Trousdale Drive the finishing
touches on the Peninsula Hospital project? At first I
thought they might be some kind of strange alien appari-
tions that appeared from outer space. Are they considered
modern art? It wasn’t until I talked to a lady in the adminis-
tration office at the hospital that I found out that they are
flocks of birds — selected by a Burlingame committee from
the city and hospital staff, etc. I wonder if some of them are
the same people who decided to remodel Burlingame Avenue
and install parallel parking? Could they also have had a
hand in the painting of the outside of some of the remod-
eled buildings at Capuchino High School with that incon-
gruous plaid design? Nah!
5). Isn’t it appalling that the cost of a college degree has
so escalated? And why are most kids pressured to attend no
matter what their resources — mentally and fiscally? Does
it make sense to make so many accumulate a huge debt that
they’d be paying off for many years following, even if they
drop out, as many do? Will they be able to find a job that
pays a decent wage? Doesn’t this jeopardize their chances
of home ownership and maybe even having a family? How
can such a disparity between college costs when our kids
attended in the ’70s and ’80s and the present time be justi-
fied? Is Congress completely dysfunctional?
6). How outrageous can it be that anyone who has heard
and read about the Zimmerman case can believe that he is
innocent? Zimmerman is obviously a guy with delusions of
grandeur who frightened Martin by trailing him and causing
him to fear being attacked. He had even been told by
authorities to back off. And what about the skewed jury —
six females, no African-Americans? Isn’t it obvious that
racism is alive and well, especially in states like Florida?
7). Why has the agriculture industry continued to be
allowed to routinely use antibiotics in their livestock
(healthy and unhealthy) when it has been known since
before 1977 that the practice leads to antibiotic resistant
bacteria that not only appears in our food, but also causes
antibiotic use in humans to become more and more ineffec-
tive? Why aren’t the Food and Drug Administration and
U.S. Department of Agriculture taking action on this issue?
How have the meat processing and pharmaceutical indus-
tries been involved? Are the FDAand USDAsupposed to
protect us or kowtow to the corporate interests?
8). Is there any greater insult to the campaign to improve
nutrition than that reviled, revived, synthetic product
Twinkies?
Just asking! As James Thurber wrote: “It’s better to know
some of the questions than all of the answers.”
Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 700
columns for various local newspapers. Her email address is
gramsd@aceweb.com.
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BUSINESS 10
Wednesday • July 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 15,451.85 -32.41 10-Yr Bond 2.53 -0.02
Nasdaq3,598.50 -8.99 Oil (per barrel) 105.77
S&P 500 1,676.26 -6.24 Gold 1,289.80
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Astring of lackluster
earnings reports from companies
including Coca-Cola and Charles
Schwab ended an eight-day winning
streak for the Standard & Poor’s 500
index.
Coca-Cola, the world’s largest bev-
erage maker, fell after the company
said it sold less soda in its home mar-
ket of North America. Retail brokerage
Charles Schwab’s second-quarter earn-
ings fell short of what analysts were
expecting. Marathon Petroleum fell
after the fuel refiner forecast weak earn-
ings and said its business was being
hurt by renewable fuels laws.
“The expectations out there for earn-
ings overall, they’re pretty modest,”
said Scott Wren, senior equity strate-
gist at Wells Fargo. “Earnings season
is not going to be what drives the mar-
ket from here.”
The Dow Jones industrial average
fell 32.41 points, 0.2 percent, to
15,451.85. The Standard & Poor’s 500
index declined 6.24 points, or 0.4 per-
cent, to 1,676.26. The Nasdaq com-
posite dropped 8.99 points, or 0.3
percent, to 3,598.50.
Eight of the 10 industry groups in
the S&P 500 fell. The declines were led
by materials companies. Phone com-
panies and technology companies
were the two groups that gained.
Coke dropped 78 cents, or 1.9 per-
cent, to $40.23 after the company
reported that its second-quarter profit
fell 4 percent. Charles Schwab fell 71
cents, or 3.3 percent, to $21 after its
earnings came in short of analysts’
expectations as expenses rose and its
interest margins fell. Marathon
Petroleum fell $3.17, or 4.3 percent,
to $69.93.
“Expectations for earnings growth
this quarter are fairly subdued,” said
Michael Sheldon, chief market strate-
gist for RDM Financial Group.
“However, the important thing for
investors is to look ahead to the sec-
ond half of the year, where earnings are
supposed to pick up significantly. ”
Overall S&P 500 earnings are
expected to grow by 3.4 percent in the
second quarter from the same period a
year ago, according to data from S&P
Capital IQ. The rate of earnings
growth is predicted to rise in the third
and fourth quarters, reaching 11.6 per-
cent in the final three months of the
year.
The stock market has climbed back
to record levels following a brief
slump in June, when the S&P 500
logged its first monthly decline since
October on concern that the Federal
Reserve would ease back on its eco-
nomic stimulus too quickly. The S&P
500 gained for eight straight trading
sessions through Monday, its longest
winning streak since January. Had the
index ended higher Tuesday, it would
have marked the longest series of
advances since 2004.
The index is up 4.4 percent in July,
putting it on track to log its biggest
monthly gain since January, when it
rose 5 percent.
Stocks got a boost last week when
Bernanke said the central bank would
not ease its stimulus before the econo-
my was ready. Investors will be listen-
ing to his comments again this week
for more clues about the central bank’s
outlook for the economy. The Fed
chairman will give his semi-annual
testimony to Congress on Wednesday.
That testimony may have more
impact on the stock market this week
than any earnings reports, said Wells
Fargo’s Wren.
Esther George, the President of
Kansas City branch of the Fed, and a
voting member of the committee that
sets the Fed’s monetary policy, said
Tuesday that the central bank should
cut back on its stimulus as the labor
market begins to recover. The central
bank is currently buying $85 billion
of bonds a month to keep interest rates
low and to encourage borrowing and
hiring.
Stocks decline on earnings; Coca-Cola drops
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Tuesday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
HCA Holdings Inc., up $1.65 at $38.86
The hospital operator expects second-quarter profit and revenue to
exceed last year’s levels as its hospitals record more admissions.
Marathon Petroleum Corp., down $3.17 at $69.93
The oil refinery operator said its business is being hurt by renewable
fuels laws, and it forecast disappointing second-quarter results.
Suntech Power Holdings Co. Ltd., up 11 cents at $1.51
Shares of the solar panel manufacturer rose a day after the Chinese
government announced ambitious plans to expand solar power capacity.
Nasdaq
Tesla Motors Inc., down $18.21 at $109.05
A Goldman Sachs analyst set a price target for the electric car maker’s
stock of $84, well below the $127.26 the shares closed at on Monday.
Baidu Inc., up $4.10 at $105.69
The Chinese search engine said it would buy 91 Wireless,a distributor of
smartphone applications and games, for $1.9 billion.
Del Frisco’s Restaurant Group Inc., down $1.31 at $21.28
The owner of Del Frisco’s Double Eagle Steak House restaurants is
planning a secondary offering of 5 million shares of common stock.
Joe’s Jeans Inc., down 39 cents at $1.47
The high-end jeans seller’s second-quarter net income fell 17 percent,and
it agreed to buy rival Hudson Clothing for $97.6 million.
Liquidity Services Inc., down $2.55 at $29.83
The company which runs auction sites such as liquidation.com lowered
its adjusted earnings forecast for the fiscal third-quarter.
Big movers
Chevron, YPF sign
$1.5B shale oil deal
By Michael Warren
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina — Argentina’s state-con-
trolled YPF oil company has persuaded Chevron Corp. to
sign a long-sought deal to invest $1.24 billion in develop-
ing the South American country’s shale oil deposits.
The joint venture adds up to $1.5 billion overall, the first
major foreign oil investment in Argentina since President
Cristina Fernandez seized control of YPF from Spain’s
Grupo Repsol last year.
YPF CEO Miguel Galuccio and Chevron CEO John
Watson presented it Tuesday night to Fernandez, who issued
two decrees this week granting special privileges to any oil
company investing more than a billion dollars in new shale
ventures. After five years, such companies will be able to
export up to 20 percent of their crude and natural gas with-
out paying taxes, and also be exempt from the currency
controls that have scared away many other foreign
investors.
The YPF-Chevron venture will start with a $300 million
pilot hydraulic fracturing project involving more than 100
wells in an area known as the “Enrique Mosconi Cluster, ”
part of the Vaca Muerta (Dead Cow) deposit in Neuquen
province, where YPF says 15 teams are already extracting
more than 10,000 barrels a day.
In a later stage of the project, YPF expects to develop
more than 1,500 wells and by the year 2017 produce 50 mil-
lion barrels of oil and 3 million cubic meters of natural gas
each day, making it the most productive strike in
Argentina, YPF said.
“Vaca Muerta is a world-class share and fits perfectly with-
in our solid portfolio of non-conventional resources,”
Watson said.
By Michael Liedtke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Yahoo
remained stuck in a revenue rut during
the second quarter, muting the cele-
bration of CEO Marissa Mayer’s first
year running the Internet company.
The numbers released Tuesday
showed Yahoo Inc.’s earnings are
still rising, but they also highlighted
the challenges facing the company as
it loses ground to rivals Google Inc.
and Facebook Inc. in the online
advertising market that generates
most of their revenue.
Yahoo sold slightly fewer display
ads than it did at the same time last
year, and the prices that marketers
were willing to pay for the space fell,
too. The Sunnyvale company made
some small strides in the Internet ad
market dominated by Google, but it
still wasn’t enough to prevent
Yahoo’s revenue from slipping in a
quarter when the digital ad market in
the U.S. increase by 15 percent,
based on estimates by the research
firm eMarketer.
Google’s second earnings, due out
Thursday, are expected to show even
more robust growth.
Yahoo’s nagging ad headaches ini-
tially dragged down the company’s
stock by more than 2 percent in
extended trading, but the selling
reversed after management assured
investors that it intends to keep buy-
ing back the company’s stock. The
commitment comes after Yahoo had
already spent $3.6 billion buying
back about 190 million of its shares
since last year, fulfilling a pledge
that Mayer made shortly after the
company realized a $7.6 billion
windfall from selling nearly half of
its stake in Chinese Internet compa-
ny Alibaba.
Yahoo’s 2Q earnings rise 46 pct., revenue sinks
<< Rained-out game reset in S.F., page 12
• Top prep athletes announced, page 14
Wednesday, July 17, 2013
CLOSE CALL: STAGE 16 HAS ITS DRAMA, BUT FROOME STILL LEADS >> PAGE 12
Pacifica Am can’t hold on, lose in title game
All-Star game
played under
a PED cloud
Rivera’s farewell highlights 3-0 ALwin
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
SAN LORENZO — The Belmont-Redwood
Shores 11-12 All-Star baseball team knew it
had to bring its “A” game in the Section 3
championship game against District 57
champ San Ramon Valley, a team it defeated
two years ago in the 9-10 championship
game.
“It was going to take a lot (to beat them),”
said BRS starting pitcher Sean Lee.
It took a nearly perfect performance from
Lee and key hits from Dominic Susa and
Brad Shimabuku to propel BRS to 2-0 win
over San Ramon to claim the Section 3 tour-
nament title at San Lorenzo American and
send it on the way to Roseville for the
Divisional Series beginning Saturday on
the road to the Little League World Series in
Williamsport, Pa.
“I knew we were going to need two or
three runs and I knew Sean could keep them
down,” said BRS manager Rudy Lopez.
It’s the second section title in three years
for Lopez and a number of players from this
year’s squad. The core has been together
since winning the 9-10 district and section-
al championships and advancing to the
divisional championship series. Last year,
many of the same players captured the 10-11
District 52 crown before bowing out in the
Section 3 tournament.
“This (San Ramon team) is the team we
beat 1-0 in sectionals two years ago,”
Lopez said.
And many of the players that beat San
Ramon two years ago were on hand Tuesday
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Mariano Rivera reported
for work an inning early, and walked off to a
fitting tribute.
Summoned in the eighth to make sure he
would pitch in his final All-Star game, the
New York Yankees’ indomitable closer
tossed a perfect inning and soaked up a pair
of standing ovations while helping the
American League to a 3-0 victory over the
National League on Tuesday night at Citi
Field.
Rivera, who took home MVP honors, and
nine other pitchers combined on a three-hit-
ter for the AL, which snapped a three-game
losing streak and regained home-field
advantage in the World Series. Joe Nathan
saved it in Rivera’s place after the American
League scratched out a pair of runs and got
an RBI double from Jason Kipnis.
Robinson Cano hobbled off early after
getting hit by a pitch from crosstown rival
Matt Harvey of the hometown Mets. X-rays
were negative and Cano said he shouldn’t
miss any games for the Yankees.
Harvey and opposing starter Max
Scherzer were among a record 39 first-time
All-Stars in a game that featured four players
21 or younger — baseball’s next genera-
tion.
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
It’s safe to say the loss that ended Pacifica
American’s season came as a surprise to a
lot of people.
And that isn’t because their opponent,
Danville Little League, isn’t a terrific team
— the 8-7 outcome makes them a worthy
Section 3 champion of the 10-11 All-Stars
tournament.
