Textiles Technology Years 7–10

Syllabus

June 2003

© 2003 Copyright Board of Studies NSW for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales. This document contains Material prepared by the Board of Studies NSW for and on behalf of the State of New South Wales. The Material is protected by Crown copyright. All rights reserved. No part of the Material may be reproduced in Australia or in any other country by any process, electronic or otherwise, in any material form or transmitted to any other person or stored electronically in any form without the prior written permission of the Board of Studies NSW, except as permitted by the Copyright Act 1968. School students in NSW and teachers in schools in NSW may copy reasonable portions of the Material for the purposes of bona fide research or study. When you access the Material you agree: • to use the Material for information purposes only • to reproduce a single copy for personal bona fide study use only and not to reproduce any major extract or the entire Material without the prior permission of the Board of Studies NSW • to acknowledge that the Material is provided by the Board of Studies NSW • not to make any charge for providing the Material or any part of the Material to another person or in any way make commercial use of the Material without the prior written consent of the Board of Studies NSW and payment of the appropriate copyright fee • to include this copyright notice in any copy made • not to modify the Material or any part of the Material without the express prior written permission of the Board of Studies NSW. The Material may contain third party copyright materials such as photos, diagrams, quotations, cartoons and artworks. These materials are protected by Australian and international copyright laws and may not be reproduced or transmitted in any format without the copyright owner’s specific permission. Unauthorised reproduction, transmission or commercial use of such copyright materials may result in prosecution. The Board of Studies has made all reasonable attempts to locate owners of third party copyright material and invites anyone from whom permission has not been sought to contact the Copyright Officer, ph (02) 9367 8289, fax (02) 9279 1482.

Published by Board of Studies NSW GPO Box 5300 Sydney NSW 2001 Australia Tel: (02) 9367 8111 Fax: (02) 9367 8484 Internet: http://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au June 2003 ISBN 1 7409 9271 7
2003176

Contents
1 Introduction ..................................................................................................................5 1.1 1.2 2 3 4 5 6 7 The K–10 Curriculum........................................................................................5 Students with Special Education Needs..............................................................6

Rationale ......................................................................................................................8 The Place of the Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus in the Technology K–12 Curriculum.......................................................................................9 Aim ............................................................................................................................10 Objectives...................................................................................................................11 Outcomes ...................................................................................................................12 Content.......................................................................................................................14 7.1 7.2 Organisation of Content...................................................................................14 Content for Years 7–10....................................................................................19 Outcomes ........................................................................................................28 Content............................................................................................................29 Stage Statements..............................................................................................35 Standards .........................................................................................................41 Assessment for Learning..................................................................................41 Reporting.........................................................................................................43 Choosing Assessment Strategies ......................................................................44

8

Life Skills Outcomes and Content...............................................................................28 8.1 8.2

9 10

Continuum of Learning in Textiles Technology K–10.................................................35 9.1 10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4 Assessment.................................................................................................................41

and participate as active and informed citizens • express themselves through creative activity and engage with the artistic. understanding. In accordance with the K–10 Curriculum Framework. creative and confident in the use of technology and understand the impact of technology on society • understand the work environment and be equipped with the knowledge. analyse. taking account of moral. and to be self-motivated. understanding. The framework also provides a set of broad learning outcomes that summarise the knowledge. These broad learning outcomes indicate that students will: • understand. structures and relationships • be productive. cultural and intellectual work of others • understand and apply a variety of analytical and creative techniques to solve problems • understand. ethical and spiritual considerations • encourage and enable all students to enjoy learning. reflective. It enunciates clear standards of what students are expected to know and be able to do in Years 7–10. This framework ensures that K–10 syllabuses and curriculum requirements are designed to provide educational opportunities that: • engage and challenge all students to maximise their individual talents and capabilities for lifelong learning • enable all students to develop positive self-concepts and their capacity to establish and maintain safe. It identifies essential knowledge. The ways in which learning in the Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus contributes to the curriculum and to the student’s achievement of the broad learning outcomes are outlined in the syllabus rationale. skills. cultural. values and attitudes. work or training • promote a fair and just society that values diversity • promote continuity and coherence of learning. competent learners who will be able to take part in further study.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus 1 1. interpret and apply concepts related to numerical and spatial patterns. biological and technological world and make responsible and informed decisions in relation to their world • understand and appreciate social. understanding and skills to evaluate potential career options and pathways • develop a system of personal values based on their understanding of moral. values and attitudes essential for all students to succeed in and beyond their schooling. geographical and historical contexts. evaluate and use information from a variety of sources • work collaboratively with others to achieve individual and collective goals • possess the knowledge and skills necessary to maintain a safe and healthy lifestyle • understand and appreciate the physical. ethical and spiritual matters. the Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus takes into account the diverse needs of all students. It provides structures and processes by 5 . and facilitate the transition between primary and secondary schooling. healthy and rewarding lives • prepare all students for effective and responsible participation in their society. develop and communicate ideas and information • access. skills.1 Introduction The K–10 Curriculum This syllabus has been developed within the parameters set by the Board of Studies NSW in its K–10 Curriculum Framework.

it may be determined that these outcomes and content are not appropriate. It contains advice to assist teachers to program learning for those students who have gone beyond achieving the outcomes through their study of the essential content.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus which teachers can provide continuity of study for all students. For these students the Life Skills outcomes and content in section 8 and the Life Skills assessment advice below can provide the basis for developing a relevant and meaningful program. Consideration should be given to whether modifications to programs and to teaching. particularly to ensure successful transition through Years 5 to 8 and from Year 10 to Year 11. 1. The syllabus also assists students to maximise their achievement in Textiles Technology through the acquisition of additional knowledge. It is necessary to continue focusing on the needs. would enable the student to access the syllabus outcomes and content. skills. Life Skills For most students with special education needs. The program will comprise the most appropriate combination of courses. 6 . the outcomes and content in sections 6 and 7 of this syllabus will be appropriate but for a small percentage of these students. values and attitudes. understanding. interests and abilities of each student when planning a program for secondary schooling. Access to Life Skills outcomes and content in Years 7–10 A decision to allow a student to access the Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Life Skills outcomes and content should include parents/carers and be based on careful consideration of the student’s competencies and learning needs. particularly those with an intellectual disability. Students with special education needs build on their achievements in K–6 as they progress through their secondary study and undertake courses to meet the requirements for the School Certificate. The decision should establish that the outcomes and content in sections 6 and 7 of the Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus are not appropriate to meet the needs of the student. including adjustments to learning activities and assessment.2 Students with Special Education Needs In the K–6 curriculum. outcomes and content available. students with special education needs are provided for in the following ways: • through the inclusion of outcomes and content in syllabuses which provide for the full range of students • through the development of additional advice and programming support for teachers to assist students to access the outcomes of the syllabus • through the development of specific support documents for students with special education needs • through teachers and parents planning together to ensure that syllabus outcomes and content reflect the learning needs and priorities of students.

Students may demonstrate achievement in relation to Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Life Skills outcomes independently or with support. Life Skills assessment Each student undertaking a Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Life Skills course will have specified outcomes and content to be studied. The type of support will vary according to the particular needs of the student and the requirements of the activity. The syllabus content listed for each outcome forms the basis of learning opportunities for students. strategies and resource requirements that will assist in the learning process. nor is it necessary to submit planning documentation. understanding and skills across a range of situations or environments including the school and the wider community. Clear time frames and strategies for monitoring progress.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus As part of the decision to allow a student to access the Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Life Skills outcomes and content. relevant to the age of the student. Assessment should provide opportunities for students to demonstrate achievement in relation to the outcomes and to generalise their knowledge. need to be identified and collaborative plans should be made for future needs. It is not necessary to seek permission of the Office of the Board of Studies for students to undertake the Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Life Skills outcomes and content. it is important to identify relevant settings. Examples of support may include: • the provision of extra time • physical and/or verbal assistance from others • the provision of technological aids. 7 .

Completion of projects is integral to developing skills and confidence in the manipulation and use of a range of textile materials. by having social meaning and cultural significance. A study of Textiles Technology provides students with broad knowledge of the properties. Project Work that includes investigation and experimentation will enable students to discriminate in their choices of textiles for particular uses. competent. These historical and cultural uses of textiles continue to influence contemporary designers today and students will examine design features characteristic of a variety of different cultures and use them as sources of inspiration in textile projects where appropriate.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus 2 Rationale Textiles Technology will contribute to the overall education of students by enabling them to confidently use a range of technologies and create an awareness of related career pathways and leisure pursuits. colouration. and by performing specific functions in commercial. Textiles Technology acknowledges and embraces an understanding of cultural diversity by examining the ways in which different groups have used textiles as an expressive and functional medium. 8 . creative. Students will develop an appreciation of the factors affecting them as textile consumers. social and environmental consequences. demonstrate responsibility in decision-making and encourage individuals to express ideas and opinions. The course encourages students to be proactive. equipment and techniques. Students will investigate the work of textile designers and from this research make judgments about the appropriateness of design ideas. Students will document and communicate their design ideas and experiences and make use of contemporary technology in their project work. the selection of materials and of tools and the quality of textile items. work or training. Students will be challenged to transfer knowledge to new situations and projects. building on technical skills and past experiences. yarns and fibres are explored. Textile projects will give students the opportunity to be creative. Current technologies and innovations that continue to emerge in the textile industry will be addressed with emphasis on their economic. satisfying both functional and aesthetic needs. performance and uses of textiles in which fabrics. Textiles continue to satisfy needs in society by being a means of selfexpression. industrial and personal settings. responsible and reflective learners able to take part in further study. Textiles have played a significant role throughout human history. independent learners and to explore functional and aesthetic aspects of textiles.

Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus 3 The Place of the Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus in the Technology K–12 Curriculum 9 .

textile design and the role of textiles in society.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus 4 Aim The aim of this syllabus is to develop confidence and proficiency in the design. 10 . Students will actively engage in learning about the properties and performance of textiles. production and evaluation of textile items.

understanding and appreciation of the significant role of textiles for the individual consumer and for society 4 skills in the creative documentation. communication and presentation of design ideas 5 skills in the critical selection and proficient and creative use of textile materials. 11 .Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus 5 Objectives Knowledge. equipment and techniques to produce quality textile items 6 knowledge and skills to evaluate quality in the design and construction of textile items. understanding and skills Students will develop: 1 knowledge and understanding of the properties and performance of textiles 2 knowledge and understanding of and skills in design for a range of textile applications 3 knowledge.

2.1 uses appropriate technology to document. communicate and present design and project work critically selects and creatively manipulates a range of textile materials to produce quality textile items selects appropriate techniques and uses equipment safely in the production of quality textile projects demonstrates competence in the production of textile projects to completion Objectives Students will develop: 1 knowledge and understanding of the properties and performance of textiles 5.4. yarns and fibres 4.3.1.2.2 2 knowledge and understanding of and skills in design for a range of textile applications 5.4. communication and presentation of design ideas skills in the selection and proficient and creative use of textile materials.2.1 describes the creative process of design used in the work of textile designers 4.5.3.2 identifies factors affecting consumer demand.3.1 5. construction and use 4.3 demonstrates skill in the production of textile projects to completion 5.5.5.2.3 3 knowledge.2 5.2 5.2 suggests appropriate uses for a variety of fabrics.1 selects and manipulates a range of textile materials 5. understanding and appreciation of the significant role of textiles for the individual consumer and for society 4. selection and use of textiles 4.1 5. cultural and contemporary perspectives on textile design.2 uses techniques and equipment safely in the production of quality textile projects 4. equipment and techniques to produce quality textile items 5.3 12 .1.1 describes historical.2.2 generates design ideas for textile items 4.1.2.1 4. cultural and contemporary perspectives that influence textile design.1 explains the properties and performance of a range of textile items justifies the selection of textile materials for specific end uses explains the creative process of design used in the work of textile designers generates and develops textile design ideas investigates and applies methods of colouration and decoration for a range of textile items analyses the influence of historical.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus 6 Outcomes Stage 4 Outcomes A student: 4. construction and use evaluates the impact of textiles production and use on the individual consumer and society selects and uses appropriate technology to creatively document.3.1 5 5.3 uses methods of colouration and decoration of textile items Stage 5 Outcomes A student: 5.5.1.5. communicate and present design and project work 4.5.2 4 skills in the creative documentation.1 describes the properties and performance of textile items 4.

Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Objectives Students will develop: 6 knowledge and skills to evaluate quality in the design and construction of textile items Stage 4 Outcomes A student: 4. it may be determined that the above outcomes are not appropriate. particularly those students with an intellectual disability.6. Life Skills For some students with special education needs. 13 . For these students.1 identifies aspects of quality in the design and construction of textile items Stage 5 Outcomes A student: 5. Teachers are advised to select from the syllabus content to target the specific needs of students who commence study in Stage 4. Life Skills outcomes and content can provide the basis for the development of a relevant and meaningful program – see section 8.1 evaluates textile items to determine quality in their design and construction Stage 4 outcomes have been provided to assist the assessment and reporting of student achievement in those schools that choose to begin elective study before Year 9.6.

1 Content Organisation of Content Textiles Technology is an elective course designed to build upon Technology (Mandatory) Years 7–8 at Stage 5. Outcomes for Stage 4 have been included to allow flexibility for those schools who wish to offer the course in Years 7 and 8.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus 7 7. 14 .

producing and evaluating. design folio. A minimum of four units of work will be completed for the 200-hour course. workbook or any other appropriate method. Units of work that revisit focus areas may be used for extension of student learning. The textile item should be relevant to student needs and interests. Students undertaking the 200-hour course must complete all content in each area of study and project work. Teachers of the 100-hour course must ensure that all outcomes are addressed when selecting content from the areas of study. covering a minimum of three focus areas. Development of practical skills to produce a textile item Students will complete a textile item for each unit of work completed. journal. Documentation of student work Students will document project work and show evidence of: • investigation and research undertaken • sources of inspiration • generation and development of ideas • experimental work • development of creative design skills • collection of resources • producing and evaluating project work.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Units of Work Project work forms the basis of every unit of work. Students may document project work in a variety of ways which may include a digital portfolio. Units of work in addition to this in either course may revisit focus areas. 15 . diary. Project Work There are two components of project work: • development of practical skills to produce a textile item • documentation of student work. Essential content Students undertaking a 100-hour course must complete all content from project work and content from areas of study appropriate to the project and focus area selected. It is expected that there will be a gradual increase in the challenge offered to students in project work to enhance the development of practical skills. thereby developing practical skills in designing. Additional content Students can move beyond the essential content in order to broaden and deepen their understanding and skills and to extend their interest in particular aspects of Textiles Technology. Additional content is suggested for each area of study. Students can negotiate a project from a focus area of interest with the teacher and work independently. Teachers will select a focus area as a starting point for the development of a unit of work. A minimum of two units of work will be completed for the 100-hour course with each unit being developed from a different focus area. Appropriate content from project work and areas of study is integrated in creating units of work that meet student needs and interests.