But the biggest surprise comes in the way
Pacifica blitzed Danville pitching in the
first inning only to see a five-run lead (that
actually got all the way to seven) evaporate
inning by inning. Pacifica still led 7-4
heading into the bottom of the sixth inning
but Danville sent eight hitters to the dish
and turned three walks, two hits and a passed
ball into a four-run frame. That frenzy of
scoring did in Pacifica and ended their sea-
son.
“They put the ball in play and when you
give them walks it just adds up — a big hit
here and there,” said Pacifica manager Steve
Falk. “They’re a good team. You give them
an opening and they take it.”
“They just believed in themselves,” said
Danville manager Brent Bowman. “We told
them this was a six-inning game, you’re
going to lose some innings and you’re
going to win some innings. You just have to
battle and grind it out. They truly believed.
I truly believe that’s what got us to the vic-
tory. ”
The dog pile at the end of the game came
as a surprise even to the Daily Journal. In
Tuesday’s edition, it was reported that it was
Pacifica who would lock up the Section 3
title with a win at Lakeshore Park in San
Mateo. As it turned out, a glitch in the
District 52 website listed Pacifica as the rep-
resentative of the winner’s bracket. But the
fact was, Danville had already beat Pacifica
once over the weekend. As such, when Nick
Espinoza beat out a Justice Turner tag at the
plate at home plate, those out of loop might
have been a little surprised.
The slight confusion didn’t take away
By Ronald Blum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Chris Davis knows power
surges lead to suspicion in the 21st century.
The debate has even trickled down to club-
house banter.
“We always joke about it — how many
home runs did you hit today?” the Baltimore
Orioles slugger recounted.
“You hit two — well, you better be hydrat-
ed tomorrow. ”
As in, make sure you drink enough fluids
to produce a urine sample for a drug test.
It’s hard talk about MVPs these days with-
out discussing PEDs.
Davis leads the major leagues with 37
home runs, matching Reggie Jackson in
1969 for most by an American League play-
er at the All-Star break. He’s among a record
39 first-time All-Stars as baseball paused for
its midsummer celebration at Citi Field.
But up ahead, more suspensions for per-
formance-enhancing drugs appear immi-
nent. Union head Michael Weiner said
before Tuesday’s game he expects Major
League Baseball will complete its investi-
gation within a month and speak with the
players’ association to determine the
mechanics of discipline, which would be
subject to grievances and arbitration.
Last year, San Francisco outfielder Melky
Cabrera was MVP of the All-Star game, then
was suspended five weeks later for 50 games
following a positive test for testosterone.
Four All-Stars this year — San Diego short-
stop Everth Cabrera, Oakland pitcher
Bartolo Colon, Texas outfielder Nelson Cruz
See BRS, Page 14
See PAC AM, Page 14
Section 3 champs: BRS wins it
Lee dominates, Belmont-Redwood Shores captures Little League title
See CLOUD, Page 13
See ALL-STAR, Page 13
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
BRS pitcher Sean Lee picked up the win.
REUTERS REUTERS
Y Yank ankees closer M ees closer Mar ar iano R iano Riv iver era r a rec eceiv eives a es a
standing o standing ov va ation in wha tion in what is his last A t is his last All-S ll-Star tar
game app game appear earanc ance e. .
SPORTS 12
Wednesday • July 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
TdP is a perennial highlight of the Bay
Area ride calendar, offering a variety of routes
to suit everyone from kids (2 to 6 miles) and
first time riders (20-mile) to serious cyclists
(31 / 56 / 63-mile options). Based in scenic
Coyote Point Park along the bay in San
Mateo, it’s easy to hangout after the ride with
a picnic lunch, listening to live music and
enjoying family activities, including visiting
the CuriOdyssey Environmental Education
Center. Proceeds benefit San Mateo County
Parks Bicycle Sunday.
August 4
2013
Presented by
S
a
n
M
a
t
e
o
County Parks
Fo
u
n
d
a
t
i
o
n
Info at:
www.supportparks.org ‹ 650-321-1638
Coyote Point
San Mateo
By John Leicester
THE ASSSOCIATED PRESS
GAP, France — Hurtling too fast for com-
fort down a twisty, turning foothill of the
Alps, Tour de France leader Chris Froome
faced a high-speed choice between risk and
reward.
The Briton knew that 10 years ago on
exactly the same descent, Joseba Beloki
shattered his leg, elbow and wrist rounding
a corner too fast and Lance Armstrong
plowed into a field to avoid the prone
Spaniard howling in pain.
So Froome wanted to go easy. Trouble
was, Alberto Contador didn’t. Against his
better instincts, Froome chased after his
Spanish rival who sped down the treacher-
ous stretch with asphalt made gooey and
slippery by the July heat.
Just like Armstrong, flirting with disaster
nearly cost Froome the Tour. Contador
crashed as he rounded a right-hand corner,
forcing Froome to swerve off the road, onto
the grass and to put a foot down to stay
upright.
Unlike Contador, who bloodied his right
knee, Froome escaped with just a fright.
Still, the drama on Tuesday’s Stage 16
proved a point that Froome and his Sky
team have made time and again: Despite his
big lead, Froome won’t savor victory until
he’s on the cobbles of the Champs-Elysees
in Paris on Sunday.
“One second you could be going for the
finish and about to win a race and the next
you’re lying in a ditch somewhere, with a
broken bone,” Froome said.
“I knew it was the descent where Beloki
crashed so I was purposefully laying off a
little bit and trying to take it easy but at the
same time also trying to keep touch with the
Saxobank guys who were really pushing the
limits.”
By that, Froome meant Contador and his
Saxo-Tinkoff teammate from the Czech
Republic, Roman Kreuziger, who are third
and fourth in the overall standings but more
than four minutes off the lead.
Opportunities for them to claw back are
fast running out. The finish line in Paris is
now just 415 miles and five days away. To
their credit, they aren’t simply accepting
defeat but are harassing Froome all the way.
If Froome wins, the way his rivals have
repeatedly tested the British rider over the
three weeks should give him the extra satis-
faction of a victory hard-earned.
Stage 16 wound from Provence past vine-
yards, lavender fields and villages clinging
to hillsides to the town of Gap, a staging
post for what promises to be a grand finale
in the Alps for the 100th Tour.
For a long while, it seemed as if the 104-
mile trek to Gap from Vaison-la-Romaine, a
charming town with old ruins near the Mont
Ventoux where Froome won on Sunday,
would be one of those Tour stages that don’t
amount to much.
Apparently preparing for the Alps,
Froome and other main protagonists
allowed 26 riders — none of them a podium
threat — to escape far ahead. The stage win-
ner, Rui Costa, later emerged from that
group, riding away on the day’s last climb,
a 6-mile long ascent to Col de Manse, and
then zipping down to Gap.
Although the Manse climb is less arduous
and less steep than the Ventoux, where
Froome blasted past Contador, the Spaniard
and Kreuziger used to it test the Briton and
his Australian wingman, Richie Porte.
Several times, Contador tried accelerating
away. Kreuziger did, too. But Porte and then
Froome alone wouldn’t let them get away.
Froome comes within inches of disaster at Tour
REUTERS
Chris Froome, a member of the Sky team, avoided an accident and still leads the Tour.
Sports briefs
Reds, Giants set for July 23
doubleheader in San Francisco
CINCINNATI — The Cincinnati Reds will
wear home uniforms and bat last, if needed,
in the first game of a July 23 doubleheader at
San Francisco.
The two clubs announced Tuesday a July 4
game at Cincinnati that was rained out will
be played as the first game starting Tuesday,
the 23rd, at 7:05 p.m. EDT. The game
already scheduled for that day at 10:15 p.m.
will become the second game, with the
Giants changing from their uniforms as
home team in the second.
The second game will start no earlier than
10:15, or 30 minutes after the end of the
first.
The teams’ schedules left them little
choice on makeup dates.
Tickets for the July 4 game can be
exchanged for upcoming Reds’ home
games, with some restrictions.
Leonard out, 3 more in
for USA Basketball minicamp
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.— Kawhi
Leonard has pulled out of USA Basketball’s
minicamp and three players were added to
the roster.
Indiana’s George Hill, Charlotte’s
Michael Kidd-Gilchrist and Oklahoma State
guard Marcus Smart will train with the
Americans next week in Las Vegas. The ros-
ter of young players now totals 29.
Smart helped lead the U.S. Under-19 team
to the world championship earlier this sum-
mer.
USA Basketball says Tuesday that
Leonard, who helped the San Antonio Spurs
reach the NBA Finals, is rehabbing after a
long season.
The Americans will practice for three days
before holding an intrasquad exhibition
game on July 25.
Both came out throwing 99 mph heat, but
it was Rivera, at 43 the oldest All-Star since
1991, who was the center of attention in his
farewell season.
He came in from the bullpen to
Metallica’s “Enter Sandman” just like
across town at Yankee Stadium, and was left
alone on the field for more than a minute to
take in a rousing ovation.
“It was a great moment. He is one of the
best pitchers that’s ever played this game,”
Tigers outfielder Torii Hunter said.
Players on both sides clapped from the
top of the dugout steps, and he tipped his
cap to the crowd.
Then he went to work, retiring three
straight hitters on 16 pitches before walk-
ing off to another ovation.
“It was tough. It was special,” an emo-
tional Rivera said. “Seeing the fans sharing
and both teams standing out of the dugout,
managers, coaches players, priceless.”
It was the ninth All-Star game in New
York — most for any city — and second in
five years after a farewell to old Yankee
Stadium in 2008. But the only other time
the Mets hosted was during Shea Stadium’s
debut season in 1964, when Philadelphia
Phillies outfielder Johnny Callison hit a
game-ending homer in the ninth.
This one gave the struggling Mets a
chance to pack their cozy ballpark for one
of the few times all season. Fans chanted
Harvey’s name during pregame introduc-
tions, and the 24-year-old sensation deliv-
ered with three strikeouts in two shutout
innings.
He walked off to a standing ovation and
received a pat on the back from NL manager
Bruce Bochy of the San Francisco Giants,
the defending World Series champions.
Harvey was the youngest All-Star starting
pitcher since former Mets ace Dwight
Gooden was 23 a quarter-century ago — and
the first from the home team since
Houston’s Roger Clemens in 2004. Gooden
cheered Harvey on from the stands.
All the buildup might have made the phe-
nom a little too excited at the start. Mike
Trout doubled inside first base on his open-
ing pitch, and Harvey drilled Cano just
above the right knee with a 96 mph fastball
on the third.
In obvious pain, Cano initially stayed in
the game but limped off after Triple Crown
winner Miguel Cabrera struck out — just as
he did against Harvey in spring training.
Stanford softball
pitcher transfers to Oklahoma
NORMAN, Okla. — University of
Oklahoma softball coach Patty Gasso says
pitcher Kelsey Stevens is transferring from
Stanford to OU.
Gasso announced Tuesday that Stevens
will join the defending national champion
Sooners beginning in the spring of 2014.
Stevens was an All-Pac 12 Freshman
selection in 2013 after going 15-7 with a
2.99 earned run average.
Stevens also faced OU during the 2013
season when she relieved in the second
inning after the Sooners had scored five runs
in the first in the season-opener on Feb. 8.
She pitched the final six innings and held
the Sooners to one run on two hits while
striking out seven.
SPORTS 13
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REUTERS
Buster Posey strikes out swinging in the National League’s loss to the AL 3-0 on Tuesday.
Continued from page 11
ALL-STAR
and Detroit shortstop Jhonny Peralta —
have been linked in media reports to
Biogenesis, the closed Florida anti-aging
clinic accused of distributing PEDs.
Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig main-
tains he’s not concerned the showcase could
be decided by a player who may be disci-
plined when his probe is concluded.
“Whatever happens, happens. Given our
knowledge today, that’s not frustrating at
all,” he said. “You play the hand you’re dealt
with on that day, and you can’t second guess
two weeks or two months or three months
later. ”
Selig says players have complained to
him that the vast majority who comply with
the sport’s drug rules have been tarnished
along with those who think they can get
away with using banned performance-
boosters.
“It is what it is. It’s the nature of the era
right now,” Colorado outfielder Michael
Cuddyer said. “Until we get the game totally
clean, I’m sure there’s going to be black
eyes and suspicions.”
Selig wants tougher penalties than the
current system that has been in place since
2006 — 50-game bans for a first positive
test, 100 games for a second and lifetime for
a third.
Weiner says some of his members agree,
some don’t, and that players will discuss the
possible changes when their executive
board meets in December.
No matter what, baseball’s image has
been damaged, just by the probe.
“The integrity of the sport is in question
because you pick up the paper and we’re no
longer looking at the boxscore, we’re dis-
cussing the investigation and we’re wonder-
ing who,” agent Scott Boras said.
Players and owners agreed to a steroids
ban in 2002 and have repeatedly strength-
ened the rules. Selig gets defensive over
baseball’s drug program, saying “this sport
is cleaner than it’s ever been.”
But even players understand why there is
distrust.
“It’s a reap-what-you-sow type of thing,”
said Cincinnati first baseman Joey Votto,
the 2010 NL MVP. “We’ve experienced the
drugs, the performance-enhancing drugs,
and we’ve taken advantage of them, and
then all of a sudden when we’ve cleaned up
the game, you can’t expect all the questions
to stop, especially when players go from
performing at a lower level to performing at
an All-Star-caliber level or leading the home
run numbers. So it becomes part of the pack-
age.”
During games, players focus on perform-
ance. PEDs usually come up only when
reporters ask questions or testers escort
players to bathrooms.
For now, no amount of questions will alle-
viate the mistrust.
“It’s not a big deal. It will pass at some
point,” Votto said.
Continued from page 11
CLOUD
Sports brief
Wiggins, Andrews win
national prep athlete awards
LOS ANGELES — Andrew
Wiggins, headed to Kansas as one
of the nation’s most highly
recruited basketball players, and
soccer player Morgan Andrews, a
Notre Dame recruit, were honored
as national prep athletes of the
year on Tuesday night.
Wiggins averaged a double-dou-
ble in 25 minutes per game at
Huntington St. Joseph’s Prep in
West Virginia. The Toronto native
has been a fixture on Canada’s jun-
ior national team.
SPORTS 14
Wednesday • July 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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night to vanquish it again, start-
ing with Lee, who was masterful.
He pitched a complete game, strik-
ing out nine. He had a perfect
game going into the top of the
seventh inning, but with one out,
San Ramon’s Brendon Schooley
stroked a solid single to right-cen-
ter field to break it up. Lee went on
to get a strikeout and a groundout
to complete the one-hitter.
“I thought I did [well]. I hit my
spots,” Lee said, adding he didn’t
think about a possible perfecto
until late.
“Not really until the end. I tried
to keep it clear from my mind,”
Lee said.
He had plenty of other things to
occupy his thoughts, namely, an
always tough San Ramon squad,
whose pitcher Jake Benno was just
as good. He worked into the fifth
inning before reaching his pitch
count. When he left, he had 10
strikeouts and had given up one
run on one hit — a Dominic Susa
second-inning, opposite-field
home run to give BRS a 1-0 lead.
“It was nice to get that run on
the board early,” Lopez said.
It wasn’t even a mistake pitch
from Benno. His 2-1 offering to
Susa was low and outside off the
right corner of the plate, but Susa
stretched his bat out over the dish
and poked a high fly ball to right
field that carried over the fence
195 feet away.
“He’s a strong kid,” Lopez said.
“He’s a good batter. I have six or
seven kids that can do that.”
Turns out that would be all the
offense Lee would need. He threw
only 63 pitches over seven
innings, 45 of which were strikes.
Only three San Ramon batters had
a two-ball count and only one
reached 3-0. Lee threw first-pitch
strikes to 15 of 19 batters he
faced. The times San Ramon did
put the ball in play, they were rou-
tine grounders that the BRS
defense vacuumed up flawlessly.
Only two balls made it out of the
infield for San Ramon — a flyout
in the second and Schooley’s sev-
enth-inning single.
“They put balls in play, but we
made the plays when we had to,”
Lopez said.
Belmont-Redwood Shores added
an insurance run in the bottom of
the fifth. With one out, Josh Fong
drew a walk – one of three issued
by Benno. Nick Lopez drew a two-
out walk a batter later to bring up
Shimabuku, who scorched a single
to right-center field to drive in
Fong to put BRS up 2-0.
“It was a great (team) perform-
ance,” Rudy Lopez said.
from a Danville comeback that
made the Section 3 championship
game a very exciting battle.
Pacifica came out playing every
bit the role of “no tomorrow” —
on all sides of the baseball field.
In the top of first, a walk got the
two-out rally going. Chris
Rodriguez followed with a first-
pitch double to right. One batter
later, Christian Falk took the sec-
ond pitch he saw way over the left
field fence for a quick and loud 3-0
lead.
Acouple of pitches later, Justice
Turner followed in Falk’s foot-
steps with an even longer, deeper
and more monstrous blast to left.
And then it appeared Pacifica had
the start it needed in order to
extend its season when Nate
Azzopardi completed the back-to-
back-to-back act with a solo shot
to centerfield.
Pacifica led 5-0.
But, in what may have won the
game for Danville, the boys from
District 57 remained calm and
starter Cameron Archer, despite
allowing another two runs in the
top of third (on Turner and
Azzopardi RBIs), kept the wheels
from totally falling off.
“He battled for us,” Bowman
said. “The first inning he was
missing his spots they hit three
home runs off of him. Pacifica is a
really good team but then he was
able to put zeroes up on the board
after that ... and then we had a cou-
ple of guys come in after that.
They did a great job.”
“We were still putting the ball in
play,” Falk said. “They put in a
new pitcher and he was good, they
just kept us off-balanced. More
credit to him, he’s a good little
pitcher. ”
That little pitcher actually got
the Danville comeback started —
Tommy Gavello got a hold of pitch
and sent it packing over the center-
field wall in the third to make it 7-
2.
Danville then turned two walks
and single into another pair of runs
in the fifth which set the stage for a
crazy bottom of the sixth.
A walk started it all and after a
strikeout, two more walks were
sandwiched between a pair of
Danville doubles — the latter by
Colin Moroney tied the game for
Danville and moved Espinoza to
third as the potential champi-
onship run.
Two pitches later, it was
Espinoza who raced down the third
base line and slid home for the win-
ning tally.
“For these guys to do it (win
District 52 titles) in back to back
years, not many teams can say they
won one, but to say you did it two
times is pretty impressive,” Falk
said of Pacifica American’s season.
“To lose in the section finals is
nothing to be ashamed about.
They’re a good group of kids. They
knew the other team played a good
game. They rose up and came to the
challenge. Today they got us.”
Continued from page 11
BRS
Continued from page 11
PAC AM
Sports brief
JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL
Christian Falk accepts congraluations after hitting a three-run bomb.
SPORTS 15
Wednesday • July 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Special:
4 Speakers
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 54 41 .568 —
Washington 48 47 .505 6
Philadelphia 48 48 .500 6 1/2
New York 41 50 .451 11
Miami 35 58 .376 18
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 57 36 .613 —
Pittsburgh 56 37 .602 1
Cincinnati 53 42 .558 5
Chicago 42 51 .452 15
Milwaukee 38 56 .404 19 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 50 45 .526 —
Los Angeles 47 47 .500 2 1/2
Colorado 46 50 .479 4 1/2
San Francisco 43 51 .457 6 1/2
San Diego 42 54 .438 8 1/2
Sunday’s Games
Washington 5, Miami 2, 10 innings
Philadelphia 4, Chicago White Sox 3, 10 innings
Cincinnati 8, Atlanta 4
N.Y. Mets 4, Pittsburgh 2
Colorado 3, L.A. Dodgers 1
Milwaukee 5, Arizona 1
San Diego 10, San Francisco 1
St. Louis 10, Chicago Cubs 6
Monday’s Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday’s Games
American 3, National 0
Wednesday’s Games
No games scheduled
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 58 39 .598 —
Tampa Bay 55 41 .573 2 1/2
Baltimore 53 43 .552 4 1/2
New York 51 44 .537 6
Toronto 45 49 .479 11 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 52 42 .553 —
Cleveland 51 44 .537 1 1/2
Kansas City 43 49 .467 8
Minnesota 39 53 .424 12
Chicago 37 55 .402 14
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 56 39 .589 —
Texas 54 41 .568 2
Los Angeles 44 49 .473 11
Seattle 43 52 .453 13
Houston 33 61 .351 22 1/2
Sunday’sGames
Cleveland 6, Kansas City 4
Minnesota 10, N.Y.Yankees 4
Detroit 5,Texas 0
Philadelphia 4, Chicago White Sox 3, 10 innings
Baltimore 7,Toronto 4
Tampa Bay 5, Houston 0
Oakland 3, Boston 2, 11 innings
Seattle 4, L.A. Angels 3
Monday’sGames
No games scheduled
Tuesday’sGames
American 3, National 0
Wednesday’sGames
No games scheduled
AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Kansas City 9 5 6 33 29 19
Montreal 9 5 4 31 31 29
New York 9 7 4 31 29 24
Philadelphia 8 6 6 30 32 30
Houston 8 6 5 29 22 19
New England 6 6 6 24 22 16
Columbus 6 8 5 23 23 23
Chicago 6 9 3 21 20 28
Toronto FC 2 9 7 13 17 27
D.C. 2 13 4 10 8 29
WESTERNCONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake 11 5 4 37 32 18
Portland 8 2 9 33 30 18
Vancouver 9 5 5 32 32 26
FC Dallas 8 5 7 31 27 27
Los Angeles 9 8 3 30 30 24
Colorado 7 7 6 27 23 22
Seattle 7 7 3 24 21 20
San Jose 6 9 6 24 21 32
Chivas USA 3 11 5 14 17 35
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
———
Friday’s Games
Philadelphia 3, Chivas USA 1
Saturday’s Games
New York 4, Montreal 0
Houston 2, New England 1
Sporting Kansas City 3, Toronto FC 0
Real Salt Lake 3, FC Dallas 0
San Jose 1, Seattle FC 0
Portland 2, Los Angeles 1
Sunday’s Games
Vancouver 3, Chicago 1
Wednesday, July 17
New England at Colorado, 6 p.m.
Toronto FC at Chivas USA, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, July 20
New York at Toronto FC, 1 p.m.
Colorado at Seattle FC, 1 p.m.
FC Dallas at Montreal, 4 p.m.
Portland at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m.
New England at Columbus, 4:30 p.m.
D.C. United at Chicago, 5:30 p.m.
Sporting Kansas City at Real Salt Lake, 7 p.m.
MLS GLANCE
All-Star
Break
All-Star
Break
vs.Norwich
City
7:30p.m.
7/20
vs.Portland
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/27
vs. Chivas
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/4
BASEBALL
American League
CHICAGOWHITESOX— Optioned RHP Simon
Castro to Charlotte (IL).
HOUSTON ASTROS — Agreed to terms with
SS Wander Franco on a minor league contract.
KANSAS CITYROYALS — Claimed INF Pedro
Ciriaco off waivers from San Diego.
MINNESOTA TWINS — Recalled C/OF Chris
Herrmann from Rochester (IL).Selected the con-
tract of INF Doug Bernier from Rochester.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS— Assigned RHP Drew
Hutchison to Dunedin (FSL).
National League
NEWYORK METS — Sent 1B Justin Turner to
Binghamton (EL) for a rehab assignment.
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Sent C Hector
Sanchez to the Arizona League Giants for a
rehab assignment.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
DENVER NUGGETS — Named Arturas Kar-
nisovas assistant general manager.
DETROIT PISTONS — Signed G Chauncey
Billups.
MIAMI HEAT— Waived F Mike Miller.
NEWYORK KNICKS — Signed F Metta World
Peace.
PHILADELPHIA 76ERS — Claimed G-F James
Anderson and C Tim Ohlbrecht off waivers from
Houston.
SANANTONIOSPURS— Agreed to terms with
F Jeff Pendergraph on a two-year contract.
TRANSACTIONS
2013 — Mariano Rivera, New York, AL
2012 — MelkyCabrera, San Francisco, NL
2011 — Prince Fielder, Milwaukee, NL
2010 — Brian McCann, Atlanta, NL
2009 — Carl Crawford,Tampa Bay, AL
2008 — J.D. Drew, Boston, AL
2007 — Ichiro Suzuki, Seattle, AL
2006 — Michael Young,Texas, AL
2005 — Miguel Tejada, Baltimore, AL
2004 — Alfonso Soriano,Texas, AL
2003 — Garret Anderson, Anaheim, AL
2002 — None
2001 — Cal Ripken Jr., Baltimore, AL
2000 — Derek Jeter, New York, AL
1999 — Pedro Martinez, Boston, AL
1998 — Roberto Alomar, Baltimore, AL
1997 — Sandy Alomar Jr., Cleveland, AL
1996 — Mike Piazza, Los Angeles, NL
1995 — Jeff Conine, Florida, NL
1994 — Fred McGriff, Atlanta, NL
1993 — Kirby Puckett, Minnesota, AL
1992 — Ken Griffey Jr., Seattle, AL
1991 — Cal Ripken Jr., Baltimore, AL
1990 — Julio Franco,Texas, AL
1989 — Bo Jackson, Kansas City, AL
1988 — TerrySteinbach, Oakland, AL
1987 — Tim Raines, Montreal, NL
1986 — Roger Clemens, Boston, AL
1985 — LaMarr Hoyt, San Diego, NL
1984 — Gary Carter, Montreal, NL
1983 — Fred Lynn, California, AL
1982 — Dave Concepcion, Cincinnati, NL
1981 — Gary Carter, Montreal, NL
1980 — Ken Griffey Sr., Cincinnati, NL
1979 — Dave Parker, Pittsburgh, NL
ALL-STAR MVPS
16
Wednesday • July 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
rather than personal use is also why he tried
killing himself with a kitchen knife on the
steps of a San Mateo church, Leanos said.
“Mr. Forrest knew that they weren’t going
to believe him,” Leanos said. “At that
point, Mr. Forrest was stunned and he was
overwhelmed.”
But Deputy Attorney General Johnette
Jauron said Forrest was trapped. When a
communication gap among law enforce-
ment provided a few hours headway before a
search, Jauron said Forrest first tried to
destroy evidence and then tried to destroy
himself.