jewellery and belts. Life Skills Outcomes and content are in Section 8. toys. lampshades. • Textile Arts – includes wall hangings. • Non-apparel – includes book covers. tents. students will use: • word-processing applications to document the procedure for the construction of a textile project • multimedia applications in the communication and presentation of design ideas for a variety of audiences 16 .Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Student Negotiated Project Work Students may elect to undertake project work in which they may select any focus area of interest and work independently. fancy dress costumes and dance costumes. curtains. Cross-curriculum content Cross-curriculum content assists students to achieve the broad learning outcomes defined in the Board of Studies K–10 Curriculum Framework. beanbags. They provide options for students to refine and enhance their knowledge and understanding of textiles using a variety of materials. Areas of Study There are three areas of study: • Design • Properties and Performance of Textiles • Textiles and Society. chair coverings. embroidery. hats. tools and techniques. • Costume – includes theatre costumes. table linen. bed linen. umbrellas. folk and traditional costumes. sleeping bags. Focus Areas Focus areas are recognised fields of textiles that will direct the choice of student projects. headdress. fabric-based artworks. masks. wearable design. The scope and nature of the project is to be negotiated with the teacher. • Furnishings – includes cushions. Focus areas are intended to encourage students to engage with a range of textile items and cater for a variety of student interests. quilt covers. It is incorporated in the content of the Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus in the following ways: Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) Students engage with a variety of ICT applications when developing design ideas and researching information to support project work. production and presentation of individual student projects. backpacks. In project work. The relevant content (learn about/learn to) from each area of study and the project work will be selected and integrated when creating a unit of work. bedspreads. The focus areas are: • Apparel – includes clothing and accessories such as shoes. ICTs will be used in the development. modification. bags.

developing knowledge and understanding of the workplace practices. Employment and Enterprise Students are given opportunities to examine various sectors in the textiles industry. developing competence in solving problems • plan. developing competence in communicating ideas and information • plan. Aboriginal and Indigenous Students develop knowledge and understanding of Aboriginal and Indigenous cultures as they investigate how these groups use textiles as an expressive and functional medium. cultural and contemporary perspectives. develop and modify projects including costing. developing competence in planning and organising activities • cooperate with individuals and groups during practical activities. projects and practical application of knowledge. describe. measurement and time. Gender Textiles Technology provides a context for challenging stereotypes about masculinity and femininity. allowing students to show awareness and acceptance of all people through a study of historical. Environment Students will examine how textile designers and manufacturers consider environmental issues in the designing and producing of textile items and the impact textile production has on the environment. discuss and explain textile-related issues in written. prepare and present project work for specific focus areas. implement and evaluate solutions to textile-based problems. Work. During the course. developing competence in using mathematical ideas and techniques 17 . developing competence in collecting. graphic and oral form. issues. select and sequence information across all the areas of study and in their project work. Key Competencies Extensive opportunities are provided within Textiles Technology to develop the key competencies. research and investigation of the practice of designers and critical analysis of commercial textile-based websites. legislation and the changing nature of work within this industry. Difference and Diversity The investigation of textiles acknowledges and embraces an understanding and appreciation of diversity. analysing and organising information • debate.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus • • graphics to communicate sources of inspiration and develop design ideas for textile projects electronic communication for the communication and presentation of design ideas. Students develop an appreciation of the differences that exist in society and the positive qualities of all people. It does this through providing students with an understanding of the contributions made by males and females in the textiles industry. students: • source. visual. Students learn about anti-discrimination legislation and equal employment opportunity (EEO) principles through the study of textiles technology work environments. This content includes specific knowledge and understanding of current employment opportunities. Employment and enterprise skills are developed throughout the course through self-evaluation. quantities. developing competence in working with others and in teams • design.

Measurement.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus • develop practical projects using appropriate equipment. visual. ideas are communicated in oral. costing and determining quantities of materials are integral parts of project development. 18 . Students also gain experience working with spatial concepts when planning project work. All areas of study in Textiles Technology provide students with opportunities to compose. Multicultural The study of textiles in society provides students with opportunities to explore textiles from a number of different cultures as they examine design characteristics of specific groups. This enhances their understanding. Numeracy Numeracy skills are inherent in the development of all student projects. graphic and written forms using textile specific terminology. Literacy In the development of documentation of student work. materials and techniques. This allows them to develop numeracy skills. which are transferable to solving problems encountered in everyday situations. appreciation and acceptance of people from different racial and ethnic backgrounds. developing competence in using technology. acquire and process text.

equipment and techniques.2 selects appropriate techniques and uses equipment safely in the production of quality textile projects 5. When documenting project work students will show evidence of each of the stages of designing. communicate and present design and project work 5.1 selects and uses appropriate technology to creatively document.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus 7. regulations and standards including Occupational Health and Safety. In developing and delivering teaching programs teachers should be aware of and adopt the relevant guidelines and directives of their education authorities and/or schools. producing and evaluating. producing and evaluating. confidence and expertise at their current stage of development is an important consideration in determining the teaching and learning sequences in the course. Outcomes A student: 5.1 critically selects and creatively manipulates a range of textile materials to produce quality textile items 5. Chemical Safety in Schools and Animal Welfare guidelines. certification. permits and licences.2 Content for Years 7–10 A note to teachers about practical experiences To satisfy the requirements of the syllabus students must undertake a range of practical experiences that occupy the majority of course time.5.6. Practical experiences should be used to develop knowledge and understanding of and skills in designing.5.3 demonstrates competence in the production of textile projects to completion 5. Student capability.4. Project work gives students the opportunity to develop and refine skills to produce quality textile items.1 evaluates textile items to determine quality in their design and construction Students learn about: Designing • Students learn to: • sources of inspiration generating and developing ideas communication and presentation of design ideas – visual and graphical – written – verbal identify and creatively document sources of inspiration for a textile project generate and develop design ideas using sketching and rendering techniques use a variety of techniques to communicate and present the development of design ideas including Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) • • • • 19 . Teachers need to be aware of activities that may require notification.5. produce and evaluate textile items across a range of focus areas. Project Work Completion of projects is integral to developing skills and confidence in the manipulation and use of a range of textile materials. Teaching programs should recognise and reflect relevant State and Commonwealth legislation. Students will learn to design. permission.

select and use techniques to ensure quality textile items • • • safe use of a variety of textile equipment techniques such as – weaving – felting – knitting – colouration and decoration – joining materials – edge finishes – closures – hems labelling requirements of textile items including – fibre content – size – country of origin – brand name – care instructions swing tag – logo – price • • • • • identify the labelling requirements of a range of textile items design and produce a product label and swing tag for textile items produced in project work • • 20 . modify and use commercial patterns and/or produce simple patterns for a textile item • • Producing • management of project work • • using commercial patterns or simple pattern production – notion requirements – fabric requirements – instruction sheet – pattern markings and layout – modification of patterns calculating textile requirements considering spatial concepts sequencing of construction for a textile item • • • calculate quantity and cost of requirements for a textile item plan and document a procedure for the construction of a textile item using a wordprocessing application select and safely use textile equipment to construct a quality textile item experiment with.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Students learn about: • Students learn to: • selection of appropriate materials identify aesthetic and functional performance criteria for textile materials of a textile item experiment with textile materials to determine which are most appropriate for a textile item justify the selection of materials for a textile item plan and organise the stages involved in the design and production of a textile item to ensure quality completion interpret.

Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Students learn about: Evaluating • Students learn to: • evaluation of the quality of textile items in relation to – design – functional requirements – aesthetic aspects – construction – fabric selection – notions used establish criteria for evaluation of a textiles item evaluate the textile items during designing and producing using techniques such as selfevaluation. peer evaluation use feedback from evaluation to modify project work and ensure a quality result • • 21 .

1 explains the creative process of design used in the work of textile designers 5.2.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Area of Study: Design The content in this area of study is covered through an investigation of the work of textile designers. By examining the practice of textile designers. Outcomes A student: 5. cultural and contemporary sources of inspiration used by textile designers • • • • • recognise historical.3 investigates and applies methods of colouration and decoration for a range of textile items Students learn about: The practice of textile designers • • Students learn to: • • textiles as a design medium textile designers across the focus areas define design in the textile context identify textile designers in selected focus areas explore textile applications across the focus areas identify examples of creative and innovative textile design use ICTs to explore the creative approaches used by a variety of textile designers use creative processes to design textile items • • the creative process when designing with textiles – researching – observation – brainstorming – sharing of ideas – visualising. students can model the work of designers in the production of project work. generating and developing ideas historical. cultural and contemporary sources of inspiration used by textile designers and evident in a variety of textile items identify features of design evident in construction across the focus areas outline the elements of design in a textile designer’s work describe how the elements of design have been used by a designer to create a desired effect • features of design in the construction of textile items elements of design – line – direction – shape – size – colour – value – texture factors affecting design – functional requirements – aesthetic aspects • • • • • • explain the factors affecting the design of one item of a designer’s work 22 .2. For the 200-hour course a minimum of two designers is to be studied. For the 100-hour course a minimum of one designer is to be studied.2.2 generates and develops textile design ideas 5.

contemporary textile designers use multimedia applications to present the results of the investigation • 23 .Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Students learn about: • Students learn to: • methods of applying colour and decoration such as – dyeing – beading – printing – appliqué – quilting – embroidery – hand painting examine methods of colouration and decoration used by textile designers investigate and describe at least one technique of colouration and decoration experiment with colour and decorating methods for a specific end product • • Additional content Students learn about: • Students learn to: • the practice of innovative and contemporary textile designers in a chosen focus area compare and contrast the practice of two innovative.

jersey. students will gain a broad understanding of how textile items are constructed.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Area of Study: Properties and Performance of Textiles The content in this area of study focuses on developing a basic understanding of the unique properties of a range of textiles and the ways in which they perform. Outcomes A student: 5. polar fleece. that is the dissection of an item into its component parts by looking at the whole item and then breaking it down progressively to its initial state.1.2 justifies the selection of textile materials for specific end uses Students learn about: Performance of textile items • Students learn to: • end uses of textile items and performance criteria design features of textile items the component parts of a variety of textile items from a range of focus areas notions required for the textile item sequence of construction techniques of manufacture pattern shapes and markings identify the performance criteria of textile items and link to end use sketch and label design features of the textile items deconstruct a textile item to its component parts examine textile items and identify the notions used outline the sequence of construction of textile items identify techniques of manufacture of textile items draw the pattern shapes used to construct items and label pattern markings recognise and name fabric(s) used in textile items identify fabric structure(s) using appropriate technology • • • • • • • • • • • • Fabric • common fabric names eg denim. organza. By deconstructing a textile item.1. felt common fabric structures including – knitted – woven – non-woven structure and properties of yarns including – staple spun – filament types of fibres – natural – manufactured – fibre blends • • • Yarn • • identify the yarn structure used in textile items Fibre • • examine and/or test textile materials to identify the fibre(s) use in textile items 24 .1 explains the properties and performance of a range of textile items 5.

resilience. handle describe how fabric. lustre.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Students learn about: Properties of fabrics and fibres • Students learn to: • functional properties eg absorbency. flammability aesthetic aspects eg drape. yarn and fibre properties contribute to the performance of textile items • Additional content Students learn about: • Students learn to: • recent textile innovations in – structure of fabrics – yarn structure – fibre types – notions select a recent textile innovation and create a range of textile items that make use of the innovation in a creative way 25 . durability.

3. Understanding these perspectives will inform students for their own design practice in textile project work.3. construction and use 5.2 evaluates the impact of textiles production and use on the individual consumer and society Students learn about: Historical perspectives of textiles • Students learn to: • historical periods.1 analyses the influence of historical. Outcomes A student: 5. cultural and contemporary perspectives to make their designs a relevant expression of the times. past and present • • 26 .Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Area of Study: Textiles and Society Successful textile designers bring together aspects of historical. cultural and contemporary perspectives on textile design. technological advances and social events that have impacted on the development of textiles explore historical. technological and social circumstances that have impacted on the development of textiles examine the contributions of females and males to the development of textiles throughout history recognise design features of textile items from different periods in history and identify these design features in contemporary designs describe how different cultures (including Indigenous Australian) use textiles as an expressive and functional medium recognise the design features of textile items from different cultural groups name and list activities undertaken in each of the sectors of the textile industry • • design features characteristic of textile items throughout history • Cultural perspectives of textiles • the use of textiles as an expressive and functional medium in different cultures design features characteristic of textile items from different cultural groups the sectors of the textile industry – textiles – clothing – footwear – allied industries career opportunities and pathways in the textile industry the changing nature of work in the textile industry – working conditions – outsourcing (local and offshore) – Occupational Health and Safety – Anti-discrimination legislation – EEO principles • • • Contemporary perspectives of textiles • • • • explore career opportunities and pathways in the textile industry recognise the nature of work in the textile industry.

Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Students learn about: • Students learn to: • factors affecting consumer demand. For these students. it may be determined that the above content is not appropriate. particularly those students with an intellectual disability. selection and use of textiles evaluate marketing strategies (including internet) used by at least two different textilebased companies examine how textiles are used to reinforce stereotypical understandings of what it means to be ‘acceptable’ identify how textile-based companies consider ethical and/or environmental issues in the design and production of textile items evaluate the potential impact of the production of textile items on the environment • • • • environmental aspects of textile production such as – pollution – recycling – conservation of resources textile innovations in fabric. Life Skills outcomes and content can provide the basis for the development of a relevant and meaningful program – see section 8. 27 . yarn. yarn or fibre manufacture • • • investigate and report on at least one textile innovation describe the benefits of this innovation for consumers and/or society • Additional content Students learn about: • Students learn to: • the cyclical nature of textile design trends related to a chosen focus area trends in – colour and decoration – silhouette/shapes – fibre. selection and use of textiles such as – social trends in society – marketing strategies – gender – age – cost – design and construction qualities of textile items – ethical and environmental considerations examine a variety of factors that affect consumer demand. fabric – manufacturing techniques – design features identify the design trends of textile items that are cyclical in nature investigate the design trends of textile items in a chosen focus area predict future trends in textile design and develop a visual presentation • • • Life Skills For some students with special education needs.