Sitting at the defense table yesterday in a
dark suit, Forrest appeared more emotion-
less than the nervous, agitated man investi-
gators described encountering on Dec. 20,
2012. He occasionally nodded while listen-
ing to testimony or conferred with Leanos
but was otherwise expressionless.
Forrest resigned as the chief probation
officers 10 days after his county office and
home were searched and he was committed
to a psychiatric unit following the suicide
attempt. He has pleaded not guilty — a
stance specifically reiterated by Leanos in
court yesterday — and faces up to three
years in prison and lifetime sex offender
registration if convicted.
By law, members of law enforcement
agencies can possess child pornography if
it is in direct connection to an investiga-
tion or training but San Jose police Sgt.
Gregory Lombardo of the Internet Crimes
Against Children task force said there are
clear-cut rules — a separate computer, no
images at home, pornography used in train-
ing is “sanitized” with bars and blurred gen-
ital areas and documentation like a case
number or suspect information.
Lombardo said his unit has never been
contacted by Forrest or the Probation
Department about child molestation or
human trafficking training and investiga-
tions. Sheriff’s Lt. Ed Barberini, chief of
the Millbrae division and the respondent to
Forrest’s church step suicide attempt, said
he would be “surprised” to find out an admin-
istrator like either man was involved hands-
on in such an investigation.
Before yesterday’s opening statements,
few details about the case aside from the
number of images and suicide attempt had
been made public as Forrest waived a pre-
liminary hearing on the evidence and the
case is being prosecuted by the state
Attorney General’s Office because of his for-
mer position in local law enforcement.
Yesterday, however, Jauron succinctly and
matter-of-factly laid out for jurors what she
said proves that Forrest is guilty of two
counts of felony child pornography posses-
sion stemming from 470 images found on a
USB drive, laptop, Kindle and Blackberry.
The images involved boys roughly 6 to 14,
either collected in his own folders with
labels like “smackdown,” “initiation” and
“my boys,” or on DVDs with titles like
“Beach Bums 1” and “Beach Bums 2.”
Postal Inspector Patrick Esteban said a
Kindle and Blackberry found in Forrest’s
office also turned up a “very graphic” news
story about a 7-year-old boy’s molestation
and web searches on key words like “Afghan
boys used as sex slaves” and “b— boy
spanking.”
“There was a lot of spanking and boy
bondage type searches,” Esteban said.
Investigators testified about finding sev-
eral pistols and rifles at both Forrest’s office
and his parent’s San Mateo home where he
primarily lived. The bedroom of that house
was in disarray when they arrived, investi-
gators said, with computers recently miss-
ing hard drives, the bed flipped over, draw-
ers ransacked, alcohol bottles in the closet
and an empty chicken bucket on the floor.
Forrest left the house twice with bags
before being detained, one with a laptop
containing some of the images. Before
agents could secure a search warrant and
arrest Forrest, he was allowed to leave and
was later found at the church holding a knife
to his neck.
Sgt. Gary Ramos used a Taser to subdue
Forrest as he drew blood from a 3-inch cut
on his neck and Barberini discovered a
handwritten note on the back of a business
card from one of the San Jose investigators.
“Tell my family I am better off ... Don’t
grieve for me,” Barberini read from the note
in court. “No more loneliness.”
The prosecution is expected to continue
Wednesday with the forensic examiners who
looked at the electronic devices.
Forrest is free from custody on a
$100,000 bail bond.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
FORREST
benefit PG&E that would amount to a net
penalty of almost nothing to the company.
“The latest penalty proposal is a long-
awaited step in the right direction for public
safety, and we commend the attorneys with-
in the CPUC’s safety division for exhibit-
ing the courage to significantly strengthen
the division’s previous, and inadequate,
penalty recommendation,” San Bruno
Mayor Jim Ruane said in a press release.
“While we wholeheartedly support the
tougher penalty and fine, the City of San
Bruno will continue to fight for additional
and ongoing safeguards to protect the pub-
lic and help us ensure that what happened in
San Bruno never happens again, any-
where.”
The lead PUC attorneys probing the blast
abruptly quit the investigation after the
penalty was announced, with one, Robert
Cagan, calling it “unlawful” in an email
sent to radio station KQED.
Under the amended brief, $300 million of
the $2.25 billion would go into the state’s
general fund in the form of a fine.
Additionally, PG&E shareholders, not
ratepayers, would be on the hook for a sig-
nificant share of the costs to fix the pipeline
system, said Tom Long, the legal director of
The Utility Reform Network, a utility
watchdog group.
“What the safety division announced
today is finally a real penalty,” Long said.
“It will actually require PG&E shareholders
to pay real money. ”
A call to PG&E for comment was not
immediately returned. The utility had called
the previous penalty excessive.
The National Transportation Safety Board
unanimously agreed in 2011 that the blast
was caused by what board chairman Deborah
Hersman called a “litany of failures” by
PG&E, as well as weak oversight by regula-
tors.
Separate from the NTSB investigation,
investigators at the utilities commission
blamed PG&E for the explosion, which
occurred when an underground pipeline rup-
tured at the site of a decades-old faulty weld,
sparking a massive fire.
PG&E has accepted liability for the disas-
ter in numerous public statements but has
denied most of state investigators’ allega-
tions that the utility violated safety rules.
Continued from page 1
FINE
FOOD 17
Wednesday • July 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Sara Moulton
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sometimes it seems that just as we get
ourselves fully into summer mode, we need
to start thinking back to school! Oh, no!
During summer, dinner could be as casu-
al and carefree as a backyard picnic or bar-
becue. But the start of the school year
means a return to at least a slightly more
formal sit-down dinner most weeknights.
If this shifting of gears is catching you by
surprise, consider reaching for some
“cheating ingredients” to help you get
dinner on the table without a hitch.
This delicious chowder recipe makes lib-
eral use of two of my favorite cheating
ingredients: store-bought rotisserie
chicken and salsa.
I’ve never met a rotisserie chicken I did-
n’t like. They are paragons of versatility.
You can heat one up and pretend you roast-
ed it, or shred it and add it to all kinds of
recipes, from chilies and sandwiches to
salads and soups. During the hectic fall
dinner season, I almost always have a
rotisserie chicken in the fridge. And when
the meal is over, I hold on to all the bones
and scraps, stockpiling them in the freez-
er for that rainy day when I have a little
extra time to make a stock. Those bones
make a killer stock.
Salsa is another ingredient I like to keep
handy at all times. An all-purpose condi-
ment that’s replaced ketchup in many
households, there’s a salsa these days for
every taste: fresh or jarred, mild, medium
or hot. And almost all of them are merci-
fully low in sweeteners. Use the salsa of
your choice to set the spiciness of this
soup.
Fresh corn is not a cheating ingredient,
especially not in August and September.
On the contrary, it’s one of late summer’s
great stars, built into this recipe not only
because it’s absurdly good — try eating
freshly picked corn raw right off the cob!
— but also because the starch in the corn
helps to thicken the broth.
Indeed, after you’ve cut all of the kernels
off of the cob, you should scrape the cob
itself with the dull side of a knife. The
milky liquid that results is another soup
thickener (as are the potatoes in the
recipe). Finally, at the end of the cooking
process, I pureed some of the vegetables
— the onions, as well as corn and the
potatoes — to make the soup creamy with-
out adding any cream.
I recommend garnishing this soup with
homemade tortilla strips. They’re deli-
cious, a snap to cook up, and both fresher
and lower in fat than store-bought tortilla
chips. Then again, if you’ve run out of
time, use the store-bought baked chips.
The real beauty of this soup is that it’s a
hearty and complete meal in a single
bowl. You won’t need to serve anything
else on a weeknight and it leaves you with
very few dishes to clean up.
SOUTHWESTERN CORN AND CHICKEN
CHOWDER WITH TORTILLA CRISPS
Start to finish: 1 hour (30 minutes
active)
Servings: 4
Three 6-inch corn tortillas
2 teaspoons ground cumin, divided
1/2 teaspoon chili powder
Kosher salt
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 cup finely chopped yellow onion
1/2 pound red bliss or Yukon gold pota-
toes, cut into 1-inch cubes
2 cups fresh corn kernels (or thawed
frozen)
4 cups chicken broth
3 cups chopped or shredded rotisserie
chicken
1 cup purchased salsa
1 to 2 tablespoons lime juice
Chopped fresh cilantro or basil, to gar-
nish (optional)
Heat the oven to 400 F.
Arrange the corn tortillas on a baking
sheet, then mist them with cooking spray.
In a small bowl, combine 1/2 teaspoon
of the cumin, the chili powder and a pinch
of salt. Sprinkle the mixture evenly over
the tortillas. Using a pizza cutter, cut the
tortillas into thin strips. Bake them on
the middle shelf of the oven until they are
golden and crisp, about 6 to 8 minutes. Set
aside to cool.
In a large saucepan over medium, heat
the vegetable oil. Add the onion and cook,
stirring, until golden, about 5 minutes.
Add the remaining 1 1/2 teaspoons cumin
and cook, stirring, for another minute.
Add the potatoes, corn and chicken
broth, bring to a boil and simmer for 15
minutes, or until the potato is tender.
Transfer 1 1/2 cups of the mixture (mostly
solids) to a blender and carefully blend
until smooth. Return the mixture to the
saucepan, add the chicken and salsa and
cook until just heated through. Add salt
and lime juice, to taste, and water, if nec-
essary, to achieve the desired consistency.
Divide between 4 serving bowls and gar-
nish each portion with some of the tortilla
strips and cilantro, if desired.
Nutrition information per serving: 400
calories; 110 calories from fat (28 percent
of total calories); 12 g fat (2 g saturated; 0
g trans fats); 85 mg cholesterol; 39 g car-
bohydrate; 4 g fiber; 10 g sugar; 34 g pro-
tein; 1,140 mg sodium.
Fresh take on creamy chicken corn chowder
This delicious chowder recipe makes liberal use of two great cheating ingredients:store-bought
rotisserie chicken and salsa.
18
Wednesday • July 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DINING
856 North Delaware St. San Mateo, CA 94401
DailySpecials
Double Punch Monday
Two-Fer Tuesday $6.50
Wet N' Wild Wednesday $6.50
Baja Thursday $7
Fish Taco Friday $6
Super Saturday $5.50
Family Day Sunday
Burlingame’s #1 Choice!
º 0reat food º Hicroorews
º full ßar º Sports TY
º fool º ßanquet facilities
º family friendly Ðining since 1995
EXPIRES: July 31, 2013
JACK’S RESTAURANT & BAR: SAN BRUNO
1050 Admiral Court, Suite A
San Bruno, CA 94066
Phone: (650) 589-2222 | Fax: (650) 589-5042
iLoveJacks.com
DATEBOOK 19
Wednesday • July 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEDNESDAY, JULY 17
FreeDiabetes Screening.9 a.m. to 11
a.m. Twin Pines Senior and
Community Center, 20 Twin Pines
Lane, Belmont. For best results, a four-
hour fast is suggested. No reservations
needed. For more information call 595-
7441.
Tips from Bay Area Job Search
experts. 10 a.m. to noon. Foster City
Community Center, 1000 E. Hillsdale
Blvd., Foster City. Free. For more
information go to
www.phase2careers.org.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon to
1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E. Fourth
Ave., San Mateo. $17 includes lunch.
For more information call 430-6500 or
go to
sanmateoprofessionalalliance.com.
‘Step Back in Time’ — Music and
Costume of the 1920s. 5:30 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. 86 Cañada Road, Woodside.
Tickets go on sale June 18. Advance
ticket purchase required. $35 for
members, $40 for non-members.To
purchase tickets go to
www.filoli.org/country-estate-evening
or call 364-8300, ext. 508.
Music in the Park — Funky Latin
Orchestra. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Stafford
Park, corner of King Street and
Hopkins Avenue, Redwood City. Free.
The Road to Conquering Diseases
of the Brain with Dr. Dale Schenk. 7
p.m. Oshman Family JCC, 3921 Fabian
Way, Palo Alto. $10 members, $15 for
non-members and $7 students with
valid ID. For more information and
tickets go to
www.commonwealthclub.org/events/
2013-07-17/dale-schenk-road-
conquering-diseases-brain.
Dolly Rappaport (Club Fox Blues
Jam). 7 p.m. Club Fox, 2209 Broadway,
Redwood City. $5. For more
information call (877) 435-9849 or go
to www.clubfoxrwc.com.
THURSDAY, JULY 18
Peninsula Youth Theatre presents
‘Charlotte’s Web.’ 10 a.m. Mountain
View Center for the Performing Arts,
500 Castro St., Mountain View. Prices
vary. For more information call 903-
6000.
Hawaiian Music Concert. 1 p.m. to 2
p.m. City of San Mateo Senior Center,
2645 Alameda de las Pulgas, San
Mateo. Spend your time Aloha style
enjoying a performance by Hawaiian
Music Jam. Listen to the music of the
islands with friends. Refreshments
provided. $1 per person. For more
information call 522-7490.
The Bubble Lady. 2 p.m. San Mateo
Public Library Hillsdale, 205 W. Hillsdale
Blvd., San Mateo. Participate in
musically enhanced bubble
adventures. Free. For more information
call 522-7838.
Kids-Size Fitness Fun. Hillsdale
Shopping Center Macy’s Center Court,
60 31st Ave., San Mateo. Free for
children ages 12 and younger. For
more information call 571-1029.
Dancin’ Off the Avenue. 4 p.m. to 8
p.m. Downtown Burlingame, Park
Road at Burlingame Avenue, at the
Burlingame Farmers’ Market. Live
music and dancing, beer and wine
garden, pet and family friendly. Free.
For more information email
burlingamebid@gmail.com.
TheJaqueLynnBand.6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Central Park, 50 E. Fifth Ave., San Mateo.
For more information visit
ci.sanmateo.ca.us.
Remi, Chloe and The Extracts Live.
7 p.m. Action Sports & Skatepark, 887
Industrial Road, San Carlos. Come
support this year’s San Carlos Battle of
the Bands winners. Advance tickets are
$5 or $15 with beverages included.
Tickets at the door are $7 or $20 with
beverages included. For more
information, call 596-5758.
FRIDAY, JULY 19
Launch Your Successful Business —
Orientation. 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Silicon Valley Community Foundation,
1300 S. El Camino Real, San Mateo.
Free. For more information go to
phase2careers.org.
Peninsula Youth Theatre presents
‘Charlotte’s Web.’ 10 a.m. Mountain
View Center for the Performing Arts,
500 Castro St., Mountain View. Prices
vary. For more information call 903-
6000.
Monster in the Closet. 1 p.m. San
Carlos Children’s Theater, Mustang
Hall, Central Middle School, 828
Chestnut St., San Carlos.The show will
also run on 21 and July 26-28. $12 for
students ages 18 and under. $15 for
adults. For more information and for
tickets go to
www.sancarloschildrenstheater.com.
Free Wine or Beer Tasting. 4 p.m. to
6 p.m. New Leaf Community Markets,
150 San Mateo Road, Half Moon Bay.
Free. For more information go to
www.newleaf.com.
Summer Concert: Caravanserai —
Santana Tribute. 6 p.m. to 8 pm.
Burton Park, 1070 Cedar St., San Carlos.
Free. For more information go to
www.cityofsancarlos.org.
Sun Kings: Beatles Tribute. 6 p.m. to
8 p.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Free. For
more information call 780-7311.
‘Annie Get Your Gun.’ 7 p.m. San
Carlos Children’s Theater, Mustang
Hall, Central Middle School, 828
Chestnut St., San Carlos.The show will
also run on July 20, 21 and July 26-28.
$12 for students ages 18 and under.
$15 for adults. For more information
and for tickets go to
www.sancarloschildrenstheater.com.
South San Francisco Open Mic. 7
p.m. to 11 p.m. 116 El Campo Drive,
South San Francisco. Free. For more
information call 451-2450.
Coastal Rep Presents ‘HAIR.’ 8 p.m.
Coastal Reparatory Theatre, 1167 Main
St., Half Moon Bay. $27. For more
information call 569-3266 or go to
www.coastalrep.com.
Andy T — Nick Nixon Band. 8 p.m.
Devil’s Canyon Brewing, 935
Washington St., San Carlos. For tickets
and more information call (615) 592-
2739.
SATURDAY, JULY 20
Half Moon Bay’s 22nd Annual ‘Tour
des Fleurs.’ Tour different nurseries,
working harbors, and farms in the Bay
Area to view flowers and plants. Each
tour takes you to three different
nurseries and there are six tour
packages to choose from. Each tour
package is $20. For more information
on locations of tours and times and to
purchase tickets call 726-8380 ext. 100
or go to www.hmbchamber.com.
Walk with a Doc. Orange Memorial
Park, 781 Tennis Drive, South San
Francisco. A free program of the San
Mateo County Medical Association’s
Community Service Foundation that
encourages healthy physical activity
for county residents of all ages.Walkers
enjoy one-hour walks with physician
volunteers and can ask questions
about general health topics along the
way. Free. To sign up visit
www.smcma.org.
Meet the Artists of Fioli Hidden
Beauty Art Exhibit. 86 Cañada Road,
Woodside. The photographers of
‘Hidden Beauty’ will be at Fioli to share
their experiences and work. Admission
is free for members of with paid
admission to Fioli. For more
information call 364-8300, ext. 508.
Millbrae Lions Club Pancake
Breakfast. 8 a.m. to noon. Millbrae
Central Park, 477 Lincoln Circle,
Millbrae.There will be a freshly cooked
pancake breakfast. $5. For more
information contact
jtnia@comcast.net.
2013 Relay For Life. 9 a.m. Millbrae
Central Park, 477 Lincoln Circle,
Millbrae. Come join your neighbors for
a 24-hour fundraiser supporting the
research and services of the American
Cancer Society. For more information
or to make a donation call 888-6015.
SeventhAnnual EdibleLandscaping
Tour. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Common
Ground Garden Supply and Education
Center, 559 College Ave., Palo Alto.
Explore local organically-grown edible
gardens, learn about sustainable and
organic gardening practices and meet
the creative gardeners with great
ideas. $35. For more information call
493-6072.
27th Annual Connoisseurs’
Marketplace. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Santa
Cruz Avenue between El Camino Real
and Johnson Street, Menlo Park. Free.
Live jazz, rhythm and blues, rock ’n’ roll,
dance and party music on the stage
and street through downtown. Fine
arts and crafts will showcase 250 of
America’s best artists. There will also
be chef demos, artisan specialty food
health and wellness displays, a green
products showcase, home and garden
exhibits, a collector car showcase and
fun and games for kids. Continues
through July 21 during same time. For
more information call 325-2818.
Colma: Serbian Cemetery walking
tour. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Byzantine
Chapel, 1801 Hillside Blvd., Daly City.
Join the San Mateo County Historical
Association in touring one of Colma’s
unique cemeteries. Park on Hillside
Boulevard or enter the Cemetery at
the south gate nearest Troy’s Body
Shop. Call 757-1676 to RSVP by
Wednesday, July 17.
Historical Society of South San
Francisco’s 11th Annual Victorian
Tea. 11:30 a.m. Plymire-Schwarz
House, 519 Grand Ave., South San
Francisco. $30. For reservation call 589-
5597.
Topper Fine Jewelers presents
Marco Bicego. Noon to 8 p.m.Topper
Fine Jewelers, 1315 Burlingame Ave.,
Burlingame. Enjoy cocktails and hors
d’oeuvres while watching Marco
Bicego hand-engrave pieces. For more
information call 347-2221.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
businesses on the avenue,” Nielsen
said. “It’s worrisome because I’ve had
to cut back workers’ hours and I’m
scared I’ll have to cut back on work-
ers.”
Nielsen also said that an issue with
the free parking has been abuse by
drivers planning to stay all day, such
as local employees.
Burlingame Public Works Director
Syed Murtuza said the new free spots
have certainly not caused any harm,
but said it’s still too early to tell how
effective the additional complimentary
parking will be.
“There was a concern from people
that more people would be taking
extended parking, but we do have
enforcement and so far there have been
no problems,” Murtuza said. “So far
it’s been positive and we’re doing
everything to move the construction
along.”
The city had initially considered
making the 75 spaces in Lot C between
Donnelly Avenue and Primrose Road
free and the 123 spots Lots O and V
across from California Drive free, but
stuck with just Burlingame Avenue to
primarily benefit stores on the avenue,
Murtuza said.
Councilwoman Terry Nagel said
parking has always been an issue in
downtown Burlingame, but that you
can always find spaces if you don’t
mind walking an extra block. The
council doesn’t have any plans for
more free parking, she said, especially
keeping in mind that the parking
meters are helping pay for the
streetscape project.
“We do realize that we need to come
up with additional parking,” Nagel
said. “We won’t allow an ugly parking
garage though.”
Copenhagen’s co-owner Ralf
Nielsen said they’ve lost some cus-
tomers due to the construction on
Burlingame Avenue between Lorton
Avenue and Park Road. He even
received a parking ticket recently after
a haircut took longer than expected.
“It was $40, thank you very much!”
Ralf Nielsen said, sarcastically. “The
tickets are outrageous. It leaves a terri-
ble taste in your mouth, so you won’t
come back.”
Other owners like Sandra Tung, who
has run Mingalaba on Burlingame
Avenue for more than five years, said
her business didn’t see many problems
with parking before the construction.
“The Free Fridays haven’t really
helped,” Tung said. “It’s noisy and
there’s less people and dust.”
L’Escape Spa’s owner Jennifer Pham
is working with the city to find out
who is responsible for cracks in the
front window of her shop on
Burlingame Avenue. The damage
occurred after construction began this
past spring.
Those farther away from the main
street are less bothered.
City Librarian Patricia Harding said
the public library, which borders
downtown, hasn’t really been affected
by the construction. Harding said she
is supportive of the city finding more
parking options, as parking impacted
the library even prior to the
streetscape project.
Horst Adam, a customer at Peet’s
Coffee and Tea, said he hasn’t seen
many results of the new Free Friday
policy.
“It still is difficult to get parking
spaces and I still see people putting
money in the meters on Fridays
because they don’t know,” Adam said.
“I bet there will be some businesses
that go bankrupt. It’s always been kind
of difficult to find parking, but it’s
been exacerbated.”
Other customers, like Stephanie
Engle, who recently started working in
Burlingame, wasn’t aware of the Free
Friday parking service.
“It probably makes it more difficult
for people to find parking since people
will take up all the spaces for the day, ”
Engle said.
Murtuza said signs along downtown,
along with the city’s e-newsletter have
informed those in the area of the newly
free two-hour parking.
The beautification of Burlingame
Avenue includes more pedestrian-
friendly features, with sidewalks
widened from 10 to 16 feet, more land-
scaping and outside dining space.
Parking will move from slanted to par-
allel and the street’s two lanes will be
thinned to a total of 20 feet.
According to a staff report, the esti-
mated loss of revenue from free park-
ing on the avenue is about $5,340 a
week. Funding is coming from
Burlingame’s capital improvement
budget.
The city has outlined plans of the
construction on its website. For exam-
ple, from July 14-19, there will be
streetscape project work on
Burlingame Avenue between Lorton
Avenue and Park Road. There will also
be utility work throughout town.
Construction began in April and will
be suspended during the holiday sea-
son. The project is expected to be com-
pleted by the end of the summer of
2014.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
REVAMP
Woodside Road.
The building has since been deemed
uninhabitable by fire officials.
Officials with KDF Hallmark did not
return a Daily Journal call yesterday.
The Chavez family is being repre-
sented by attorneys Ara Jabagchourian
and Alexandra Hamilton with
Burlingame-based Cotchett, Pitre &
McCarthy.
Jabagchourian told the Daily Journal
yesterday that more plaintiffs could
join in the lawsuit.
The landlords need to take responsi-
bility for protecting their tenants’ pos-
sessions and lives, Jabagchourian said.
“Given the lack of sprinklers, inade-
quate smoke detectors and/or other safe-
guards, a localized fire consumed nearly
the entire apartment complex,” accord-
ing to the complaint.
A fire that started in one unit should
not have grown to such enormity,
Jabagchourian said.
About half of the tenants in the build-
ing also received some type of assis-
tance from the county, including hous-
ing vouchers. Many of the victims
sought emergency shelter from the Red
Cross for at least three days after the
fire.
The victim who died was identified as
Darin Michael Demello-Pine, 48,
according to the San Mateo County
Coroner’s Office. Pine lived on the third
floor in unit no. 307, where fire officials
believe the blaze started as an accident,
perhaps from cooking.
Almost 40 hours after the fire was first
reported, fire crews were still in the
building knocking out windows and
attending to hot spots.
Former residents of the complex
stood in line two days after the fire start-
ed for a chance to recover any belong-
ings remaining from the blaze. They
only had 10 minutes, however, to
recover their belongings.
Much of the third floor of the com-
plex was completely destroyed by the
fire and the rest of the building suffered
major water and smoke damage. About
25 residents were briefly hospitalized
and another 61 were housed at the evac-
uation center at the Fair Oaks
Community Center the morning of the
blaze.
KDF Hallmark did return deposits
quickly to residents and also reimbursed
them for July rent, a Redwood City
police official said.
Yesterday, a fundraiser was held at Red
Morton Park for the fire victims from 3
p.m. to 7 p.m.
KDF has been involved in the con-
struction, acquisition and rehabilita-
tion of more than 5,300 affordable
rental units in 44 properties throughout
California, according to the company’s
website.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
FIRE
COMICS/GAMES
7-17-13
tuesday’s PuZZLe sOLVed
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Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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6 Defeated, in wrestling
12 Bobwhites
14 Wake up
15 Make it —!
16 Slangy foot
17 Dawn goddess
18 Put a stop to
19 Koan discipline
21 Gridiron stats
23 Sci. room
26 Egg layer
27 Microscopic
28 Wyoming range
30 Circle part
31 Paris friend
32 Houston player
33 Sullen
35 Noncom
37 And, to Fritz
38 King with a golden touch
39 Previously
40 Maiden name indicator
41 Badminton need
42 Mr., in Delhi
43 Business VIP
44 Cookout intruder
46 Two-bagger (abbr.)
48 Monster’s nickname
51 Formed a gully
55 Kansas capital
56 With a level head
57 Warmed up
58 Migratory focks
dOwn
1 Mensa stats
2 Sister
3 LAX regulators
4 Age on the vine
5 Dog chow brand
6 Party spreads
7 Fe
8 Strips of pasta
9 Almond
10 Curvy letter
11 Actress Susan
13 Dewey Decimal —
19 Take aim (2 wds.)
20 Convert a message
22 Airport fuid (hyph.)
24 Harmonize
25 It’s north of Java
26 Mia — of soccer
27 Channels
28 Unlikely story
29 Leaf juncture
34 Computer input (2 wds.)
36 Lion families
42 Lieu
43 Replica
45 Winged Victory
47 Toot one’s own horn
48 — degree
49 Help wanted abbr.
50 Rejuvenation resort
52 Aberdeen’s river
53 Raised railways
54 Apply henna
diLBert® CrOsswOrd PuZZLe
future sHOCk®
PearLs BefOre swine®
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wednesday, JuLy 17, 2013
CanCer (June 21-July 22) -- There is a strong
probability that a new arrival will show you how to
circumvent a problem that has been blocking your
path for far too long. It’s about time!