1 LS4. schools may integrate Textiles Technology Life Skills outcomes and content across a variety of school and community contexts.1 LS2.1 28 . Outcomes may be demonstrated independently or with support.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus 8 Life Skills Outcomes and Content The Board of Studies recognises that a small percentage of students with special education needs may best fulfill the mandatory curriculum requirements for Textiles Technology by undertaking Life Skills outcomes and content. yarns and fibres appropriate to intended use evaluates the design of clothing and household items in terms of function and aesthetics explores factors that influence textile design gathers and uses information for design purposes uses a variety of techniques to present design ideas and solutions demonstrates skills and techniques in the context of a textiles project demonstrates safe practices in the use of equipment and the implementation of techniques undertakes textiles projects applies appropriate evaluation techniques to a textiles project Objectives Students will develop: 1 2 knowledge and understanding of the properties and performance of textiles knowledge and understanding of and skills in design for a range of textile applications knowledge.2 LS5. equipment and techniques to produce quality textile items LS5. interests and abilities of each student.1 selects fabrics. goals and priorities of each student. Students are not required to complete all outcomes. understanding and appreciation of the significant role of textiles for the individual consumer and for society skills in the creative documentation.) Life Skills outcomes will be selected on the basis that they meet the particular needs.1 4 LS4.3 6 knowledge and skills to evaluate quality in the design and construction of textile items LS6. (Requirements for access to Life Skills outcomes and content are detailed in section 1.2 5 skills in the selection and proficient and creative use of textile materials. 8.2. In order to provide a relevant and meaningful program of study that reflects the needs.1 Outcomes Outcomes A student: LS1.1 LS5. communication and presentation of design ideas 3 LS3.

vinyl Outcome LS2. direction. cotton. safety. yarns and fibres appropriate to intended use. strong fabric for a work apron.1: A student evaluates the design of clothing and household items in terms of function and aesthetics. Students learn to: • Students learn about: • fibres. weather. aesthetics choose clothes that enhance appearance taking into consideration – body shape – colour combinations – elements of design including line. colour and texture • 29 . knitted fabric for a T-shirt • • • • recognise common types of fibre and fabrics used in clothing and household items eg polyester. Outcome LS1.2 Content The content forms the basis for learning opportunities. Students are not required to complete all of the content to demonstrate achievement of an outcome. absorbent fabric for a baby’s bib. crease-resistant fabric for boxer shorts. shape. age. yarns and fabrics characteristics of fabrics that affect their intended purpose and use including – flammability – absorbency – durability – strength – ease of care – knitted or woven fabrics commonly used in clothing and household items recognise differences between fibres.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus 8. yarns and fabrics in the context of textile items select fabrics for particular purpose and use eg waterproof fabric for beach bag. occasion. goals and priorities of each student. Students learn to: • Students learn about: • function and aesthetics in the context of selecting clothing and household items choose clothes and household items appropriate to function. denim. Content will be selected on the basis that it meets the needs. size. The examples provided are suggestions only.1: A student selects fabrics. heatresistant fabric for an oven mitt.

1: A student gathers and documents information for design purposes. popular – history eg tradition. high speed sewing.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Outcome LS3. fashion cycles recognise the influence of marketing on their purchases – compare value for money in relation to ‘brand name’ as opposed to ‘generic brands’ of clothing and accessories – consider the longevity of fashion ‘fads’ – consider the impact of ‘pressure to buy’ when shopping • the impact of marketing on clothing and accessories selection – mass media – advertising – shopping environments • Outcome LS4. globalisation – culture eg indigenous cultures. Students learn to: • Students learn about: • obtaining and using information from a variety of sources for design purposes gather information from a variety of sources such as – electronic media – people – newspaper – library – internet – CD-ROMs etc use information for design purposes eg compile a sample board for the redecoration of a bedroom – include colours. Students learn to: • Students learn about: • the impact of technology.1: A student explores factors that influence textile design. culture and history on fashion and design trends recognise the impact of – technology eg mass production. textures and accessories • 30 . fabrics.

1: A student demonstrates skills and techniques in the context of a textiles project. vinyl • how skills and processes may be combined to complete a project • • fabrics commonly used in clothing and household items • 31 . denim. Students learn to: • Students learn about: • using a variety of communication techniques use techniques to communicate ideas including – draw pictures – take photographs and use digital camera – use video camera – use computer graphics – participate in discussions eg show the development of design for decorating a hat: inspirational pictures. buttons – use appropriate fabric glue – thread a sewing machine demonstrate a combination of skills and processes in the context of a textile project eg – estimate amount of fabric required – measure fabric in accordance with a pattern – cut out fabric in accordance with a pattern – use a sewing machine to assemble a garment or item – complete hand-sewing if required recognise common types of fabrics and fibre used in clothing eg polyester.2: A student uses a variety of techniques to present design ideas and solutions. design sketches. Students learn to: • Students learn about: • skills and techniques that are necessary to undertake a specific textiles project demonstrate skills and techniques in the context of a textiles project eg – use scissors safely to cut a range of materials – thread a needle of appropriate size for a hand-sewing task – attach a range of fasteners such as hook and eye. swatches/embellishments Outcome LS5. cotton.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Outcome LS4.

2: A student demonstrates safe practices in the use of equipment and the implementation of techniques.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Outcome LS5. Students learn to: • Students learn about: • handling and using a variety of equipment safely identify characteristics of textiles equipment that could make them dangerous eg – sharpness – temperature – electrical connections – weight carry and transfer textiles equipment safely eg – passing scissors – handling pins and needles – carrying heavy sewing machines select suitable laundering techniques for a range of textile items eg – hand washing – machine washing – drying – dry cleaning use equipment to clean and care for a variety of fabrics safely eg – use washing machines. clothes dryers and irons in accordance with the fabric label directions care for and maintain textiles equipment eg – report faulty electrical equipment such as leaking iron – store equipment appropriately such as returning pins and needles to containers – keep work areas such as a sewing machine table tidy apply safe cutting out procedures eg – cut out on a flat surface – ensure fabric scissors are used – check pattern layout before cutting use safe sewing machine techniques eg – thread machine prior to electrical connection – refrain from sewing over pins – raise needle prior to removing fabric from machine demonstrate safe ironing techniques eg – adjust ironing board to correct height – iron at correct temperature for fabric – turn off iron when not in use • • caring for textile items • • • • using safe techniques in the context of a textiles design project • • • 32 .

ribbon. embroidery – indicate materials required – participate in the process of decorating a T-shirt – express satisfaction with result eg undertake a basic garment repair – identify need for repairs and explore available options – determine the most appropriate solution – select appropriate equipment and materials – carry out the repair – evaluate the effectiveness of the repair eg decorate a hat – indicate preferred type of hat by identifying purpose – suggest design for decoration – identify and gather materials required such as flowers. thread. sewing machine – construct bag using the pattern – evaluate effectiveness in terms of intended purpose and suggest modifications if appropriate 33 . fasteners – undertake decoration – evaluate finished product in terms of satisfaction eg make a beach bag – determine size and form of bag – select a design pattern from a range of options – identify and gather materials and equipment needed such as fabric.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Outcome LS5. stencilling or screen printing.3: A student undertakes textiles projects. appliqué. Students learn to: • Students learn about: • undertaking (independently or with support) a textiles design project that may include – inspiration – idea creation – synthesis of ideas and information – making – evaluating – communicating – managing undertake (independently or with support) a specific textile project eg personalise a T-shirt – communicate a desire for a new garment with a variety of colours – express preferences for colours – indicate preferred method of decorating with colours such as tie-dying.

Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Outcome LS6. durability and costeffectiveness respond to questions eg – do you like it? – would you change anything? – is it strong enough? – will it last? identify specific skills used and comment on personal proficiency in each area make suggestions for enhancing skills in the context of future projects re-evaluate project in the light of any modifications made • expressing value judgements about aspects of a finished product • • • 34 . Students learn to: • Students learn about: • evaluating a project in response to aesthetic appeal.1: A student applies appropriate evaluation techniques to a textiles project. functionality.

skills. events. Students explore and identify the needs of people and other living things. images and play games. 35 . suggest ideas. Students in Early Stage 1 recognise that information can come from a variety of sources. phenomena. They identify what they like or dislike about their designs or explorations. including other people and from different media. Students develop ideas through the use and manipulation of concrete materials as a means of progressing towards abstract thought. Early Stage 1 students use play to explore ideas. places and living things around them. They develop and begin to refine their understanding of environments. understanding. manipulate materials and trial solutions.1 Continuum of Learning in Textiles Technology K–10 Stage Statements Stage statements illustrate the continuum of learning in the Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus and are summaries of the knowledge. with assistance. Early Stage 1 – Science and Technology Students who have achieved Early Stage 1 show a growing awareness of. They demonstrate confidence in proposing ideas for designs they develop through play and modelling. They ask questions. They demonstrate an awareness of a range of uses for computer-based technology as well as showing an emerging confidence in their ability to explore and use computer-based technologies. for example. They give reasons for safe working practices and organisational procedures related to the use of equipment. propose their own explanations and are able to report verbally and graphically on their actions and observations. Students show growing awareness of the appropriate use and maintenance of a range of classroom equipment. the natural and made environments. They identify and group living and non-living things according to some common characteristics. materials.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus 9 9. to create text. They are unlikely to perceive the steps in a designing and making process as they often work in situations where these aspects occur at the same time. equipment and other resources through trial and error. using make-believe. Students in this stage use their senses to observe features of their immediate environment and to explore the properties of a range of common materials. They demonstrate curiosity about artefacts. Students generate their own ideas. pictorially and through modelling. and interest in. and express these verbally. They recognise the use of some forms of energy and their ideas about it are beginning to develop as they experience energy in different contexts. values and attitudes that have been developed by students as a consequence of achieving the outcomes for the relevant stage of learning. resources and materials. books and videos.

services and environments to meet their own needs. while others are made. Students recognise and discuss with others some of the strengths and limitations of what they have done and identify some changes that could be made to improve plans or models. drawings and models. Students effectively manipulate materials that are available in the classroom environment. They can write labels and simple explanations when creating images. Using plans. They are starting to develop the social skills required to investigate. Students have a developing awareness of a range of media and information products. and show a growing awareness of the different properties of such materials and how they affect the way in which the materials are used. They are better able to accept that the result of a test may be different from what was originally expected. They safely use. computers and disks. They are able to identify the different forms of technology in their immediate environments and explain how they help us. They use their senses to identify similarities and differences. maintain and store equipment such as scissors. save and shut down. They begin to see that an investigation is a series of orderly steps. systems or environments. 36 . They are able to use computer technology to start and open files or applications. design and make products and services. Students are starting to appreciate the interdependence of living things and their environments. Students are able to interpret information and make predictions based on their own observations. They make comparisons about what they like and dislike about familiar products. for example in appearance. They build on their existing understanding of some of the forms of energy. They recognise that people create products. They are able to use computer-based technologies where appropriate for a given task. They recognise that some materials occur naturally. Stage 1 students begin to generate and select ideas to best meet design task objectives. magnifying glasses. Students in this stage can draw plans for a design and can explain some of the features and materials to be used. Students are able to recognise the purpose of an investigation and seek further information as a result of their own curiosity. and give simple explanations of why they have chosen a certain idea. Students show curiosity about natural and made environments and seek explanations that allow them to interpret their observations.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Stage 1 – Science and Technology Students who have achieved Stage 1 are developing an awareness of the wider world and are applying their scientific and technological understanding to new and different situations.

Students are able to explore the properties. They recognise the importance of evaluation throughout a design cycle. They can identify and describe some aspects of the structure and function of living things and some of the ways living things interact. recording results and drawing conclusions. They predict outcomes by proposing explanations and testing to see if their predicted outcomes eventuate. They recognise that materials are varied and have different properties that affect their use. As students develop skills in predicting. Students also demonstrate a greater understanding of and control over a design process. Students give consideration to issues such as function and aesthetics when designing and evaluating products. Students in this stage devise systems that inform or utilise their understanding of some forms of energy. Students are developing a capacity to understand relationships in the natural world. testing. Students recognise the function of some hardware and software and are able to select and use these to meet the requirements of a task. its appearance and how it might affect the environment. including the selection of different solutions to arrive at a suitable outcome. They can also identify and describe some of the interactions of the Earth with other parts of the solar system. services and environments. capabilities and working characteristics of both natural and manufactured materials and components. Students who have achieved Stage 2 are able to explore ideas for investigations and their design proposals in order to identify where decisions still need to be made. and justify their selection for particular tasks. They can discuss the possibilities and limitations of using a range of technology including computer-based technology. Students develop plans that show some consideration of the types and quantities of materials required and an awareness of the need for accuracy in a plan for production purposes. Students may suggest modifications to improve their initial proposals. They identify ways of improving their own scientific and technological activities by considering issues such as how well something works. 37 . hardware and software. Students develop the capacity to ask questions to clarify understanding. and to suggest possible courses of action. They can select. They ask perceptive questions and respond to design tasks in innovative ways. maintain and safely use classroom tools and equipment. they begin to form understanding about ‘fair testing’ that takes into account the need for consistent conditions combined with one variable. in order to ensure accurate results. They can identify some limitations when carrying out a design task.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Stage 2 – Science and Technology Students who have achieved Stage 2 are able to initiate their own investigations as a result of something that has aroused their curiosity.

they can make decisions involving some conflicting interests or issues. Students research and investigate to identify phenomena and processes that have influenced Earth over time. They build on their existing understanding of forms of energy. They can observe the form and detail of objects carefully in order to produce accurate drawings from different views and they reflect on their drawings. 38 .and three-dimensional drawings and models to develop and modify their design ideas and to communicate details to others. Students at this stage can identify alternative uses and can be creative in adapting available software to the requirements of a task. Students recognise that computer-based technologies have a wide range of applications in society and can identify and describe some of the effects of such technologies on individuals and communities. Students select and use appropriate language. Students reflect on the methods used and positive and negative results of technological and scientific activity both throughout their own projects and in personal. Students identify emerging trends by using data. investigating and using technology. this might include designing appropriate fair tests to evaluate a range of possible explanations for the results of their investigations. They recognise and use some conventions and symbols related to developing plans and diagrams. diagrams and a range of tools and equipment to assist with observations. Students use two. aesthetic. They manage the design process including aspects of time management. sketches or computer models. Students who have achieved Stage 3 can confidently and competently use a range of computer-based hardware and applications. Students are aware of the skills and processes involved in designing and making. local and global contexts. structures and media and demonstrate skills in critically examining and communicating scientific and technological ideas and issues. At this stage. Students can relate their scientific and technological understanding to new tasks or different situations. design constraints and needs of the target audience. for example ethical. Students are aware of a range of issues related to scientific and technological achievements. They are capable of acquiring information from a variety of sources and are able to experiment with new techniques and skills as technologies change. such as measurements and some use of scale.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Stage 3 – Science and Technology Students who have achieved Stage 3 are able to undertake investigations independently in order to satisfy their own curiosity. environmental and cultural. They demonstrate a willingness to initiate their own investigations.

Students demonstrate competence when using a range of ICTs and have the ability to select and use them appropriately in developing design projects. producing and evaluating used when developing design projects. They learn to manage their own time by sequencing processes of designing.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Stage 4 – Technology (Mandatory) Students at Stage 4 are able to independently initiate design projects and investigations that reflect an understanding of needs and opportunities. They develop knowledge and understanding of a range of design processes. safely. They consider the impact of innovation and emerging technology on society and the environment and identify and explain ethical. Students are aware of the skills and processes involved in designing and are able to generate and communicate design ideas and solutions. roles of designers and associated work opportunities. confidently and accurately apply a range of contemporary and appropriate tools. Stage 4 – Textiles Technology Students at Stage 4 have developed higher order understanding and skills in the context of more specialised technology applications through a study of Textiles Technology. social. Students responsibly. They work collaboratively and learn to work safely with others in technological environments. They describe factors that influence design. Students recognise the importance of safety. sustainability and environmental considerations related to design projects. Throughout the design process students reflect on and evaluate their design projects. This may include recounting the process of designing. producing and evaluating to plan ahead. quality and management in the design and production of design projects. design considerations specific to textiles and the role of textiles in society. Students select and use a broad range of media and method and appropriate language and structures to accurately communicate design ideas to a diverse audience. They can identify what makes good design and are able to creatively develop quality design projects. 39 . In particular students focus more directly on the development of textile projects in selected focus areas in consideration of the properties and performance of textiles. They demonstrate the ability to research and extract information from a variety of sources and a willingness to use experiments and tests to enhance the development of a design project. materials and techniques and understand the implications and applications of these in the wider community.

In the production of supporting documentation students demonstrate skills in communicating ideas in written and graphic forms using freehand and/or various computer applications. tools. and demonstrate responsibility in decisionmaking. colouration. Students demonstrate practical skills in design and in the manipulation of textiles including the ability to select and use appropriate techniques. These investigations enable them to design. Students apply theoretical underpinnings in a practical manner. negotiated projects in safe learning environments. express ideas and opinions. equipment and technologies. identifying functional requirements and aesthetic features of their designs.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Stage 5 – Textiles Technology Students at Stage 5 are able to undertake project work. students manage risks. Investigations. Students are discerning in their design and construction of textiles items and are informed textile consumers relating performance criteria to intended use of a textile item. Students are aware of the development of technology and its impact on the textile industry and society. 40 . Students demonstrate knowledge. experiment and test ideas. Through the management of open-ended. and consider the impact on the individual consumer and society. materials and technology appropriate to the production and use of textiles. Students reflect on and evaluate decisions made in the production of textile items. Students select and use appropriate language and a broad range of media to accurately communicate technological ideas to a variety of audiences for a number of purposes. Students can confidently and competently use a range of technologies including those which are computer-based. yarns and fibres. Students apply knowledge and understanding of the properties and performance of textiles through the study of fabrics. demonstrating decision-making processes and expressing individual ideas. produce and evaluate quality textile projects with confidence. skills and understanding of a range of techniques. experimentation and project work will enable students to be discriminative in their choices of textiles for particular uses.

4. make changes to programs and strategies to support and improve each student’s progress. 41 . through syllabuses and other documents.1 Assessment Standards The Board of Studies K–10 Curriculum Framework is a standards-referenced framework that describes. 6. as they plan the work students will do. Exemplar tasks and student work samples help to elaborate standards. Assessment for learning involves teachers in deciding how and when to assess student achievement. Standards in the framework consist of two interrelated elements: • outcomes and content in syllabuses showing what is to be learnt • descriptions of levels of achievement of that learning. as well as planned assessment events. Syllabus outcomes in Textiles Technology contribute to a developmental sequence in which students are challenged to acquire new knowledge. but realistic. and for assessing and reporting student progress. understanding and skills. 10 and 12. students and parents in reflecting on assessment data. as a result. to demonstrate their learning. expectations of the quality of learning to be achieved by the end of Years 2. understanding and skills.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus 10 10.2 Assessment for Learning Assessment for learning in Textiles Technology is designed to enhance teaching and improve learning. the expected learning outcomes for students. It is assessment that gives students opportunities to produce the work that leads to development of their knowledge. 10. Standards in Textiles Technology will help teachers and students to set targets. The standards are typically written for two years of schooling and set high. Teachers of Textiles Technology will provide students with opportunities in the context of everyday classroom activities. 8. using a range of appropriate assessment strategies including self-assessment and peer assessment. monitor achievement. and. assessment for learning: • is an essential and integrated part of teaching and learning • reflects a belief that all students can improve • involves setting learning goals with students • helps students know and recognise the standards they are aiming for • involves students in self-assessment and peer assessment • provides feedback that helps students understand the next steps in learning and plan how to achieve them • involves teachers. Using standards to improve learning Teachers will be able to use standards in Textiles Technology as a reference point for planning teaching and learning programs. In summary.

this means: – teachers use tasks that assess. deeper learning – feedback is given in a way that motivates the learner and helps students to understand that mistakes are a part of learning and can lead to improvement – assessment is an integral component of the teaching-learning process rather than being a separate activity. Assessment for learning: • emphasises the interactions between learning and manageable assessment strategies that promote learning In practice. this means: – assessment against standards provides opportunities for all learners to achieve their best – assessment activities are free of bias. • clearly expresses for the student and teacher the goals of the learning activity In practice. rather than just achieve a better mark In practice. this means: – feedback is directed to the achievement of standards and away from comparisons with peers – feedback is clear and constructive about strengths and weaknesses – feedback is individualised and linked to opportunities for improvement. • • • • 42 . this means: – assessment includes strategies for self-assessment and peer assessment emphasising the next steps needed for further learning.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Quality Assessment Practices The following Assessment for Learning Principles provide the criteria for judging the quality of assessment materials and practices. this means: – teachers reflect on the purposes of assessment and on their assessment strategies – assessment activities allow for demonstration of learning outcomes – assessment is embedded in learning activities and informs the planning of future learning activities – teachers use assessment to identify what a student can already do. reflects a view of learning in which assessment helps students learn better. helps students take responsibility for their own learning In practice. provides ways for students to use feedback from assessment In practice. this means: – students understand the learning goals and the criteria that will be applied to judge the quality of their achievement – students receive feedback that helps them make further progress. is inclusive of all learners In practice. and therefore encourage.