LeO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- You’re likely to get an
opportunity to help a good friend by showing him or
her how to see the good in people instead of just the
bad. It’s counsel your pal has long needed.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- People who know you
well respect the fact that your word can be relied
upon. You might get some proof of this faith today.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Even though a reward
you receive might be small in terms of dollars and
cents, the respect and acknowledgement that it
signifes will be worth much more in the long run.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- You’ll be adept at handling
your personal affairs as well as good at advising friends
and associates on how to handle their own complicated
lives. Don’t hide your light under a bushel.
saGittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- If you have
to make a decision between being practical or
compassionate regarding something involving a
close friend, choose the latter. Everything will work
out, and you’ll feel good about yourself.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- You are likely to
get an opportunity to develop a relationship with
someone whom you’ve long desired to know. This
person will be able to open doors for you that are
currently locked.
aQuarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Through an unusual
set of circumstances, something might transpire
that will stimulate your ambitions. You’re likely to
realize that you can follow someone’s example and
achieve something big.
PisCes (Feb. 20-March 20) -- The main reason
companions give credence to what you say is that
you clearly follow your own advice, and it works.
Keep doing what you’re doing.
aries (March 21-April 19) -- Much-needed changes in
your domestic life will at last take place. Even though
things may not end up exactly as you wished, it’ll be
close enough. Don’t sweat the details.
taurus (April 20-May 20) -- A friendly interaction
with a knowledgeable person should turn out to your
liking. This person will have a steadying effect that
will be extremely constructive.
GeMini (May 21-June 20) -- Generally speaking,
you should be rather lucky when it comes to matters
pertaining to money. This will include not only your
primary earnings, but income from a second source
as well.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
20 Wednesday • July 17, 2013
THE DAILY JOURNAL
21 Wednesday • July 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
IRISH HELP AT HOME
HIRING NOW
Caregivers wanted for a variety of posts
in the South Bay area
Transportation preferred
Work one-on-one in the client’s home
Competitive rates of pay
Call (650) 347-6903
Website: irishhelpathome.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
Employment Services
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CARLMONT GARDENS
NURSING CENTER
2140 CARLMONT DRIVE
BELMONT
Immediate openings. CNA’s
and Housekeeping/Laundry.
Must have solid identifica-
tion and the ability to work
“4-On, 2-Off” schedule.
Please apply in person,
Monday thru Friday.
110 Employment
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
CUSTOMER SERVICE/
SEAMSTRESS -
YOU ARE INVITED
Are you:
Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have:
Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for emplployment benefits
Sewiing skills
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available for
Customer Service/Seamstress.
Call for appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo CA, 94402
GREAT CLIPS
@ Sequoia Station
Redwood City
Now Hiring
Stylists & Managers.
Call Flo/Randy
408 247-8364 or 408 921-9994
Grand Opening Soon!
HELP WANTED: FOSTER CITY REC-
REATION FACILITY - part-time staff po-
sition open. Evening and weekend shifts
required. Must live locally. For a full job
description, please email:
Rob@themanorassn.com
HIRING LINE COOKS - Evenings, Avan-
ti Pizza. . 3536 Alameda, MENLO PARK,
CA (650)854-1222.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. All shifts
available. Call (650)703-8654
RESTAURANT -
Now hiring for Quick Service / Counter
Service positions. Apply in person at
753 Laurel Street, San Carlos
110 Employment
JANITORS - Part time, Foster City area.
Call Jerry (707)344-3678
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
UBER AND Limo and Taxi Driver
Wanted, Living in south bay making $600
to $900 a week, Fulltime, (650)766-9878
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
150 Seeking Employment
HOUSE CLEANER - 35 years experi-
ence, excellent references, have trans-
portation, (650)678-5155
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 521929
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Jodie Faye Schmeltz
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Jodie Faye Schmeltz filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Jodie Faye Schmeltz
Proposed name: Jodie Faye
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on August 13,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 06/20/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 06/10/2013
(Published, 07/10/13, 07/17/2013,
07/24/2013, 07/31/2013)
22 Wednesday • July 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 522710
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Michele Ann Poulter,
Eva Marie Poulter,
Olivia Poulter & Grant Poulter
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Michele Ann Poulter filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
a.Present name: Michele Ann Poulter
a.Proposed name: Michele Ann Saint
b.Present name: Eva Marie Elizabeth
Poulter
b.Proposed name: Eva Marie Elizabeth
Saint
c.Present name: Olivia Rose Poulter
c.Proposed name: Olivia Rose Saint
d.Present name: Grant Robert Poulter
d.Proposed name: grant Robert Saint
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on August 21,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 07/08/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 07/08/2013
(Published, 07/10/13, 07/17/2013,
07/24/2013, 07/31/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256490
The following person is doing business
as: La Lacquerie, 262 Club Dr., SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered
by the following owner: La Lacquerie
Corporation, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Susan Aflak /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256356
The following person is doing business
as: Sierra Home Automation, 76 Mission
Dr., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Sha
Consulting, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
06/01/2013.
/s/ Patrick Hagerman /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/26/13, 07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256618
The following person is doing business
as: K & B Discount Store, 201 S. Del-
ware St. #A, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Eddy Mejia, 1900 S. Norfolk, #350, San
Mateo, CA 94403, Maria Sautizo, 1101
Tilton Ave., Apt. 11, San Mateo, CA
94401. The business is conducted by co-
partners. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Eddy Mejia /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/012013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256318
The following person is doing business
as: Bay Area Metro Group, 21 Airport
Blvd, Ste. H, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: New Metropolitan, Inc.,
CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
06/03/2013.
/s/ Leona Shum /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256545
The following person is doing business
as: Dylan’s Kids Cuts, 939 Edgewater
Blvd., FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Er-
landson & Associates, LLC, CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Lia-
bility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Marc Erlandson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256175
The following person is doing business
as: Sequoia Medical Group, 3400 Data
Dr., Second Floor, RANCHO CORDO-
VA, CA 95670 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Dingnity Health
Medical Foundation, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Thomas Lowry /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256429
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Stella Events, 794 Francisco
St., HALF MOON BAY, CA 94019 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Vanessa Stella, and Rick Stella Po Box
1383, El Granada, CA 94018. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Married Couple.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ Vanessa Stella /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256576
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Abeles and Associates, 2) Balance
Point Group, 624 Cuesta Ave., SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Alan M. Abeles,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/01/2009.
/s/ Alan M. Abeles /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256621
The following person is doing business
as: Park Center Company, 1120 Royal
Ln., SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Paul
Hoffman, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Paul Hoffman /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256452
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Mold Remedies, 2) R & R Con-
struction 320 Vallejo Dr. #41, BURLIN-
GAME, CA 94011 is hereby registered
by the following owner: RPRW, Inc, CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
01/01/2003.
/s/ Richard Wolf /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256173
The following person is doing business
as: Your Life Your Plate Nutrition Con-
sulting, 1600 E. 3rd Ave. SAN MATEO,
CA 94401 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Daniel Anthony Velarde
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Daniel A. Velarde /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256252
The following person is doing business
as: Carlmont Advisors, 751 Laurel St.,
Ste 423, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Flora M. Burke, 22 Club Dr., #A, San
Carlos, CA 94070. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Flora M. Burke /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256375
The following person is doing business
as: Hire10, 3150 Edison Street, SAN
MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Virginia Nikoloff,
1309 Sixth Ave., Belmont, CA 94002.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Virginia Nikoloff /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13, 07/31/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256336
The following person is doing business
as: Your Water Filtration Co., 742 Dart-
mouth Ave., SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
O’Haran Enterprises, CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Bette Haran /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13, 07/31/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256649
The following person is doing business
as: Leslie’s Janitorial Service, 15 S. Nor-
folk St., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Le-
slie Padilla, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Leslie Padilla /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13, 07/31/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256568
The following person is doing business
as: Special Tech DJ, LLC, 572 San Ma-
teo Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Special Tech DJ, LLC, CA. The business
is conducted by a Limited Liability Com-
pany. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
07/01/2013.
/s/ Frank Cuevas /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13, 07/31/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256518
The following person is doing business
as: Fishbusters, 2001 Hastings Shore
Lane, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94065 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
DexCare, Inc., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Dexter Chiang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13, 07/31/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256687
The following person is doing business
as: Starband, 484 Tiller Lane, RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94065 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Maureen
McInerney, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Maureen McInerney /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13, 07/31/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256510
The following person is doing business
as: Bilingual Cine-Television, 1312 Acad-
emy Avenue, BELMONT, CA 94002 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Monti Rossetti, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 06/20/2013.
/s/ Monti Rossetti /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/17/13, 07/24/13, 07/31/13, 08/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256766
The following person is doing business
as: J & J Technet Solutions, 224 Wild-
wood Drive, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Guillermo Jimenez, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 07/12/2013.
/s/ Guillermo Jimenez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/17/13, 07/24/13, 07/31/13, 08/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256763
The following person is doing business
as: Sixto’s Cantina, 1448 Burlingame
Avenue, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
EDIW, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Teresa Lindhartsen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/17/13, 07/24/13, 07/31/13, 08/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256496
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: SCO’D, 130 16th Ave., SAN
MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered
by the following owners: Shanon W. Cor-
nejo, same address, Daniel L. Ortiz, 455
Jackson Ave., Redwood City, CA 94061
and James Sanabria, 58 W. Portal Ave.,
#245, San Francisco, CA 94127. The
business is conducted by a Joint Ven-
ture. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Shanon W. Cornejo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/17/13, 07/24/13, 07/31/13, 08/07/13).
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
CHANGE IN OWNERSHIP OF
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE
Date of Filing Application: July 12, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
GILBERT HUERTA GONZALEZ
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
840 BREWSTER AVE.
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063-1510
Type of license applied for:
48-On-Sale General Public Premises
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
July 17, 2013
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: July 3, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
JOSE CORTEZMACHUCA
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
3194 MIDDLEFIELD ROAD
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063
Type of license applied for:
41-On-Sale Beer And Wine-Eating
Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
July 17, 2013
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: July 5, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
NULY LLC
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
206 S. B STREET
SAN MATEO, CA 94401-4018
Type of license applied for:
41-On-Sale Beer And Wine-Eating
Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
July 17, 14, 31, 2013
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE
FILE NO. 7037.98083
TITLE ORDER NO. 7072056
MIN NO. APN 106-460-120-4
YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A
DEED OF TRUST, DATED 01/01/06.
UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO
PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT
MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE.
IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION
OF THE NATURE OF THE PRO-
CEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU
SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A
public auction sale to the highest bid-
der for cash, cashier's check drawn
on a state or national bank, check
drawn by state or federal credit union,
or a check drawn by a state or federal
savings and loan association, or sav-
ings association, or savings bank
specified in §5102 to the Financial
code and authorized to do business in
this state, will be held by duly ap-
pointed trustee. The sale will be
made, but without covenant or
warranty, expressed or implied, re-
garding title, possession, or encum-
brances, to satisfy the obligation se-
cured by said Deed of Trust. The un-
dersigned Trustee disclaims any liabil-
ity for any incorrectness of the proper-
ty address or other common designa-
tion, if any, shown herein. Trustor(s):
STEPHANIE SINGER, AN UNMAR-
RIED WOMAN Recorded: 01/09/06,
as Instrument No. 2006-003538, of
Official Records of SAN MATEO
County, California. Date of Sale:
08/06/13 at 12:30 PM Place of Sale:
At the Marshall Street entrance to the
Hall of Justice, 400 County Center.,
Redwood City, CA The purported
property address is: 1919 ALAMEDA
DE LAS PULGAS, #120, SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94403 Assessors Parcel No.
106-460-120-4 The total amount of
the unpaid balance of the obliga-
tion secured by the property to be
sold and reasonable estimated
costs, expenses and advances at the
time of the initial publication of the No-
tice of Sale is $298,376.04. If the sale
is set aside for any reason, the pur-
chaser at the sale shall be entitled on-
ly to a return of the deposit paid, plus
interest. The purchaser shall have
no further recourse against the
beneficiary, the Trustor or the trust-
ee. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BID-
DERS: If you are considering bidding
on this property lien, you should un-
derstand that there are risks involved
in bidding at a trustee auction. You
will be bidding on a lien, not on the
property itself. Placing the highest bid
at a trustee auction does not automat-
ically entitle you to free and clear
ownership of the property. You
should also be aware that the lien be-
ing auctioned off may be a junior lien.
If you are the highest bidder at the
auction, you are or may be responsi-
ble for paying off all liens senior to the
lien being auctioned off, before you
can receive clear title to the property.
You are encouraged to investigate the
existence, priority and size of out-
standing liens that may exist on this
property by contacting the county re-
corder's office or a title insurance
company, either of which may charge
you a fee for this information. If you
consult either of these resources, you
should be aware that the same lender
may hold more than one mortgage or
deed of trust on the property. NO-
TICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The
sale date shown on this notice of sale
may be postponed one or more times
by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trust-
ee, or a court, pursuant to Section
2924g of the California Civil Code.
The law requires that information
about trustee sale postponements be
made available to you and to the pub-
lic, as a courtesy to those not present
at the sale. If you wish to learn
whether your sale date has been
postponed, and if applicable, the re-
scheduled time and date for the sale
of this property, you may call 877-
484-9942 or 800-280-2832 or visit this
Internet Web site www.USA-Foreclo-
sure.com or www.Auction.com using
the file number assigned to this case
7037.98083. Information about post-
ponements that are very short in dura-
tion or that occur close in time to the
scheduled sale may not immediately
be reflected in the telephone informa-
tion or on the Internet Web site. The
best way to verify postponement infor-
mation is to attend the scheduled
sale. Date: July 15, 2013 NORTH-
WEST TRUSTEE SERVICES, INC.,
as Trustee Bonita Salazar, Author-
ized Signatory 1241 E. Dyer Road,
Suite 250, Santa Ana, CA 92705 866-
387-6987 Sale Info website:
www.USA-Foreclosure.com or
www.Auction.com Automated Sales
Line: 877-484-9942 or 800-280-2832
Reinstatement and Pay-Off Requests:
866-387-NWTS THIS OFFICE IS
ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT
AND ANY INFORMATION OB-
TAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT
PURPOSE. ORDER # 7037.98083:
07/17/2013,07/24/2013,07/31/2013
203 Public Notices
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252527
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Key-
la’s Dollar Store, 201 S. Delaware St.,
#A, SAN MATEO, CA 94401The fictitious
business name referred to above was
filed in County on 09/27/12 The business
was conducted by: Maria L. Santizo.
/s/ Maria L. Santizo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 07/01/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 07/03/13,
07/10/13, 07/17/2013, 07/24/2013).
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CIV519062
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): TIEN TIEN FOOD COMPA-
NY, INC., a California corporation; TIEN
TIEN FOOD PRODUCTS, INC., a Cali-
fornia corporation; UMC FOOD CORPO-
RATION,a California corporation; YIN
SHUN TANG a/k/a FRED TANG, an indi-
vidual; MABLE CHAN TANG a/k/a
MABLE CHAN, an individual; and DOES
1 TO 100, inclusive
YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF:
(Lo esta demandando el demandante):
EAST WEST BANK, a California corpo-
ration
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
Superior Court of San Mateo County
400 County Center
Redwood City, CA 94063-1655
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Scott O. Smith, SBN 62839, Ivo Keller,
SBN 245909
Buchalter Nemer
1000 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 1500
Los Angeles, CA 90017-2457
(213)891-0700
Date: (Fecha) Jan. 11, 2013
John C. Fitton, Clerk
(Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
July 17, 24, 31, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, $90.,
(650)610-9765
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIER 5200 BTU window air conditioner
- never used, in box, $95. obo, (650)591-
6842
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WEBER BRAND Patio Refrigerator,
round top load, for beer, soda, and wa-
ter. $30 obo SOLD!
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, SOLD!
298 Collectibles
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $75.,
(650)596-0513
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo SOLD!
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
84 USED European (34) and U.S. (50)
Postage Stamps. Most issued before
World War II. All different and all detach-
ed from envelopes. $4.00, 650-787-
8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
23 Wednesday • July 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NOTICE OF PUBLIC REVIEW AND INTENT TO ADOPT A
MITIGATED NEGATIVE DECLARATION
An Initial Study/ Proposed Mitigated Negative Declaration
(IS/MND) has been prepared by the California State Lands
Commission (CSLC), as Lead Agency under the California En-
vironmental Quality Act (CEQA) (Pub. Resources Code, §
21000 et seq.) for the Offshore Geophysical Permit Program
Update (Project). The IS/MND is in compliance with the re-
quirements of CEQA, the State CEQA Guidelines (Cal. Code
Regs., tit. 14, § 15000 et seq.), and CSLC Regulations (Cal.
Code Regs., tit. 2, § 2901 et seq.). This Notice fulfills a State
regulatory process noticing and review requirement for the
CSLC.
Project Title: Low Energy Offshore Geophysical Permit Pro-
gram (OGPP) Update
Project Location: Offshore Waters (to 3 nm) from Mexico
border to Oregon border
Project Description: The CSLC has statutory authority, pur-
suant to Public Resources Code section 6826, to issue geo-
physical permits in State waters to qualified permittees for the
use of low energy geophysical equipment to perform geophys-
ical surveys of the ocean bottom, subject to specified terms
and conditions. The CSLC has proposed the OGPP Update as
a means to develop and implement a revised permitting struc-
ture for offshore geophysical surveys it permits under existing
law, in order to establish consistent guidance, limitations, and
permit conditions and ensure that the activities of permittees
do not result in a significant effect on the environment.
The IS/MND can be downloaded, in PDF format, at
www.slc.ca.gov (click on the “Information” and “CEQA Up-
dates” links). Hard copies of the IS/MND and the documents
referenced in the IS/MND (on CD) are also available for review
at the locations below:
California State Lands Commission
200 Oceangate, 12th Floor
Long Beach, CA 90802
California State Lands Commission
100 Howe Ave., Suite 100
South Sacramento, CA 95825
The IS/MND is available for a 45-day review period beginning
July 9, 2013. All comments must be received or postmarked
on or before August 23, 2013, and can be sent to:
Division of Environmental Planning and Management
California State Lands Commission 100 Howe Ave., Suite
100-South Sacramento, CA 95825
Email: CEQAcomments@slc.ca.gov
Fax: (916) 574-1885
Important Notes to Commenters
1. You are encouraged to submit electronic copies of your writ-
ten comments. If written comments are sent by e-mail, please
send the comments to CEQAcomments@slc.ca.gov and write
the following in the subject line of your email: OGPP Update
Comments. If written comments are faxed, please also mail a
copy to ensure that a clean copy is received by this office.
2. If you represent a public agency, please provide the name,
email address, and telephone number for the contact person
in your agency for the Project.
3. Before including your address, telephone number, email ad-
dress or other personal identifying information in your com-
ment, you should be aware that your entire comment—includ-
ing your personal identifying information—may be made pub-
licly available at any time (including in the MND and posted on
the CSLC’s website). While you may ask the CSLC (promi-
nently at the beginning of your submission) to withhold your
personal identifying information from public review, the CSLC
cannot guarantee that it will be able to do so. The CSLC will
make available for inspection, in their entirety, all comments
submitted by organizations, businesses, or by individuals iden-
tifying themselves as representatives of organizations or busi-
nesses.
The Project’s MND will be considered for adoption at a future
scheduled meeting of the CSLC. The specific time and loca-
tion will be posted on the CSLC’s website at www.slc.ca.gov
when specific meeting information becomes known; in addi-
tion, interested parties will be notified prior to Commission ac-
tion.
Should you have any questions or need additional information
from a State or CEQA perspective, please contact Jennifer
DeLeon at (916) 574-0748, or via e-mail at
jennifer.deleon@slc.ca.gov.
298 Collectibles
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MENORAH - Antique Jewish tree of life,
10”W x 30”H, $100., (650)348-6428
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $35 (650)341-8342
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, SOLD!
298 Collectibles
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
302 Antiques
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500
(650)766-3024
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HARMON/KANDON SPEAKERS (2)
mint condition, great, for small
office/room or extra speakers, 4 1/2 in.
high, includes cords $8., SOLD!
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center draw locks all comes with
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame SOLD!
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3 MEDAL base kitchen cabinets with
drawers and wood doors $99
(650)347-8061
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR (2), with arms, Italian 1988 Cha-
teau D'Ax, solid, perfect condition. $50
each or $85 for both. (650)591-0063
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet with 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
COPENHAGEN TEAK DINING TABLE
with dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions.
48/88" long x 32" wide x 30" high.
$95.00, (650)637-0930
COUCH - reclines, very good condition,
fabric material, San Mateo area, $50
(510)303-0454
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 draw dresser 61" wide,
31" high, & 18" deep $50., (650)592-
2648
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
GLASS DINING Table 41” x 45” Round-
ed rectangle clear glass top and base
$85 (650)888-0129
304 Furniture
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, SOLD!
LIGHT WOOD Rocking Chair & Has-
sock, gold cushions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
RECLINER ROCKER - Like new, brown,
vinyl, $99., SOLD!
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR with wood carving,
armrest, rollers, and it swivels $99.,
(650)592-2648
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEAK TV STAND, wheels, rotational,
glass doors, drawer, 5 shelves. 31" wide
x 26" high X 18" deep. $75.00 (650)637-
0930
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WICKER ENTERTAINMENT CABINET -
H 78” x 43” x 16”, almost new, $89.,
(650)347-9920
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
3 PIECE fireplace set with screen $25
(650)322-2814
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, (650)578-9208
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
1/2 HORSE power 8" worm drive skill
saw $40 OBO (650)315-5902
10" BAN Saw $75.STOP
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
BLACK & DECKER CORDLESS 18 volt
combo drill, vacuum, saw, sander, two
batteries & charger, brand new, $95.
obo, SOLD!
BLACK AND Decker, 10” trimmer/edger
, rechargeable, brand new, $50
(650)871-7200
BOB VILLA rolling tool box & organizer -
brand new with misc. tools, $40. obo,
SOLD!
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTMANS PROFESSIONAL car buf-
fer with case $40 OBO (650)315-5902
CRAFTSMAN 14.4 VOLT DRILL - bat-
tery & charger, never used, $35. obo,
SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 3/8” 16.8 volt drill & vac-
uum combo, brand new, with charger,
$45. obo, SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DREMEL HIGH SPEED ROTARY TOOL
- all attachments, never used, $25. obo
SOLD!
ELECTRIC HEDGE trimmer good condi-
tion (Black Decker) $40 (650)342-6345
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 21” Belt Sander with long cord,
$35 (650)315-5902
NEW DRILL DRIVER - 18V + battery &
charger, $30., (650)595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SANDER, MAKITA finishing sander, 4.5
x 4.5"' used once. Complete with dust
bag and hard shell case. $35.00 SOLD!
SMALL ROTETILLER 115 Volt Works
well $99.00 (650)355-2996
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
TORO ELECTRIC POWER SWEEPER
blower - never used, in box, $35. obo,
(650)591-6842
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
3 LARGE old brown mixing bowls $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History,
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
5 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $9. for all
(650)347-5104
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
AIR CONDITIONER - Window mount,
$50. obo, (650)438-4737
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALOE VERA PLANTS - (30) medicine
plant, $3.00 each, (650)678-1989
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99., (650)580-
3316
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
310 Misc. For Sale
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASTRONOMY BOOKS (2) Hard Cover
Cambridge Encyclopedia of Astronomy,
World of Discovery, $12., (650)578-9208
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14., (650)578-9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, $40,
(650)347-5104
BAY BRIDGE Framed 50th anniversary
poster (by Bechtel corp) $50
(650)873-4030
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection SOLD!
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY Jake AB Scissor Exercise Ma-
chine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
COLEMAN ICE CHEST - 80 quart, $20.,
(650)345-3840
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
(650)578-9208
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOOD HEALTH FACT BOOK - un-
used, answers to get/stay healthy, hard
cover, 480 pages, $8., (650)578-9208
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HABACHI BBQ Grill heavy iron 22" high
15" wide $25 SOLD!
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15., (650)345-
3840
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
epels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model", $250., (650)637-0930
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LAUNDRY SORTER - on wheels, triple
section, laundry sorter - $19., (650)347-
9920
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12” L x
5”W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, (650)341-1861
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW COWBOY BOOTS - 9D, Unworn,
black, fancy, only $85., (650)595-3933
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., (650)578-9208
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
Ideal for Apartment balconies. 33" wide x
20 inches deep. 64.5 " high. $70.00
SSF, (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
24 Wednesday • July 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Pearl Harbor mo.
4 Pearl Harbor
presence
8 Cuts into
14 Singles out
16 League of
Nations home
17 “Right back
atcha!”
18 Came down and
delayed the
game
19 Capital on the
Dnieper
20 Bay window
22 Prepare for an
attack
25 Words on some
blue balloons
30 Ruler in un
palacio
32 Story including a
time and place
34 “Finished!”
35 Bring down the
curtain on
36 Almond __:
candy
37 Quran religion
38 Antilles native
40 Penny prez
42 “Affliction” Oscar
nominee
43 Name on a range
44 Berserk
46 __ vivant
47 Chinese menu
promise
48 Hag
49 “Wish you were
here — __ were
there”
50 Cirque du Soleil
staple
52 Medium’s
medium
54 Longtime
Chicago
Symphony
conductor
56 Organ knob
59 Seattle ballpark,
familiarly
63 Forgo
accomplices
66 Sinuous course
67 It bodes well
68 Table no-nos
69 Bygone blade
70 Watched kids
DOWN
1 Frisbee, e.g.
2 Hollywood’s
Morales
3 “Ally McBeal”
genre
4 “Forget it!”
5 Took the cake?
6 Riverdale High
brunette of
comics
7 North Sea feeder
8 Wetlands nester
9 Skunk, literally
and figuratively
10 Secretive
maritime org.
11 Cozy retreat
12 Anticipatory time
13 In a funk
15 Strauss of denim
21 Sundial number
23 Harbor hauler
24 U.N. anti-child-
labor agcy.
26 Nodding words
27 Popular ’60s-’70s
pants, and what
can be found in
3-, 9-, 23- and
33-Down?
28 Henry Clay, for
one
29 Sana’a citizen
30 Eat one’s words
31 Fill with love
33 Pachyderm friend
of Zephir the
monkey
39 Javert’s rank:
Abbr.
41 :-( is one
45 “Not __ bet!”
48 Animation still
51 Speeds
53 Capital formerly
named
Christiania
55 Puts (out)
57 __ Day
vitamins
58 Cooped (up)
59 Leeds-to-London
dir.
60 Without
exception
61 “Groovy!”
62 “Out of the Blue”
rock gp.
64 Pump part
65 Lime ending
By Don Gagliardo and C.C. Burnikel
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
07/17/13
07/17/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
310 Misc. For Sale
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS & CD un-
opened, “Calculate with Confidence”, 4th
edition, like new, $34., (650)345-3277
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS - “Human
Physiology Mechanisms of Disease”, 6th
edition, $15., and “Pathphysiology Bio-
logic Basics”, 4th edition, $32., (650)345-
3277
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SAFETY SHOES - Iron Age, Mens steel
toe metatarfal work boots, brown, size 10
1/2, in box, $50., (650)594-1494
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. White Rotary
sewing machine similar age, cabinet
style. $85 both. (650)574-4439
SLIDE PROJECTOR - Airequipt Super-
ba 66A slide projector and screen.
$50.00 for all. (650)345-3840
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STAINED GLASS panels multi colors
beautiful work 35" long 111/2" wide $79
OBO (650)349-6059
STAINED GLASS,
28”x30” Japanese geisha motif, multi
colored, beautiful. $200 (650)520-9366
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, (650)341-1861
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
“UP STAIRS DOWN STAIRS” - first two
years, 14 videos in box, $30 for all,
(650)286-9171
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VHS MOVIES and DVD's. (20) Old to
current releases. $2 per movie. Your
choice. South San Francisco
(650) 871-7200
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WEBER GO ANYWHERE GAS BARBE-
QUE - never used, in box, $40., SOLD!
311 Musical Instruments
GUITAR FOR sale. Fender Accoustic,
with case. $89.00 (415)971-7555
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
MARTIN GUITAR 1971 D-18S Great
shape, Great sound. Price reduced to
$1200. SOLD!
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
COAT - Dressy ladies short trench coat,
red, brand new, weather proof, light-
weight, size 6/8, $35.,(650)345-3277
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
316 Clothes
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
IONIC BREEZE quadra, Sharper Image,
3 level silent air purifier. 27”h, energy
saver, original box with video. Excellent
condition. $77. (650)347-5104
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS JACKET - size XXL, Beautiful
cond., med., $35., (650)595-3933
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NEW! OLD NAVY Coat: Boy/Gril, fleece-
lined, hooded $15 (415)585-3622
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
brand new, never worn for $25
(650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, SOLD!
150 COPPER spades for #6 strand.
Copper wire. $50.00 for all.
(650)345-3840
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
PVC SCHEDULE 80 connectors and
coupling. 100 pieces in all. $30.00 for all
(650)345-3840
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 AIR rifles, shoots .177 pelets. $50 ea
Obo SOLD!
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).SOLD!
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
318 Sports Equipment
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
FOR SALE medium size wet suit $95
call for info (650)851-0878
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
KELTY SUPER TIOGA BACKPACK -
$40., (650)552-9436
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels, $85.
obo, (650)223-7187
ROWING MACHINE. $30.00
(650)637-0930
STATIONARY EXERCISE BICYCLE -
Compact, excellent condition, $40. obo,
(650)834-2583
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
TENT - one man packable tent - $20.,
(650)552-9436
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
THULE SKI RACK - holds 3 pairs, $85.,
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL EXERCISE- Pro Form 415
Crosswalk, very good condition $200 call
(650)266-8025
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40.,
(408)764-6142
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
325 Estate Sales
ESTATE SALE
Redwood City
(Emerald Hills)
2547 Woodland
Place
Friday & Saturday
July 19 & 20
8 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Antiques collected
over 40 years,
furniture, toys,
classic car,
home & lawn decor.
Don’t Miss!
335 Garden Equipment
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $65.,
(650)342-8436
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
SLEEP APNEA breathing machine com-
plete in box helps you breathe, costs $$$
sacrifice for $75, (650)995-0012
WALKER - $25., brand new, tag still on,
(650)594-1494
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
FURNISHED ONE BEDROOM APART-
MENT - $1300. month, $800. deposit,
close to Downtown RWC, Call (650)361-
1200
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
1999 AUDI A6 sedan with 116k miles,
Quattro automatic loaded looks and
drives very nice comes with 3000
miles warranty clean Car Fax #4447
priced at $5995.00 plus tax lic,etc.
(650)637-3900
2000 BMW 323CI coupe with 129 k
miles automatic sport two door great
looking drives excellent all power pack-
age #4518 clean Car Fax on sale for on-
ly $7000.00 plus normal fees.s normal
fees. (650)637-3900
2002 PT Criuser limited with 121k miles
she is fully loaded looks and drives great
automatic inexpensive sedan with clean
Car Fax #4515 on sale for $4995.00 plus
normal fees. (650)637-3900
2003 AUDI A6 Quattro with 79k
miles,sports luxury sedan fully optioned
in excellent conditions and 3000 miles
free warranty clean Car Fax #4424 on
sale for $7995 plus fees. (650)637-3900
2003 FORD MUSTANG GT deluxe con-
vertible with 102k miles automatic and
loaded with lots of options comes with
power top and 3000 miles free warranty
clean Car Fax #5031 priced at $7995.00
plus, fees (650)637-3900
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
620 Automobiles
2004 CHEVY MALIBU Classic automatic
sedan with 87k low miles clean car fax all
power package and 3 mounths warranty
#4437 on sale for $5850.00 plus fees.
(650)637-3900
2004 FORD Explorer Eddie Bauer SUV
with 146k miles auto all wheel drive with
third row seat room for 7 people looks
and drives like new car clean car and
warranty #4330 at $7995.00 plus fees.
(650)637-3900
2004 HONDA CIVIC LX sedan with 154k
miles 4 door automatic with power pack-
age tilt and cruise new trade in which
comes with warranty #4517 on sale for
$5995.00 plus fees. (650)637-3900
2008 HYUNDAI Accent GLS 4 door se-
dan with only 49k miles automatic great
on gas cold air condition and 3000 miles
free warranty #4512 on sale for low price
of $7995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
ACURA ‘97 - 3.0 CL CP, Black, Auto-
matic, $2800., (650)630-3216
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
25 Wednesday • July 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
620 Automobiles
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBIL”79Royal Delta 88, 122k
Miles, in excelleny Condition $1,800
(650)342-8510
VOLVO ‘00 - 4 door, excellent condition,
$4200 or best offer, (650)678-5155
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
1997 BMW 540I sedan with 120k miles
automatic powerfull luxury sedan lot of
room for 5 people and a great ride clean
Car Fax #5044 on sale for only $5500.00
plus fees.(650)637-3900
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $50. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35., (650)670-
2888
NEW MOTORCYCLE HELMET - Modu-
lar, dual visor, $69., (650)595-3933
WANTED-HONDA 90 or 350. Any
condition (831) 462-9836
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $60 for all
(650)588-7005
2 BACKUP light 1953 Buick $40
(650)341-8342
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPEAR tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
670 Auto Parts
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Bath
TUBZ
Over 400 Tubs on display!
World’s Largest “Hands-On, Feet-In”
Showroom
4840 Davenport Place
Fremont, CA 94538
(510)770-8686
www.tubz.net
Asphalt/Paving
AIM CONSTRUCTION
John Peterson
• Paving • Grading
• Slurry Sealing • Paving Stones
• Concrete • Patching
We AIM to please!
(650)468-6750
(408)422-7695
Lic.# 916680
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Artificial Grass • Gazebos •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Contractors
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Home repairs &
Foundation work
Retaining wall • Decks • Fences
No job too small
Gary Afu
(650)207-2400
Lic# 904960
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
Concrete
CHETNER CONCRETE
Lic #706952
Driveways - Walkways
- Pool Decks - Patios - Stairs
- Exposed Aggregate - Masonry
- Retaining Walls - Drainage
- Foundation/Slabs
Free Estimates
(650)271-1442 Mike
Concrete
Construction
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Cleaning service.
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
26 Wednesday • July 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
Painting
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets,
Also, Electrical, Hauling
Carpet, Tile & Stucco
(650)461-0326
Lic# 983312
HAMZEH PLUMBING
5 stars on Yelp!
$25 OFF First Time Customers
All plumbing services
24 hour emergency service
(415)690-6540
Plumbing
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Coverings
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Cemetery
CRIPPEN & FLYNN FUNERAL
CHAPELS
Family owned & operated
Established 1949
Personalized cremation &
funeral services
Serving all faiths & traditions
Woodside chapel: (650)369-4103
FD 879
Carlmont chapel: (650)595-4103
FD 1825
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
WORLD 27
Wednesday • July 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Juan Zamorano
and Michael Weissenstein
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PANAMA CITY — A North Korean ship
carrying weapons system parts buried under
sacks of sugar was seized as it tried to cross
the Panama Canal on its way from Cuba to
its home country, which is barred by United
Nations sanctions from importing sophis-
ticated weapons or missiles, Panamanian
officials said Tuesday.
The ship appeared to be transporting a
radar-control system for a Soviet-era sur-
face-to-air missile system, according to a
private defense analysis firm that examined
a photograph posted on Twitter by
Panamanian President Ricardo Martinelli.
Martinelli said the ship identified as the
14,000-ton Chong Chon Gang was carry-
ing missiles and other arms, but he provid-
ed no specific evidence or details about the
cargo. He said on his Twitter account that
the arms were “hidden in containers under-
neath the cargo of sugar. ”
The photo posted by the president shows
a green tube that appears to be a horizontal
antenna for the SNR-75 “Fan Song” radar,
which used to guide missiles fired by the SA-
2 air-defense system found in former Warsaw
Pact and Soviet-allied nations, said Neil
Ashdown, an analyst for IHS Jane’s
Intelligence.
Jane’s isn’t sure where the system in the
photo was manufactured but the radar would
be useful to North Korea as part of a dense
air defense network, Ashdown said.
“It is possible that this could be being
sent to North Korea to update its high alti-
tude air-defense capabilities,” he said.
One container buried under sugar sacks
contained radar equipment that appears to be
designed for use with air-to-air or surface-to-
air missiles, said Belsio Gonzalez, director
of Panama’s National Aeronautics and
Ocean Administration.
Panama finds suspected weapons on North Korean ship
By Hamza Hendawi
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO — Egypt’s interim leader swore in
a Cabinet on Tuesday that included women
and Christians but no Islamists as the mili-
tary-backed administration moved swiftly
to formalize the new political order and
present a more liberal face that is markedly
at odds with the deposed president and his
supporters.
The changes came at a time of deep polar-
ization and violence in Egypt, including
new clashes that killed seven people as part
of the continuing bloodshed that has
marked the days following the armed forces
coup that swept President Mohammed
Morsi from office and cracked down on the
Muslim Brotherhood.
Egypt’s military already wields great
influence behind the scenes, and the army
chief, Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, who oust-
ed Morsi on July 3, was given a promotion
in the Cabinet. He became a first deputy
prime minister in addition to keeping his
post as defense minister.
For most of the two years since the over-
throw of autocrat Hosni Mubarak, the coun-
try has been split into two camps — one led
by Morsi, his Muslim Brotherhood and its
Islamist allies, and another led by secular
Egyptians, liberals, Christians and moder-
ate Muslims.
The fault lines remain, except that the
Islamist camp is no longer in power.
It does not include members of any
Islamist parties — a sign of the enduring
division that follows the removal of Morsi,
Egypt’s first freely elected president.
Egypt Cabinet has women, Christians; no Islamists
REUTERS
A long,green missile-shaped object is seen inside the North Korean flagged ship ‘Chong Chon
Gang’ docked at the Manzanillo Container Terminal in Colon City, Panama.
Food
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)868-0082
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
UNION SPA & SALON
Grand Opening
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Massage Therapy
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT
SENIOR LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
Video
ADULT VIDEOS $99 (415)298-0645
Jewelers
Massage Therapy
Video
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT
SENIOR LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
Massage Therapy
28
Wednesday • July 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL

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