At Stage 4 there are four levels of achievement. Level 6 describes a very high level of achievement in relation to course objectives and outcomes. 43 . while the level 1 description will help identify students who are progressing towards the outcomes for the stage. levels 2 and 3 describe satisfactory and high achievement that should provide a solid foundation for the next stage of learning.3 Reporting Reporting is the process of providing feedback to students. when schools may wish to report differentially on the levels of knowledge. The level 1 description will help identify students who are progressing towards the outcomes for the stage. At Stage 5 there are six levels of achievement. Descriptions of levels of achievement for Stage 4 and Stage 5 in Textiles Technology have been developed to provide schools with a useful tool to report consistent information about student achievement to students and parents. and to the next teacher to help to plan the next steps in the learning process. to match each student’s achievement to a level description. At the end of Year 10. These describe observable and measurable features of student achievement at the end of a stage. Level 2 describes satisfactory achievement. For students undertaking Life Skills outcomes and content in Years 7–10. based on the available assessment evidence. This level will be reported on the student’s School Certificate Record of Achievement. within the indicative hours of study. the content listed for each identified Life Skills outcome forms the basis of the learning opportunities for these students.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus 10. parents and other teachers about students’ progress. teachers of Textiles Technology Years 7–10 will make an on-balance judgement. Descriptions of levels of achievement provide a common language for reporting. understanding and skills demonstrated by students. Level 4 describes a very high level of achievement. These may be at the end of a year or stage. In a standards-referenced framework this involves teachers in making professional judgements about student achievement at key points in the learning cycle. It also provides examples of activities on which teachers can base judgements to report student progress in relation to individual learning goals. Teachers can use evidence gathered from assessment to extend the process of assessment for learning into their assessment of learning.

In planning for assessment. They use these materials to describe for themselves what students should know and be able to do at a particular stage. The challenge and complexity of assessment tasks increase to enable students to develop evaluative independence as they assess their own knowledge. with a view to ensuring that there is sufficient and appropriate information collected for making an on-balance holistic judgement of the standard achieved by the student at the end of the stage. Strategies should be appropriate to the outcomes being addressed.4 Choosing Assessment Strategies Planning for assessment is integral to programming for teaching and learning. from multiple performances in a variety of contexts. In planning for assessment in Textiles Technology it is important for teachers to consider: • the requirements of the syllabus • the accessibility of the proposed activity in terms of language requirements • the appropriateness of the challenge presented to individual students • resource availability • how the task will be administered • the way in which feedback will be provided. In a standardsreferenced framework. Assessment is fundamental for furthering student learning. Students are provided with a description of the learning expected to be accomplished. Teachers could work collaboratively in planning appropriate assessment strategies. to monitor student progress and to collect information to report student achievement. Assessment is used to determine the students’ initial knowledge. Assessment relies on the professional judgement of the teacher and is based on reliable data acquired in a fair and challenging environment. be manageable in number and be supportive of the learning process. and what needs to be done to continue their learning. Teachers of Textiles Technology should employ a range of assessment strategies to ensure that information is being gathered regarding the knowledge and understanding that are being acquired. opportunities to discuss the criteria on which judgements will be based. individually and collaboratively. and where possible. Working collaboratively leads teachers to develop a shared understanding of the syllabus standards and also supports teachers in making consistent and comparable judgements of student achievement in relation to these standards. and determine ways to improve their learning. Students gain information about their learning through feedback from teachers and from self-assessment and peer assessment. understanding and skills. and the skills that are being developed. 44 . teachers. school and community may have. The evidence collected should enable teachers of Textiles Technology to make consistent judgements to meet the various reporting requirements that the system. examples of what that learning looks like. review the syllabus and standards materials.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus 10. In planning programs. understanding and skills. teachers assess student performance on tasks in relation to syllabus outcomes and make on-balance judgements about student achievement. The assessment cycle is continuous. teachers of Textiles Technology need to consider how results will be recorded. students receive and give themselves feedback on what they have learnt. time to learn. and they consider the kinds of evidence their students could produce to show they have learnt what they needed to learn.

They move from undertaking teacher-guided work to a more independent mode. When presentations are used for assessment purposes. equipment or material(s) for a project • justify their use of a particular techniques or material • use appropriate tools and methods • set goals. graphic and written forms using a variety of subject specific concepts and content. interviews and essays. the teacher has the opportunity to observe and note aspects of student learning. Presentations Presentations allow students to develop skills in communicating their ideas in oral. They provide opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate their skills and reflect upon the performances of others. field trip reports. Practical experiences Textiles Technology students undertake project work throughout the course. Written reports These may include surveys. prioritise tasks and manage time effectively • use equipment safely and efficiently for an appropriate purpose. evaluation reports.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Textiles Technology particularly lends itself to the following assessment techniques. Assessment of these projects should reflect the change in nature and demands at different stages. When undertaking practical experiences. keeping in mind that a range of strategies should be used to assess the outcomes of the course. Research projects Research projects can be used to develop in students analytical. they could be assessed on their ability to: • conduct appropriate research using a variety of methods • select and interpret relevant information • address the chosen issues with clarity • present information in a logical manner. they could be assessed on their ability to: • show appropriate depth of analysis • summarise key findings in a concise manner • use appropriate detail • use appropriate language consistent with the textiles industry. When students produce a written report. students could be assessed on their ability to: • select and apply appropriate information • present information in a creative and logical manner. organisational and problemsolving skills and may include case studies and internet research projects. multimedia presentations and various forms of display techniques. 45 . Assessment strategies may include prepared and impromptu oral presentations. When students undertake research projects. students could be assessed on their ability to: • conduct hands-on investigations • report on and apply the results of investigations • select appropriate techniques. When students are working on practical work in class.

about students’ understanding of concepts and allow the teacher to plan further learning activities. can use correct techniques and can recall. They also develop self-awareness and critical thinking skills in students. Opportunities exist for students to reflect on their progress towards the achievement of the syllabus outcomes. Written and practical tests Written and/or practical tests can be used to determine if students have the necessary skills. or along the way. Peer assessment Textiles Technology encourages the active involvement of students in the learning process. 46 . By self-assessing students can: • identify their own personal development over time • identify key indicators and evidence of their own learning. students could be assessed on their ability to: • effectively describe the development and production of projects • show appropriate depth of analysis. responsible choices. Self-assessment In Textiles Technology students are encouraged to acquire basic skills to become self-directed learners. comprehend and apply knowledge at a level that is appropriate for them to move on to the next step in the learning process. Developing self-assessment skills is an ongoing process. Activities such as peer evaluation of initial design ideas for textile projects allow students to draw on feedback from their peers in order to improve their learning. It is important that feedback is provided on test performance in order to enhance student learning. They allow students to develop knowledge. interpret. Tests can provide information prior to commencing a unit of work. This reflection provides the basis for improving their learning. When using journals as an assessment technique. becoming increasingly more sophisticated and self initiated as a student progresses. skills and abilities to make informed.Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Journals Journals provide opportunities for students to write personal reflections. Opportunities exist for individual and collaborative work.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful