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Spinks Auction Catalogue of Medals: July 2013

Spinks Auction Catalogue of Medals: July 2013

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Catalogue of medals for auction, by Spinks in London
Catalogue of medals for auction, by Spinks in London

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Published by: Fuzzy_Wood_Person on Jul 21, 2013
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25 JULY 2013

LONDON

ORDERS, DECORATIONS, CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND MILITARIA

GROUP CHAIRMAN AND CEO Olivier D. Stocker YOUR SPECIALISTS STAMPS UK - Tim Hirsch Guy Croton David Parsons Nick Startup Neill Granger Paul Mathews Dominic Savastano Tom Smith USA - George Eveleth Arthur Poudrier Rex Bishop Richard Debney EUROPE - Guido Craveri Fernando Martínez CHINA - Anna Lee COINS UK - Mike Veissid Paul Dawson Richard Bishop William MacKay Eleanor Charlotte Dix Tim Robson Barbara Mears John Pett USA - Stephen Goldsmith Greg Cole Normand Pepin CHINA - Mark Li BANKNOTES, BONDS & SHARES UK - Barnaby Faull Mike Veissid Andrew Pattison USA - Stephen Goldsmith CHINA - Mark Li ORDERS, DECORATIONS, MEDALS & MILITARIA UK - Mark Quayle Oliver Pepys BOOKS UK - Philip Skingley AUTOGRAPHS USA - Stephen Goldsmith WINES CHINA - Anna Lee Guillaume Willk-Fabia YOUR EUROPE TEAM (LONDON - LUGANO) Chairman’s Office Monica Kruber Charles Blane Directors Tim Hirsch Anthony Spink Auction & Client Management Team Miroslava Adusei-Poku Eleanor Ball Luca Borgo Rita Ariete John Winchcombe Harry Gladwin María Martínez Maurizio Schenini Finance Alison Bennet Marco Fiori Mina Bhagat Dennis Muriu Alison Kinnaird Billy Tumelty Dean Dowdall IT & Administration Berdia Qamarauli Attila Gyanyi Liz Cones Curlene Spencer Tom Robinson Cristina Dugoni Giacomo Canzi YOUR AMERICA TEAM (NEW YORK) Chairman Emeritus John Herzog Auction Administration and Marketing & Design Sonia Alves Luke Mitchell Finance & Administration Sam Qureshi Ingrid Qureshi Auctioneer Stephen Goldsmith YOUR ASIA TEAM (HONG KONG - SINGAPORE) Vice Chairman Anna Lee Administration Amy Yung Newton Tsang Raymond Tat Gary Tan

ORDERS, DECORATIONS, CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND MILITARIA

25 July 2013 in London and on

SALE LOCATION
SPinK London 69 Southampton Row, Bloomsbury London WC1B 4et tel +44 (0)20 7563 4000 fax +44 (0)20 7563 4066 vat no: gB 791627108

YOUR SPINK TEAM FOR THIS SALE
FoR YoUR QUeStionS ABoUt the SALe LotS

Mark Quayle mquayle@spink.com +44 (0)20 7563 4064 Oliver Pepys opepys@spink.com +44 (0)20 7563 4061

SALE DETAILS
thursday 25 July 2013 at 10.00 a.m. in sending commission bids or making enquiries, this sale should be referred to as REDWING - 13002 John Hayward jhayward@spink.com +44 (0)20 7563 4049

FoR YoUR BidS

Rita Ariete auctionteam@spink.com +44 (0)20 7563 4005 fax +44 (0)20 7563 4037

VIEWING OF LOTS
SPinK London 69 Southampton Row, Bloomsbury London WC1B 4et tuesday 23 July 2013 10.00 a.m. - 5.00 p.m. Wednesday 24 July 2013 10.00 a.m. - 5.00 p.m.

FoR YoUR inteRnet Bidding

Attila Gyanyi agyanyi@spink.com +44 (0)20 7563 4090

FoR YoUR PAYment

Billy Tumelty btumelty@spink.com +44 (0)20 7563 4018

Use this QR code to visit our online catalogue and leave commission bids. You can download the QR Code Reader for iPhone, Blackberry and Android from App Store on your smartphone

FoR YoUR vAt enQUiRieS

The Spink Environment Commitment: Paper from Sustainable Forests and Clean Ink
For centuries Spink and its employees have been preserving and curating collectable items. We now wish to play a modest role in preserving our planet, as well as the heritage of collectables, so future generations may enjoy both. We insist that our printers source all paper used in the production of Spink catalogues from FSC registered suppliers (for further information on the FSC standard please visit fsc.org) and use non hazardous inks. We also insist they hold the environmental standard ISO 14001. Spink recycle all ecological material used on our premises and we would encourage you to recycle your catalogue once you have finished with it.

John Winchcombe jwinchcombe@spink.com +44 (0)20 7563 4101
to purchase a catalogue: email: catalogues@spink.com tel: +44 (0)20 7563 4005 fax: +44 (0)20 7563 4037 For more information about Spink services, forthcoming sales and sales results visit the Spink Website www.spink.com

Front Cover illustration: Rear Admiral Sir Thomas Ussher, by Andrew morton, Copyright, national maritime museum, greenwich, UK: Lot 62 Back Cover illustration: Lot 15

July 25, 2013 - London

Order of Sale
Thursday 25 July 2013

Groups and Pairs with Orders and Decorations for Gallantry or Distinguished Service ..................................................

1- 37

British Orders and Single Awards .............................................................. 38- 61 Medals to the Ussher Family ...................................................................... 62- 63 Single Campaign Medals ............................................................................ 64-240 Campaign Groups and Pairs .................................................................... 241-332 Coronation, Jubilee, Meritorious, Long Service and Efficiency Decorations and Medals ...................................................... 333-360 Honours and Awards Betowed Upon Monsieur P.A. Lambin, Belgian Railways .......................................... 361-366 Honours and Awards Betowed Upon New York Justice Victor J. Dowling .................................................... 367-380 Foreign Orders, Decorations and Medals ................................................ 381-437 Miniature Awards .................................................................................... 438-439 Life Saving Awards .................................................................................. 440-441 Miscellaneous ............................................................................................ 442-448

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oRdeRS, deCoRAtionS, CAmPAign medALS And miLitARiA

THURSDAY 25 JULY 2013 Commencing at 10.00 a.m.
All Sales are subject to the Terms and Conditions for Buyers printed at the back of this catalogue. Estimates The estimated selling price of each lot is printed below the lot description and does not include the Buyer’s Premium. Bidders should bear in mind that estimates are prepared well in advance of the sale and are not definitive. They are subject to revision.

GROUPS AND PAIRS WITH ORDERS AND DECORATIONS FOR GALLANTRY OR DISTINGUISHED SERVICE
x1 A Fine Second War ‘1944’ C.S.I., ‘1940’ C.B.E., Great War ‘1918’ ‘Salonika’ D.S.O., ‘1916’ ‘Western Front’ M.C. Group of Eleven to Major-General W.C. Holden, Royal Artillery, Deputy Chief of General Staff, General Head Quarters, India, 1943-44 a) The Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Companion’s (C.S.I.) neck Badge, gold, silver, and enamel, with a fine quality central onyx cameo of a youthful Queen Victoria, the motto illuminated with diamonds, with neck riband b) The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 2nd type, Military Division, Commander’s (C.B.E.) neck Badge, silver-gilt and enamel, with neck riband c) Distinguished Service Order, G.V.R., silver-gilt and enamel, with integral top riband bar d) Military Cross, G.V.R., the reverse privately engraved ‘Lieut. William Corson Holden R.G.A. 1917.’ e) 1914 Star, with Bar (2.Lieut. W.C. Holden. R.G.A.) f) British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaves (Major W.C. Holden.) g) 1939-1945 Star h) Defence and War Medals i) Greece, Kingdom, War Cross 1916-17, Second Class, silver, with bronze star emblem on riband, extremely fine (11) £5,000-6,000
C.S.I. London Gazette 8.6.1944 Colonel (Temporary Major-General) William Corson Holden, C.B.E., D.S.O., M.C., British Service, Deputy Chief of the General Staff, General Headquarters, India. C.B.E. London Gazette 27.8.1940 Colonel (temporary Brigadier) William Corson Holden, D.S.O., M.C., late Royal Artillery ‘For distinguished services in the field.’ D.S.O. London Gazette 1.1.1919 Capt. (A./Maj.) William Corson Holden, M.C., R.G.A. ‘For distinguished service in connection with Military Operations in Salonika.’ M.C. London Gazette 1.1.1917 Lt. William Corson Holden, R.G.A. ‘For distinguished service in the field.’ M.I.D. London Gazette 30.1.1919 Holden, Capt. (A./Maj.) W.C., M.C., Royal Garrison Artillery ‘For gallant conduct and distinguished services rendered with the British Salonika Force during the period from the 1st March to the 1st October, 1918.’ Greek War Cross London Gazette 21.7.1919 Captain William Corson Holden, D.S.O., M.C., Royal Garrison Artillery ‘For distinguished services rendered during the course of the campaign.’ Major-General William Corson Holden, C.S.I., C.B.E., D.S.O., M.C., born Nassau, Bahamas, February 1893, the son of Mr. F.W. Holden, Imperial Lighthouse Service, and educated at Nassau Grammar School; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Royal Garrison Artillery, 10.12.1913; served with the Artillery during the Great War on the Western Front from 26.9.1914; promoted Lieutenant, 9.6.1915; appointed Adjutant, 27th Brigade, R.G.A., 14.3.1916; promoted Captain, 18.7.1917; Acting Major, 7.8.1917; served with the Egyptian Expeditionary Force from 23.8.1917, and with the British Salonika Force in Greek Macedonia, Serbia, Bulgaria, Turkey, and the islands of the Aegean Sea from 2.1.1918; appointed Staff Captain, Royal Artillery Fourth Garrison, 18.6.1919; Captain Instructor in Gunnery School of Artillery, 25.2.1922; Brigade Major, R.A, 1926; promoted Colonel, 1.1.1937; served during the Second War with the British Expeditionary Force and with the Home Guard, 1940; appointed to the Eastern Supply Group Council, Delhi, 1941-42, in which capacity he visited Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Malaya, Burma, Rhodesia, Kenya, Uganda, and the Dutch East Indies; appointed Deputy Chief of the General Staff, India, 19.4.1943; promoted Major-General, 20.9.1944, and appointed Deputy Master-General of Ordnance, India; retired 31.8.1946. Major-General Holden died at home in Beaulieu, Hampshire, 15.3.1955.

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July 25, 2013 - London

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oRdeRS, deCoRAtionS, CAmPAign medALS And miLitARiA 2 A Rare Great War ‘1917’ C.M.G., ‘1915’ D.S.O. Group of Nine to Colonel H.F. Fraser, 21st Lancers, Late 5th Lancers, Wounded During the Aro Expedition, 1901-02; Aide-de-Camp to the General Officer Commanding, 2nd Army Corps, British Expeditionary Force, From 5.8.1914, and Provost Marshal, 3rd Army, B.E.F., 1915 a) The Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George, Companion’s (C.M.G.) neck Badge, silver-gilt and enamel, with neck riband, in Garrard, London, case of issue b) Distinguished Service Order, G.V.R., silver-gilt and enamel, with integral top riband bar c) Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two clasps, Elandslaagte, Defence of Ladysmith (Lieut. H.F. Fraser. 5/Lcrs.) d) Africa General Service 1902-56, E.VII.R., one clasp, Aro 1901-1902 (Capt. H.F. Fraser, 21/Lcrs:) e) 1914 Star, with Bar (Major H.F. Fraser. 21/Lrs:) f) British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaves (Lt. Col. H.F. Fraser.) g) Coronation 1902, silver h) France, Third Republic, Legion of Honour, Chevalier’s breast Badge, 54mm including wreath suspension x 40mm, silver, gold, and enamel, minor damage to tips of legion of Honour, otherwise good very fine or better, mounted court style as worn, with the recipient’s related miniature awards, the C.M.G. and D.S.O. both gold and enamel, and two portrait images of the recipient (9) £2,800-3,200
C.M.G. London Gazette 24.1.1917 ‘In recognition of valuable services in connection with the War.’ D.S.O. London Gazette 23.6.1915 Major H. F. Fraser, 21st Lancers ‘For distinguished service in the Field.’ M.I.D. London Gazette 22.6.1915 Fraser, Major H. F., 21st Lancers, General Headquarters Staff &c. ‘For gallant and distinguished service in the field.’ French Legion of Honour, Chevalier London Gazette 24.2.1916 Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Francis Fraser, D.S.O., 21st Lancers ‘In recognition of distinguished service during the campaign.’ Colonel Henry Francis Fraser, C.M.G., D.S.O., born Stratherrick, Inverness-shire, November 1872, the younger brother of Alexander Edmund Fraser; educated at Wellington College, Berkshire; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, 5th Lancers, December 1895; served with the Regiment in India and appointed extra Aide-de-Camp to H.E. the Viceroy of India, 1897; promoted Lieutenant, October 1899; served in South Africa and took part in the operations in Natal, 1899, including the action at Elandslaagte, 21.10.1899, when the 5th Lancers ‘had the satisfaction of knowing that they took part in the one real cavalry charge of the campaign’ (British

Colonel H.F. Fraser

Regiments in South Africa 1899-1902, by John Stirling refers); the actions at Rietfontein, 24.10.1899, and Lombard’s Kop, 30.10.1899; at the Defence of Ladysmith, including the sorties of the 7th and 10th December 1899, and the action of the 6th January 1900; promoted Captain and transferred to the 21st Lancers, 29.5.1901; took part in the Aro Expedition, Southern Nigeria, 30.10.1901 27.4.1902 (slightly wounded and Mentioned in Despatches, London Gazette 12.9.1902); promoted Major, 27.4.1907; appointed Assistant Military Secretary to the General Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Eastern Command, 4.4.1912; served during the Great War as Aide-de-Camp to the General Officer Commanding, 2nd Army Corps, British Expeditionary Force, from 5.8.1914; Appointed Assistant Provost Marshal, Cavalry Corps, B.E.F., 10.10.1914; Provost Marshal, 3rd Army, B.E.F., 13.7.1915; promoted Lieutenant-Colonel, 6.9.1915; appointed Assistant AdjutantGeneral, Southern Command, 2.7.1916; Assistant AdjutantGeneral, War Office, 8.3.1917; promoted Colonel, 6.9.1919; served as Assistant Adjutant-General, General Headquarters, Egyptian Expeditionary Force, from 16.4.1920; retired 1924. Colonel Fraser died, 26.4.1949. For the Order of the Crown of Johore awarded to Alexander Edmund Fraser see Lot 420

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oRdeRS, deCoRAtionS, CAmPAign medALS And miLitARiA

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x3 The C.I.E., O.B.E., Great War ‘1915’ ‘Western Front’ M.C. Group of Nine to Lieutenant-Colonel G.F.J. Paterson, 34th Sikh Pioneers a) The Most Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, Companion’s (C.I.E.) neck Badge, gold and enamel b) The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 1st type, Military Division, Officer’s (O.B.E.) breast Badge, silver-gilt (Hallmarks for London 1918) c) Military Cross, G.V.R. d) 1914 Star, with Bar (Capt. G.F.J. Paterson. T/34/ Sikh Pionrs.) e) British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaves (Capt. G.F. Paterson.) f) Delhi Durbar 1911, silver g) Jubilee 1935 h) Coronation 1937, good very fine or better (9) £1,800-2,200
C.I.E. London Gazette 11.5.1937 Lieutenant-Colonel George Frederick Joseph Paterson, O.B.E., M.C., Indian Army (Supernumerary List), Director of Military Lands and Cantonments, Defence Department.

O.B.E. London Gazette 3.7.1926 Major George Frederick Joseph Paterson, M.C., Indian Army. M.C. London Gazette 14.1.1916 Captain George Frederick Joseph Paterson, 34th Sikh Pioneers, Indian Army ‘For distinguished service in the Field.’ Lieutenant-Colonel George Frederick Joseph Paterson, C.I.E., O.B.E., M.C., born March 1885, the son of Colonel H. Paterson, Indian Staff Corps; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, 9.1.1904; posted to the Indian Army, 25.3.1905; promoted Lieutenant, 9.4.1906; Captain, 9.1.1913; served with the 34th Sikh Pioneers during the Great War on the Western Front from 23.9.1914, and in Mesopotamia (twice Mentioned in Despatches, London Gazettes 1.1.1916 and 15.8.1917, and awarded the Military Cross); promoted Major, 9.1.1919; Lieutenant-Colonel, 9.1.1930; appointed Director of Military Lands and Cantonments, Defence Department, India.

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July 25, 2013 - London

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x4 The Second War ‘Persia and Iraq’ C.B.E., Great War ‘Western Front’ M.C. Group of Eleven to Brigadier H.G.L. Prynne, Pioneer Corps, Late London Regiment a) The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 2nd type, Military Division, Commander’s (C.B.E.) neck Badge, silver-gilt and enamel b) Military Cross, G.V.R. c) 1914-15 Star (2.Lieut. H.G.L. Prynne. 13Lond.R.) d) British War and Victory Medals (Capt. H.G.L. Prynne.) e) 1939-1945 Star f) Africa Star g) Italy Star h) Defence and War Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaf i) Efficiency Decoration, G.VI.R., silver and silver-gilt, reverse officially dated ‘1944’, with top ‘Territorial’ riband bar, the Great War awards nearly very fine, the Second War awards nearly extremely fine (11) £1,400-1,800
C.B.E. London Gazette 23.12.1943 Brigadier (temporary) Harold Gordon Lusby Prynne, O.B.E., M.C. (16577), Pioneer Corp ‘In recognition of distinguished services in Persia and Iraq.’ O.B.E. London Gazette 9.10.1942 Major (temporary Lieutenant-Colonel) Harold Gordon Lusby Prynne, M.C. (16577), Pioneer Corps (London, S.E-3)

‘In recognition of gallant and distinguished services in the Middle East during the period November, 1941, to April, 1942.’ M.C. London Gazette 1.1.1919 Lt. (T./Capt.) Harold Gordon Lusby Prynne, 1/13th Bn., Lond. R. ‘For distinguished service in connection with Military Operations in France and Flanders.’ T.D. London Gazette 20.4.1944 Lt.-Col. (T/Brig.) H.G.L. Prynne, C.B.E., M.C. (16577) (T.A.R.O.), Pioneer Corps M.I.D. London Gazette 5.8.1943 Col. (temp.) H.G.L. Prynne, O.B.E., M.C. (16577) (Res. of Off.), Pioneer Corps ‘In recognition of gallant and distinguished services in PersiaIraq.’ Brigadier Harold Gordon Lusby Prynne, C.B.E., M.C., T.D., enlisted as Private, 3rd County of London Yeomanry; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, 13th Princess Louise’s Kensington Battalion, London Regiment, 19.2.1915; served with the 13th Battalion London Regiment during the Great War on the Western Front from 20.9.1915; promoted Lieutenant, 19.9.1916; seconded to Staff HQ, 167 Infantry Brigade, as Staff Captain with the temporary rank of Captain, 3.5.1918; promoted Major, 27.2.1924; transferred to Pioneer Corps, 8.11.1939; served during the Second World in Persia and Iraq (C.B.E., Mentioned in Despatches); retired with the honorary rank of Brigadier, 2.11.1945.

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5 A Good Fighting Boer War D.S.O., Great War O.B.E. Group of Seven to Lieutenant-Colonel P.J. Bailey, 12th Lancers a) Distinguished Service Order, V.R., silver-gilt and enamel, with integral top riband bar b) The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 1st type, Military Division, Officer’s (O.B.E.) breast Badge, silver-gilt (Hallmarks for London 1919) c) Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, six clasps, Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg, Driefontein, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill, Wittebergen (Capt. P.J. Bailey. 12/R. Lcrs.), rank officially corrected d) King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (Capt. P.J. Bailey. D.S.O. 12/Lcrs.) e) 1914 Star, with copy Bar (Major P.J. Bailey D.S.O. 12/Lrs.) f) British War and Victory Medals (Major P.J. Bailey.), toned, generally very fine or better, together with a photographic image of the recipient (7) £2,400-2,800
D.S.O. London Gazette 26.6.1902 Captain Percy James Bailey, 12th Lancers ‘In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa.’ O.B.E. London Gazette 3.6.1919 Bailey, Maj. Percy James, D.S.O., 12th Lancers ‘For valuable services rendered in connection with the War.’ Lieutenant-Colonel Percy James Bailey, D.S.O., O.B.E., born December 1873, the eldest son of Sir James Bailey; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, 12th Lancers, December 1895; promoted Lieutenant, May 1897; served with the Regiment in South Africa and took part in the advance on Kimberley, including the action at Magersfontein, and present at the Relief of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including the actions at

Officers of the 12th Royal Lancers who sailed for France, August 1914 (Bailey front row, third from right)
Paardeberg, Poplar Grove (severely wounded 7.3.1900), Driefontein, Houtnek, and Zand River; served during operations in the Transvaal, May to June 1900, including the actions at Johannesburg and Diamond Hill; in the Orange River Colony, May to November 1900, including the actions at Lindley, Bethlehem, and Wittebergen; appointed a Brigade Signalling Officer (graded Staff Captain), 13.10.1900, and afterwards served on the Staff as a Staff Officer to a Column; promoted Captain, April 1901; Mentioned in Despatches (London Gazette 17.6.1902), and appointed a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order. He received his D.S.O. from H.M. the King, 24.10.1902. Bailey served as Adjutant and Quartermaster, Cavalry School, August 1905 to August 1909; promoted Major, 22.8.1908; served with the Regiment during the Great War on the Western Front from 17.8.1914; appointed Assistant Commandant, Remount Service, Shirehampton, Southern Command, 3.1.1919; Deputy Director of Remounts, General Headquarters, British Armies of the Rhine, 6.4.1919; retired with the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel, 12.12.1919. He died, 1.2.1947.

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July 25, 2013 - London

6 6 The Great War ‘1917’ Western Front D.S.O., ‘1919’ O.B.E. Group of Six to Colonel J.D. Richmond, Royal Army Medical Corps a) Distinguished Service Order, G.V.R., silver-gilt and enamel, obverse central medallion slightly loose, with integral top riband bar b) The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 1st type, Military Division, Officer’s (O.B.E.) breast Badge, silver-gilt (Hallmarks for London 1919) c) 1914-15 Star (Major J.D. Richmond. R.A.M.C.) d) British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaves (Lt. Col. J.D. Richmond.) e) India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., two clasps, Afghanistan N.W.F. 1919, Waziristan 1919-21, second clasp loose on riband as issued (Maj. T.D. Richmond. R.A.M.C.), good very fine or better, mounted as worn and housed in a damaged fitted leather case, together with a post card photograph of the recipient (6) £1,200-1,600
D.S.O. London Gazette 4.6.1917 Maj. John Duncan Richmond M.B., R.A.M.C. ‘For distinguished service in the field.’ O.B.E. London Gazette 3.6.1919 Richmond, Maj. John Duncan, D.S.O., M.D., R.A.M.C. ‘For valuable services rendered in connection with military operations in France.’ M.I.D. London Gazette 1.1.1916 Richmond, Major J.D., M.D., R.A.M.C., General Headquarters Staff, Army Medical Service ‘For gallant and distinguished service in the field.’ M.I.D. London Gazette 29.5.1917 Richmond, Maj. J.D., M.B., Headquarters Staff, Army Medical Service ‘For distinguished and gallant services and devotion to duty.’ M.I.D. London Gazette 10.7.1919 Richmond, Maj. J.D., D.S.O., M.B., R.A.M.C., Army Medical Service ‘For distinguished and gallant services and devotion to duty during the period 16th September, 1918, to 15th March, 1919.’

Colonel J.D. Richmond

Colonel John Duncan Richmond, D.S.O., O.B.E., born Govan, Lanarkshire, October 1877; educated at Glasgow University (M.B. 1900); Commissioned Lieutenant, Royal Army Medical Corps, 31.8.1903; served in India, 1904-07 (invalided) and 1907-09; promoted Captain, 28.2.1907; Major, 28.2.1915; served during the Great War on the Western Front from 29.5.1915 (temporary LieutenantColonel, 1.6-12.8.1916); served with the Medical Corps in Afghanistan and Waziristan, 1919-21; promoted LieutenantColonel, 23.2.1926; served in Malaya, 1926-29; promoted Colonel, 23.3.1930; Appointed Deputy Director of Medical Services, 10.11.1931; retired 14.10.1934. Colonel Richmond died 6.5.1962.

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oRdeRS, deCoRAtionS, CAmPAign medALS And miLitARiA 7 The Outstanding Second War ‘Immediate’ 1941 D.S.O., ‘1940’ D.F.M. Group of Six to Hampden and Manchester Pilot, Squadron Leader W.S. “Kip” Herring, Royal Air Force, Who Flew An “Impossible” Return Trip From Berlin, 7.9.1941, When His Aircraft Was Held in a Cone of 50 Searchlights Above The City For Four Minutes, and Peppered With More Than 30 Flak Holes in Wings and Fuselage; He Dragged His Battered Aircraft the 600 Miles To Home, Over The Most Heavily Defended Part of Germany, Unarmed, On One Engine and at a Height of 5,000 Feet; A Very Experienced Pilot, Having Carried Out Over 80 Operational Sorties, He Was Specifically Seconded For the Sikorski V.I.P. Flights in the Summer of 1943; He Was Killed Whilst Serving as Second Pilot in the General Sikorski Air Crash Disaster, 4.7.1943 a) Distinguished Service Order, G.VI.R., silver-gilt and enamel, reverse of suspension bar officially dated ‘1941’, with integral top riband bar, in Garrard & Co. Ltd. case of issue b) Distinguished Flying Medal, G.VI.R. (564688. Sgt. W.S. Herring. R.A.F.) c) 1939-1945 Star d) Air Crew Europe Star e) Defence and War Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaf, generally good very fine, with the following items and documentation: - Caterpillar Club gold brooch badge, with ‘ruby’ eyes, reverse engraved ‘Sgt. Herring Pres. By Irving Co.’ - R.A.F. Halton Barrington Kennett Trophy Medal, silver (Hallmarks for London 1931), reverse engraved ‘A/A Herring. W.S.’, with silver top riband bar, in fitted case - No. 4 App. Wing Royal Air Force Londonderry Cup Medal, silver, reverse engraved, ‘Junior Cross Country W.S. Herring 1930’; Royal Air Force Athletics & Cross Country Association Prize Medal, gilded bronze, reverse engraved, ‘Junior Cross Country Championship 1937 Runners-Up’ - Memorial Scroll named to ‘Squadron Leader W.S. Herring Royal Air Force’ - Bestowal Document for the Distinguished Service Order, dated 7.10.1941 - M.I.D. Certificate, dated 31.8.1940 - M.I.D. Certificate, dated 2.6.1943 - Investiture Letters for both D.S.O. and D.F.M., dated 19.2.1942 and 14.11.1941 respectively - Letter to recipient from Ivan Scott, Air Correspondent, The Daily Telegraph, dated 14.11.1941 - Telegraph to recipient’s wife from Lincolnshire Constabulary informing her of her husband’s death, dated 5.7.1943 - Buckingham Palace Letter of Condolence - Portrait of recipient entitled “Kipper”, by Cuthbert Orde, signed ‘Orde 23 April 1942’, framed and glazed, typed note attached to reverse states the following, ‘This portrait by Orde was commissioned by AVRO following Kip’s return from overhead Berlin at night on one engine in an AVRO Manchester L7432 on 7th September - take off 21.35 and crash landed at RAF West Raynham 06.00 8th September 1941.

Squadron Leader W.S. “Kip” Herring

The slight damage to the surface of this portrait was caused during the evacuation of Limassol, Cyprus during the brief cease-fire following the Turkish invasion in June 1974. The Greek Cypriots were attacking the Turkish Cypriots in the harbour area of Limassol and the RAF and British Army families living in the town eventually got out during the very brief cease-fire. I was a Flight Commander on IX Vulcan Squadron serving at nearby RAF Akrotiri at the time and I lived in Limassol.’ The latter is signed by recipient’s son Wing Commander Graham “Kip” Herring - Letter and card from Edward Prchal’s family announcing his death - Letter from David Irving, author of The Death of General Sikorski Accident, to recipient’s widow, dated 1.2.1969 - Letter from Carlos Thompson, author of The Assassination of Winston Churchill, to recipient’s widow, dated 17.6.1969 - Copy of proceedings of the R.A.F. Court of Inquiry held into the Sikorski Crash - Newspaper cuttings and photographic images, with other ephemera Pair: Gunner H. Hardy, Royal Artillery British War and Victory Medals (176078 Gnr. H. Hardy. R.A.), good very fine (lot) £6,000-8,000

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July 25, 2013 - London

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D.S.O. London Gazette 7.10.1941 Acting Flying Officer Wilfred Stanley Herring, D.F.M. (44709), 207 Squadron ‘One night in September, 1941, this officer was the captain of an aircraft which participated in an attack on Berlin. Whilst over the city the aircraft was repeatedly hit by shell-fire from an intense and accurate barrage and, when Flying Officer Herring succeeded in evading the defences, the aircraft had sustained severe damage. The port engine had failed and, owing to lack of hydraulic power to the gun turrets, the aircraft was almost defenceless. Nevertheless, Flying Officer Herring decided to attempt to fly the aircraft back to this country by the shortest route which entailed passing over the enemy’s most heavily defended areas. Overcoming many difficulties he succeeded in reaching this country and in landing safely at an aerodrome with practically no fuel left in the tanks. Throughout, this officer displayed outstanding determination. On numerous occasions, Flying Officer Herring has carried out attacks on the most heavily defended targets, involving deep penetration into enemy territory, and has at all times displayed the greatest ability and devotion to duty.’ The Recommendation, dated 17.9.1941, states: ‘Flying Officer Herring has now completed over 320 hours operational flying as the captain of Hampden and Manchester aircraft and he has always shown the utmost determination to carry through whatever operation he has been allotted. On numerous occasions this officer has been detailed to attack the most heavily defended targets involving deep penetration into enemy territory, and in every instance he has completed his mission with a cool efficiency that has been a model to other aircrews. His resolute behaviour was particularly noticeable on the night of September 7th, when he was the captain of a Manchester which took part in a raid on Berlin. Whilst over the City the aeroplane was the target for intense and accurate anti-aircraft fire and repeated hits were received. Severe damage was sustained, including the seizure of the port engine owing to a punctured radiator. Flying Officer Herring

feathered the port air screw, dived out of the defences, sustaining more damage, and decided to attempt to fly the damaged aircraft to England. This decision was taken with the full knowledge that the flight would necessarily have to be made during a full moon by the shortest route which would entail passing through the thickest part of the enemy searchlight belt and fighter areas. At this time he was also aware that, following the failure of the port engine, there was no hydraulic power to the gun turrets and that the aeroplane was almost defenceless. The return flight was made successfully at about 5,000 feet. The aircraft encountered cloud at the most critical part of the flight and in consequence of severe icing conditions was forced to fly below cloud across the main enemy searchlight area. On arrival back in England, a successful landing was made at an aerodrome with practically no fuel left in the tanks. The decision to make a return flight in the face of all the known and unknown hazards shows that this officer possesses the finest type of courage and determination and the manner in which the flight was executed demonstrates his skill and efficiency as a pilot and captain of a heavy bomber. The modest demeanour, ability and devotion to duty of this officer has done an immense amount towards raising the confidence of flying crews in the capabilities of Manchester aircraft.’ D.F.M. London Gazette 22.11.1940 564688 Sergeant Wilfred Stanley Herring, 44 Squadron The Recommendation, dated 27.8.1940, states: ‘This Pilot has consistently set a high standard of courage in pressing home his attacks against the enemy. He has completed 217 hours operational flying. Several of the flights were carried out under adverse weather conditions and necessitated sea crossings of over 800 miles. Covering Remarks by Air Officer Commanding - Air Vice Marshal Arthur [“Bomber”] Harris: This N.C.O. pilot has just been sent back to an O.T.U. for a rest after a long period

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of excellent work as a captain of aircraft. He has done consistently well on operations - many of a very hazardous nature.’ Also Recommended for the A.F.C. (Periodical Awards 1.8.1942-31.1.1943), Acting Squadron Leader Wilfred Stanley Herring, D.S.O., D.F.M. (44709) 1654 Conversion Unit, ‘This officer now commands “A” flight of this unit. He has himself flown on a great many occasions, both by day and night, in order to expedite the training of crews. He is not only a first class instructor but has administered his flight with efficiency and tact showing fine powers of leadership.’ Squadron Leader Wilfred Stanley “Kipper” Herring, D.S.O., D.F.M. (1914-1943), born Edmonton, London; enlisted Royal Air Force, as a Metal Rigger under training, R.A.F. Halton, September 1930; remustered as a Pilot under training, July 1937, and was promoted Sergeant Pilot the following year; posted 7 Squadron, April 1939; posted for operational flying to 44 (Rhodesia) Squadron (Hampdens), Waddington, September 1939; the squadron’s early operations consisted mainly of North Sea sweeps and minelaying; Herring’s first operational sortie was a Nickel Raid over Bremen, 23/24.2.1940; he also took part in some of the first raids on German industrial centres, such as over the Ruhr and Munchen Gladbach, in May 1940; Max Riddell (Herring’s Rear Gunner during his ops with 207 Squadron) gives the following, ‘Kipper - I recall a slightly built dark chap with a moustache. Quietly spoken but with an air of confidence, he was very much respected probably because of his efforts when he won his D.F.M. on Hampdens. The story, as I heard it, was that he was second pilot - in the early days in Hampdens operational training consisted of an experienced pilot and W/Op airgunner taking on ops with them a new pilot and W/Op A/G filling positions of navigator and bottom rear gunner...After half a dozen trips or so the ‘second’ became a crew and took on other ‘seconds’... Kipper as second pilot/nav. was in the lower nose of the Hampden which was one of a ‘box’ of six on a daylight. They were attacked by enemy fighters and as the Hampden had a blind spot on the beam which the guns could not traverse and the enemy fighters soon cottoned on to this, they attacked on the beam. The formation had to wheel in an attempt to give its gunners a chance to fire at the attackers. You will appreciate that this was a slow and cumbersome manoeuvre. Evidently Kipper removed his single V.G.O. gun from the Navigator’s position, took it up to the astro hatch which he opened and sat up in, which meant he was sitting from the waist up in the slipstream. He jammed the butt of the gun against the side of the hatch and holding it steady in his arms, opened fire and got one of them. The others broke off the attack. Sounds all very simple but to sit up in the slipstream and direct fire shooting from the waist as it were - with a gun firing 500 rounds per minute, unmounted and held only by the strength of his arms, which were quite badly burned through his clothing by the heat from the barrel, was a terrific feat. He was completely unflappable!’ (Copy of letter written by Riddell to Robert Kirby, author of Avro Manchester. The Legend Behind The Lancaster, included in lot refers). “London Pride” - To Berlin and Back Herring was commissioned Pilot Officer, 8.10.1940; posted to No. 16 O.T.U., October 1940; posted to 207 Squadron (Manchesters), Waddington, February 1941; sorties flown with the Squadron during his 2nd operational tour included: Kiel (3); Brest; Mannheim (2); Hamburg; Berlin (3), including 7.9.1941, ‘this is the epic story of an Avro Manchester bomber. “S for Sugar” (since unofficially renamed “London Pride”. It was told to me (perhaps I should say I dragged out the story) by the captain of the machine, as we flew in it together, he in the captain’s seat, I in that of its second pilot. But for this man’s pluck and determination, “London Pride” would have been abandoned over Berlin during a recent night raid; its crew of seven would either have been killed or in enemy hands for the duration.... The story behind this Flying Officer’s D.S.O. opens at 1am on a certain Saturday, 17,000 feet above the heart of Berlin. It is no longer a secret that the bomb-racks of the twinengined Manchester accommodate the heaviest bombs yet in service. Nor is it a secret that the R.A.F. is now using a blast bomb that weighs nearly two tons. “London Pride” had jockeyed for position above its target in Central Berlin - the General Post Office. Before releasing its load it was held for three or four minutes by a cone of about 50 searchlights. In the officer’s own words: “We were being peppered with flak and had already been hit four times. “Then, just as we hit the G.P.O. and were watching the colossal red flame expanding and contracting like a concertina, up it came! It was like the kick of a million mules. “One shell tore through the radiator of my port engine... and away went the coolant. “Four other direct hits in quick succession carried away my rear and dorsal gun turrets, shot away the hydraulic system and put the undercarriage out of action. Although we didn’t know it at the time, the rubber dinghy was also blown away. “My port fuel-tank was holed three times, but sealed up again. We had more than 30 flak-holes in wings and fuselage. One airscrew was completely severed.” The machine was then 600 miles from home. What does an air pilot in this plight think of? I have often wondered. Here is this officer’s answer: “As the engine went my first thought was Prisoners of War and many tons of lovely aircraft for the Nazi scrap-heap!” Miraculously, none of the crew was injured. The captain gave them the choice of abandoning aircraft or trying to limp back to base on one engine and one wheel. “ ‘We’re staying with you, Skipper!’ they chorused. Great lads! I could have hugged them all,” said the pilot with a grin. All the way home, everything movable was torn from the bomber and thrown overboard. Stationary fittings were broken up with an axe. The strain on the starboard engine had to be reduced to a minimum. Guns, instruments, ammunition tanks, even the crews’ rations, were jettisoned. And the short cut to England lay over vast areas of flak and searchlights. When hit, the Manchester dropped rapidly from 17,000 to 5,000 feet; at this height the pilot managed to stagger most of the way across the North Sea. The crossing was made at little more than the plane’s normal landing speed. Every gallon of petrol was priceless. The homeward flight, normally a matter of little more than two hours, took five hours. By freak luck there was no interception by enemy night fighters. Day was breaking as the gallant band crossed the East Coast. They had no radio to help them. A belly-glide was not to be attempted; for the Manchester airscrews are the world’s biggest and have a diameter of 16 feet. Many miles from the home aerodrome the impossible was attempted. Fuel tanks were now dry: there was less than 20 gallons in the pipes - enough for only a few yards. Using air-bottles to lower the starboard wheel, and holding off the giant plane almost to the last drop of petrol...[Herring] at last brought it to rest on an even keel. His squadron Engineer Officer, who drove over that morning to inspect the damage summarised the performance for me in one word: “Impossible!” But to-day “London Pride” is prouder than ever. As good as new, it took an active part in the recent night mass attack on Cologne. And that was her skipper’s 62nd operational flight over enemy territory’ (Newspaper cutting included with lot refers); Herring also flew on sorties to Dusseldorf; Hanover; Lennion; Essen and Frankfurt; Flying Officer, 8.10.1941; posted to 44 Squadron, November 1941; served with 455 Squadron (R.A.A.F.) and No. 44 Conversion Unit, February-May 1942; advanced Acting Squadron Leader,

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July 25, 2013 - London

Herring (left) with Pilot Officer Hills, D.F.M., ‘on return from West Raynham after epic flight on one engine from Berlin’
8.2.1942; served with No. 1654 Conversion Unit, Swinderby, June 1942-April 1943; initially served at No. 10 O.T.U. from April 1943, before transferring to No. 104 O.T.U., Nutts Corner; attached 511 Squadron (Liberators), Transport Command, June 1943; the Squadron was employed mainly on the Lyneham - Gibraltar - Cairo West run, transporting a mixture of freight and VIP passengers; it would appear that Herring was specifically seconded for the Sikorski flight. The Sikorski Air Crash General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Premier of the Polish Government in exile and Commander in Chief of the Free Polish Forces from 1939 was the only Polish leader who had sufficient stature and skill to secure the confidence of his people and to achieve the close relations with Churchill and Stalin necessary to maintain a united and effective Polish government with a substantial influence in Allied planning. The Polish leader, after a tour of the Middle East which included his review of the Polish troops in that theatre, was advised to relax for a few days, and on 29th June was invited to the excavations at Luxor and Aswan; however the invitation was not taken up as a telegram from Churchill the following day was interpreted as a recall to London. General Sikorski had previously asked through the Polish Consul that the R.A.F. pilot (Flight Lieutenant E.M. Prchal) that had flown him out from England be allowed to fly him back as he was greatly impressed with his skill and experience. His request was granted - Prchal and his crew (Squadron Leader W.S. Herring, D.S.O., D.F.M., W/O L. Zalsberg, D.F.M.; Sergeant F.S. Kelly and Flight Sergeants Gerrie, D.F.M., and Hunter) had arrived in Cairo on the 28th June. Herring was new to the crew, ‘he had been with me as second pilot since leaving England on this trip and he had not flown with me before. On the two take-offs on this trip, at Lyneham and Cairo, one carried out at night and one by day in fog, he had carried out the drill quite normally’ (Extract from Prchal’s questioning during the Court of Inquiry held into the crash, refers). Herring and crew were in place for the final act of the tragedy as the Squadron Record Book shows: 1.7.1943 ‘Liberator AL 523: departed from Cairo West to Gibraltar 0406 hrs. - General Sikorski, his staff and daughter on board (12) passengers, -arrived 1437hrs’. 4.7.1943 ‘Liberator AL 523: Took off from Gibraltar and crashed into the sea, the crew (except F/L. Prchal) and the passengers, including General Sikorski were killed.’ The Liberator had taken off at 2307hrs, and as Prchal had pushed the control forward at 130mph to gather speed to 165mph he tried to pull the column back but it locked. The aircraft hit the sea and sank within minutes, in five fathoms of water. Prchal, who suffered a fractured ankle, lacerations and shock, was the only survivor. He was picked up within six minutes of the crash.The aircraft was later raised and the cause of the accident was found to be jamming of the elevator controls shortly after take off. Herring’s was one of three bodies which were never recovered. Tragically he was never to see his second son, who was born 4 days after the crash. Squadron W.S. Leader Herring, D.S.O., D.F.M. is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial. Gunner H. Hardy was W.S. Herring’s father-in-law.

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x8 A Fine Great War 1917 ‘Cavalry’ D.S.O. Group of Seven to Lieutenant-Colonel P.D. Stewart, 3rd Dragoon Guards, Late Gordon Highlanders a) Distinguished Service Order, G.V.R., silver-gilt and enamel, with integral top riband bar b) Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, four clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Relief of Ladysmith, Transvaal, top lugs removed (Lieut. P.D. Stewart. Gordon Highrs.) c) King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps, top lugs removed (Lieut. P.D. Stewart. Gordon Highrs:) d) 1914 Star, with Bar (Capt: P.D. Stewart. 3/D. Gds.) e) British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaves (Lt. Col. P.D. Stewart.) f) Delhi Durbar 1911, silver, minor edge bruise to QSA, toned, good very fine (7) £1,600-2,000
D.S.O. London Gazette 27.10.1917 Capt. (A./Lt.-Col.) Patrick Douglas Stewart, Dgn. Gds. ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He led his battalion with great skill in an attack, capturing all the objectives and holding them against several counter-attacks. By his example and training he inspired all ranks in his battalion with a very fine fighting spirit.’ M.I.D. London Gazette 17.2.1915 Stewart, Captain P.D., 3rd Dragoon Guards ‘For gallant and distinguished service in the Field.’ M.I.D. London Gazette 11.12.1917 Stewart, Capt. (actg. Lt.-Col.) P.D., D.S.O., Dragoon Guards ‘For distinguished and gallant services and devotion to duty during the period February 16th to midnight September 20th/21st, 1917.’ Lieutenant-Colonel Patrick Douglas Stewart, D.S.O., born September 1876; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, South Lancashire Regiment, May 1899; transferred to the Gordon Highlanders, November 1899; served with the Highlanders in South Africa; took part in the Relief of Ladysmith, including the action at Colenso; operations of 17-24.1.1900, and the action at Spion Kop (severely wounded, 20.1.1900); and operations in Natal, the Transvaal, and Orange River Colony; promoted Lieutenant, 10.10.1900, and Mentioned in Despatches (London Gazette 8.2.1901); promoted Captain, 1.1.1906; appointed Adjutant, 1908; transferred to the 3rd Dragoon Guards, 2.10.1912; served with the 3rd Dragoon Guards during the Great War on the Western Front from 28.10.1914; retired with the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel, 8.6.1920.

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July 25, 2013 - London 9 A ‘Military Division’ O.B.E. Group of Six to Wing Commander W.L. Milburn, Royal Air Force, A Great War R.E. 8 Pilot with 16 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps a) The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 2nd type, Military Division, Officer’s (O.B.E.) breast Badge, silver-gilt b) British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. W.L. Milburn. R.A.F.), BWM with minor official correction, VM erased c) Defence Medal d) Coronation 1953 e) Cadet Forces Medal, G.VI.R., with Second Award Bar (Act. Sqn. Ldr. W.L. Milburn. R.A.F.V.R. (T.)), generally very fine, with several newspaper cuttings picturing recipient in uniform (6) £180-220
O.B.E. London Gazette 1.1.1959 Acting Wing Commander Wilton Legender Milburn (65119), Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (Training Branch) Wing Commander Wilton Legender Milburn, O.B.E., born Sunderland, 1899; studied as a Dental Student at Durham University, 1915-1917, and was a member of the University O.T.C.; enlisted as 3/A.M, Royal Flying Corps, 29.5.1917; became a Cadet, June 1917; after training was posted as a Pilot to 16 Squadron (R.E. 8’s), Bruay, France 27.3.1917; the squadron was mainly tasked with reconnaissance and artillery observation; returned to the Home Establishment, 25.1.1919; transferred to the Unemployed List, 27.1.1919; re-engaged as Acting Pilot Officer, Training Branch, R.A.F.V.R., for service with A.T.C., 1.2.1941; advanced Squadron Leader, 26.7.1943; Wing Commander, Durham Wing, A.T.C., 25.11.1947; retired 1965.

10 Family Group: The M.B.E. Group of Five to Warrant Officer E.H. Robbins, Royal Air Force a) The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 2nd type, Military Division, Member’s (M.B.E.) breast Badge, silver, in Royal Mint case of issue b) 1939-1945 Star c) France and Germany Star d) Defence and War Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaf, extremely fine, the Second War awards in named card box of issue, addressed to ‘Sgt’s Mess R.A.F Eastern Ave, Gloucester’, with named Buckingham Palace enclosure for the M.B.E. Imperial Service Medal, E.II.R. (Edward William Robbins), extremely fine, in Royal Mint case of issue (6) £140-180
M.B.E. London Gazette 1.1.1946 Warrant Officer Edward Henry Robbins (215630), Royal Air Force. M.I.D. London Gazette 1.1.1945 Warrant Officer E. H. Robbins (215630). 215360 Warrant Officer Edward Henry Robbins, M.B.E., served during the Second World War with the Royal Air Force; discharged, 31.3.1949. Mr. Edward William Robbins served as a Telephonist, London Telecommunications Region.

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11 A Good ‘Mau Mau’ M.B.E. Group of Seven to District Military Intelligence Officer, Major W.S. Watson, Royal Armoured Corps, Whose Leadership in the Thomson Falls and South Nyeri Reserve Districts, Resulted in the Death of Over One Hundred Terrorists, and the Capture of Twenty-Four Others, in Addition to the Wounding of Thirty-Nine Terrorists, and Capture of Four Precision Weapons a) The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 2nd type, Military Division, Member’s (M.B.E.) breast Badge, silver b) 1939-1945 Star c) Defence and War Medals d) Africa General Service 1902-56, E.II.R., one clasp, Kenya (Major W.S. Watson. R.A.C.) e) General Service 1918-62, E.II.R., one clasp, Malaya (Major W.S. Watson. M.B.E. R.A.C.) f) Efficiency Medal, G.VI.R., with ‘Territorial’ scroll suspension (Lt. W.S. Watson. R.A.C.), minor contact marks, very fine and better, mounted as originally worn (7) £1,200-1,600
M.B.E. London Gazette 27.1.1956 Major W.S. Watson, Royal Armoured Corps “In recognition of distinguished services in Kenya during the period 21 April to 20 October, 1955.” The Recommendation states: “Major Watson has served as a District Military Intelligence Officer for the last two years, first at Thomsons Falls, and then at South Nyeri Reserve. As a result of his leadership and devotion to duty, he built up an efficient intelligence organisation in both Districts, which directly contributed to Security Force successes. In South Nyeri Reserve, his organisation has been responsible for the death of over one hundred terrorists, and the capture of twentyfour others. In addition, thirty-nine terrorists have been wounded, and four precision weapons recovered. He has taken part himself in many intelligence operations, some of a hazardous nature. He has maintained excellent relations with the Police, Administration and Army, and has thereby assisted to build up confidence in the Intelligence organisation.”

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July 25, 2013 - London

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x12 The Second War M.B.E. Group of Three Attributed to Flight Officer A.B. Davies, Women’s Auxiliary Air Force a) The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 2nd type, Military Division, Member’s Badge, silver, on Lady’s bow riband b) Defence and War Medals, nearly extremely fine, with the related miniature awards (3) £80-120
M.B.E. London Gazette 14.6.1945 Flight Officer Agnes Emily Davies (2761), Women’s Auxiliary Air Force. Flight Officer Agnes Emily Davies, M.B.E., Commissioned Assistant Section Officer, 25.8.1941; promoted Section Officer, 25.8.1942.

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13 The Second War 1944 ‘Italy’ M.C. Group of Nine to Major J.M. Brown, Royal Artillery a) Military Cross, G.VI.R., reverse officially dated ‘1944’ and additionally privately engraved ‘68888 T/Major John Michael Brown’ b) The Most Venerable Order of St. John, Officer’s breast Badge, silver and enamel c) 1939-1945 Star d) Africa Star, with 8th Army Bar e) Italy Star f) France and Germany Star g) Defence and War Medals. M.I.D. Oak Leaf, the Second War awards all privately engraved ‘68888 T/Major John Michael Brown’ h) Efficiency Decoration, G.VI.R., reverse officially dated ‘1949’ and additionally privately engraved ‘68888 T/Major John Michael Brown’, with Second Award Bar, G.VI.R., reverse officially dated ‘1949’, and top ‘Territorial’ riband bar, good very fine, mounted as worn, and housed in a fitted leather case, together with the recipient’s riband bars and a photographic image of the recipient (9) £800-1,200

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July 25, 2013 - London

Major J.M. Brown

M.C. London Gazette 24.8.1944 Captain (temporary Major) John Michael Brown (68888), Royal Regiment of Artillery (Rugby) ‘In recognition of gallant and distinguished services in Italy.’ The Recommendation, originally for a D.S.O., dated 30.1.1944, states: ‘During the period 26th September 1943 to 31st December 1943, Major Brown’s work as a Battery Commander in operations in Italy has been characterised by a complete disregard for danger, and by his forethought and readiness to assume responsibility he has achieved outstanding results. In particular, in the operations about Teano and, again, before Monte Camino, his conduct was an example to all who worked with him. By his resourcefulness and indifference to his personal safety, Major Brown has set a standard which is outstanding and has been an inspiration in times of difficulty and danger to all who know him.’ T.D. London Gazette 30.12.1949 Capt. J. M. Brown, M.C. (68888), Royal Artillery T.D. Second Award Bar London Gazette 30.12.1949 Capt. J. M. Brown, M.C. (68888), Royal Artillery M.I.D. London Gazette 4.4.1946 Maj. (temp.) J. M. Brown, M.C. (68888), Royal Regiment of Artillery ‘In recognition of gallant and distinguished services in NorthWest Europe.’ Major John Michael Brown, M.C., T.D., Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Royal Artillery, Territorial Army, 26.9.1936; served with 146 Field Regiment, Royal Artillery during the Second World War; promoted Lieutenant, 2.3.1941; Captain, 11.4.1945; Major, 16.5.1951.

14 A Great War M.C. Group of Three Attributed to Lieutenant T. Smith, Army Service Corps a) Military Cross, G.V.R., unnamed as issued b) British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. T. Smith.), good very fine, with a contemporary newspaper cutting detailing the M.C. citation (3) £500-700
M.C. London Gazette 16.9.1918 T./2nd Lt. Turberville Smith, A..S.C. ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in successfully getting away the guns of a siege battery, in spite of the road along which it was necessary for his motor tractors to pass being under permanent shell fire in enfilade for about 5,000 yards. He showed a fine example of courage and resource.’ Three Lieutenants with the name T. Smith were awarded the Military Cross during the Great War, of the Royal Fusiliers, East Lancashire Regiment, and the Army Service Corps.

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Squadron Leader C.I. ‘Joe’ Blyth, in the cockpit of his Venom in Aden 15 The Unique Korea, Suez, Aden and Oman Operations D.F.C. and Bar, A.F.C. and Bar, Air Medal (U.S.A.) Group of Ten to Mustang and Meteor Jet Fighter Pilot, Squadron Leader C.I. ‘Joe’ Blyth, Royal Air Force, He Served During the Second War with 161 (Special Duties) Squadron, Dropping Agents and Supplies into Occupied Europe, Before Being Shot Down and Evading Capture. Attached to 77 (Australian) Squadron in Korea, He Flew in Over 100 Operational Sorties and Took Part in Successful Air to Air Combats Against MiG Fighters; He Commanded 8 Squadron (Venoms) in Action Against the Egyptian Air Force in the Canal Zone; In the First Two Days of Operations Blyth’s Squadron Destroyed At Least 43 MiGs On Their Airfields; He Commanded 8 Squadron Again Leading His Venoms Against Rebel Forces in Oman. These Operations From 1951-1957 Make ‘Joe’ Blyth Arguably The Most Decorated Post War R.A.F. Officer a) Distinguished Flying Cross, G.VI.R., reverse officially dated ‘1952’, with Second Award Bar, reverse officially dated ‘1958’ b) Air Force Cross, G.VI.R., reverse officially dated ‘1950’, with Second Award Bar, reverse officially dated ‘1955’ c) 1939-1945 Star d) Air Crew Europe Star e) Defence and War Medals f) Korea 1950-53, 1st ‘Britt: Omn:’ type (Flt. Lt. C.I. Blyth. R.A.F.) g) United Nations Medal for Korea h) General Service 1918-62, E.II.R., four clasps, Canal Zone, Cyprus, Near East, Malay Peninsula (Sqn. Ldr. C.I. Blyth. R.A.F.), clasps reconstituted to facilitate the wear of ‘Canal Zone’ i) Coronation 1953 j) United States of America, Air Medal, generally very fine or better, mounted as originally worn, with General Service 1918-62, E.II.R. (Flt. Lt. CI Blyth RAF), planchet and suspension carriage only, and the following related items and documents: - The recipient’s related miniature awards, mounted as worn - D.F.C. Royal Mint case of issue; A.F.C. Royal Mint case of issue; United States of America Air Medal, case of issue - Riband Bar for first three awards; Air Gunner’s badge, brass - Forged French Identity Card, used by Blyth whilst evading capture in occupied France, complete with stamps and photograph of recipient in civilian clothing - Caterpillar Club Membership Card, with postal envelope addressed to ‘Sgt. C.I. Blyth, 16 E.F.T.S., R.A.F. Burnaston, Derby’; three Letters to recipient from the Caterpillar Club, dated 4.5.1943, 29.11.1967 and 8.12.1967 - Air Ministry Letter regarding Second War Campaign Medal entitlement; Second War Campaign Medal Enclosure Slip - Two Air Ministry Letters regarding the recipient’s service in Korea, and the award of the D.F.C., dated 2.2.1952 and 11.6.1952 - Letter from The Foreign Service of The United States of America inviting recipient to an investiture ceremony for the award of the Air Medal, dated 24.9.1954; Official Carbon Copy of Citation for the award - Congratulatory Letter from Air Vice Marshal H.L. Patch, C.B., C.B.E. on the occasion of the award of the United States of America Air Medal, dated 28.9.1954 - Congratulatory Letter from Wing Commander K.C.M. Giddings, O.B.E., D.F.C., A.F.C. on the occasion of the award of the Bar to the recipient’s A.F.C., dated 23.1.1955 - Official Secrets Acts Declaration, signed by the recipient, and dated 1.3.1963; R.A.F. Instrument Pilot Rating Certificate, dated 20.2.1952, with other ephemera (lot) £35,000-40,000

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D.F.C. London Gazette 30.5.1952 Flight Lieutenant Colin Ian Blyth A.F.C (199075) Royal Air Force ‘In recognition of gallant and distinguished service in Korea’ D.F.C. Second Award Bar London Gazette 10.6.1958 Squadron Leader Colin Ian Blyth D.F.C., A.F.C. (199075) Royal Air Force ‘In recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in air operations in Aden and Oman’ A.F.C. London Gazette 2.1.1950 Flight Lieutenant Colin Ian Blyth (199075), R.A.F., No. 6 Flying Training School, R.A.F. Tern Hill The Recommendation states: ‘During his two years at No. 6 Flying Training School, Flight Lieutenant Blyth has shown outstanding qualities as a Flying Instructor. Throughout a period of extensive re-organisation and expansion on the unit he has worked extremely hard and well, and has inspired his fellow instructors and the cadets by his example. He is always keen to get into the air, is an excellent pilot, and particularly specialises in bad weather flying, a practise at which he is expert. Owing to the shortage of instructors he has many times, by his own wish, remained on flying duty for periods far in excess of what is normally required. The example Flight Lieutenant Blyth has set by his keeness to fly in the difficult conditions and the quality of his instructional work are outstanding.’ A.F.C. Second Award Bar London Gazette 1.1.1955 Flight Lieutenant Colin Ian Blyth, D.F.C., A.F.C. (199075), Royal Air Force United States of America Air Medal London Gazette 30.10.1953 Flight Lieutenant Colin Ian Blyth, D.F.C., A.F.C. (199075), Royal Air Force ‘In recognition of valuable services rendered during operations in Korea’ The Citation states: ‘Flight Lieutenant Colin I. Blyth performed acts of meritorious service while participating in sustained operations in support of United Nations activities in Korea. Flight Lieutenant Blyth participated in thirty operational flights during the period 2 March 1951 to 22 August 1951; in the course of these operations dive bombing, rocketing and strafing runs were made from dangerously low altitudes, destroying and damaging enemy installations and equipment. Through his ability, initiative and courage, Flight Lieutenant Blyth has brought great credit upon himself and the Royal Air Force.’ Squadron Leader Colin Ian Blyth, D.F.C., A.F.C. (19252012), known throughout his life as Joe, was born in Maidstone and was educated at the local County School. He volunteered for aircrew duties in the RAF in 1940. He was 15 years old but had ‘stolen’ his sister’s national insurance number allowing him to claim he was 18. He was accepted and started his training as a wireless operator/air gunner in November 1940. Second War - SOE In December 1940 Blyth joined No. 161 (Special Duties) Squadron and flew operations to drop agents and supplies into occupied Europe. On the night of 24th September 1942, his Whitley V Z9131 MA-Q piloted by Pilot Officer D.C. Boothby, ‘T/O Tempsford. Crashed near SevignyWaleppe (Ardennes), 23 km West Northwest of Rethel, France’ (Royal Air Force Bomber Command Losses of the Second World War, refers). Of the crew of seven, one was killed, three were taken POW, and three (including Blyth) evaded capture. He headed south on foot and was helped by farmers. In Lyon he was picked up by the local escape line and moved to a ‘safe house’ in Marseille where he came under the control of the Pat O’Leary Line. He assumed the false identity of one Gaston Emile Vanbach, a salesman from Toulouse. On 12th October he was taken by French Resistance couriers with 32 other evaders to Canet Plage near Perpignan. After a nervewracking wait on the beach, the party was transferred to the Polish-manned SOE felucca Seawolf, arriving in Gibraltar two days later. Shortly afterwards he returned to England. More detail is offered by Blyth’s Evader Report, jointly given with Pilot Officer Reed, ‘We came down together about 0130 hrs on 25th Sep. near Rheims. We were both uninjured. We hid our parachutes in a hedge and began walking S.E. We walked for two days, sleeping by day in the woods and walking at night. During this time we did not get any help from French people. When we got to the river Aisne we spoke to a farmer. We convinced him we were English and he took us to the Mayor of the village, who gave us food and civilian clothes and put us on a minor road to Rheims, warning us of the position of German A.A. units.

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After a time we left the road and went Southwards across country, bearing slightly East. Two days later, after we had crossed a battle field, we reached St. Martin-Le-Hereux where a farmer and his wife, whom we had met in the fields, gave us food and shelter for the night. Next morning, after supplying us with a Michelin map of the district they put us on a bus for Chalons-Sur-Marne and gave us train times for Dijon. We went to Dijon by train (30 Sep.) and walked through the Cote D’Or for about 24 hours. As Sgt Blyth’s feet gave out we went to the largest farm house in a village, where we got a meal and were put on a bus for Beaune. From there we walked towards the West side of Chalon-Sur-Saone. We crossed the Line of Demarcation without a guide, three miles west of the town on 2nd Oct. We had slept the previous night beside a charcoal-burners’ fire and in the morning the charcoal-burners gave us some advice about crossing the Line. Once across the Line we walked to Varenne-Le-Grand where we spent a day at a cafe. On 6th Oct we went by train to Lyons and Marseille. We went to the docks to try to get a boat, but the docks were too well guarded. We then got in touch with the organisation.’ Of the three evaders from the Whitley crew - Boothby and Reed were recommended for the M.C, whilst Blyth was recommended for the M.M. Both Boothby and Reed were awarded with the D.F.C., whilst Blyth was to miss out this time around. After a period of recuperation, he served the following year at 1 Squadron, 2 ITW, Selwyn College, Cambridge and at No. 16 E.F.T.S., Burnastone, Derby. Blyth left for South Africa to train as a pilot. He was assessed as above average and became a flying instructor. After returning to the UK in January 1946, he spent two years instructing pilots on piston-engine aircraft at No. 6 F.T.S. Tern Hill before converting to jets and joining No. 203 Advanced Flying School to train fighter pilots. A dynamic personality and innovative leader and pilot, he was awarded the AFC. Korea - Fighter Pilot Blyth was an experienced instructor on the Meteor jet fighter when he left for Korea in March 1951. Four RAF pilots had been selected to assist No.77 Squadron of the Royal Australian Air Force to convert from the piston-engine Mustang to the Meteor. Although not authorised to fly on operations, Blyth managed to persuade his Australian CO to allow him to participate in a few sorties - in the event he completed over 100. His enthusiasm to get ‘into the mix’ is illustrated by a verse from a popular song about fighter pilots in Korea taken from the Fleet Air Arm Songbook: Now one newcomer’s keen to fly, It’s Flight Lieutenant Joey Blyth, Two hundred hours a month he’d try, It’s foolish but it’s fun.’ Mustangs to Meteors, With Three MiGs Along The Way No. 77 was operating from Pusan in South Korea and Blyth was soon in action. On March 20th, a colleague was forced to crash land during a ground attack mission and Blyth remained overhead as a helicopter attempted a rescue. As he strafed Chinese troops advancing on the scene, his Mustang was hit by small arms fire but he continued to give cover until the rescue was completed. During 24 days in March, Blyth flew twenty-eight sorties strafing and rocketing trucks and artillery pieces in addition to flying close escort sorties for photographic reconnaissance aircraft. With the arrival of the first Meteors he spent the next few weeks training the Australian pilots. With the task complete in September, he volunteered to remain with No. 77 and embarked on an intensive period of operations in the jet fighter. In addition to attacking supply dumps, vehicle parks and trains with rockets and cannons, he also escorted USAF heavy bombers when MiG 15 fighters, often flown by Russian pilots, were encountered. On 5th September, Blyth was

Blyth as Gaston Vanbach- on the run
leading a formation of eight Meteors escorting two USAF photographic reconnaissance aircraft when 24 MiGs attacked and a fierce combat ensued. Some of the Meteors were damaged and Blyth managed to fire on one of the MiGs when he saw smoke coming from one of them. In air-to-air combat, the MiG was superior but Blyth did not allow this to deter him and he engaged them on numerous occasions. Blyth’s skill and aggressive spirit attracted the attention of Air Vice-Marshal Bouchier, the AOC of the Air Component of the British Commonwealth Occupation Forces, who strongly recommended that Blyth should be allowed to stay longer with 77 Squadron. On 24th October Blyth was escorting USAF B-29 bombers when MiGs attacked the force. He dived after a lone enemy aircraft that was on the tail of his leader and opened fire damaging the MiG, which broke off the engagement. A week later, he fired on another that was engaging his leader. Smoke poured from the MiG, which dived away. On 17th November, Blyth led a fighter sweep, his 105th and final operation over Korea. Shortly after returning to the UK he was awarded the D.F.C. The latter had been granted on the recommendation of the Governor General of Australia in conjunction with the AOC, Royal Australian Air Force Overseas. The US Government awarded Blyth the Air Medal, which was presented to him by Brigadier General Sterling, U.S. Air Attache to the United Kingdom. On his return from Korea he was appointed flight commander of No. 63 Squadron flying Meteors from Waterbeach near Cambridge. His combat experience, presson attitude and professionalism ensured that the squadron was one of the most efficient in Fighter Command. At the end of his tour in August 1954 he was awarded a Bar to his A.F.C, a congratulatory letter from Wing Commander K.C.M. Giddings gives the following on Blyth’s time at

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77 Squadron Pilots being addressed before an Op in Korea by Squadron Leader R.C. Cresswell. Blyth far left
Waterbeach, ‘My very sincerest congratulations on the bar to your A.F.C. I was fairly confident that you would get one in view of your exceptional record at Waterbeach but one can never be sure so that it was very gratifying to find that it really did come through. I cannot imagine anyone deserving the honour more and I doubt if any other flight commander in Fighter Command has for many years achieved the number of flying hours that you piled in here. Flying hours are only one thing and quite apart from that you would have deserved recognition for the first class press-on spirit that you imbued in “A” Flight, and, indeed, in the whole squadron.’ The Suez Crisis - A Brush With MiGs Again Blyth joined No. 32 Squadron as a flight commander in the Middle East. The unit had just been equipped with the Venom fighter bomber and moved to Kabrit in the Canal Zone before moving to Shaibah in Iraq. After eighteen months, he left for an appointment in the headquarters in Cyprus. He had been there six months when the Suez Crisis erupted. No. 8 Squadron, also equipped with Venoms, arrived from Habbaniya (Iraq) but without a CO - he had left at short notice. As Blyth entered the operations centre his group captain spotted him and shouted, ‘Do you want 8 Joe?’ He took command that afternoon. Operations commenced at dawn on November 1st, 1956 and three Venom squadrons headed for the Egyptian Air Force (EAF) airfields. Blyth took No. 8 to Abu Sueir and Fayid and strafed lines of MiG fighters. Leading the formation, he accounted for five of the eleven destroyed. He led a second strike later in the morning, this time against his old airfield at Kabrit where ‘he put a few rounds through his old office’. Late in the afternoon he took off again at the head of another section to re-attack Kabrit. The following day, Blyth was again leading his squadron against the EAF airfields when more aircraft were destroyed. On a second sortie he attacked a vehicle and tank park and on a third, late in the day, he carried out an armed reconnaissance over Ismailia. In the first two days, No. 8 destroyed at least 43 aircraft on the ground. Over the next three days, Blyth continued to be in the thick of the action. In preparation for the airborne assault, he led a rocket strike against gun emplacements and flew armed reconnaissance sorties to identify targets. At dawn on November 6th, No. 8 joined the other two Venom squadrons, each aircraft armed with eight rockets, to attack the defence boom at Port Fouad in anticipation of the seaborne landings. The following day, a ceasefire stopped all further operational flying. Venoms in Oman The squadron returned to its base at Khormaksar in Aden and Blyth was soon involved in operations against rebel strongholds. In the aftermath of the Suez episode, the festering troubles in central Oman flared up in July 1957 and the Sultan requested British assistance. Blyth was in command of No.8 Squadron, equipped with the Venom fighter-bomber based in Aden when he was ordered to deploy to Sharjah in the Persian Gulf on the 20th. Within days, he was leading strikes against rebel positions in the Jebel Akhdar region. The Venoms were armed with four 20mm cannons and could fire eight rockets each with a 60lb warhead. On the 24th he led his squadron on rocket-firing sorties against the forts at Izki, Nizwa and Tanuf and the operations were repeated the following day. No. 8 continued to attack fortifications with rockets and to support an advance on the rebel area when Air Contact Teams accompanying the troops directed the Venom pilots. On 6th August snipers lodged in a large fortified building held up the advance - Blyth and his pilots destroyed it with rockets. As a final act in this phase of operations, the two forts at Sait and Ghum were destroyed by rocket fire. After a lull in operations, Blyth was back in action in November attacking rebel posts. He led his squadron with great dash and efficiency. In December 1957 it was time for Blyth to return to the UK. One of his junior pilots described his as a ‘brilliant CO.’ Another, who would later become an air chief marshal, has commented, ‘He was an amazing CO. If I learnt anything about leadership, it came from Joe Blyth’. For his services in Aden and Oman, and undoubtedly Suez, Blyth was awarded a Bar to his D.F.C making him one of the most decorated post-war RAF officers. He spent four years as a staff officer before retiring from the RAF on his 38th birthday. For twenty-one years he was the personal pilot of the banker Loel Guinness and he kept his flying licence until late in his life. He prided himself in never wearing spectacles, something he attributed to daily eye exercises. In later life he lived in Acapulco, Mexico.

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x16 A Second War ‘1945’ Bomber Command D.F.C. Group of Seven to Warrant Officer I C.H. Jack, 35 (Madras Presidency) Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force a) Distinguished Flying Cross, G.VI.R., reverse officially dated ‘1945’ b) 1939-1945 Star c) Air Crew Europe Star, with France and Germany Bar d) Defence Medal e) Canadian Volunteer Service Medal, with Overseas clasp f) War Medal g) Canadian Forces Decoration, E.II.R. (Sgt. C.H. Jack), generally very fine or better, mounted for display, with similarly mounted miniature awards (lot) £1,000-1,200
D.F.C. London Gazette 17.4.1945 Warrant Officer Clayton Hugh Jack (Can/R.75219), 35 Sqn., Royal Canadian Air Force. The Recommendation (jointly with several other Commonwealth Servicemen) states: ‘W.O. Clayton Hugh Jack (C/R75219), R.C.A.F., 35 Squadron (Air Bomber, Sorties 41, Flying Hours 164). The officers and airmen marked have completed, in various capacities, numerous operations against the enemy, in the course of which they have invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.’ 35 (Madras Presidency) Squadron flew Lancasters for the latter stages of the War, and played ‘a major part in historic Bomber Command raids - Le Creusot (19/20th June, 1943), Peenemunde (17/18th August 1943)... and in the early hours of D-Day, 6th June, attacked two German coastal batteries - one at Maisy and the other at Longues. Later in the year the gun batteries on Walcheren Island, key to the vital port of Antwerp, and communications centres supporting Von Runstedt’s Ardenne offensive, felt the weight of the squadron’s bombing. The closing months of the war saw a series of successful raids on industrial targets, hastening the enemy’s final collapse.’ (Bomber Squadrons of the R.A.F. and Their Aircraft, P.J.R. Moyes, refers)

x17 An O.B.I. Group of Six to Subadar Dalel Khan, 1st Punjab Regiment, Late 56th Rifles a) Order of British India, First Class neck Badge, gold and enamel, with neck riband b) India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., four clasps, Afghanistan N.W.F. 1919, Waziristan 1919-21, Waziristan 1921-24, North West Frontier 1935 (1530 Sepoy Dalel Khan, 2-56 Rfls.) c) India General Service 1936-39, one clasp, North West Frontier 1937-39 (Subdr. Dalel Khan, 5-1 Punjab R.), unit partially officially corrected d) 1939-1945 Star e) War Medal f) India Service Medal, nearly very fine or better, the OBI good very fine (6) £800-1,000
M.I.D. London Gazette 8.5.1936 Dalel Khan, Jemadar, 5th Battalion, 1st Punjab Regiment ‘For distinguished services rendered in connection with the Mohmand operations, North West Frontier of India, 15th/16th August to 15th/16th October, 1935.’

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18 18 The Great War 1918 ‘Hindenburg Position’ D.C.M., ‘Western Front’ M.M. Group of Five to Company Sergeant Major A.R. Sykes, Scottish Rifles a) Distinguished Conduct Medal, G.V.R. (9986 Sjt: A.R. Sykes. M.M. 1/Sco: Rif:) b) Military Medal, G.V.R. (9986 L.Sjt: A.R. Sykes. 1/Sco: Rif:) c) 1914 Star, with later slide Bar (9986 Pte. A. Sykes. 1/Sco: Rif.) d) British War and Victory Medals (9986 Sjt. A.R. Sykes. Sco. Rif.), edge bruise to last, generally nearly very fine or better, with the recipient’s Soldier’s Pay Book, and two post card photographs of the recipient (5) £1,200-1,600
D.C.M. London Gazette 16.1.1919 9986 Sjt. A. R. Sykes, M.M., 1st Bn., Sco. Rif. (London, E.) ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty near VillersGuislain on 21st September, 1918. Acting as C.S.M., he was of great assistance to his Company Commander when all other officers were casualties. He made repeated and determined attempts against uncut wire, silenced a machine gun, and dispersed a bombing post. He also brought in several wounded, and his fine example kept the men steady under heavy fire.’ M.M. London Gazette 9.7.1917 9986 L./Sjt. A.R. Sykes, Sco. Rif. Company Sergeant Major Albert R. Sykes, D.C.M., M.M., born 1894; enlisted as a Musician in the 1st Battalion, Cameronians (Scottish Rifles), 28.4.1908; served with the Regiment during the Great War on the Western Front from 15.8.1914; awarded the D.C.M. for gallantry during an attack before the main Hindenburg Position, 21.9.1918; promoted Company Sergeant Major, 17.2.1919.

Company Sergeant Major A.R. Sykes (second from left) WWW.SPinK.Com

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19 A Great War ‘French Theatre’ 1918 D.C.M., 1916 M.M. Pair to Bombardier T. Evans, Royal Artillery a) Distinguished Conduct Medal, G.V.R. (22828 Gnr: T. Evans. 401/By: 14/A. Bde: R.H.A.) b) Military Medal, G.V.R. (22828 A. Bmbr: T. Evans. 35/By: R.F.A.), nearly very fine (2) £600-800
D.C.M. London Gazette 1.1.1918 22828 Gnr. T. Evans, R.H.A. (Barnfurlong, nr. Wigan) ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He showed great coolness and resource in the performance of his duties, often under difficult and trying conditions.’ M.M. London Gazette 11.11.1916 22828 Actg. Bombr. T. Evans, R.F.A. Bombardier Thomas Evans, D.C.M., M.M., served with the 37th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery during the Great War on the Western Front from 23.8.1914.

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20 20 Family Group: The Great War 1915 ‘Ypres’ D.C.M., ‘Tower of London’ R.V.M. Group of Eight to Battery Sergeant Major G. Trott, Royal Artillery, Later Curator of the Jewel House, Tower of London a) Distinguished Conduct Medal, G.V.R. (19497 Sjt: G. Trott. 108/Hvy: Bty: R.G.A.) b) 1914 Star, with later slide Bar (19497 Sjt. G. Trott. R.G.A.) c) British War and Victory Medals (19497 W.O. Cl.2. G. Trott. R.A.) d) Jubilee 1935 e) Coronation 1937 f) Army Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Field Marshal’s bust’ type (19497 By: S.Mjr: G. Trott. R.G.A.) g) Royal Victorian Medal, G.VI.R., silver, unnamed as issued, the mounted group polished and worn, therefore nearly fine, the RVM extremely fine, the first seven awards mounted as worn, with the following related documents &c.: - Bestowal Document for the Royal Victorian Medal (Silver), named to Battery Sergeant Major George Trott, D.C.M., Royal Artillery (retired), and dated 7.6.1951 - Named Buckingham Palace enclosure document for the Silver Jubilee Medal 1935 - Named Buckingham Palace enclosure document for the Coronation Medal 1937 - Royal Mint case of issue for the R.V.M. - Warrant Appointing Mr. George Trott, D.C.M., Curator of the Jewel House, Tower of London, for the Reign of King Edward VIII, dated 21.7.1936 - Warrant Appointing Mr. George Trott, D.C.M., Curator of the Jewel House, Tower of London, for the Reign of King George VI, dated 1.3.1937 - The recipient’s Army Discharge Certificate - The recipient’s vellum Battery Rough Rider Certificate, dated Rawalpindi, 15.5.1907 - Various individual and group photographs of the recipient from his time at the Tower of London - Souvenir Album of the Tower of London Four: Warrant Officer G.D. Trott, Royal Air Force 1939-1945 Star; Atlantic Star; Defence and War Medals, extremely fine, in named card box of issue, addressed to ‘G.D. Trott, Esq., 131A Purewell, Christchurch, Hants’, with Air Council enclosure and award entitlement slip, together with a Loyal Service Badge Pair: Mrs. A.E. Trott Defence and War Medals, extremely fine, in named card box of issue, addressed to ‘Mrs. A.E. Trott, 131A Purewell, Christchurch, Hants’, with Air Council enclosure (lot) £1,200-1,600
D.C.M. London Gazette 5.8.1915 19497 Serjeant G. Trott, 108th Hy. By., R.G.A. ‘For gallant conduct at Regensburg Camp, Ypres, on 11th May, 1915, when he assisted in the rescue of a mortally wounded Officer under heavy shell fire. He has rendered excellent service throughout the Campaign.’ 19497 Battery Sergeant Major George Trott, D.C.M., R.V.M., born 1879; enlisted in the Royal Garrison Artillery, April 1897; served with the Regiment in India and during the Great War on the Western Front; awarded L.S.&G.C., 1917 (Army Order 125); discharged, 27.12.1919; after the War served as Curator of the Jewel House, Tower of London, and awarded the Royal Victorian Medal on retirement in 1951.

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Battery Sergeant Major G. Trott, Curator of the Jewel House (back row, third from left), with Yeoman Warders at the Tower of London

Trott with Government officials preparing to photograph the Crown Jewels at the Tower of London. A Yeoman Warder looks on 31

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21 The Crimea ‘Heavy Brigade’ D.C.M. Group of Three to Private J. Thomas, 1st Dragoons a) Distinguished Conduct Medal, V.R. (John Thomas. 1st. Rl. Drags.) b) Crimea 1854-56, three clasps, Balaklava, Inkermann, Sebastopol, lugs broken in places with clasps loose on riband (Pte. J. Thomas 1st. Rl. Drags.), contemporarily engraved in large serif capitals c) Turkish Crimea, Sardinian die, with contemporary silver ring suspension, light contact marks, otherwise very fine (3) £3,000-3,500
D.C.M. Recommended 9.1.1855. 626 Private John Thomas, D.C.M., born Haverfordwest, Pembrokeshire; enlisted in the 10th Hussars, March 1838; transferred to the 1st Royal Dragoons, June 1839; served with the Regiment in the Crimea as part of the Heavy Brigade; discharged, January 1863, after 24 years and 50 days with the Colours. Eight D.C.M.s were awarded to men of the 1st Dragoons, and they were all Recommended on the same date, save for one to the Troop Sergeant Major (Recommended 7.2.1855). Interestingly, the Distinguished Conduct Medals awarded to men from the other Regiments of the Heavy Brigade for the Battle of Balaklava were Recommended over the period 321.1.1855; and those to men of the Light Brigade for the Battle of Balaklava were Recommended over the period 10.113.2.1855.

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22 A Good Afghanistan ‘Peiwar Kotal’ D.C.M. Group of Five to Private D. Bonar, Seaforth Highlanders a) Distinguished Conduct Medal, V.R. (1489 Pte. D. Bonar 72nd. Regt.) b) Afghanistan 1878-80, four clasps, Peiwar Kotal, Charasia, Kabul, Kandahar (1489 Pte. D. Bonner [sic]. 72nd. Highrs.) c) Kabul to Kandahar Star 1880 (1489 Private Danl. Bonnar [sic] 72nd. Highlanders) d) Egypt 1882-89, dated, one clasp, Tel-el-Kebir (1489 Pte. D. Bonar. 1/Sea: Highrs.) e) Khedive’s Star 1882, unnamed as issued, heavy contact marks throughout, therefore good fine (5) £3,000-4,000
D.C.M. Recommendation submitted to the Queen, 7.6.1879. 1489 Private Daniel Bonar, D.C.M., served with the 72nd (Duke of Albany’s Own) Highlanders in Afghanistan and wounded by a bullet to the left arm at Charasia, 6.10.1879. One of six D.C.M.s for Peiwar Kotal, 2.12.1878.

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23 The Boer War D.C.M. Group of Three to Private J. Hamilton, Seaforth Highlanders a) Distinguished Conduct Medal, E.VII.R. (6272 Pte. J. Hamilton. 2/Seaforth Hdrs.) b) Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, five clasps, Cape Colony, Paardeberg, Driefontein, Transvaal, Wittebergen (6272 Pte. J. Hamilton. 2: Sea: Highrs:) c) King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (6272 Pte. J. Hamilton. Seaforth Highrs:), contact, marks, nearly very fine, the DCM better (3) £1,400-1,600
D.C.M. London Gazette 27.9.1901 Private J. Hamilton, Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs, the Duke of Albany’s) ‘In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa.’

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24 A Good ‘1918’ Great War D.C.M. Group of Four to Sergeant T. Williamson, King’s Own Scottish Borderers a) Distinguished Conduct Medal, G.V.R. (13007 Cpl. T. Williamson. 7/8 K.O. Sc: Bord:) b) 1914-15 Star (13007 Pte. T. Williamson. K.O. Sco: Bord:) c) British War and Victory Medals (13007 Cpl. T. Williamson. D.C.M. K.O.S.B.), VM officially renamed, good very fine or better (4) £600-800
D.C.M. London Gazette 21.10.1918 13007 Cpl. T. Williamson, K.O.S.B. (Glasgow) ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During several raids he worked his Stokes mortars with excellent effect, and during an attempted enemy raid, when no officer was present in the sector, he controlled his guns with great skill during a heavy bombardment. Immediately the attempt was over, he got up more ammunition, and got his guns in working order again on his own initiative.’ 13007 Sergeant Thomas Williamson, D.C.M., served with the 6th Battalion King’s Own Scottish Borderers during the Great War on the Western Front from 12.5.1915; discharged, 20.2.1919.

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25 The Unique 1946 ‘Anti-Terrorist’ King David Hotel Bomb Attack G.M. Group of Four to Sergeant E.A. Smith, Palestine Police; Who Rushed to the Scene of the Attack Immediately After the 770lb Bomb Had Exploded; He Initiated Rescue Operations and After 6 Hours Solid of Tunnelling Through Tonnes of Rubble and Debris He Secured the Rescue of 3 Seriously Injured Soldiers. 91 People Were Killed in the Attack, With 46 Injured. After 3 Days of Continuous Work Only 6 Survivors Were Pulled From the Rubble a) George Medal, G.VI.R. (Sgt. Edward S.[sic] Smith, Palestine Police) b) General Service 1918-62, G.VI.R., two clasps, Palestine, Palestine 1945-48 (1316 Const. E.A. Smith. Pal. Police), minor edge nicks c) Defence and War Medals, generally very fine or better, mounted as originally worn, with a photographic image of recipient, several newspaper cuttings and an original copy of The West London Press (Chelsea, Westminster and Pimlico News), dated 24.1.1947 (4) £5,000-7,000

Mr. and Mrs. Smith

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The bombed out King David Hotel

G.M. London Gazette 21.1.1947 Edward Alfred Smith, Sergeant, Palestine Police Force ‘On July 22nd, 1946, Jewish terrorists attacked the Secretariat and Force Headquarters situated at the King David Hotel, Jerusalem and by means of high explosives completely destroyed part of the building. At the time of the explosion Sergeant Smith was off duty but he immediately turned out all the available personnel and at once initiated rescue work. With assistance he made a hole in the debris large enough to insert himself in a prone position and in this manner tunnelled his way into the wreckage until he reached three soldiers who were seriously injured. Smith spent 6 hours under the debris in an atmosphere choked with dust and explosive fumes before he succeeded in extricating the three men. There was a real and constant danger of further explosions, of fire and of the collapse of the tunnel. Throughout his ordeal Smith displayed courage of the highest order with complete disregard of his own safety.’ 1316 Sergeant Edward Alfred Smith, G.M., ‘born 44 years ago [1903] at Ballymena, Co. Antrim. His father was Irish, his mother Australian. For 12 years he served in the Regular Army. On the Rhine he met his Dutch-born wife, and married in 1933. In 1937 he left the Army and went into coal mining. But a coal slump was on, so he turned to the Palestine Police... he was turned down. Too short; chest not big enough, they said... Sergeant Smith appealed to Sir Charles Augustus Tegart, then advisor to the Government on Police Organisation in Palestine [of Tegart Fort fame - many of these Police Fortresses, although built in 1938, are still in service use in Palestine today]. For Mrs. Smith was Sir Charles’s housekeeper. “I promise to do well, sir, if I am accepted,” said Sergeant Smith.

In 1938 he went to Palestine, a member of the force. Early last year [1946] Sergeant Smith wrote to his wife: “Tell Sir Charles I was promoted Sergeant today... still trying.” (Newspaper cutting included with the lot refers) The King David Hotel During the afternoon of the 22nd July 1946 an attack was carried out on the King David Hotel, Jerusalem. The attack was perpetrated by the Zionist underground movement the Irgun. The southern wing of the hotel was principally occupied by the central offices of the Secretariat of the Government of Palestine and the Headquarters of the British Forces in Palestine. A 770lb bomb was placed by the terrorists in the basement underneath the southern wing of the hotel. The explosion occurred shortly after half past twelve that afternoon, and caused half of the southern wing to collapse. Smith, who was off duty but in the vicinity, rushed to initiate rescue work, “I just started digging, and kept on digging until I got them out” (Newspaper cutting refers). After 6 hours solid of tunnelling he managed to extricate 3 seriously injured soldiers. Only 6 survivors in total were rescued from the rubble. The Royal Engineers, using heavy equipment, removed 2,000 lorry loads of rubble over the course of three days. As a result of the terrorist attack 91 people were killed, and 46 injured. Smith was presented with his George Medal by Nicol Gray, the Inspector General of Palestine Police, at a ceremony in Jerusalem, January 1947, ‘everyone knew “Ted” Smith in the Stanley Arms, World’s End, just before the War. When he left to join the Palestine Police they lost one of their best darts men. But “Ted” meant to make good at other things... And this week it was announced he had been awarded the George Medal’ (Newspaper cutting refers).

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x26 A Great War ‘Mesopotamia’ I.D.S.M. Group of Four to Kot Daffadar Daud Khan, 23rd Cavalry a) Indian Distinguished Service Medal, G.V.R. (1357 Kot Dfdr. Daud Khan 23rd, Cavly F.F.) b) British War Medal (1357 S.D.M. Daud Khan, 23 Cavy. F.F.) c) Victory Medal, erased d) India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., one clasp, Afghanistan N.W.F. 1919 (1357 K.D. Daud Khan. 23/Cavy.), light contact marks, scratch to obverse field of IDSM, nearly very fine (4) £350-450
I.D.S.M. Indian Government General Order 879 1919 Daud Khan, 1357 Kot-Dafadar, 23rd Cavalry (Frontier Force) (Mesopotamia).

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x27 A Second War ‘Panthal, Burma’ I.D.S.M. Group of Seven to Sepoy Mohammed Said, 7th Rajputs a) Pakistan, General Service Medal, one clasp, Kashmir 1948 b) Indian Distinguished Service Medal, G.VI.R. (19542 Sep. Muhammad Said, 4-7 Rajput R.) c) 1939-1945 Star d) Africa Star e) Burma Star f) Defence and War Medals, generally very fine or better, mounted for display purposes in this order (7) £600-800
I.D.S.M. London Gazette 20.4.1944 No. 19542 Sepoy Mohd Said, 7th Rajput Regiment ‘In recognition of gallant and distinguished services in Burma.’ The Recommendation, dated 5.2.1944, states: ‘In the Arakan on the 15th January 1944 Sepoy Mohammed Said was detailed to accompany a line party under Naik Mulaim Singh. The party was ordered to lay a line from Razabil North to a forward isolated Company established by night in Razabil South, whose original line had been badly destroyed by enemy action. The party left at about 11:30 hours and whilst crossing the flat open cut paddy separating the two villages was fired on from the dominating heights of the Tortoise and Boomerang features. The party was pinned down and the Commander Naik Mulaim Singh was wounded. Naik Mulaim Singh then attached his telephone and reported to the Signal Officer, who ordered him to return and the rest of the party to find such cover as they could behind low paddybunds and wait for dark. Sepoy Mohammed Singh however after the departure of the N.C.O. personally took charge of the line party and insisted on carrying on which he did in spite of repeated bursts of light Machine Gun fire on his party every time they moved. However, by crawling most of the way a distance of about 800 yards, with little or no cover he at last succeeded in reaching the Company at about 15:00 hours, thereby enabling L/T communication to be established and orders for that night regarding D.F. tasks and patrolling to be got to that Company with reasonable security before dark. This Sepoy’s courage, tenacity of purpose, and complete disregard of his own personal safety was of the very highest order and was a splendid example to all his comrades of extreme devotion to duty.’

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oRdeRS, deCoRAtionS, CAmPAign medALS And miLitARiA 28 A Scarce Great War 1917 D.H.4 Observer and Aerial Gunlayer’s D.S.M. Group of Three to Air Mechanic 1st Class G. Smith, 5 (Naval) Squadron, Royal Naval Air Service, Who Claimed At Least 2 Victories with Captain C.R. ‘Luppy’ Lupton D.S.C., and Completed 101 Bombing Raids Before His Luck Ran Out. Smith Was Killed in Action, 18.3.1918, Taking Part in One of The Biggest Aerial Battles of the War - With Nearly 100 Aircraft Engaged. 30 of the German Aircraft Belonged to ‘Richthofen’s Circus’ and Were Personally Led By Manfred Von Richthofen Himself. 15 Of The ‘Flying Circus’ Engaged Smith’s Formation Resulting in His Aircraft Being Sent Down in Flames a) Distinguished Service Medal, G.V.R. (F.4430 G. Smith, Act. A.M. 1 GR. R.N.A.S. Dunkerque. 26.Oct.1917.) b) British War and Victory Medals (F 4430 G. Smith. Act. A.M.1. R.N.A.S.), extremely fine, with the recipient’s Great War Bronze Memorial Plaque, ‘George Smith’, in card holder (3) £3,000-4,000
D.S.M. London Gazette 19.12.1917 Act. Air Mech, 1st Gr, George Smith, ON F.4430 F.4430 Air Mechanic 1st Class George Smith, D.S.M., born Maidstone, Kent, 1891; enlisted Royal Naval Air Service, A.M. II, May 1915; posted for service with No 3 Wing, France, August 1916-April 1917; served at R.N.A.S. Crystal Palace, April 1917-June 1917; posted as Observer to 5 (Naval) Squadron (DH4s), Dunkirk, 1.7.1917; flew in mostly bombing raids throughout July and August, including on Varssenaere, Snelleghm and Houttave Aerodromes; he formed an early partnership with Flight Sub Lieutenant C.R. ‘Luppy’ Lupton; on 4.9.1917 they successfully bombed Bruges Docks, dropping their bombs on ammunition stores; on the 20th and the 25th they attacked Sparappelhock Aerodrome, before recording their first victory together on 28.9.1917, ‘on leaving the coast over Blakenburghe, an Albatross D.III attacked from behind. Two pans were fired at him when he turned and spun down...the tracers from the back gun were seen to go into his engine and left plane’ (R.N.A.S. Bomb Raid Report refers); in October raids carried out included on Engel and Houttave Aerodrome and the Zeebrugge Mole; Lupton was awarded the D.S.C. and Smith the D.S.M. for a raid on Thorout Rail Station and Varssenaere Aerdrome, 26.10.1917; on 4.11.1917 whilst on a bombing raid to Engel Aerodrome, ‘Bombs were dropped over the line of sheds on the West side of the aerodrome... Ten E.A. were seen under the formation just after crossing the lines. One attacked N. 6009 [Lupton and Smith’s D.H.4] and got right under the tail. After two pans had been fired at him he went down and landed at Engel Aerodrome’ (R.N.A.S. Bomb Raid Report refers); on 8.12.1917 Lupton and Smith shared an Albatross forced down out of control over Aertrycke Aerodrome with Flight Sub Lieutenant Gamon and Aerial Gunlayer Winter; whilst trying to carry out a raid on Varssenaere Aerodrome, 10.12.1917, ‘when at 1500 feet the radiator appeared to burst and we were covered in steam and water. I [Lupton] turned and tried to find the aerodrome which was difficult to do owing to the steam and water coming back from the engine. I was obliged to land with all bombs on and hit a triplane when on the point of landing and crashed’ (R.N.A.S. Bomb Raid Report refers); having survived one hair-raising experience, they then suffered another when they were set upon by 5 enemy aircraft on the way back from a raid on Engel Aerodrome, 18.12.1917, ‘Several double pans were fired into an attacking E.A. Tracers were seen to go into the machine from the back guns. After a minute or two he broke off the engagement and turned away’ (Combat Report refers); throughout the early part of 1918 they were regularly engaged by enemy aircraft whilst enroute, and returning from, bombing raids; on 7.3.1918 2 miles east of St. Quentin, a ‘machine flew across the front of the formation and two double trays were fired at him from the back guns with apparently no result, although tracers were seen to enter into his fuselage. Another hostile machine tried to come under the tail of our machine but after a few shots from our own back guns and from those of the machine in front, he dived steeply and went away’ (Combat Report refers); on 18.3.1918, having completed 101 bombing raids, Smith’s luck finally ran out; most of these raids had been flown with Lupton, but on this date his pilot was the 18 year old Flight Sub Lieutenant Ransford; on the latter date they took off for a raid on Busigny Aerodrome, led by Flight Commander Bartlett - in his book Bomber Pilot 1916-1918 he gives the following account: ‘March 18th. A perfect morning. I led off seven bombers and two fighters at 9.45am and we all crossed the Lines in good formation over Bellicourt at 15,500 at 10.50am. Above Beaurevoir, Wodehouse, who was flying high, left the formation and turned back. Approaching Bohain the sky ahead seemed literally full of aircraft, three large formations of some twenty each to our north, and many smaller formations all about our height - but then too far to distinguish as friend or foe. Immediately after dropping our bombs and turning for home, every aircraft in the sky seemed to come together and there was a colossal mix-up. Everyone computed the enemy strength at between 50 and 60, and we ourselves numbered 38. All engaged in furious melee and immediately there were some fifteen or more Albatross and Fokker Triplanes on to our formation, very well handled, being part of the ‘Richthofen Circus’ [footnote gives - At least 30 of the enemy aircraft were indeed from Jagdstaffeln 6, 10 and 11 of Jagdeschwader Nr 1, led in person by Rittmeister Manfred von Richthofen. Between them these EA claimed 9 victories for no losses to JG1]. I kept our formation together as far as possible and together we accounted for three two certainties and one probable. Things happened so quickly and the fight was on such a big scale that it was impossible to follow all that was happening, but we saw numbers of EA spinning down on fire, our Camels following them right down; also a few of our own out of control. I had my front guns on to an Albatross at about 30 yards range for a few seconds as he cut across our bows, and got some 20-30 rounds into him, but he dived, coming up again under our tail. I slowed enough for Naylor to get a long burst into him and he went down pouring black smoke from his tail. Meanwhile I was trying to keep count of our formation and saw what appeared to be one of our DHs at the rear gliding down trailing a column of black smoke. McBain’s gunlayer, Jones, shot the tail of an Albatross and Dickson’s got another down out of control. We left the SEs and Camels still scrapping furiously, our intructions being to return immediately after dropping. Apart from accurate AA near the lines, our troubles were over. This must have been the greatest aerial battle of the war so far, a total of nearly 100 aircraft engaged. On landing found Wodehouse had been shot to blazes, being hit three times in the ankle and another in his left shoulder after penetrating his tank, none of them serious however and he pulled off a good landing with a seized engine in a field near the aerodrome. His machine was riddled but his gunlayer, James, escaped with nothing worse than ripped clothing. Ransford failed to return and it must have been him we saw gliding down smoking badly. A sad loss and an excellent gunlayer in Smith. That makes our ninth casualty in nine consecutive days. The SEs accounted for eight E.A. for the loss of two of their own, and the Camels for two certainties; but as five Camels who followed their quarry right down failed to return, they probably got several more. I was talking over the ‘phone to Captain Kitto, their leader, after we got back, and he said it was by far the biggest scrap he had ever beenin. He seemed quite unnerved and kept repeating, “frightful affair, frightful affair...” Undoubtedly the Germans accepted yesterday’s challenge and concentrated their forces, including Richthofen’s startingly-coloured ‘Circus’, with the idea of annihilating us, but they suffered more than we did despite the enormous tactical advantage.’ Both Smith and Ransford were buried in the St. Souplet British Cemetery, France. Lupton did not outlast his old partner by long, having been awarded the Bar to his D.S.C. for actions a few days after Smith’s death, he was killed in May of the same year.

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x29 A Good Second War 1941 Submariner’s D.S.M. Group of Six to Chief Engine Room Artificer C.H. Toms, H.M.S. Urge, Royal Navy, Killed in Action When the Urge was Sunk By An Italian Aircraft, With the Loss of All Hands, Off Ras Hilal, 29.4.1942 a) Distinguished Service Medal, G.VI.R. (D/M. 35358. C.H. Toms. C.E.R.A. H.M.S. Urge.) b) 1939-1945 Star c) Atlantic Star d) Africa Star e) War Medal f) Naval Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 2nd ‘coinage head’ type (M.35358. C.H. Toms. A/C.E.R.A.2. H.M.S. Severn.), light contact marks, very fine (6) £1,800-2,200
D.S.M. London Gazette 16.12.1941 Chief Engine Room Artificer Charles Herbert Toms, D/M.35358, H.M.S. Urge ‘For courage, skill and resolution in successful Submarine patrols.’ D/M.35358 Chief Engine Room Artificer Charles Herbert Toms, D.S.M., of Gosport, Hampshire; served during the Second World War in H.M. Submarine Urge, 1st Submarine Flotilla (based in Malta) in the Mediterranean, during which time she torpedoed and damaged the Italian battleship Vittorio Veneto, 13.12.1941, during the operations around the First Battle of Sirte, and sank the Italian light cruiser Giovanni delle Bande Nere, on 1.4.1942; Toms was killed in action when the Urge, whilst engaging the Italian sailing vessel San Giusto in the Mediterranean off Ras Hilal, was attacked by an escorting Italian bi-plane and was sunk with the loss of all hands, 29.4.1942. Toms is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.

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x30 The Great War ‘Western Front’ M.M., Italian War Cross Group of Five to Driver J. Billington, Royal Field Artillery a) Military Medal, G.V.R. (700075 Dvr: J. Billington. R.F.A.) b) 1914-15 Star (618. Dvr. J. Billington. R.F.A.) c) British War and Victory Medals (618. Dvr. J. Billington. R.A.) d) Italy, Kingdom, War Merit Cross, bronze, generally good very fine (5) £300-400
M.M. London Gazette 13.3.1919 700075 Dvr. Billington, J., 80th By., 15th Bde., Royal Field Artillery (Blackburn).

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x31 A Great War ‘Western Front’ M.M. Group of Four to Lance Corporal H.J. Eaborn, Coldstream Guards a) Military Medal, G.V.R. (19208 Pte. L.Cpl. H.J. Eaborn. 1/C. Gds.) b) British War and Victory Medals (19208. Pte. H.J. Eaborn. C. Gds.) c) Special Constabulary Long Service Medal, G.V.R. (Harold J. Eaborn.), good very fine £500-600
M.M. London Gazette 23.7.1919 19208 Pte. (L./C.) Eaborn, H. J., 1st Bn., Coldstream Guards (Portsmouth).

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32 The Second War 1943 ‘Sidi Brahim’ M.M. Group of Four to Lance Corporal E.G. Hughes, Coldstream Guards a) Military Medal, G.VI.R. (882306 L.Cpl. E.G. Hughes. C. Gds.) b) 1939-1945 Star c) Africa Star d) War Medal, edge bruise to first, otherwise very fine (4) £800-1,200
M.M. London Gazette 23.9.1943 No. 882306 LanceCorporal Edward Gordon Hughes, Coldstream Guards (Sheffield) ‘In recognition of gallant and distinguished services in North Africa.’ The Recommendation, dated 30.4.1943, states: ‘At Sidi Brahim, on the 26th April 1943, this Lance Corporal, on of the Company signallers, showed the greatest coolness and fearlessness in helping to evacuate wounded under heavy Machine Gun and shell fire. After carrying one many away he returned to Company Headquarters to collect a Bren Gun although most of the Company had withdrawn. He remained there, still under heavy fire, until ordered to withdraw by an officer. His courage and efforts were the greatest inspiration to all those around him. Throughout the campaign the conduct of this Lance Corporal in every action has been of the very highest order.’

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x33 A Second War M.M. Group of Eight to Driver Mehtab Khan, Royal Indian Army Service Corps a) Military Medal, G.VI.R. (Mtn 898783 Dr. Mehtab Khan.) b) Pakistan Independence Medal 1947, unnamed as issued c) Pakistan, General Service Medal, one clasp, Kashmir 1948 d) Pakistan, Republic Medal 1956 e) 1939-1945 Star f) Italy Star g) Defence and War Medals, generally good very fine, mounted for display purposes in this order (8) £500-600
M.M. London Gazette 14.9.1944 No. 898783 Driver Mehtab Khan, Royal Indian Army Service Corps ‘In recognition of gallant and distinguished services in the field.’

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34 34 A Good Second War 1944 ‘Immediate’ Evader’s D.F.M. Group of Five to Stirling and Lancaster Wireless Operator, Flight Sergeant, Later Signaller 2, P. Jezzard, 622 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Who Was Killed in a Flying Accident Over the North Sea, 5.4.1948 a) Distinguished Flying Medal, G.VI.R. (1501713 F/Sgt. P. Jezzard R.A.F.) b) 1939-1945 Star c) Air Crew Europe Star d) Defence and War Medals, generally very fine, with the following related items and documents: - Caterpillar Club gold brooch badge, with ‘ruby’ eyes, reverse engraved, ‘Sgt. P. Jezzard’, in Irving box, with named Membership Card, and enclosure letter, dated 21.7.1944 - ‘Escapers’ Compass; two Silk Maps of France; Royal Air Force Escaping Society badge, gilt and two Pea-Nut Club badges - Cloth insignia including WAG Brevet - R.A.F. Navigator’s, Air Bomber’s and Air Gunner’s Flying Log Book (15.4.1943-5.4.1948), stamped ‘Death Presumed, Central Depository, Royal Air Force’ - Letter from recipient to his family, written after he had escaped to Spain from Occupied France, dated 12.5.1944 - Congratulatory Telegram from Air Chief Marshal A.T. “Bomber” Harris, on the occasion of the award of Jezzard’s D.F.M., dated 23.11.1944 - Telegram to the same effect from the Officer Commanding 622 Squadron, dated 24.11.1944 - Telegram to recipient’s father informing him that his son is ‘missing’ whilst on a training excercise, dated 6.4.1948 - Air Ministry letter to recipient’s father stating that Death is Presumed, dated 17.6.1948 - Letter of Condolence to recipient’s mother from Air Vice-Marshal Sir Basil Embry, dated 12.5.1948 - Several photographs of recipient, including a portrait photograph in uniform; newspaper cuttings and other ephemera (lot) £2,800-3,200 47

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Flight Sergeant P. Jezzard
D.F.M. 2.1.1945 1501713 Flight Sergeant Peter Jezzard, R.A.F.V.R., 622 Sqn The Recommendation, dated 12.11.1944, states: ‘This N.C.O. is now nearing completion of his first tour of operations throughout which his skill, courage and devotion to duty have been outstanding. On the night of 15th/16th March, 1944, the aircraft in which he was despatched on an operational mission to Stuttgart was so severely damaged by enemy action that the crew was ordered to bail out. Before abandoning the aircraft, however, he successfully transmitted a distress message to Base. From this ordeal, Flight Sergeant Jezzard made a successful escape from enemy occupied territory and on return to this country he immediately applied to be returned to his squadron for operational duty. Since his return in August, 1944, he has operated against many heavily defended German targets and has successfully completed several important mining missions. His resourcefulness in emergency and his determination and disregard of personal safety in face of danger is an inspiration to all and is worthy of recognition I strongly recommend an award of the Distinguished Flying Medal.’ 1501713 Signaller 2 Peter Jezzard, D.F.M., a native of Prestwich, Manchester; served as a Cadet, No. 183 (1st Prestwich) Squadron A.T.C., prior to Second War service with the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve; posted for training to No. 2 Radio School, Yatesbury, April 1943; after additional training at 26 O.T.U. and undertaking a conversion course on Stirlings at 1665 Conversion Unit, posted for operational flying as Wirless Operator to 622 Squadron (Stirlings and Lancasters), Mildenhall, November 1943; intially carried out 8 operational sorties with the squadron including: the Frisian Isles; Bayonne; Berlin; Schweinfurt; Augsburg, 29.2.1944, ‘Combat with Ju 88. Searchlights and Flak’ (Log Book refers); Stuttgart (2), including 15.3.1944, when in Lancaster I LL828 JI-J piloted by Flight Sergeant P.A. Thompson, ‘T/o 1720 Mildenhall. Last heard on W/T at 0141 transmitting “Baling Out”. Reports from the crew tell of attacks from night-fighters and from a fix taken of the wireless message it is likely the engagement took place SE of Rouen in France’ (Royal Air Force Bomber Command Losses of the Second World War refers); of the crew of seven, four (including Jezzard) managed to evade capture, whilst the remaining members were taken POW; Sergeant T.J. Maxwell, one of those to evade capture, gives the following account: ‘The thing about bailing out, in total darkness at night, from a crippled aircraft or splashing your 25 ton Lancaster into a raging sea swell was that you didn’t get any practice lessons beforehand, so it was a bit of a new thing. The nearest one got was about a year before was jumping off the top diving board in the warm water and brightly lit baths in Brighton in a flying suit and Mae West. Then the water had loads of noisy laughter and PT life-saving instructors to help if one got into difficulty. It was 1.30 in the morning and pitch black, the top board was about 8,000 feet vibrating and descending rapidly, and spewing fuel and oil from ruptured tanks. No friendly life-

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savers etc, but the reality that our fuel was being exhausted even faster than calculated had now replaced the ‘ditching’ idea and bailing-out (and pretty soon at that) was the only option left. We, or certainly I was already well into a personal life saving preservation situation. I was personally totally disenchanted when the channel rowing excercise in total darkness was muted as a possibility. I never found the idea of hitting the English Channel at 100mph in total darkness, with sea and swell conditions unknown, and with an indeterminate amount of fuel, to be in the least appealing... Six of the crew all landed in an area 40 miles North East of Rouen and all reasonably close, within a kilometre or so of each other, but when they left the aircraft I was already on the way down some 20 kilometres further back, representing several minutes. The reason for their delay will never be known, but after 57 years almost to the day it has been established that the aeroplane crashed within a couple of miles from where some of the crew were taken POW. Of the four who returned to England on May 22nd on a DC3 from Gibraltar to Bristol (Whitchurch) I only met up later with Peter Jezzard. Both of us returned to operational flying with our original Squadron 622, Peter finishing his ‘tour’ in November 1944 on 35 ‘trips’ and myself on 32, finishing on New Year’s Day 1945’ (Interview carried out in 2002 refers). Another member of the crew, Sergeant F. Harmsworth, gives the following account from the time after the crew had landed: ‘Later I met a schoolteacher who got me a change of clothes and temporary, false ID papers. He took me to a small rail station and there I bumped into my Wireless Operator Peter Jezzard. With barely a wink of recognition, we were on the train; the Frenchman [Maquis] up front, Pete in the middle, and me at the back of the coach. The train was straffed enroute by the R.A.F. guns so we hopped off the train and headed for a ditch. Later, we hopped back on the train and carried on to Paris. We got to the train station and it was very crowded with local Parisians, plus hundreds of German troops. We left the station and kept the same order of 20 ft. apart. After an hour we arrived at an apartment block and met the teacher’s cousin, a vivacious, 20 year old girl, Madeline Vuillemont, who lived with her parents... I was moved across Paris on the metro to the East End... A couple of days after I arrived, trusty John took me to a large store in town, where I stood in line with locals and stood next to German soldiers to get my picture taken in a booth... After 2 days, with good police connections, I received back my French I.D. card with other documents all duly signed and rubber-stamped... They found out it was my 20th birthday, so one night, a sign was put on the door that said, “closed for a family party.” I got lots of little presents like toothbrushes, a box of Belgian tobacco and some Galoise cigarettes. Then Peter, the Wireless Operator, was brought in so we got a bit boozed up. Lots of the Cafe patrons were “in the know” - no names were used except nicknames. It was one hell of a night! Soon I had to say goodbye to these wonderful people. Helen, the Red Cross nurse took me to the main train station and put me on a train heading south. I pretended to be a wounded deaf/dumb ex French P.O.W. On the train, I met Peter again. We met a couple of young Frenchmen who worked at the Post Office... They had a backpack full of stamps that they had stolen from the Post Office to trade for money - so they were most helpful on our journey through France. Our I.D. cards passed muster several times on the way with Gestapo inspectors. We left the main line trains and road in a succession of goods and ammo trains jumping on and off while going uphill! Knees were scarred somewhat! We came to the Bayonne area and walked through the outskirts. There was a curfew of 10pm so we got a second story room in a flea bag hotel. The Gestapo checked the registers every night, so a special knock was agreed upon for the friendlies - otherwise get out quick. Early one morning, it was still dark, when we got the wrong knock. We leaped out of the upstairs window in a flash and went running and scrambling through fences, backyards, and garden allotments. Dogs were barking and people were shouting. It was utter pandemonium. I was scared. We ended up in the Railway Yards... After hiding quietly for a couple of hours, we saw a train getting steam up, so the young Frenchmen spoke to the Engineer, who took us to a box car, then moved the train off quickly. During the night we were wakened by the slamming of doors - lots of shouting and “Achtung” and loud guttural German troops. It was an ammunition train being loaded! We fortunately did not get discovered and were very glad to leave. Next day, we jumped off the train onto a gravel shoulder as it slowed for a hill in the Pyrenees Foothills - scarring our hands, knees and shins in the process. Walking through a village, we entered a forest and stayed in the bush for a couple of days. We were cold and in the open... One of the Frenchmen negotiated with a local Gasogena Taxi to take us to the edge of the Pyrenees Mountains. The taxi had a large wood boiler on the back which burned wood to make it go. We were approaching a checkpoint with a swing down wooden barricade right on top of a steep hill. The taxi started balking. As we stuffed wood in to stoke the fire, we were pushed up the hill. Fortunately, the taxi picked up speed, where it levelled off. Crashing through the barrier, we were chased by cavalry guards on horses - just like a Yankee movie. We descended quickly down hill for about 10 miles, so left them behind. Several more villages beyond, we switched to bicycles and walking on the steep, mountain roads - 5 people on 2 bikes. A couple of days later, we arranged with a Basque guide to take us above the Snow Line up through the high Pyrenees (away from the roads and the Germans). We slept in shepherd caves by day, and walked by night and managed to avoid German Patrols... We were tracked by dogs and shot at in a long ravine. Eventually we hit the Spanish border.’ Once in Spain Jezzard and Harmsworth were arrested by the Police, questioned and then transferred to the British Embassy in Madrid. Jezzard travelled to Gibraltar returning to the UK, 22.5.1944; he asked to be returned to his old squadron for operational flying; he arrived at Mildenhall, 1.8.1944, and was on an operational sortie to Bordeaux just four days later; flying with “B” Flight he undertook a further 29 operational sorties with 622 Squadron, including: Foret de Lucheux; Fort D’Englos; Lens; Brunswick; Hamel; Stettin (2); Eindhoven; Le Havre (2); Rostock Bay; Kiel; Calais (2); Rhur; Cap Gris Nez; Saarbrucken; Dortmund; Kleve; Bonn; Essen (3); Cologne (2); Solingen (2); Koblenz and Oslo Fjord; having completed his second tour Jezzard was posted as an Instructor to R.A.F. Jurby, Isle of Man, January 1945; posted to 1 A.N.S. R.A.F. Topcliffe, North Yorkshire, March 1947; Jezzard was killed when his Wellington crashed into the North Sea whilst on a Navigation Excercise, 5.4.1948; he is commemorated on the Armed Forces Memorial, Staffordshire.

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35 A Scarce Second War 1944 ‘Parachute Jump Instructor’s’ A.F.M. Group of Six to ‘Ringway Character’, Warrant Officer W.T. Aldridge, Royal Air Force, Who With Over 150 Descents and 300 Flying Hours Was Prominent in The Training of The 6th Airborne Division for D-Day; He Flew With The 6th Airborne as a Despatcher For the Invasion of Normandy a) Air Force Medal, G.VI.R. (524775 F/Sgt. W.T. Aldridge. R.A.F.) b) 1939-1945 Star c) France and Germany Star d) Defence and War Medals e) Royal Air Force Long Service & G.C., E.II.R. (W./O. W.T. Aldridge. (524776) R.A.F.), generally good very fine, mounted as originally worn, with the following related documentation: - Congratulatory Letter to the recipient from Air Marshal Sir Roderic Hill, K.C.B., M.C., A.F.C., on the occasion of the award of the A.F.M., dated 27.9.1944 - Letter to the same effect from Major W.H. Smith, ‘D’ Company 34th (Bilston) Battalion, South Staffordshire Home Guard - With a photocopy of recipient’s R.A.F. Observer’s and Air Gunner’s Flying Log Book (5.7.194210.10.1949) (lot) £3,500-4,500

A.F.M. London Gazette 1.9.1944 524776 Flight Sergeant William Thomas Aldridge, Royal Air Force, Parachute Training School, Royal Air Station, Ringway (No. of descents 70) The Recommendation states: ‘Flight Sergeant Aldridge has served as an instructor with the Parachute Training School for two years and proved himself to be a first class teacher who instils great confidence into his pupils. Prior to the invasion of Normandy, this airman was attached to the 6th Airborne Division to assist in the final training of the airborne troops. He frequently accompanied them on their exercises and, during the invasion, flew as a despatcher with the airborne troops. His courage and efficiency have contributed much to the building up of confidence and morale among airborne troops.’ 524776 Warrant Officer William Thomas Aldridge, A.F.M., a native of Wolverhampton; joined the Royal Air Force for service during the Second War, and commenced training as a Parachute Jump Instructor in ‘B’ Squadron, Parachute Training Squadron, Ringway, Manchester; he made his first parachute descent, 5.7.1942; qualified as Flight Sergeant, Parachute Jump Instructor, 27.7.1942; appointed to the P.J.I. Staff at Ringway, 29.7.1942, and over the coming months made demonstration, training, container and night descents, air experience flights and despatched trainee parachutists from balloons, Whitley and Harrow aircraft at 500-800 feet; he jumped with both ‘old’ and ‘new’ parachute packs from Whitley floor and rear-gunner exits; in late 1942 he trained Belgian, Czech and Polish paratroopers at Ringway; by the end of that year he had completed 21 descents and over 36 flying hours; throughout 1943 he

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continued instructing troops, including No. 12 Commando, Combined Ops, Canadians, Norwegians and Free French soldiers; on 10.2.1943 he made an experimental jump in a 20 man stick from a US Army Air Force Douglas Dakota, and on 3.12.1943 he jumped as 6th man in the first experimental jump with kit-bags; by the end of the year he had completed 62 descents and over 100 flying hours; posted to Bulford in the first week of January 1944 to train parachutists of 6th Airborne Division in preparation for the D-Day Operations; on the 8th-14th January he ran a balloon programme, when the following occurred, ‘the powerful influence of an experienced and determined instructor is illustrated by a report which I received concerning Flight Sergeant Aldridge. If a man refused to jump or asked to be taken off parachuting during his basic training at Ringway no stigma was attached to him and he was merely sent back to his unit..... Once he had completed his training and accepted the badge and pay of a qualified paratroop it was a different matter and refusal to jump - unless there was a genuine and acceptable excuse meant a court martial..... I had been asked to send two or three experienced instructors to Bulford to see what they could do with a number of men who had let it be known that they didn’t intend to do any more parachuting. Such gossip did not of itself constitute a refusal to jump, but it was bad for morale and had to be stopped one way or the other. Bulford was the camp occupied by the Airborne Division and a balloon similar to those in use at Ringway had been installed there. Flight Sergeant Aldridge was one of the instructors selected for the duty. He was a sturdy man experienced in obeying orders and equally competent at seeing that orders he gave were acted upon. In due course he was shown a small group of men and told that they were being “difficult” about parachuting. They were already fitted with parachutes, jumping overalls and rubber crash hats, so he wasted no time in getting them into the balloon car, hooking them up and giving the word to the winch operator - “Up 700 - 4 down”, which, being interpreted, meant that the balloon was to go up to 700 ft. and that four men would be jumping. Flight Sergeant Aldridge was on his mettle! There was a certain amount of muttering among the men when the balloon started to rise, but as the ground receded and the feeling of security decreased they huddled in the corners of the car and relapsed into silence. At last the winch stopped and, having satisfied himself that everything was in order, Aldridge said in a quiet but very firm voice “Now look here, you fellows, you’ve all been to Ringway and you all know how to jump - so don’t let’s have any damned nonsense. When I say go - I mean Go.” A small balloon car, the floor of which is mostly hole, swaying uneasily 700 ft. above the earth, is not a good place to start an argument and numbers one, two and three went out like “good-uns” on the crisp words of command. Number four, however, showed no inclination to take up position and strongly protested that he wasn’t going to jump. Aldridge thought otherwise and as he moved across the car he muttered viciously: “Now then, you blighter, one last chance - are you to jump or aren’t you? Action stations - Go!” and go the man did. Looking over the side at the scrabbling mass of arms and legs, Aldridge fired his parting shot: “That was a ruddy awful exit - you’d better do better next time.” A few hours later Flight Sergeant Aldridge was surprised to receive instructions that he was to report to General Gale, the Divisional Commander. After some preliminary talk about parachuting and the good work down by the P.T.S. the General said: “By the way, didn’t you take up some men this morning who were expecting to refuse?” “Yes, sir,” answered Aldridge proudly, “but they all jumped - it just depends on how you treat them.” “How very true,” observed the General with a twinkle in his eye. “It may interest you to know that one of your pupils was an officer of the Provost Marshal’s department who had never previously made a parachute descent and who went up as a witness in case any of the men refused to jump. I gather that he didn’t altogether appreciate the experience.” Aldridge’s normal ruddy complexion flushed a few shades darker as he answered: “Well, sir, nobody told me who he was and he looked like a paratroop.” “And so he ought to be,” said the General greatly amused, “and even if he didn’t like it the men did. The story is all over the camp and doing any amount of good.” The period training the 6th Airborne Division was hectic, and drops included ballooons, single up to 250 aircraft drops, using Albemarle, Stirling, Halifax and Dakota aircraft; Aldridge trained and despatched troops from a mulititude of units including from 3rd, 5th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 12th and 13th Battalions Parachute Regiment, 1st Canadian Para Battalion, Independent Para Company, and 224 Para Squadron; on 18.6.1944 he took off from Tarrant Rushton in a Halifax of 644 Squadron, from which he despatched an operational stick of troops in action over France; after the D-Day ops Aldridge was awarded the A.F.M. and promoted Acting Warrant Officer; on his 77th descent he was dropped very low and landed in twists, injuring both knees and arms; having recovered he continued to train on water and land descents, and spent November 1944 training the 2nd SAS Regiment and the Free French to jump from Stirlings; by the end of 1944 he had completed 83 descents and over 188 flying hours; during 1945, Aldridge continued normal training duties but also instructed aircrew, observed gun and jeep dropping trials, experimented on low level container drops into water, took part in glider-borne exercises and even despatched a stick of 10 SAS troopers with their dog; he completed 100 descents by VE Day, 8.5.1945; he despatched and jumped from a balloon during the 1945 Battle of Britain Day Parade; by the end of December 1945 he had completed 114 descents and over 245 flying hours; post war he moved with No. 1 PTS to Upper Heyford, Oxfordshire; normal instructing duties were punctuated by demonstrations for the Chinese Military Mission, GOC Indian Para Division and a Pathe film crew; Aldridge’s workload increased with the establishment of Territorial Army Para units in 1948; he was also involved with demonstrations for the Swedish Army, and despatched for Operation Mephisto which involved dropping a Jeep, 25 pounder gun, 4 canisters and 6 Paras from each Halifax; by the end of the year Aldridge’s total was 135 descents and 302 flying hours; he was involved in an accident, 10.10.1949, when he parachuted (his 151st descent) from a Dakota; he got two thrown lines and a badly torn canopy which resulted in a very fast descent from which he was lucky to emerge without serious injury - even more so since at this time there were no reserve parachutes; awarded with his L.S. & G.C. 1953, he retired Warrant Officer, 1958; he resided in later life at ‘305 Penn Road, Wolverhampton.’ Approximately 259 A.F.M.s were gazetted between 1940-45, with very few being awarded to Parachute Jump Instructors.

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36 A Second War Indian Police Medal Group of Six to Second Officer W. Fraser, Calcutta Fire Brigade, Late Mechanical Transport Unit, Indian Army Service Corps a) Indian Police Medal, G.VI.R., 1st ‘Distinguished Conduct’ type (W. Fraser, 2nd Officer, Calcutta Fire Brigade,) b) 1914-15 Star (No.14 Cpl. W. Fraser, Mechl. Transpt.) c) British War and Victory Medals (14 Cpl. W. Fraser, Mech. Transport.), BWM officially renamed d) Association of Professional Fire Brigade Officers Long Service Medal, silver (Hallmarks for Birmingham 1928) (Station Officer W. Fraser. 1929) e) National Fire Brigades’ Association Long Service Medal, silver (Hallmarks for Birmingham 1932), with ‘Twenty Years’ clasp, edge engraved ‘4646 Station Officer W. Fraser’, reverse engraved ‘Calcutta Fire Brigade’, generally very fine or better (6) £350-450
Second Officer William Fraser, served with the Mechanical Transport Unit, Indian Army Service Corps, during the Great War; awarded Indian Police Medal, Calcutta Gazette 14.1.1943.

37 A Good 1967 ‘Aden’ B.E.M. Group of Nine to Warrant Officer G.O. White, Royal Air Force a) British Empire Medal, Military Division, E.II.R. (Y1036822 Sgt. George O.White, R.A.F.) b)1939-1945 Star c) Burma Star d) Defence and War Medals e) General Service 1918-62, E.II.R., one clasp, Malaya (1036822 Sgt. G.O. White. R.A.F.) f) General Service 1962-2007, one clasp, South Arabia (Y1036822 Sgt. G.O. White R.A.F.) g) Coronation 1953 h) Royal Air Force Long Service & G.C., E.II.R. (1036822 Sgt. G.O.White. R.A.F.), minor contact marks throughout, generally good very fine, with the following related items: - The recipient’s related miniature awards - Silver-plated presentation rose bowl, inscribed ‘Presented to W.O. G. White B.E.M. from Fellow Members of the Sergeants Mess R.A.F. Biggin Hill on his Retirement 11th Sept. 1975’ - Silver-plated presentation Salver, 205mm diameter, inscribed, ‘W.O. G.O. White B.E.M.’ R.A.F. Biggin Hill 1974-75’

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37 - R.A.F. Station Abingdon Presentation Plaque, inscribed ‘Presented to W.O. G. White from R.A.F. Abingdon 1972-1974’ - Parachute Regiment Presentation Plaque, inscribed ‘Presented to W.O. G. White from P.C.A.U.’ - Buckingham Palace enclosure for the B.E.M., framed and glazed - Warrant appointing George Oliver White, B.E.M., a Warrant Officer in the Royal Air Force, dated 1.1.1974, framed and glazed - Royal Air Force Strike Command Commendation by Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief Certificate, named to Flight Sergeant G.O. White, and dated 3.6.1972, framed and glazed - Royal Air Force No. 46 Group Commendation by the Air Officer Commanding Certificate, named to Warrant Officer George Oliver White BEM, and dated 20.1.1974, framed and glazed - The recipient’s Certificate of Qualification and Certificate of Discharge - The recipient’s photograph album, containing photographs from his time at Marham, Abingdon, and Biggin Hill, together with various other photographs - Various newspaper cuttings, including one of the recipient’s obituary - Two Royal Air Force Warrant Officer’s wooden canes (lot) £400-500
B.E.M. London Gazette 10.6.1967 Y1036822 Sergeant George Oliver White, Royal Air Force. Y1036822 Warrant Officer George Oliver White, B.E.M., born 5.11.1920; enlisted in the Royal Air Force, 10.2.1941, and served during the Second World War in Burma during the Japanese occupation; on the island of Ghan in the Indian Ocean, where he helped construct the island’s runway; and in Malaya; Awarded L.S.&G.C., 19.10.1959; served in Aden from June 1966 at the height of hostilities, and awarded the B.E.M. ‘for sterling qualities under duress’ (newspaper cutting refers); posted to RAF Marham, 1968; awarded an Air Officer Commanding-inChief, Strike Command, Commendation ‘for outstanding devotion to duty and setting the highest example whilst working in the Engineering and Manning Control at RAF Marham since 1968’, 3.6.1972; posted to RAF Abingdon,

Warrant Officer G.O. White

1972; RAF Biggin Hill, 1974, where he was involved with organising two of the Biggin Hill air displays; retired, 5.11.1975. In retirement Warrant Officer White served as a member of the Wisbech branch of the Royal Air Forces Association, and helped organise events to raise money to provide special Christmas dinners for veterans of the Great War. He died at home in Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, 4.11.1982.

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BRITISH ORDERS AND SINGLE AWARDS

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x38 The Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Civil Division, Knight Commander’s (K.C.B.) set of Insignia, by Garrard, London, neck Badge, silver-gilt (Hallmarks for London 1920); Star, silver, gold, and enamel, with gold retaining pin, about extremely fine, with neck riband (2) £800-1,200

x39 The Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George, Knight Commander’s (K.C.M.G.) Star, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, with gold retaining pin, blue enamel damage to motto, therefore very fine £400-600

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40 40 The Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Companion’s (C.S.I.) neck Badge, gold, silver, and enamel, with a fine quality central onyx cameo of a youthful Queen Victoria, the motto illuminated with diamonds, nearly extremely fine £2,500-3,000

42 The Most Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, Companion’s (C.I.E.) neck Badge, gold and enamel, extremely fine, with full neck riband £550-750 43 The Most Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, Companion’s (C.I.E.) neck Badge, gold and enamel, extremely fine £550-750 x44 The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 1st type, Military Division, Commander’s (C.B.E.) neck Badge, silver-gilt and enamel, nearly extremely fine, in Garrard, London, case of issue £200-240

x41 The Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George, Companion’s (C.M.G.) neck Badge, silvergilt and enamel, with neck riband, extremely fine £300-350

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x45 Distinguished Service Order, G.V.R., silver-gilt and enamel, with integral top riband bar, extremely fine £700-900 47 46 The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 2nd type, Civil Division, Officer’s (O.B.E.) breast Badge, silver-gilt, nearly extremely fine, in Royal Mint case of issue £80-120 47 Indian Order of Merit, 2nd type, Military Division, Second Class (I.O.M.) breast Badge, silver and enamel, Reward of Valour, impressed reverse, good very fine, lacking integral riband buckle £350-400 x48 Indian Order of Merit, 2nd type, Military Division, Second Class (I.O.M.) breast Badge, silver and enamel, Reward of Valour, impressed reverse, good very fine, lacking integral riband buckle £350-400 49 Military Cross, G.V.R., unnamed as issued, extremely fine, in case of issue £450-550

x50 Military Cross, G.V.R., unnamed as issued, extremely fine £400-500 51 Distinguished Flying Cross, G.VI.R., reverse officially dated ‘1942’, extremely fine £1,000-1,200 52 Order of British India, 2nd type, First Class (O.B.I.) neck Badge, gold and enamel, extremely fine £800-1,000 x53 Kaisar-i-Hind Medal, G.VI.R., First Class, gold, with integral top riband bar, extremely fine, in case of issue £1,000-1,200

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53 54 Kaisar-i-Hind, G.V.R., 2nd type, Second Class, silver, with Second Award Bar, dated ‘1946’, and integral top riband bar, nearly extremely fine £300-400 55 The Most Venerable Order of St. John, Knight of Grace’s set of insignia, neck Badge, 54mm, silver and enamel, lions and unicorns in angles; Star, 70mm, silver and enamel, lions and unicorns in angles, good very fine, with neck riband, in case of issue The Most Venerable Order of St. John, Officer’s breast Badge, 42mm, silver and enamel, lions and unicorns in angles, extremely fine (3) £300-400 x56 The Most Venerable Order of St. John, Serving Brother’s breast Badge, circular type, silver and enamel, good very fine, with silver Maltese Cross emblem on riband, in Spink, London, case of issue, together with two St. John Ambulance Association Badges, silver (Hallmarks for Birmingham 1915), reverse engraved ‘190676 Robert W. Glendinning’; bronze, reverse engraved ‘A113200 Leslie Cave’ (3) £30-40 57

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oRdeRS, deCoRAtionS, CAmPAign medALS And miLitARiA 57 The Highly Emotive Edward Medal for Mines to Workman T. Birkett, Who Helped With the Attempted Rescue of Miners Trapped by a Terrible Fire in the Wellington Pit, Whitehaven, 11.5.1910; Of the Original Shift of 143 Miners Only 7 Survived Edward Medal (Mines), E.VII.R., bronze (Thomas Birkett), nearly extremely fine £1,000-1,400
E.M. London Gazette 11.2.1911 Thomas Birkett, Workman ‘On account of conspicuous bravery in connection with the attempt made to rescue their fellow workmen at the Wellington Pit, Whitehaven, on the 11th of May, 1910.’ The original citation, London Gazette 22.7.1910, states: ‘On the 11th May, 1910, a terrible fire occurred in the Wellington Pit, Whitehaven, at a point about 4,500 yards from the shafts. Various rescue parties, with great courage and self-devotion and at considerable risk, descended the mine and endeavoured to extinguish the fire and penetrate to the persons in the workings beyond the same. Thorne and Littlewood, fitted with breathing apparatus, reached within a distance of 150 yards of the fire, but were driven back by the great heat and effusion of gases. The others got to within about 300 yards of the fire, working in the smoke backing from the fire. It was found impossible to penetrate to the scene of the fire or to rescue any of the entombed miners. Had an explosion occurred - a by no means unlikely eventuality, seeing that the mine is a very gassy one - they would undoubtedly all have been killed. Special gallantry was shown by John Henry Thorne, to whom the Edward Medal of the First Class has already been awarded, and by James Littlewood.’ For this action John Henry Thorne and James Littlewood were awarded silver Edward Medals (the award to Thorne being a Second Award bar); and 64 men, including Graham, were awarded bronze Edward Medals, the greatest number of Edward Medals ever to be given for one incident. The Wellington Pit Disaster ‘The first indication something was wrong reached the shaft top about eight o’clock on the evening of Wednesday, 11th May, 1910. An exploration party was dispatched down the shaft and news quickly spread around the town. A large party of police was almost immediately on the spot but there was no issue of keeping order - the huge crowds, which soon grew to thousands, stood quietly on the clear, starlit night. A terrible explosion involving a large loss of life was feared. An entire shift of men, numbering 143, had entered the mine the previous evening. Only seven had managed to escape immediately after the explosion, leaving 136 men still unaccounted for. Right through the night and all the next day, rescue parties were at work trying to reach the workings where the missing men were entombed, but it was extremely difficult, the atmosphere dense. Some of the timbering in the mine was on fire while the only means of ventilating the portion of the pit where the men were trapped was entirely cut off. At the pithead there were heart-rending scenes. Women, with children, in pain and anxiety waited for news of their loved ones. Many of them stayed at the pithead all night and the whole of the following day refusing to leave for rest or refreshment and a number collapsed, worn out by their vigil. As the day wore on and successive rescue parties reported the stupendous difficulties underground, hopes of saving the imprisoned men diminished and the distress of the crowd grew more acute. The demonstration of grief was extreme. Weeping women and children would not leave as it became extremely doubtful any further lives would be saved. The mine was on fire, many fire extinguishers and other fire appliances had been sent to the scene. In Whitehaven itself business was at a standstill. The fishermen and dock labourers

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all volunteered any assistance they could render. And a large number of doctors and nurses had mustered waiting to give aid. The police were engaged keeping the crowd from surging on to the pit shaft. Mr. J.B. Atkinson, H.M. Chief Inspector of Mines for the Northern District, arrived at four o’clock in the afternoon, accompanied by Mr. H.A. Abbott, Inspector of Mines for the North-Eastern District, and they were briefed on the situation. They both then descended the shaft to inspect the progress that had been made. The fire by now had taken hold at the friction gear. With the risk to the rescue teams and the possibility of a further explosion, Mr. Atkinson ordered the mine be cleared of all men. He stated it would be impossible for anyone to be alive on the other side of the fire and ordered every man to proceed to the surface. Some of the rescue party, concerned for trapped men, needed to be forcibly dragged away. A conference was held at the pit top at nine o’clock that Thursday evening between the Inspectors and Colliery Officials. It was decided to wait until special rescue teams arrived from Armstrong Whitworth and Co. at Elswick, and The Sheffield Mining Company. The teams arrived around eleven o’clock that evening and proceeded to enter the shaft with their special breathing apparatus. The Sheffield men, John Thorne and James Littlewood, were well known in mining circles as the two most experienced men available. The party descended the shaft at 11:25pm, accompanied by the Inspectors, Colliery officials, and a party of the best miners that they could find. On reaching the bottom, they walked for just under three miles before stopping to set their equipment. Thorne and Littlewood then set off on their own in an attempt to pass the fire and get into the workings beyond, to check the air there. After battling ahead for 170 yards the smoke was so thick that they could not see their torches. Thorne, who led, with Littlewood a few steps behind, tripped over some fallen telegraph wires which were so hot they badly burned his legs. On reaching the brattice cloth, he put his hand around the side and described it “like putting your hand inside an oven”. They could hear the crackling of the fire but could see nothing for the smoke. The heat was so intense that the soldered name plates on the

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helmets were melted and caused a blister on each of the men’s faces. Reluctantly, they decided to turn back after twenty minutes, no longer able to stand the heat and fearing for another explosion. On arrival back at the shaft top, it was realised that nothing further could be done for the trapped men. Mr. Atkinson made the decision to build a two foot thick stopping in the main passageway in an attempt to starve the oxygen of fire. This was achieved by Friday morning. On Friday morning a large congregation of around 3,000 miners assembled in the Market Place demanding to be allowed to continue the search for their trapped comrades. A telegram had already been sent, by the miners, to the Home Secretary, the Rt. Hon. Winston Churchill, asking for such permission. On Sunday morning, a party of seven entered the mine hoping to reach the seat of the fire by the return airway. About one and a half miles in, the doors separating the intake from the outtake were opened and four men entered with breathing apparatus. Mr. Steel, the Mine Manager; Mr. Blair, the Assistant Manager; Mr. Henry, the Under Manager; and John Thorne had travelled about 190 yards when their canary fell from its perch. Further on, their safety lamps went out. Undaunted, they continued over many falls until the heat was 85 degrees Fahrenheit and they could no longer see their electric lamps for the smoke. They had reached a point 500 yards beyond the stopping in the intake and within 400 yards of the fire. They reluctantly came to the decision that no one could make it past the fire and all beyond must be long since dead. It was decided to build another stopping in the return and a further stopping in the intake as the only possible course to put the fire out.’ (Whitehaven News, 12-17.5.1910 refers). The first of the bodies were recovered from the pit on the 27th September, and a mass funeral took place with an estimated 10,000 people attending. Many families had lost more than one family member, with the McAllister family losing seven members to the fire.

60 x58 Indian Distinguished Service Medal, G.V.R. (4977 Naik Barmayya 64th Pioneers.), very fine £300-350
I.D.S.M. Indian Government General Order 1360 1917 Barmayya, No. 4977 Naik, 64th Pioneers (Mesopotamia). M.I.D. London Gazette 15.8.1917 Barmayya, No. 4977 Naik, Pioneers, Indian Army (Mesopotamia).

59 Military Medal, G.V.R. (25749 Sjt: G. Baxter. 85/By: R.F.A.), lacking retaining rod, very fine £100-140
M.M. London Gazette 18.7.1917 25749 Sjt. G. Baxter, R.F.A. 25749 Sergeant Gilbert Baxter, M.M., served with 45th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery during the Great War on the Western Front from 6.11.1914.

60 Military Medal, G.V.R. (9-4561 Pte. P. Kenny. 6/R. Muns: Fus.), nearly very fine £200-240
M.M. London Gazette 24.1.1919 9/4561 Pte. Kenny, P., 6th Bn., Royal Munster Fusiliers (Tralee) (Salonika). 9/5461 Private Patrick Kenny, M.M., served with the 6th Battalion Royal Munster Fusiliers during the Great War on the Western Front from 19.12.1915.

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oRdeRS, deCoRAtionS, CAmPAign medALS And miLitARiA 61 British Empire Medal, Military Division, E.II.R. (T/23184602 Dvr. Malcolm T. Bignall, R.A.S.C.), nearly extremely fine £300-350
B.E.M. London Gazette 22.10.1957 T/23184602 Driver Malcolm Trevor Bignall, 19 Company, Royal Army Service Corps ‘Driver Bignall was driving a fifty ton transporter carrying a Centurion tank down a steep hill into the village of Hurstbourne Tarrant, when the brakes failed completely. He endeavoured to steer the vehicle into the left hand bank in order to slow its momentum, but owing to the combined weight of the tank and trailer this manoeuvre was unsuccessful. Realising that an accident was now inevitable he ordered his co-driver to jump from the vehicle, whilst he remained at the wheel in an effort to control the vehicle’s passage, but as it gathered speed and momentum the flywheel disintegrated and the flying pieces injured him. Even so he managed to slew the vehicle across the road into a field and avoid the village of Hurstbourne Tarrant. In the resultant crash he received serious injuries. Driver Bignall acted with great courage and with complete disregard for his own safety by remaining at the wheel of his vehicle. His action in bringing the transporter to rest in the way he did undoubtedly saved extensive damage to property and probably saved injuries and loss of life to the population of the village.’ The Hurstbourne Hill Incident ‘A massive tank transporter weighing about 20 tons, carrying a 50-ton Centurion tank from Tidworth to Chilwell, hurtled down Hurstbourne Hill (gradient 1 in 5) on Tuesday, 18th June, at 12:15pm. The brakes failed and the 70-ton mass careered crazily down the hill with the driver, 22-year-old Driver Malcolm Bignall, of the 19th R.A.S.C. Depot, Retford, Nottinghamshire, straining to save it from smashing to pulp the houses at the bottom of the hill. Miraculously he steered the transporter into the left bank, braking it a little, but the vehicle with its massive load continued down the hill, swerving as it did so. At the bottom of the hill it swung hard to the right, parting company with the tank it was carrying, which shot to the left. The lorry and carrier ploughed into the garden of the first house at the bottom of the hill, where a tank trap stopped them from going any further. Driver Bignall, whose right leg was broken and right hip badly damaged, was thrown clear before his lorry came to a halt, facing the way it had come. Bignall told the nurse who attended him: “I did all I could to stop the thing from hitting the houses.” The tank, which had broken free of its lashings, careered down the left side of the road, tearing up the road surface, flattening fences and poles, tearing up a huge yew tree and piling it against the nearest house, and completely flattening a newly-built garage in the garden of that house. The codriver, Driver M. Elliott, was pushed clear by Bignall half-way down the hill. He escaped without injury. For almost the full length of the hill, which is half-a-mile long, pieces of brake drum and wreckage were scattered. The road at the beginning of the line of houses was ripped up and fences and bushes each side flattened as if a bomb had been dropped nearby. When the ambulance and police arrived the scene was utter chaos. Traffic was held up in both directions, parts of the crashed vehicle lay all over the road, telephone wires were strewn about; everyone there appeared dazed. The one person who saw the final frightening scene, when the army lorry, transporter, and its Centurion tank load broke apart, was Mr. John Powell, the landlord of the George and Dragon, Hurstbourne Tarrant.

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“I heard that tanks were coming through Andover. I half expected an accident, knowing that the hot day would melt the brake fluid and make it pretty difficult for anything of that size to come down that hill. I was outside when it happened. As soon as I saw it out of control I dashed back to telephone the police. I did not wait to see what would eventually happen.” When Mr. Powell got back to his house he told his wife and she bundled her nanny, 22-year-old nurse Miss Eileen Downing, into a car and they drove to the crash. “I went to tend the driver who was beside his lorry,” said Eileen Downing. “I washed his face, cleaned the facial and shoulder lacerations, and put a disinfected compress on his broken leg. It was only after I had done this that I recognised him. I told him that I knew his mother, father, and wife- they live in London near where I used to work- but he did not recognise me. The last time I saw him was last Christmas.” A doctor was called from a nearby surgery and arrived with the ambulance. He treated Driver Bignall, then Bignall was driven to Tidworth Military Hospital with his co-driver, Elliott.’ Mr. and Mrs. Thompson, who are the owners of the house on the right-hand side of the road where the tank came to rest, were away for the day. They moved into this house, The Limes, a few months ago. Now a 50-ton tank lies on top of their new garage, built two months ago.’ (Andover Advertiser, 21.6.1957 refers). Gift from the Village After the accident the Rev. K.M.C. Melrose, vicar of Hurstbourne Tarrant, visited Bignall in hospital. Thinking that the villagers owed the driver a debt of gratitude, he appealed to his flock for a gift: ‘They eagerly responded, and before the end of Bignall’s first week in hospital he was presented with an inscribed table lamp and a gift voucher.’ (Andover Advertiser, 25.10.1957 refers).

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MEDALS TO THE USSHER FAMILY

62 62 The Unique and Historically Important K.C.H. and Five Clasp Naval General Service Medal Group to Rear Admiral of the Blue Sir Thomas Ussher [C.B.], Royal Navy; A Master Exponent of Both the Boat Action and the Broadside, He Always Led from the Front Even when on Crutches. Seriously Wounded Several Times, ‘Equivalent to the Loss of a Limb’, And Taken Prisoner of War, He was a Daring Officer who Reconnoitred The Entire French Fleet in Brest Harbour on His Own Initiative- Entering the Harbour in a Gig under the Cover of Darkness He Obtained Exact Intelligence on the Disposition of the Enemy Fleet and was Only Discovered when His 4-Oared Vessel was Abreast of the French Admiral’s Ship: Ussher Made Good His Escape from 3 Boats and 11 Pursuing Gun-Brigs. Whilst In Command of the Redwing He Obliterated 7 Spanish Vessels With a Broadside Delivered at Pistol Shot Range Off Cape Trafalgar, 7.5.1808; He Captured Almuñecar Castle With The Aide of Spanish Partisans, Before Being Given the Honour of Conveying Napoleon in H.M.S. Undaunted to Start His Exile on Elba, 1813 a) The Royal Guelphic Order, Military Division, Knight Commander’s (K.C.H.) set of Insignia, by Rundell, Bridge, and Rundell, London, neck Badge, 87mm including crown and crossed swords suspension x 58mm, gold and enamel, Hallmarks for London on suspension ring; Star, 78mm, silver, gold, and enamel, the reverse engraved ‘Rundell, Bridge & Rundell. Jewellers to Their Majesties & Royal Family, London’, with gold retaining pin, very minor green enamel damage b) Naval General Service 1793-1840, five clasps, 1 June 1794, Redwing 7 May 1808, Redwing 31 May 1808, Malaga 29 April 1812, 2 May Boat Service 1813 (Thos. Ussher, Capt. R.N.), last lightly lacquered, nearly extremely fine (3) £40,000-50,000 61

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Thomas Ussher served as Midshipman in H.M.S. Invincible for the Fleet action that became known as ‘The Glorious First of June.’ A total of seven Large Naval Gold Medals and 15 Small Naval Gold Medals were awarded for this action; Ussher served as Commander in H.M.S. Redwing (brig), when under his command she captured or destroyed a convoy of 12 Spanish merchant vessels escorted by seven armed vessels (including the schooners Diligente and Boreas), 35 miles off Cape Trafalgar, Spain, 7.5.1808. During this spirited action the 18-gun Redwing got within point blank shot of the enemy. The seven Spanish escorts formed in close line and advanced with the intention of boarding. Ussher, however, brought his guns to bear with such devastating effect that within two hours only two of the armed vessels remained afloat. Both schooners turned over and were lost with all hands, a number of gunboats ran ashore and four merchant ships, in their attempts to scatter, were sunk by the Redwing; Ussher served as the same rank and in the same vessel for the capture of two Spanish vessels, and the destruction of a third in the Bay of Bolonia, near Cape Trafalgar, and the silencing of a gun battery, 31.5.1808. The Redwing chased a mistico and two feluccas into the Bay of Bolonia, which took shelter under a gun battery of six long 24-pounders. Ussher landed with a party of 40 seamen armed with pikes, stormed the battery area, spiked the guns and destroyed the magazine. The mistico was then destroyed and the two feluccas brought out. For this and several earlier actions Ussher was advanced to post rank; Ussher served as Captain in H.M.S. Hyacinth, and officer commanding of a small squadron, for the capture of the French privateers Brave and Napoleon, lying within the mole of Malaga, Spain, 29.4.1812. The squadron consisted of the Hyacinth, Goshawk (Commander James Lilburne), the gun-brig Resolute (Lieutenant John Keenan) and No. 16 gunboat (Lieutenant Thomas Cull). British merchant shipping had consistently come under attack by several fast rowing French privateers under the command of a Chief named Barbastro. Unable to flush the privateers out of the mole, Ussher decided to attack them in port by employing boats. Despite the harbour entrance being defended by a 15-gun battery and being overlooked by a castle Ussher pressed on with his attack - taking the lead boat himself. Lieutenant Hustings carried the mole-head battery, whilst Commander Lilburne with the gunboat and other boats boarded and captured the enemy rowboats. Guns from the castle opened up on the attackers and French infantry entered the mole-head battery just as Captain Ussher left after spiking the guns. British losses were Commander Lilburne and 14 men killed and 53 officers and men wounded; Ussher served as Captain in H.M.S. Undaunted, when the marines from the Repulse, Volontaire, and Undaunted, under Captain Michael Ennis R.M., were landed and destroyed some newly erected works near Morgiou, Toulon, while the boats from the same ships, under the command of Lieutenant Isaac Shaw of the Volontaire, covered by the launches and H.M.S. Redwing, brought out six laden merchant vessels, 2.5.1813. Approximately 7 ‘Redwing 7 May 1808’ clasps issued Approximately 5 ‘Redwing 31 May 1808’ clasps issued Approximately 17 ‘Malaga 29 April 1812’ clasps issued Approximately 48 ‘2 May Boat Service 1813’ clasps issued Rear Admiral of the Blue Sir Thomas Ussher, C.B., K.C.H. (1779-1848), son of the Reverend Henry Ussher, a Senior Fellow of Trinity College, Dublin and first Astronomer Royal of Ireland; Thomas Ussher joined the Royal Navy as Midshipman (under the patronage of Colonel W.B. Conyngham, M.P., uncle of the then late Marquess Conyngham), 1791. He was appointed to H.M.S. Squirrel (Captain W. Drury) later that year, and, ‘in that vessel, after serving on the Irish station, he proceeded to the coast of Africa; where, to avenge an insult offered to the British flag, he assisted in driving the Portuguese Governor of Prince’s Island, in the Bight of Benin, with severe loss, from the two batteries (one mounting 22, the other 4 guns) defending the harbour’ (O’Byrne, refers). His return passage to England was one of hardship - with the officers and crew of the Squirrel reduced to a daily allowance of 1 oz of bread and a single cup of water each. Ussher was appointed to H.M.S. Invincible (Captain the Hon. T. Pakenham), September 1793. He served in the latter vessel during ‘The Glorious First of June’, before following his Captain for service in H.M.S. La Juste. Both Captain and Ussher had been instrumental in the capture of La Juste during Lord Howe’s action. Between 1795-1796 Ussher served in H.M. Ships Prince George, Glory and Thunderer (all bearing the flag of Sir Hugh Christian). He made passage with H.M.S. Thunderer to the West Indies. On the way out, ‘he removed with Sir H.C. Christian to the Astraea frigate. During the operations of May 1796, against Ste. Lucie, Mr. Ussher, who had been nominated Acting-Lieutenant of the Minotaur.... was employed on shore in command of a party of seamen attached to the army under Sir Ralph Abercromby. Subsequently to the surrender of the island, he was ordered to act as Lieutenant in the Pelican brig (18-guns)....under Capt. Searle the latter vessel, with only 97 men on board, beat off in the most dashing manner, near Désirade, the French frigate Médée of 40 guns and 300 men, after a close action, in which the enemy sustained a loss of 33 men in killed and wounded.... This affair took place on the morning of 23 Sept. 1796; and in the course of the same day the sloop retook the Alcyon, late a British army victualler, and then a prize to the Médée’ (O’Byrne, refers). A Liking for Boats In September the following year he took part in the destruction of the French privateer La Trompeur off St. Domingo. His bravery was commended in his commanding officer’s despatch (London Gazette 1797, p114). La Trompeur (16-guns and 160 men) engaged the Pelican for over half an hour before trying ‘to effect her escape, but, being overtaken, had resolutely defended herself until the fire of her opponent sent her to the bottom. Sixty only of her brave crew could the British save, but among them was their gallant chief, whose life was preserved through the exertions of Mr. Ussher.... On 4th April 1798, Mr. Ussher, who, in command of two boats containing 14 men, had been occupied... in looking into the different creeks about Cumberland Harbour and St. Jago de Cuba in search of a privateer.... landed in a sandy bay near the latter port. While his men were reposing on the beach, they were of a sudden, although a sentinel had been posted on a height to prevent a surprise, attacked by between 60 and 70 soldiers, who, with a volley of musketry, rushed upon them.... A deadly conflict ensued, and lasted until Mr. Ussher, having succeeded in

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62 (Star reverse)

regaining his only remaining boat - the Spaniards had swamped the other - was enabled to fire into the midst of them a swivel, loaded with 200 musket-balls. The enemy then fled; and the British re-embarked, with a loss, however, of two killed and 10 severely and slightly wounded. Among the latter was Mr. Ussher’ (Ibid). Despite being wounded Ussher attempted to capture another French privateer the following day. With only two boats and 19 men at his disposal he attempted to board Le Moulin a Café (7-guns and 83 men) near Cumberland Harbour. He was rebuffed by a broadside, ‘yet, unwilling to retreat, and eagerly anticipating a re-enforcement from the Pelican, he remained exposed to a destructive fire until, having had his best marksmen killed and many others wounded, he was himself felled by a shot through the right thigh. Conceiving his wound to be mortal, he directed those of his party, who were able, to retire, and he then, from loss of blood, fainted. On recovering his senses he found himself in the hands of the French.... For many months after his return to the Pelican, Mr. Ussher was under the necessity of using crutches’ (Ibid). Always Lead From the Front- Even on Crutches Despite his physical state he volunteered to lead another daring attack in January 1799. Ussher, ‘with the Pelican’s cutter and 12 men, to attack another privateer, La Trompeuse, of 5 guns and about 70 men, lying in the Artribonite River, at the west end of St. Domingo. The original plan had been to approach the privateer with 50 men in a merchant schooner. The plan had been changed due to weather conditions. Undeterred the gallant Ussher lead his men to board, capture and destroy the privateer, ‘much to the credit

of Mr. Ussher; who, it may be here added, was present, while belonging to the Pelican, in upwards of 20 boat engagements with the enemy’ (Ibid). In May 1799 he was appointed to H.M.S. Trent (36-guns, Captain R.W. Oatway). On the 7th June using the ship’s barge he boarded and towed out a schooner under the guns of a large battery in Aguada Bay, Puerto Rico. Having, ‘with the assistance of the Trent’s cutter under Mr. H. M’Cleverty, the Master, towed the prize out beneath a ruinous fire.... he returned in the cutter and, fortunately without further loss (every one nearly of the barge’s crew had been killed or wounded) brought off a felucca’ (Ibid). In July of the same year Ussher again commanded boats in the capture of another felucca. He brought her out from under another battery in the face of a troop of cavalry at Laguira. Ussher returned to England in September 1800, ‘from the effects of his wounds, which threatened even to produce locked-jaw, was obliged for a time to seek half-pay, thereby, losing the fairest chance of promotion. Although, on being surveyed by the College of Surgeons, the injuries he had received were declared equal to the loss of a limb.... his late Commander in Chief Sir Hyde Parker, in a letter to the Secretary of the Admiralty, ‘recommended him, in justice to his merits, not only for a pension, but for any mark of favour their Lordships might think proper to bestow on him.” On applying in June, 1801, for employment, contrary to the advice of his physicians, he was at once appointed to the command of the Nox cutter. In this vessel, which was stationed off Weymouth in attendance upon the King, he remained four months’ (Ibid).

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Under the Cover of Darkness Between 1803-1804 Ussher was appointed to the command of the Joseph and the Colpoys. Both were attached to the blockading force under Admiral Cornwallis off Brest. At the end of 1804, ‘the British Fleet, during a succession of hard weather, was blown off the coast; and on regaining his station Admiral Cornwallis was in some doubt as to whether or not the enemy had left port. On hearing of this, Mr. Ussher, of his own accord, stood close in shore after dark, and, hoisting out his gig (a 4-oared boat), actually entered the harbour, discovered and rowed along the whole French line, and thereby obtained an exact knowledge of the enemy’s force, consisting of 21 sail. On arriving abreast of the French Admiral’s ship he was descried, and immediately pursued by three boats; but from these he fortunately escaped, as well as from the boats of 11 gun-brigs lying in Camaret Bay, who, on his clearing the Goulet Passage, united in the chase. The Colpoys, the next day, joined her own Admiral, with signal flying “The enemy the same as when last reconnoitred”; affording the latter the information that he had anxiously desired, and to Captain Puget the particulars that were required for the fructification of the plan he formed’ (Ibid). Ussher’s next exploit was a ‘cloak and dagger’ raid on Bertheume Castle. He landed at midnight with six men only 200 yards from the castle. With total surprise he overwhelmed the sentry and captured both the enemy’s private signals and the commanding officer. He returned to more conventional methods, 21.3.1806, ‘having driven three Spanish luggers under a battery of six 24-pounders in the port of Avillas, he pushed with two boats, manned with volunteers, through a heavy fire of grape from the battery and of musketry from a party of soldiers, who had been sent on board the vessels to defend them, and with six men in the headmast boat, boarded and carried them, the enemy jumping over one side as the British entered the other. Thirteen of the former were taken prisoners, and on the arrival of the second boat, which pulled heavy, two of the prizes, mounting each two guns, and laden with flax and steel (the third, in ballast, was restored), were brought off. On first boarding, Mr. Ussher had made two of the crew jump overboard and swim onshore, directing them to inform the officer commanding at the battery that if another gun was fired, he would hang the Spaniards, 11 in number, remaining in his possession. The menace having the effect he wished, he was enabled with safety to complete his operations’ (Ibid). For the latter action he was mentioned in despatches (London Gazette 1806, p437). Ussher was mentioned again (London Gazette 1806, p570) when he landed with 24 men and captured a two gun battery at the mouth of the river Douillan, 19.4.1806. He also captured and destroyed a signal post at Douillan on the same day, both without suffering any loss. Redwing In July 1806 Ussher commanded the Colpoys, the Haughty (gun-brig), Frisk (cutter) and the Felix (schooner) in destroying several batteries at St. Antonio, Avillas and Bermeo. On 28.7.1806, ‘he took possession, after much opposition, of the town of Hea, the defences of which, two batteries, were, together with a magazine and some vessels, either taken or demolished. In less than a week after the latter event he was obliged to resign the command of the Colpoys; the fatigue he had undergone having been so great as to cause the wound he had before received in his thigh to break out afresh, accompanied by the most alarming symptoms. His claims being now backed by testimonials of the strongest character from Earl St. Vincent and Admirals Cornwallis and Graves, he had the gratification of being at length, on 18th October in the same year, promoted to the command of the Redwing sloop of 18-guns. His conduct at Avillas had previously obtained for him a sword valued at 50l from the Patriotic Society; and he had had the satisfaction of receiving from the crew of the Colpoys a similar token of their “respect and esteem.” ’ (O’Byrne refers) Captain Ussher was now to be employed mainly in a defensive capacity. The Redwing was to protect merchant shipping against attacks from Spanish gun-boats and privateers near Gibraltar. Defence, however, was not a word with which Ussher appeared to be overly familiar with - he immediately went on the attack. Between March-September 1807 he bested a division of gun-boats and several batteries near Cabritta Point; on passing Tarifa he decoyed an enemy flotilla within range of his carronades and then forced them to seek shelter under their land batteries and ‘on her return from conveying despatches to the Balearic Islands, the Redwing, on 7th September, drove several vessels on shore near the town of Calassel, on the coast of Catalonia.... On the following day, having pushed in within 100 yards of the castle of Benidorme, mounting four 18-pounders, she enabled her boats.... to board and carry a polacre-ship.... She then, although her masts, sails, and rigging were greatly damaged, made after three privateers, mounting respectively 10, 6, and 4 guns, who, under cover of the smoke, had made their escape from before the town. These she pursued until they ran on shore, apparently in a sinking state, at Jovosa, four miles west of Benidorme’ (Ibid). Give Them a Broadside! Ussher resumed his station in the Gut of Gibraltar, when on 7.5.1808, ‘being about six miles E.S.E. of Cape Trafalgar, he discovered, at daybreak, a convoy of 12 sail passing alongshore under the protection of seven armed vessels, namely, two schooners, the Diligente and Boreas, each mounting two long 24-pounders and two 8’s, with a complement of 60 men; three gun-vessels, carrying in aggregate three long 24-pounders, two 6’s, one 36-pounder,

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and 111 men; and a mistico and felucca, each of four guns and 20 men. Forming a line abreast, this formidable force swept, with an evident intention of boarding, towards the Redwing; who, nothing loth, prepared for the conflict by loading each gun with one round shot, one grape, one canister, and 500 musket-balls, the latter tied up in a bag. When within pistol-shot the Redwing’s broadside, reserved until then, went off like a single gun. Struck at the waterline, and cut open fore and aft, the Diligente gave two or three heavy rolls, turned over, and, with all on board went down. Sharing her fate, the Boreas was soon no more; two other of the vessels, with four of the merchantmen, disappeared in the surf; and seven traders, together with the armed mistico, fell into the hands of the British. The felucca, one gun-boat, and a single merchant-vessel were all that escaped. In thus brilliantly disposing of her foes the Redwing had her foremast crippled by two 24-pounders; and a shot of similar dimensions passed through her mainmast; the gammoning of her bow-sprit was shot through; and the knee of her head was cut asunder. Her loss, however, was confined to 1 man killed, and the Master, Purser, and 1 sailor wounded; while that of the Spaniards, as by themselves admitted, extended to 240, out of 271, killed, wounded, and taken prisoner’ (Ibid). Ussher was mentioned in Collingwood’s despatch (London Gazette 1808, p735). On 31.5.1808 Ussher chased a mistico and two feluccas into the Bay of Bolonia, ‘where, as soon as she had silenced the fire of a battery, mounting six long 24-pounders, her boats, under Lieutenant Ferguson, destroyed the mistico and took possession of the feluccas. Accompanied by the Lieutenant and 40 men armed with pikes, Captain Ussher then landed, stormed the battery, rendered its guns unserviceable, and destroyed the magazine. Up to this period the Redwing, in the whole, had not lost more than 7 men killed and 32 wounded. On his return to Gibraltar, Captain Ussher found that for “his judicious and gallant conduct in his Majesty’s service” he had been promoted to Post-rank, by a commission bearing the date of 24th May 1808’ (Ibid). Due to deteriorating health, as a consequence of his old wounds, Ussher was forced to return to the UK. He arrived in September 1808, ‘At a public dinner given to him by the nobility and gentry at Dublin, Captain Ussher was presented with the freedom of that city’ (O’Byrne refers). Subsequent appointments included to H.M.S Leyden, with whom he was involved in operations against Walcheren, and H.M. Ships America and Hyacinth (26-guns). After accompanying a fleet of merchantmen in the Hyacinth to the Mediterranean, he joined the squadron engaged in the defence of Cadiz, ‘on the night of the 29th April, 1812, having assembled the boats of his own ship and of the Goshawk sloop and Resolute gun-brig, and having added to them a gun-boat, No. 16, he placed himself at the head of the whole and proceeded to the attack of several privateers, commanded by one Barbastro, a man of great enterprise and daring, and then lying in the port of Malaga; the entrance to which was protected by two batteries, one mounting 15 long 24-pounders, the other four guns of the same calibre. In his own gig with six men, supported by his Second-Lieutenant, the present Sir Thomas Hastings, in the pinnace with 20 men, he made a dash at the larger battery, and although fired at before the scaling-ladders could be placed, made himself completely master of it in less than five minutes after he had touched the shore. He immediately turned the guns against the castle of Gibralfaro, and kept the garrison there in check until all the powder he could find was expended. He then pulled up the harbour to superintend the further operations; but the boats, in the meantime, had become exposed, with such prizes as they had taken, to a murderous fire as well from the castle as from the 57th Regt. of French infantry, on the mole-wall; and the moon now rising with more than usual brightness, and displaying them to full view, while from the effects of the firing the wind died away, their position became critical in the extreme. Barbastro’s own privateer.... the Braave [sic].... and the Napoleon..... were brought out - the remainder, before they were abandoned, being damaged as much as possible. In this most heroic affair the British, out of 149 officers and men, had 15, including Captain Jas. Lilburne of the Goshawk, killed, and 53 wounded’ (Ibid). For this action Ussher received the high approbation of Sir Edward Pellew (Commander-in-Chief) and the Board of Admiralty.

Partisans The following month Ussher contacted and gained the confidence of partisans on the Granada Coast. The latter agreed to co-operate in an attack led by the Hyacinth with the assistance of the Termagent (sloop) and the Basilisk (gunbrig). On the 26th of ‘that month, and in less than an hour [they] silenced the fire of the important castle of Almuñecar, armed though it was with two brass 24-pounders, six iron 18pounders, and a howitzer, and defended by 300 French troops. At 7am, on the 27th latter, having during the night mounted a howitzer in a breach made by the ships on the covered way to the castle, the French re-opened their fire; but by 10am the castle was again silenced, and the French were driven with great loss into the town, where they fortified themselves in the church and houses. Desirous of sparing the unfortunate inhabitants, Captain Ussher ceased firing; and at 2pm, after having destroyed a privateer of 2 guns and 30 or 40 men, at anchor under the castle, he weighed and ran down to Nersa, for the purpose of concerting plans with the guerrillas; on his arrival there he emarked 200 infantry on board his little squadron, and then stood back with them towards Almuñecar, while a body of cavalry hastened thither by a more circuitous route. A calm, however, delaying his progress, the enemy obtained a knowledge of the combined movement that was being made against them, and precipitately fled. The fortifications of the castle were ultimately demolished (Ibid). Ussher was mentioned for this action (London Gazette 1812, p1279) and for the interception of several valuable American merchantmen (London Gazette 1812, p2296).

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Napoleon- Ussher ‘Undaunted’ During Ussher’s short time in command of the Euryalus, he was employed chiefly at the blockade of Toulon. He was appointed to the command of H.M.S. Undaunted in 1813, and employed his boats in a number of important operations, including at Carri, 18.3.1813; Morgiou 31.3.1813 and 2.5.1813; near Marseille in the same month and at Cassis in August. In consequence of harsh weather the Undaunted was stationed off Toulon for the duration of winter, ‘where he was left by Sir Edward Pellew with a small squadron under his orders to watch the movements of the French fleet. In April, 1814, being close in with Marseille, in company with the Euryalus (Captain Charles Napier), he received from that city a deputation, consisting of the mayor and civil authorities, who had come off to inform him of the abdication of Napoleon Buonaparte, and of the formation of a provisional government in the absence of the Bourbons. He therefore landed; but he had not long done so when, through the hands of Sir Neil Campbell, who had just arrived from Paris, he received a requisition from Lord Castlereagh that he should forthwith make preparations for conveying the exEmperor from the shores of France to Elba. Repairing accordingly to Fréjus, he there had the honour of embarking the fallen chief; with whom, at about 8pm on the 30th he anchored at the mouth of the harbour of Porto Ferrajo. On 3rd May Napoleon landed and took upon himself the government of the island. Captain Ussher, who obtained great credit for the manner in which he acquitted himself of the delicate and important duty which had been confided to him, remained at Elba until the English transports which had brought the ex-Emperor’s troops, horses, carriages, baggage etc, were cleared and sent to Genoa; whither, although entreated by Napoleon to prolong his stay, he himself proceeded’ (O’Byrne, refers). During this period Ussher and Napoleon entered into many long and engaging conversations on a variety of topics which were recorded at length in Ussher’s diary and then published in 1840 as a Narrative of the First Abdication of Napoleon. This was then republished alongside the diary of John R. Glover, Secretary to Rear Admiral Cockburn (on board the Northumberland) in 1890 as Napoleon’s Last Voyages. This detailed account offers a fascinating insight into the fallen Emperor’s mind, right from the first dinner spent together on board Undaunted, ‘the party at table consisted of Prince Schoovalof, Russian envoy; Baron Koller, Austrian envoy; Comte Truxos, Prussian envoy, and our envoy, Colonel Campbell; Comte Clam, aide-de-camp to Prince Schwarzenberg; Comte Bertand, Drouot, and I. The Emperor did not appear at all reserved, but, on the contrary, entered freely into conversation, and kept it up with great animation’, to Ussher departing from Elba. It is recorded that Napoleon gave Ussher a large quantity of wine and a snuff box as a token of his esteem. Ussher returned to England in August 1814. He was nominated a C.B., 4.6.1815, and awarded a pension for his wounds of £250 per annum. He was appointed Equerry in the Household of Queen Adelaide, July 1830, and appointed a K.C.H. the following year. Ussher advanced to Flag-rank in November 1846, and served as Commander-in-Chief at Cork until his death in 1848. The inscription on the reverse of Ussher’s Guelphic Star dates it from the period 1831-37. His Bath insignia, in accordance with the statues in force at the time, was liable to be returned to the Central Chancery on his death.

63 Pair: Major E.P.H. Ussher, Royal Marines China 1842 (E.P.H. Ussher, 2nd Lieut., Royal Marines.), planchet detached from original suspension and housed in silver band, with silver straight bar suspension; Baltic 1854 (Major E.P.H. Ussher, R.M.I.), engraved in large sans serif capitals, edge bruise to both, traces of lacquer, nearly extremely fine (2) £800-1,200
Major Edward Pellew Hammett Ussher (1817-78); born London, the third son of Rear Admiral Sir Thomas Ussher, C.B., K.C.H., and the godson of Lord Exmouth; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Royal Marines, December 1836; posted to H.M.S. Wellesley, July 1837, and served in her during the operations on and off the coast of China 1840-42, and was present at the capture of Chusan, 5.7.1840; the attack and capture of Chuenpee, 7.1.1841; the capture of North Wantong, 26.2.1841; the advance on Canton, March 1841; the attack of the heights of Canton, 25-26.5.1841; the attack and occupation of Golongsoo, 2630.8.1841 (Mentioned in Captain S.B. Ellis’s Despatch for having led the Royal Marine detachment from H.M.S. Wellesley ashore at Golongsoo, London Gazette 14.1.1842); the second attack and capture of Chusan, 1.10.1841; and at the capture of the cities of Chinhai and Ningpo; promoted First Lieutenant, January 1841; transferred to H.M.S. Iris, October 1843; served in Ireland, on the books of the Flag Ship at Cork, October 1846 to August 1847; promoted Captain, August 1849; posted for service aboard H.M.S. Royal George, November 1853, and served during the Baltic Campaign; promoted Brevet Major, March 1856.

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July 25, 2013 - London

SINGLE CAMPAIGN MEDALS

64 64 Honourable East India Company’s Medal for Mysore 1790-92, large silver medal, 42mm, silver, straight grained edge, test cut to obverse rim at 8 o’clock, otherwise very fine, rare, pierced with ring suspension £1,600-2,000
PROVENANCE:

65

71 x68 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (James Hyde.), light contact marks, very fine £400-450
James Hyde served as Ordinary Seaman in H.M.S. Powerful during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840; one other man of this name appears on the Admiralty Claimant’s List, the latter being an award for Navarino.
PROVENANCE:

Alan Wolfe Collection, December 2005

65 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (A.A. Bridgman, Naval Instr.), light scratches over last part of rank, very fine, Scarce £700-800
Arthur A. Bridgman served as Naval Instructor in H.M.S. Thunderer during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840.

Glendining, November 1919

69 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (Thomas Ellis.), minor edge bruising, very fine £300-350
Thomas Ellis served as Private, Royal Marines in H.M.S. Asia during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840; four other men of this name appear on the Admiralty Claimants’ List, this being the only single clasp award for Syria.

66 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (William Court.), scratches to obverse, edge bruising, therefore nearly very fine £400-500
William Court served as Yeoman of Signals in H.M.S. Cambridge during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840.

70 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (Joseph Bacon.), suspension claw tightened, contact marks, therefore nearly very fine £400-500
Joseph Bacon served as Boy in H.M.S. Benbow during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840.
PROVENANCE:

67 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (William Morey.), contact marks, therefore very fine £400-500
William Morey served as Able Seaman in H.M.S. Magicienne during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840.
PROVENANCE:

Glendining, June 1918

71 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (Edwin Moore.), edge bruise, very fine £400-500
Edwin Moore served as Boy in H.M.S. Rodney during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840.

Glendining, June 1933

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75 72 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (James Fowler.), contact marks, nearly very fine, with Memorial Card for ‘James Camplin Fowler’ £300-350
Two men of this name appear on the Admiralty Claimants’ List, both of which are for Syria. James Camplin Fowler died 11th February 1874, aged 54, and was buried in Arnos Vale Cemetery, Bristol.

76 76 Naval General Service 1793-1840, two clasps, Trafalgar, St. Sebastian (William Mead.), good very fine £6,000-8,000
William Mead served as Private, Royal Marines in H.M.S. Leviathan during the major fleet action off Cape Trafalgar between the British fleet under the command of ViceAdmiral Lord Nelson and the Franco-Spanish fleet under the command of Vice-Admiral P.C. de Villeneuve, 21.10.1805. At Trafalgar the Leviathan was in the weather column, ‘she was closely engaged with the French flagship Bucentaure, 80 guns, and the Spanish 140 gun Santisima Trinidad and the 74 gun San Augustin, the latter of which she easily outmanoeuvred, boarded, and carried without opposition. Lashing the Spaniard to her port side, she brought on herself a nasty fire from the French 74 gun Intrepide, until the Africa, Orion, and other ships came to the rescue. Her losses in the battle amounted to twenty-six killed and wounded. The mainpiece of her head was shot through, all three masts, bowsprit, and most of her lower and topsail yards wounded, her mizzen topsail yard shot away, and a great part of the rigging cut to pieces. She received eight shots between wind and water, and had three guns completely disabled’ (The Trafalgar Roll, The Officers, The Men, The Ships, Colonel R.H. Mackenzie, refers); Mead served as the same rank in H.M.S. Beagle, which assisted in the capture of St. Sebastian when some ship’s boats were employed in the inner blockade, 8.9.1813.
PROVENANCE:

x73 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (John Knight.), nearly extremely fine £350-400
John Knight served during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840; seven other men of this name appear on the Admiralty Claimants’ List, three of which are for Syria.

74 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (Thomas Wedlock.), minor edge nicks, good very fine £280-320
Two men of this name appear on the Admiralty Claimants’ List, both were borne on H.M.S. Cambridge, and both were entitled to the Syria clasp.

75 Naval General Service 1793-1840, two clasps, Egypt, Syria (John Speed, Purser.), very fine, scarce £2,800-3,200
John Speed served as Clerk in H.M.S. Renown in cooperation with the Army on and off the coast of Egypt, 1801; Speed served as Purser in H.M.S. Asia during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840.
PROVENANCE:

Glendining, September 1923

Gowan Collection

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July 25, 2013 - London

77 77 Naval General Service 1793-1840, two clasps, Lissa, Pelagosa 29 Novr. 1811 (John Collins.), very fine £2,500-3,000
John Collins served as Landsman in H.M.S. Active as part of the British squadron which engaged a Franco-Venetian squadron off the Island of Lissa, in the Adriatic, 13.3.1811. Captain Hoste’s squadron captured two enemy frigates, the 40-gun Bellona, the 40-gun Corona and destroyed the 40gun frigate Favorite. The combined loss to the British squadron amounted to 190 killed and wounded against an enemy loss of about 430. The original British force was approximately 886 seaman and marines against at least 2,500 Franco-Venetian allies with less than half their gun superiority. Four Small Naval Gold Medals were awarded for this action; Collins later served as the same rate in the same vessel when she in company with H.M. Ships Unité and Alceste engaged three French frigates, capturing two, off the Island of Pelagosa in the Adriatic, 29.11.1811. Approximately 64 ‘Pelagosa 29 Novr. 1811’ clasps issued.
PROVENANCE:

78

79 78 Military General Service 1793-1814, one clasp, Egypt (J. Parkins, R. Arty.), minor edge bruise, good very fine £600-800
Gunner John Parkins, born Rotherham, Yorkshire, 1773; enlisted in the Royal Artillery, November 1796; discharged, November 1818, after 22 years’ service.

x79 Military General Service 1793-1814, four clasps, Corunna, Vittoria, Pyrenees, Orthes (Jas. Gorten, 6th Foot.), pawn broker’s mark to edge at 10 o’clock, nearly very fine £600-800
PROVENANCE:

Glendining, May 1902 Elson Collection, September 1963.

Glendining, November 1927 Glendining, March 1985

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80 80 A Superb M.G.S. to Major J. Boyd, 82nd Foot, Who Was Severely Wounded in the Pyrenees, 30.7.1813. His Clasp Combination is Believed To Be Unique To The British Army Military General Service 1793-1814, six clasps, Roleia, Vimiera, Corunna, Barrosa, Vittoria, Pyrenees (John Boyd, Lieut. 82nd. Foot.), minor edge nick, extremely fine £6,000-8,000
Major John Boyd served with the 1st Battalion, 82nd Foot during the Peninsula Campaign; only the flank company’s fought at the battle of Barrosa (4.3.1811), in which they suffered almost 50% casualties (99 men killed, wounded or missing); the Regiment suffered 31 casualties at Vittoria and 173 casualties in their actions in the Pyrenees; Boyd was severely wounded in action in the Pyrenees, 30.7.1813, and received a Temporary Pension of £70 per annum commencing the following year; Captain December 1813; Major 91st Foot, January 1837.
PROVENANCE:

Glendining, March 1927 Glendining, October 1952

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July 25, 2013 - London

82

85

x81 Alexander Davison’s Medal for the Nile 1798, 47mm, bronze, edge bruising, nearly very fine, with contemporary ring suspension £80-120 82 Honourable East India Company’s Medal for Seringapatam 1799, 48mm, silver, Soho Mint, with contemporary silver ‘Seringapatam’ Bar, extremely fine, with contemporary loop and detachable ring suspension and top silver florate riband bar £1,400-1,600 83 Honourable East India Company’s Medal for Seringapatam 1799, 48mm, bronze-gilt, Soho Mint, gilding rubbed in parts, edge bruising, nearly very fine, pierced with later ring suspension £150-200

84 Honourable East India Company’s Medal for Seringapatam 1799, 48mm, bronze, Soho Mint, minor dig to reverse, otherwise good very fine £180-220 85 Army of India 1799-1826, short hyphen reverse die type, one clasp, Ava (Lieut. A.J. Pictet, 1st. Foot), officially impressed, Royal Mint, edge bruise, nearly extremely fine £1,300-1,600
Lieutenant Armand Jaques Pictet, Commissioned Ensign, February 1815; promoted Lieutenant, April 1820; served during the First Burma War with the Royal Scots, and present at the taking of Donabew; placed on half-pay, February 1828; later appointed Consul at Geneva; retired c.1860.

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86 Honourable East India Company’s Medal for Egypt 1801, 48mm, silver, a fine quality later striking with die cracks to obverse, nearly extremely fine, with contemporary pillar suspension £400-450
PROVENANCE:

Spink, April 2009

86

87 Matthew Boulton’s Medal for Trafalgar 1805, 48mm, white metal, good very fine, with contemporary silver loop suspension £300-350

87

88 Honourable East India Company’s Medal for Java 1811, 50mm, gold, a later striking with die crack to obverse, extremely fine, with contemporary gold loop suspension £2,000-3,000

88 WWW.SPinK.Com

July 25, 2013 - London

89

91

89 Honourable East India Company’s Medal for Nepaul 181416, 51mm, silver, a slightly later striking, nearly extremely fine, with contemporary silver loop suspension £450-500
PROVENANCE:

Spink, April 2009

90 Waterloo 1815 (Corporal George Wilson 18th. Hussars.), contemporarily renamed in large serif capitals, good very fine, with steel clip and straight steel bar suspender £300-400
Corporal George Wilson served with the 18th Hussars in Captain George Luard’s Troop during the Waterloo Campaign, 1618.6.1815.

x91 Waterloo 1815 (Thomas Barlow 2nd Batt. Coldstream Gds.), minor edge bruising, good very fine, with steel clip and split ring suspension £1,400-1,800
Private Thomas Barlow, enlisted in the Coldstream Guards, March 1807; served in Lieutenant-Colonel Sir William Gomm’s Company during the Waterloo Campaign, 16-18.6.1815; discharged, January 1824, after 18 years and 297 days with the Colours.

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94

97

x92 Waterloo 1815 (Serj. William Hill. 2nd Batt. 30th Reg. Foot.), worn, good fine, with original steel clip and split ring suspension £600-700
Sergeant William Hill served in Captain James Skerrow’s Company, 2nd Battalion, 30th Foot during the Waterloo Campaign, 16-18.6.1815.

95 St. Jean d’Acre 1840 (2), silver, pierced for ring suspension as issued, worn, good fine; gilded-bronze, pierced for ring suspension as issued, very fine (2) £100-150 x96 St. Jean d’Acre 1840, silvered-bronze, pierced for ring suspension as issued, good very fine, with contemporary silver ring and straight bar suspension £60-80 97 Ghuznee 1839, a fine quality ‘Officer’s Indulgence’ privately made hollow cast medal, 37mm, gold, obverse impressed ‘Ghuznee 23rd. July 1839’ within wreath, reverse impressed ‘Affghanistan’, unnamed, extremely fine, with contemporary gold double loop swivel suspension and gold riband buckle £600-800
PROVENANCE:

x93 Waterloo 1815, naming lightly erased, nearly very fine, with later ring suspension £250-300 94 Honourable East India Company’s Medal for Burma 1824-26, 38mm, silver, good very fine, with original steel clip and split ring suspension £500-600

Dr. Arthur B. King Collection, 2003

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July 25, 2013 - London

98

99

100

98 Defence of Jellalabad 1842, 1st ‘Mural Crown’ type, edge engraved in serif upper and lower case letters ‘Pte. W. Wall. XIII P.A.L.I.’, very fine, with contemporary replacement steel clip and straight bar suspension £550-650 99 Kelat-i-Ghilzie 1842, unnamed as issued, very fine, with original steel clip and straight bar suspension £800-1,200

x100 Maharajpoor Star 1843 (Segt. Michael White H.M. 39th Regt.), very fine, original brass riveted hook replaced with later suspension bar £380-420
320 Sergeant Michael White, born Templenoe, Kerry, Ireland; enlisted 39th Foot, 1824; discharged 1845, after 21 years and 207 days service with the Colours.

101 Maharajpoor Star 1843, an unnamed specimen, extremely fine, with original brass riveted hook and ring suspension Jummoo and Kashmir 1895, bronze, one clasp, Chitral 1895, the reverse of the clasp impressed ‘Gurney, London’ and additionally engraved ‘Specimen’, nearly extremely fine (2) £200-300

75

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102

103

104

x102 Punniar Star 1843 (Private Michael Pratt 50th Queen’s Own Regt.), nearly very fine, original brass riveted hook replaced with later straight bar suspension £380-420 x103 Sutlej 1845-46, for Moodkee, one clasp, Ferozeshuhur (James McDonnell 9th Regt.), toned, minor edge bruising, good very fine £500-600
1893 Private James McDonnell (published transcription of casualty roll gives ‘McDonnel’), 9th Foot, was wounded at Ferozeshuhur, 21.12.1845; he was invalided to England.

104 Sutlej 1845-46, for Ferozeshuhur, no clasp (Capt. W.B. Thompson. Dep. Asst. Comy. Genl.), officially engraved in large serif capitals, nearly extremely fine £450-550
Major-General William Beveridge Thomson, C.B., born Edinburgh, May 1809; Commissioned Ensign, Bengal Army, June 1826; posted to the 67th Native Infantry, May 1827; promoted Lieutenant, April 1828; appointed Quartermaster, 67th N.I., October 1828; promoted Captain, August 1837; appointed Deputy Assistant Commissary General, November 1842, and served during the First Sikh War at the Battle of Ferozeshuhur, 21-22.12.1845; appointed Assistant Commissary General, September 1847; Deputy Commissary General, May 1853; transferred to the newly-raised 3rd Bengal European Regiment, November 1853; promoted Major, September 1854; served during the Indian Mutiny, and present at the siege and capture of Delhi (C.B. (London Gazette 18.6.1858), Medal and clasp, Brevet Colonel); promoted Lieutenant-Colonel, July 1858; appointed Commissary General, November 1858; transferred to the 57th Native infantry, September 1859; retired with the rank of Major-General, December 1861. Major-General Thomson died at home at St. Peter’s Square, Hammersmith, January 1863.

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July 25, 2013 - London

105

106

107

105 Sutlej 1845-46, for Ferozeshuhur, one clasp, Sobraon (John Bulger 29th. Regt.), toned, extremely fine, with contemporary top silver riband buckle £350-400 x106 Punjab 1848-49, two clasps, Goojerat, Mooltan, clasps in this order (Sowar Asdoollah Khan (2nd) 11th Irregular Cavalry), engraved in running script, light contact marks, therefore nearly very fine £300-350 107 Punjab 1848-49, two clasps, Chilianwala, Goojerat (G. Harst, 3rd. Lt. Dragns.), pawn broker’s mark to edge, minor edge nicks, therefore very fine £450-500

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108

109

110

x108 South Africa 1834-53 (Bugler W. Letter. 90th Regt.), contact marks, therefore nearly very fine £340-380
1051 Bugler William Letter, born Manchester; enlisted 90th Foot, April 1833; he served with the regiment ‘during the Kaffir War of 1847-48, at the Cape of Good Hope, and four months in the Crimea’ (service papers refer); discharged August 1855; admitted as ‘In Pensioner’ Chelsea Hospital, July 1881; died May 1887.

x109 South Africa 1834-53 (James Broderick, 2nd Regt.), toned, nearly extremely fine £340-380
3566 Private James Broderick, born Cork, Ireland; served with the 2nd Foot in South Africa during the Third Kaffir War, 1850-53; admitted as ‘In Pensioner’ Chelsea Hospital, April 1880; died January 1881.

110 South Africa 1834-53 (David Anderson, 72nd. Regt.), contact marks, very fine £380-420

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July 25, 2013 - London

115

116

117

111 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Persia (Corpl. E. Chetwin, 78th Highlanders), contact marks, nearly very fine £280-320
2977 Sergeant Edwin Chetwin, born Nottingham, 1818; enlisted in the 17th (Leicestershire) Foot, March 1840; promoted Corporal, December 1844; transferred to the 78th Highlanders, February 1847; served with the Regiment in Persia and during the Indian Mutiny (Medal and clasps Defence of Lucknow and Lucknow); promoted Sergeant, July 1857; discharged, April 1861, after 21 years and 9 days with the Colours, of which 19 years were spent in India.

x115 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, ChinLushai 1889-90 (823 Pte. H. Bulmer 1st Bn. K.O. Sco. Bord), toned, suspension slack, good very fine £180-220 116 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Burma 1889-92 (Lieut. L.A. Forbes 39th. Bl. Infy.), very fine £300-350
Captain Lindsay Anstruther Forbes, born October 1865; Commissioned Lieutenant, Highland Light Infantry, November 1886; seconded for service to the Indian Staff Corps, May 1888; served during the Burmese Expedition with the Tlang-tlang Column, and severely wounded; promoted Captain, November 1897

x112 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Bhootan (Sepoy Hur Singh Booklee 3rd. Goorkha Regt.), suspension claw tightened, very fine £100-140 x113 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Jowaki 1877-8 (874 Pte. Geo. Jackland. 2/9th Foot.), nearly very fine £140-160 x114 India General Service 1854-95, bronze issue, one clasp, Burma 1887-89 (Syce Tuckia 4th Cavy. Hybd. Contgt.), good very fine £80-120 79

x117 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Hazara 1891 (1958 Pte. W. McKinnon 2d Bn. Sea Highrs.), minor edge bruising, good very fine £160-200 x118 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Hazara 1891 (1732 Sowar Mahan Singh 11th. Bl. Lcrs.), suspension slightly loose, nearly very fine £100-140

oRdeRS, deCoRAtionS, CAmPAign medALS And miLitARiA

121

124

126

x119 India General Service 1854-95, two clasps, Burma 1885-7, Burma 1887-89, 2nd clasp loose on riband as issue (4418 Sergt. P. Carter 1st Bn. Rif. Brig.), suspension claw loose, very fine £100-140 120 India General Service 1854-95, two clasps, Hazara 1888, Hazara 1891 (2206 Pte. D. Graham 2nd. Bn. Sea. Highrs.), number and initial officially corrected, nearly extremely fine £100-140 x121 Baltic 1854 (C. Gillett. Serjt. H.M.S. Odin.), contemporarily engraved in upright serif capitals, very fine £120-160 x122 Baltic 1854, unnamed as issued, nearly extremely fine £100-140 123 Baltic 1854, unnamed as issued, part of suspension claw missing, good very fine £70-90

x124 Crimea 1854-56, one clasp, Sebastopol (Chas. King, Chief Engineer, R.N. H.M.S. Lynx.), contemporarily engraved in upright serif capitals, nearly extremely fine £180-220 x125 Crimea 1854-56, one clasp, Sebastopol (J. Stokes. Trmptr. Rl. Horse Arty.), officially impressed, contact marks, therefore nearly very fine £140-180 x126 Crimea 1854-56, one clasp, Sebastopol (G. Priestley. 11th Dragns.), officially impressed, edge bruising, otherwise good very fine £180-220 127 Crimea 1854-56, one clasp, Sebastopol (2219 Charles Cheyne 71st. Hd. Lt. Infy.), privately engraved in large serif capitals, suspension re-affixed, traces of brooch mounting, edge bruising, otherwise nearly very fine £60-80 128 Crimea 1854-56, one clasp, Sebastopol (3265. John. Dawson. 72. Highlanders.), Regimentally impressed, light contact marks, very fine £140-180

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July 25, 2013 - London

133

134

x129 Crimea 1854-56, one clasp, Sebastopol (No. 2941 David McLaren. 72d. Highlanders), contemporarily engraved in sloping upper and lower case script, top right-hand lug missing, contact marks, therefore nearly very fine £100-140 x130 Crimea 1854-56, one clasp, Sebastopol (3964. Alexander. Hutton. 79. Cameron Highlanders), contemporarily engraved in upright serif capitals, top lugs removed, contact marks, therefore nearly very fine £100-140 131 Crimea 1854-56, one clasp, Sebastopol (1st. Class Dvr. S. Harrold. L.T.C.), engraved in large serif capitals, good very fine £80-120

132 Crimea 1854-56, one clasp, Sebastopol, unnamed as issued, heavy contact marks, good fine Turkish Crimea, Sardinian die (3977. W. Hudson 1st. B. Fusiliers.), named in a variety of styles, pierced as issued and fitted with a Mutiny-style suspension, good fine (2) £70-90 x133 Crimea 1854-56, two clasps, Alma, Inkermann (Asst. Surgeon John Norris, 55th Foot.), contemporarily engraved in Hunt & Roskill style, extremely fine £400-450
Assistant Surgeon John James Norris, appointed Assistant Surgeon, 55th (Westmoreland) Foot, 28.3.1854; died before Sebastopol, 22.11.1854.

x134 Crimea 1854-56, three clasps, Alma, Inkermann, Sebastopol (R. Wolladge [sic]. 7th Regt.), officially impressed, light contact marks, very fine £350-450
Private Robert Walladge, served with the 7th (Royal Fusiliers) Foot during the Crimean War and wounded at the Battle of the Alma, 20.9.1854 (London Gazette 17.10.1854).

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135 x135 Crimea 1854-56, three clasps, Alma, Inkermann, Sebastopol, last clasp loose on riband as issued later (Major Thos. N Dalton 49th. Foot), contemporarily engraved in ‘Hunt and Roskell’ style, extremely fine £1,400-1,800
Major Thomas Norcliffe Dalton, Commissioned Ensign, 61st (South Gloucestershire) Regiment of Foot, June 1837; promoted Lieutenant, December 1840; Captain, April 1846; served with the Regiment during the Second Sikh War 184849, and was present at the passage of the Chenab, and in the Battles of Sadoolapore, Chilianwala, 13.1.1849, and Goojerat, 21.2.1849 (Medal with two clasps); later served with the Field Force in pursuit of the enemy to the Khyber Pass, March 1849; promoted Major, February 1851; transferred to the 49th (Princess Charlotte of Wales’s) Regiment of Foot, 1853, and served with the Regiment in the Crimea; Mentioned in Lord Raglan’s Despatch (London Gazette 10.10.1854); killed in action at the Battle of Inkermann, 5.11.1854- whilst leading his men in an assault he was struck by a musket ball in the head, and died on the battlefield. Had he survived, Major Dalton would have been recommended for the honour of the Third Class of the Order of the Bath (London Gazette 31.7.1855).

136 x137 Crimea 1854-56, three clasps, Alma, Inkermann, Sebastopol (Jas. Sadlier [sic] 55th. R..), contemporarily engraved in upright serif capitals, unofficial rivets between 2nd and 3rd clasps, contact marks, good fine £200-240
2175 Private James Sadler, born Arundel, Sussex; enlisted 55th Foot, 1845; (entitled to Turkish Crimea and L.S.& G.C.); discharged 1866, after 21 years and 59 days with the Colours.

x138 A ‘Heavy Brigade’ Crimea Medal to Sergeant D. Clay, 5th Dragoon Guards Crimea 1854-56, three clasps, Balaklava, Inkermann, Sebastopol (David Clay 5th Dragoon Guar...), engraved in upright serif capitals, unofficial rivets, severe edge bruising, therefore good fine £400-500
80 Sergeant David Clay, born Cork, Ireland; enlisted in the 5th Dragoon Guards, 1841; promoted Corporal, 1856; transferred to the 5th Lancers, 1858, promoted Sergeant, 1858; discharged 1865, after 24 years and 136 days with the Colours: ‘he has the Crimean Medal with clasps for Balaklava, Inkermann, & Sebastopol, the Turkish Crimean Medal, and a Medal for Good Conduct and Long Service with a gratuity of ten pounds’ (Service Papers refer)

x136 Crimea 1854-56, three clasps, Alma, Inkermann, Sebastopol (G. Hindle. 50th Regt.), officially impressed, nearly extremely fine £350-450
Listed on Medal Roll as ‘Died 18.1.1855.’

139 Crimea 1854-56, four clasps, Alma, Balaklava, Inkermann, Sebastopol, rivets between first, second, and third clasps popped (4154 J. Walpole. Coldm. Guards.), Regimentally impressed, suspension post replaced, contact marks, good fine £180-220 WWW.SPinK.Com

July 25, 2013 - London

141 x140 Turkish Crimea (3), British die, unnamed as issued, with contemporary foliate suspension; Sardinian die (2), unnamed as issued, one pierced for ring suspension as issued the other with contemporary silver scroll bar suspension, generally nearly very fine or better (3) £100-140 x141 Turkish Crimea, Sardinian die, attributed to Commander W.C. Geary, Royal Navy, the reverse side finely enamelled, brooch mounted on obverse, with ring suspension, overall nearly extremely fine, scarce, in Spink, London, case, with name plaque inscribed ‘Captain W.C. Geary R.N.’ £150-200
Commander William Charles Geary, second son of Commander John Geary, R.N.; entered the Royal Navy, June 1839, and served as Mate aboard H.M.S. Howe in the Mediterranean; Commissioned Lieutenant, January 1846, and served in the survey-vessel Volage; served in the Crimea as ‘Agent for Transports’, 1854-55, at the Port of Balaklava; advanced Commander; after 1856 served in the Coast Guard. In Victorian days it was customary to refer to Commanders socially as Captain, a habit which persisted until the Edwardian age.
PROVENANCE:

142

143 142 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Delhi (Robt. Ashley, 1st. Eurn. Bengal Fusrs.), good very fine £280-320 143 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (W. Hyrons, 38th. Regt.), contact marks, nearly very fine £240-280
4378 Private William Hyrons, born Nuneaton, Warwickshire, 1827; enlisted in the 38th (1st Staffordshire) Regiment of Foot, March 1855; served with the Regiment in the Crimea (Medal and clasp for Sebastopol and Turkish Medal), and in India for 14 years; discharged, September 1874, after 19 years and 56 days with the Colours.

Presented by the recipient to his daughter Margaret, who converted it into an enamelled brooch in 1882.

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144

145

146

144 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Central India (Hugh Laird, 72nd. Highlanders), suspension claw slightly loose, nearly extremely fine £280-320
3847 Private Hugh Laird, born Ayrshire, 1838; enlisted in the 72nd Highlanders, March 1856; discharged, April 1866, after 10 years and 13 days with the Colours, of which 8 years were spent in India.

x146 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, two clasps, Delhi, Lucknow (Cr. Serjt. Chas. A. Grant, 1st Eurn. Bengal Fusrs.), minor edge bruising, otherwise good very fine £400-450 147 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, two clasps, Defence of Lucknow, Lucknow (Drumr. J. Milano, 78th. Highlanders), contact marks, very fine £400-500
Drummer J. Milano does not appear on the latest published transcript of the Indian Mutiny Medal Roll. However, the medal is correctly named and appears entirely as issued.

145 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Central India (Actg. S & P Sergt. I. Neild,), letter ‘N’ officially corrected, suspension slack, very fine, Scarce £280-320

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July 25, 2013 - London

147

148

150

x148 China 1857-60, two clasps, Fatshan 1857, Canton 1857 (L.J.H.A. Crawford, L.S. H.M.S. Highflyer.), contemporarily engraved in upright serif capitals, minor edge nicks, otherwise good very fine £250-300
Luke John H.A. Crawford (erroneously listed as L.F. Crawford on published transcription of medal roll), born Feakle, Clare, Ireland, 1831; joined the Royal Navy, 1845; service included as Leading Seaman in H.M.S. Highflyer, July 1856-July 1859; wounded in action at Peiho Forts, 25.6.1859; invalided July 1859; returned to service in 1860; served in H.M.S. Cockatrice, from March 1861; later service included in H.M.S. Falcon, 1863-1867; returned to the Highflyer as Quarter Master, 1868; discharged 1870.

x150 Canada General Service 1866-70, one clasp, Fenian Raid 1866 (Lt. C.A. Jones, Greenwood I. Co.), nearly extremely fine £400-500 x151 Abyssinia 1867-68 (1502 W. Norton. 26th Regt.), suspension re-affixed, very fine £180-220 x152 Abyssinia 1867-68 (767. A. Thomson. 26th. Regt.), good very fine £240-280

x149 New Zealand 1844-66, reverse dated 1863-1866 (3107 Sergt. Wm. Brisk, 43rd Lt. Inftry.), contact marks, nearly very fine £300-340
3107 Sergeant William Brisk, born Guildford, Surrey; enlisted 43rd Light Infantry, 1853; advanced Sergeant 1860; discharged 1874, after 21 years and 22 days with the Colours; employed as Sergeant Instructor, 1st Berkshire Rifle Volunteer Corps, at Reading, 1874-1888; admitted as ‘In Pensioner’ Chelsea Hospital, 1888.

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153

154

155

x153 Ashantee 1873-74, no clasp (A.J. Barnes, Stoker. H.M.S. Bittern. 73-74.), toned, nearly extremely fine £180-220
Alfred Joseph Barnes, born Worcester, 1852; joined the Royal Navy as Stoker 2nd Class, 1870; served in H.M.S. Bittern, January 1873-March 1875.

x156 The South African Campaign Medal to Private H. Perkins, 2nd Battalion, 24th Foot, Killed in Action at the Battle of Isandhlwana, 22.1.1879 South Africa 1877-79, one clasp, 1877-8-9 (1134 Pte. H. Perkins. 2/24th Foot.), toned, edge bruise, good very fine £4,500-5,500
1134 Private Hugh Perkins enlisted in the 24th (2nd Warwickshire) Regiment of Foot, February 1877; served with the 2nd Battalion in the South African Campaign, 1877-79; killed in action at the Battle of Isandhlwana, 22.1.1879.

x154 Ashantee 1873-74, no clasp (59. Pte. E. Sullivan, 2 Bn. 23. R.W. Fus: 1873-4.), toned, good very fine, with contemporary silver top-riband buckle £180-220 x155 South Africa 1877-79, no clasp (J. Halloran. Sailmks. Mate. H.M.S. “Shah.”), extremely fine £240-280
John Halloran, born Whitegate, Cork, Ireland, 1834; joined the Royal Navy as Able Seaman, 1861; service included in H.M.S. Shah, April 1877-October 1879; ‘Shore Pensioned’ January 1881.

x157 South Africa 1877-79, one clasp, 1879 (4310. Driv: G. Ringwood, 6th Bde. R.A.), edge bruising, therefore nearly very fine £320-360 158 Afghanistan 1878-80, no clasp (1050 Pte. Fnk. Kennedy. 63rd. Regt.), nearly very fine £80-120 x159 Afghanistan 1878-80, no clasp (1286 Pte. J. Rutherford. 72nd Highrs.), light contact mark, otherwise very fine £80-120

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July 25, 2013 - London

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160

161

x160 Afghanistan 1878-80, one clasp, Ali Musjid (27B/524. Pte. T.J. Hunt. 1/17th Regt.), toned, pawn broker’s mark to edge at 11 o’clock, good very fine £200-240 161 Afghanistan 1878-80, one clasp, Ali Musjid (Hospl. Asst. Nooroo Deen 20th. Regt. N.I.), edge bruise, very fine £180-220 x162 Afghanistan 1878-80, two clasps, Charasia, Kabul (58.B/695 Pte. R. Kinnaird. 72nd Highrs.), suspension claw re-pinned, very fine £200-240
58.B/695 Private Robert Kinnaird (latest published transcription of casualty roll erroneously gives as ‘Kennard’), 72nd Highlanders, was severely wounded at Kabul, 14.12.1879. Having received a gun shot wound to the left knee, he was ‘Discharged to England’.

x165 Egypt 1882-89, dated, no clasp (2406. Pte. C. Shadwell. 1/R.W.Kent. R.), virtually Mint £90-110 x166 Egypt 1882-89, dated, no clasp (1239. Corpl. T. Howard. 2/Manch: R.), light contact marks, therefore very fine £80-100 x167 Egypt 1882-89, dated, two clasps, The Nile 1884-85, Kirbekan (2218, Drumr. D. Tyrrell. 1/S. Staff: R.), solder repair to left-hand side of 1st clasp facing, very fine £160-200 x168 Egypt 1882-89, dated, three clasps, Tel-El-Kebir, Suakin 1884, El-Teb_Tamaai (1803. Pte. J. Bailey. 1/Gord: Highrs:), minor edge bruising, otherwise good very fine £280-320 x169 Khedive’s Star 1882 (2), unnamed as issued, very fine Khedive’s Star 1884-6, unnamed as issued, pawn broker’s marks to reverse, very fine (3) £80-120 170 Khedive’s Star 1882, unnamed as issued, good very fine Khedive’s Sudan 1896-1908, bronze issue, no clasp (Bombay Lancer), nearly very fine £100-140 87

163 Kabul to Kandahar Star 1880 (1569 Private A.W.R. Bruce 92nd. Highlanders.), very fine £200-240 x164 Kabul to Kandahar Star 1880 (56/153 Private H. McChrystal 92nd Highlanders), pawn broker’s marks to reverse, very fine £200-240

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x171 East and West Africa 1887-1900, one clasp, Benin 1897 (P. Liddle, Sto. 2 Cl. H.M.S. St. George.), toned, nearly extremely fine £180-220 x172 East and West Africa 1887-1900, one clasp, 1897-98 (1787 Pte. Grunshi Temiyah, G.C. Constby:), pitting to obverse, therefore nearly very fine £160-200 x173 British South Africa Company’s Medal 1890-97, for Rhodesia 1896, no clasp (Troopr. J.C. Blair. M.R.F.), remnants of lacquer, edge bruising, therefore nearly very fine £200-240 174 Hunza Nagar Badge 1891, the reverse impressed ‘Gurney & Son, Woodstock Street, London’, with original reverse lugs and split pin, very fine, scarce £380-420 x175 Central Africa 1891-98, unnamed as issued, ring suspension, nearly very fine £160-200 176 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., one clasp, Relief of Chitral 1895 (3737 Pte. H. Fern. 2nd. Bn. Seaforth Highlrs.), light contact marks, very fine £100-140

177 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., bronze issue, one clasp, Relief of Chitral 1895 (1112 Bhishty Jiwan Jeypore I.S.T. Corps), very fine £100-140 x178 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., bronze issue, one clasp, Relief of Chitral 1895 (567 Dooly Bearer Orray Kattayya Comst Transpt Dept. Madrs.), nearly extremely fine £80-120 179 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., one clasp, Punjab Frontier 1897-98 (4921 Sepoy Kirpa Singh 1st. Sikh Infy.), heavy contact marks, good fine Tibet 1903-04, bronze issue, no clasp (28 Dvr. Mat Wali S.& T. Corps), suspension re-affixed, worn, therefore fine India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., one clasp, North West Frontier 1930-31 (12229. Sep. Mohd. Azam, 1-10 Baluch R.), edge bruising, good very fine India General Service 1936-39, one clasp, North West Frontier 1936-37 (12406 Sep. Kartar Singh, 5-1 Punjab R.), suspension claw tightened, contact marks, nearly very fine (4) £120-140 x180 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., bronze issue, one clasp, Punjab Frontier 1897-98 (Grass Cutter Buga 13th Bl. Lcrs), slight abrasion to unit, very fine £70-90

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July 25, 2013 - London

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187

188

x181 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., bronze issue, one clasp, Punjab Frontier 1897-98 (44 Multr. Kassim C.T. Dept.), good very fine £70-90 x182 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., two clasps, Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Samana 1897 (4279 Lce. Corpl. J. Hawney 2d. Bn. Ryl. Ir: Regt.), toned, minor edge bruising, otherwise good very fine £140-160 x183 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., three clasps, Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Malakand 1897, Tirah 1897-98 (4299 Sepoy Gurbachan Singh. 22d. Pjb. Inf.), good very fine £80-120 x184 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., three clasps, Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Samana 1897, Tirah 189798 (2570 Rifleman Patab Thapa 1st. Bn. 2d. Goorkhas), unofficial rivets between clasps, very fine £80-120 x185 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., four clasps, Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Samana 1897, Tirah 189798, Waziristan 1901-2 (1199 Sepoy Hakum Singh 36 Sikhs), additional retaining rod between third and fourth clasps, nearly very fine £80-120 89

x186 Ashanti Star 1896, unnamed as issued, extremely fine £140-180 x187 Queen’s Sudan 1896-98 (3985 Pte. G. Clifford 1/R. War: R.), good very fine £180-220
3985 Private George Clifford, born Leamington, Warwickshire; enlisted Royal Warwickshire Regiment, 1893; discharged 28.6.1905, after twelve years with the Colours (entitled to Khedive’s Sudan with The Atbara and Khartoum clasps).

x188 Khedive’s Sudan 1896-1908, no clasp (2774 Naick Lal Baz 26th Bl. Infy), engraved in running script, extremely fine £80-100 189 Khedive’s Sudan 1896-1908, no clasp, unnamed as issued, extremely fine £80-120 190 Khedive’s Sudan 1896-1908, one clasp, Khartoum (4766. Pte. J. Ball. 2nd. L.F.), engraved in large sans-serif capitals, nearly extremely fine £120-160 191 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, no clasp (24248 Spr: P. Hutchings. R.E.), good very fine £40-60

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193

194

192 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, one clasp, Defence of Ladysmith (282698. Sto. H.W.G. Gardner. H.M.S. Powerful.), engraved naming, minor edge bruise, very fine £400-450
282698 Stoker Harry William George Gardner, born Rotherhithe, Surrey, 1877; joined Royal Navy as Stoker 2nd Class, 1896; served in H.M.S. Powerful, 8.6.1897-1.3.1900, on the latter date he died of Enteric Fever, at Ladysmith.

196 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal (2001 Pte. W. Brown, Norfolk Regt.), minor edge bruise, very fine £70-90 x197 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Laing’s Nek, Belfast (3315 Pte. C.W. Hempson, 1: Leic: Regt.), partially officially corrected, good very fine £50-70 x198 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Diamond Hill, Wittebergen (5470 Pte. W. Karley, 1: R: Sussex Regt.), minor edge bruising, very fine £60-80 x199 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Belmont, Orange Free State, Transvaal (5716 Pte. D. Murphy, Munster Fus:), edge bruise, good very fine £80-120
5716 Private Denis Murphy, born Cork, Ireland; enlisted Royal Munster Fusiliers, 1897; served with the Regiment in South Africa, August 1899-September 1902 (entitled to K.S.A.); discharged 16.11.1909, after 12 years with the Colours.

x193 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, one clasp, Defence of Ladysmith (10527 Pte. E. Birch, R.A.M.C.), good very fine £140-180 194 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two clasps, Cape Colony, Driefontein (2066. Tpr. F.J. Hunt. 2nd. L. Gds:), extremely fine £100-140 x195 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Tugela Heights, Relief of Ladysmith (3052 Pte. A. Healing, 2: E. Surrey Regt.), good very fine £80-100
3052 Private A. Healing, 2nd Battalion East Surrey Regiment, died of disease at Chieveley, 6.5.1900.

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July 25, 2013 - London x200 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg, Transvaal (4686 Pte. G. Kelly, W. Riding Regt.), remnants of lacquer, light contact marks, very fine £70-90 x201 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Transvaal, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 (35414 Cpl. A. Mc.Coll. Scot: Horse.), traces of lacquer, good very fine £70-90 202 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, four clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1901 (77207 Dvr. R. Winterbottom R.H.A.), nearly extremely fine £60-80 x203 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, four clasps, Modder River, Transvaal, Wittebergen, South Africa 1901 (6687 Pte. J. Fox, 1/High: L.I.), good very fine £120-160
6687 Private J. Fox, 1st Battalion Highland Light Infantry was wounded at Witpoort 14.8.1900, ‘after the surrender of Prinsloo the Highland Brigade operated under Sir A. Hunter in the Bethlehem-Heilbron district. On 15th [sic] August General Hunter had a stiff action at Witpoort, near Heilbron, where the Highland Light Infantry had most of the work. They lost approximately 3 men killed, Colonel Kelham and 40 men wounded.’ (British Regiments in South Africa 18991902, J. Stirling refers).

212

204 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, four clasps, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 (9500 Sapr. A. Reynolds. Tel: Bn: R.E.), light pitting, nearly very fine £70-90 205 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, five clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 (28551 Cpl: W. Taylor. 39th. Bty: R.F.A.), edge nick, very fine £70-90 x206 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, five clasps, Tugela Heights, Orange Free State, Relief of Ladysmith, Transvaal, Laing’s Nek (1868 Pte. L. Bending, Devon: Regt.), cleaned, very fine £80-100 207 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, five clasps, Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg, Driefontein, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill (22477 Dr. W. Hibbert, G Bty., R.H.A.), minor edge bruise, nearly very fine £80-100

208 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, five clasps, Transvaal, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902, unofficial rivets between first and second clasps (7177 Pte. T. Whitehead. Vol: Coy. Manch: Regt.), minor edge bruising, good very fine £60-80 209 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, seven clasps, first clasp face missing, Tugela Heights, Orange Free State, Relief of Ladysmith, Transvaal, Laing’s Nek, South Africa 1901 (25538. Sapr. J.A. Chambers. R.E.), good very fine £60-80 x210 Queen’s Mediterranean 1899-1902 (5086 Pte. S. Dobson, W. York: Regt.), suspension slack, minor edge bruising, therefore very fine £200-240 x211 China 1900, no clasp (337 Sepoy Hira Singh 1st. Sikh Infy.), contat marks, obverse slightly worn, nearly very fine £60-80 x212 China 1900, one clasp, Relief of Pekin (W. Moore, A.B., H.M.S. Centurion.), very fine £320-360
Medal presented to the recipient by H.M. The King, 8.3.1902.

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218

x213 Africa General Service 1902-56, E.VII.R., one clasp, Somaliland 1902-04 (3918 Sepoy Lachman Singh. 27/Punjabis), nearly very fine £70-90 x214 Tibet 1903-04, no clasp (2689 Rifln: Kulbir Thapa 8th Gurkha Rifles), very fine £180-220 215 Tibet 1903-04, one clasp, Gyantse (2660 Rifln. Badalsing Rana 8th. Gurkha Rifles), nearly very fine £300-350 x216 Tibet 1903-04, one clasp, Gyantse (2905 Sepoy Husain Shah 40th Pathans.), toned, good very fine £300-350 217 India General Service 1908-35 (2), E.VII.R., one clasp, North West Frontier 1908 (9698 Pte. J. Browning 1st. Bn. Sea Highrs.); G.V.R., one clasp, North West Frontier 1930-31 (2816775 Pte. G. Mitchell Seaforth), light scratch marks to second, otherwise nearly extremely fine (2) £80-120

218 India General Service 1908-35, E.VII.R., one clasp, North West Frontier 1908 (8002 Pte. M. Braddish 1st. Rl. M. Fusiliers.), minor edge bruise, good very fine £80-100 x219 India General Service 1908-35 (2), E.VII.R., one clasp, North West Frontier 1908 (222 Sepoy Dalip Singh 22nd Punjabis.); G.V.R., one clasp, Afghanistan N.W.F. 1919 (214979 Dvr. J.W. Shaw. R.A.), generally good very fine (2) £50-70 x220 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R. (2), one clasp, Afghanistan N.W.F. 1919 (7044 Sepoy Kehar Singh, 14 Sikhs.); three clasps, Afghanistan N.W.F. 1919, Waziristan 1919-21, Waziristan 1921-24 (657 Rfmn. Partiman Rai, 3/11/Gurkha Rfls.), very fine India General Service 1936-39, one clasp (2), North West Frontier 1936-37 (9973 P-L. Kulbahadur Rana, 2-6 G.R.); North West Frontier 1937-39 (10999 Sep. Ahmad Ali, 5-1 Punjab R.), very fine (4) £90-110 221 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., one clasp, Waziristan 1919-21 (SS-111 S-Sgt. E.A. Montgomery. S&T.C.), extremely fine General Service 1918-62, E.II.R., one clasp, Malaya (22828641 Gnr. W.J. Hills. R.A.), good very fine (2) £50-70

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July 25, 2013 - London x223 1914 Star (8526 Pte. F. Collins. 2/Oxf. & Bucks: L.I.), nearly very fine British War Medal (25815 Rflm. E. Cosgrave. N.Z.E.F.), very fine Mercantile Marine War Medal (Frank P. Jelfs), very fine Victory Medal (5) (50632 A. Cpl. A. Galloway. R.A.; 162574 Gnr. A.C. Hawkins. R.A.; 13542 Sjt. J. Martin. R. Scots.; 3917 Pte. W.R. Watson. R. Highrs.; 5845 Pte. A. Lawrie. Gordons.), generally good very fine British Red Cross Society War Medal (4), unnamed as issued, good very fine, all with integral top riband bar Defence Medal (2), good very fine War Medal (3) (NX66652 B.H. Johnston); unnamed (2), very fine Canadian Volunteer Service Medal (2), one with Maple Leaf Bar, good very fine New Zealand War Service Medal, extremely fine Africa Service Medal (M12172 J.K. Dyason), edge bruise, good very fine South African Medal for War Services, nearly extremely fine India Service Medal (31050 Gnr. Keso Ram, R.I.A.), very fine United Nations Medal for Korea, good very fine (24) £140-180
25815 Rifleman Edward Cosgrave served with the 1st Battalion, 3rd New Zealand Rifle Brigade during the Great War; killed in action,19.8.1917, and is buried in Prowse Point Military Cemetery, Belgium. 3917 Private William Robert Watson, born Edinburgh; served with the 6th Battalion Royal Highlanders (Black Watch) during the Great War; died of wounds on the Western Front, 30.7.1916, and is buried in Dernancourt Communal Cemetery, France. NX66652 Sergeant Bruce Hutton Johnston, of Cremorne, New South Wales, served with the 2/30th Battalion, Australian Infantry during the Second World War; taken Prisoner of War; died 8.7.1943, and is buried in Kanchanaburi War Cemetery, Thailand.

222

x222 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., two clasps, Mahsud 1919-20, Waziristan 1919-21 (A-Maj. T.M.O. Chatterson Smith, 3-34 S. Pnrs.), officially renamed, good very fine £300-400
D.S.O. London Gazette 27.9.1920 Catterson-Smith, Thomas Mervyn Osborne, Capt., 1/12th Pioneers, attached 3/34th Sikh Pioneers, Indian Army ‘For gallantry at Pioneer Piquet, on 21st December 1919. Owing to the retirement of the covering party, his working party was suddenly attacked in force and surrounded. By his coolness, sound leadership, and example, he inspired his men and repulsed five assaults. Though twice wounded he remained in control, and did not withdraw his command till all ammunition had been expended.’ Captain Thomas Mervyn Osborne Catterson-Smith, D.S.O., born June 1888; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, 4.9.1908; promoted Lieutenant, 9.12.1910; Captain, 12th Pioneers, Indian Army, 1.9.1915; served with the Regiment in Waziristan, 1919, wounded at Pioneer Picquet, 21.12.1919, and died at Rawalpindi Hospital, 10.2.1920.

224 1914-15 Star (Mid. H.S. King. R.N.), nearly very fine British War Medal (SS-8362 Pte. F.G. Kerby. A.S.C.), minor edge bruise, nearly very fine Victory Medal (46246 Pte. J. Collins. Lan. Fus.), very fine Miniature Awards: British War Medal; Victory Medal, very fine (5) £70-90
Sub-Lieutenant Henry Stuart King, Commissioned Midshipman, Royal Navy, 15.1.1914; promoted SubLieutenant, 15.1.1916; served during the Great War in H.M.S. Indefatigable, and killed in action at the Battle of Jutland, 31.5.1916, when the Indefatigable was sunk with the loss of all but two of its crew of 1,019 men, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.

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230

225 British War Medal, bronze issue (6352 E. Abdilla Maltese L.C.), edge nicks nad light scratches to obverse, good very fine £80-100 226 Territorial Force War Medal (2036. Pte. J. Partington. L.N. Lan. R.), good very fine £200-250 x227 General Service 1918-62 (2), G.V.R., one clasp, Iraq (89944 Pte. J. English. North’d Fus.); E.II.R., one clasp, Cyprus (23426200 Fus. R.J. Fletcher. L.F.), good very fine (2) £80-100 x228 General Service 1918-62 (3), G.V.R., two clasps, Iraq, N.W. Persia (1719 Sewpoy Harnam Singh. 32Pioneers.); G.VI.R., one clasp (2), Palestine (B/W.O.Cl.1. F. Brailsford. T.J.F.F.); Malaya (21018220 Pte. H.G. Lawson. R.A.O.C.), very fine General Service 1962-2007, one clasp, Borneo (RM. 19905 T.J. Ledden Mne. R.M.), good very fine (4) £160-200

229 General Service 1918-62, E.II.R., one clasp, Malaya (S/22522326 Cpl. W. Strike. R.A.S.C.), good very fine General Service 1962-2007, one clasp, Northern Ireland (24110038 Fus. B.M. Shenton 2 RRF.), good very fine £60-80 230 1939-1945 Star, with Battle of Britain Bar, nearly extremely fine £700-900 231 Second World War Awards (17), 1939-1945 Star, with copy Battle of Britain Bar; Atlantic Star (2), one with Air Crew Europe Bar; one with France and Germany Bar; Air Crew Europe Star, with copy Atlantic Bar; Africa Star (3), one with 1st Army Bar; one with 8th Army Bar; one with North Africa 1942-43 Bar; Pacific Star, with copy Burma Bar; Burma Star, with Pacific Bar; Italy Star; France and Germany Star; Defence Medal (2), one with King’s Commendation for Brave Conduct silver Laurel Leaves; War Medal (2), both with M.I.D. Oak Leaf; New Zealand Service Medal (2), generally nearly extremely fine Korea 1950-53, 2nd ‘Dei Gratia’ type, stamped ‘Specimen’, good very fine Miniature Award: George Cross, good very fine (19) £300-350

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July 25, 2013 - London x232 Second World War Medals (10), 1939-1945 Star; Atlantic Star; Air Crew Europe Star; Africa Star; Pacific Star; Burma Star; Italy Star; France and Germany Star; Defence Medal; War Medal, good very fine or better (10) £220-250 233 Second World War Medals (10), 1939-1945 Star; Atlantic Star; Air Crew Europe Star; Africa Star; Pacific Star; Burma Star; Italy Star; France and Germany Star; Defence Medal; War Medal, good very fine or better (10) £220-250

234 234 The Battle of Britain Bar Attributed to Warrant Officer E.H. Bee, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve Battle of Britain Bar, extremely fine, with a note from the recipient dated 7.6.86, and signed ‘E.H. Bee’ £900-1,100
751768 Warrant Officer Ernest Horace Bee, born 11.12.1919; enlisted in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, May 1939; posted as an Air Gunner to No.29 Squadron (Blenheims), Debden, 17.5.1940; served with the Squadron during the Battle of Britain; advanced Warrant Officer and left the Royal Air Force at the end of the War; died 27.3.1987.

240

235 Air Crew Europe Star, with Atlantic Bar, extremely fine £180-220 236 Air Crew Europe Star, with France and Germany Bar, extremely fine £180-220 x237 Air Crew Europe Star, good very fine £160-200 238 Second World War Medals (9), Africa Star, with North Africa 1942-43 Bar; Defence Medal (36544 N.A. McKenzie); War Medal (2) (N28563 S. Phage); unnamed; Canadian Volunteer Service Medal; Australia Service Medal (N236986 W.F. Ebert); New Zealand War Service Medal; Africa Service Medal; India Service Medal, generally good very fine Police Long Service Medal, G.VI.R. (Sergt. Alexander G. Campbell), good very fine Special Constabulary Long Service Medal, G.V.R. (Alfred G. Coggan), extremely fine, together with a Metropolitan Special Constabulary Badge 95

Civil Defence Long Service Medal, British type, unnamed as issued, extremely fine Pakistan Independence Medal 1947 (Mtn 826020 Naik Iqbal Uddin RPASC_MT), very fine Women’s Royal Volunteer Service Medal, unnamed as issued, extremely fine Japan, Empire, Red Cross Membership Medal, silver, nearly extremely fine, with rosette on riband Nigeria, Republic, National Service Medal 1966-70, bronze, nearly extremely fine Nigeria, Republic, Defence Service Medal 1967-70, silvered, nearly extremely fine Nigeria, Republic, Republic Medal 1963-73, bronze, extremely fine Pakistan, Republic, War Medal 1965, silvered, very fine Rhodesia, General Service Medal, silvered (R94391T Rfn R. Rajah), good very fine United Nations Medal for Cyprus, good very fine (21) £100-140 x239 General Service 1962-2007, one clasp (2), Borneo (23688095 Cpl. D. Coulson. Gren Gds.); Northern Ireland (24239641 Gdsm. D.A. Reid Coldm. Gds.), nearly extremely fine (2) £70-90 240 General Service 1962-2007, one clasp, Air Operations Iraq (MEM2 W C Mawford D251304C RN), light pitting to rate, otherwise nearly extremely fine, in box of issue £300-350

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CAMPAIGN GROUPS AND PAIRS

241

242

241 Pair: Sergeant W. Edmonds, Royal Horse Artillery Military General Service 1793-1814, one clasp, Toulouse (W. Edmonds, Serjt. Royal H. Arty.); Waterloo 1815 (William Edmund [sic], Bomb. Royal Horse Artillery.), with original steel clip, this loose, and split ring suspension, traces of lacquer, heavy contact marks, therefore good fine or better (2) £2,000-2,400
Sergeant William Edmonds, born Lanarkshire, January 1789; enlisted in the Royal Horse Artillery, January 1805; served in the Peninsula and with Lieutenant-Colonel Gardiner’s ‘E’ Troop, Royal Horse Artillery, during the Waterloo Campaign, 16-18.6.1815 (listed as William Edmund for Waterloo on the latest published transcript of both the MGS and Waterloo Rolls; the latter Roll also states ‘Transferred to ‘G’ Troop’, the Troop which Captain Mercer commanded during the actual Battle); discharged, February 1829, after 24 years and 59 days’ service.

242 Pair: Lieutenant E.A.T. Lloyd, Royal Navy Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (E.A.T. Lloyd, Midshipman.), minor edge bruise, with contemporary silver riband buckle and gold retaining pin; St. Jean d’Acre 1840, silver, pierced for ring suspension, as issued, with contemporary silver top riband bar, good very fine (2) £1,000-1,200
Edward Lloyd served as Midshipman in H.M.S. Rodney during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840. Lieutenant Edward Alexander Tylden Lloyd, R.N., entered the Royal Navy, 1833; served as Mate in H.M. Ships Rodney and Madagascar on the Mediterranean and Home stations; passed his examination January 1841, and whilst serving in H.M.S. Queen (flag ship of Sir Edward Owen) was promoted Lieutenant in honour of Queen Victoria’s visit to the ship whilst she was lying at Spithead, 1842; subsequent appointments included to H.M. Ships Vernon, Geyser and Orestes, before being attached to the gunnery-ship H.M.S. Excellent, at Portsmouth, 1845; appointed to H.M.S. Dragon, on the Lisbon station, May 1847, and to the command of H.M.S. Lucifer, September 1848.
PROVENANCE:

Glendining, November 1951 Spink, February 1980

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243

244

243 Pair: Clerk A. Speed, Royal Navy Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (Arthur A. Speed, Clerk.); St. Jean d’Acre 1840, silver, with contemporary silver straight bar suspension, and silver top-riband buckle, light contact marks, generally very fine (2) £800-1,200
Arthur Speed served as Clerk in H.M.S. Asia during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840.
PROVENANCE:

244 Pair: S. Carr, Royal Navy Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (Samuel Carr.); St. Jean d’Acre 1840, bronze, pierced for ring suspension as issued, with contemporary silver straight bar suspension, edge bruising, very fine (2) £550-600
Samuel Carr served as Blacksmith in H.M.S. Medea during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840.
PROVENANCE:

Sotheby, March 1988

Sotheby, January 1971

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245

x245 Pair: Sergeant Major J. Milligan, 12th Lancers South Africa 1834-53 (Troo.. Ser.. Major J. Milligan. 12th Lancers.), edge bruising; Crimea 1854-56, one clasp, Sebastopol (Serjt. Major Jno. Milligan. 12th Lancs.), contemporarily engraved in upright serif capitals, contact marks overall, nearly very fine (2) £450-550
Sergeant Major John Milligan, born Monaghan, Ireland; served with the 12th Lancers in South Africa during the Third Kaffir War, 1850-53; served with the regiment during the Crimean War (entitled to Turkish Crimea); discharged June 1863.

246

x246 A Crimea Pair to Private J. Gusterson, 11th Hussars, Who Rode in the Charge of the Light Brigade, 25.10.1854 Crimea 1854-56, four clasps, Alma, Balaklava, Inkermann, Sebastopol (No.1618. James. Gusterson. XIth. P.A.O. Hussars), Regimentally impressed; Turkish Crimea, Sardinian die (1618 James Gusterson XI PAO Hussars), with ring suspension, heavy contact marks, therefore good fine (2) £4,000-5,000
1618 Private James Gusterson, born Rochford, Essex, 1833; enlisted in the 11th (Prince Albert’s Own) Hussars, December 1853; served with the Regiment in the Crimea, and rode in the Charge of the Light Brigade at Balaklava, 25.10.1854; served as the camp cook in 1855; discharged, September 1873, after 19 years and 208 days with the Colours; attended the first Balaklava Banquet in 1875; died June 1880.
PROVENANCE:

x247 Pair: Private J. Gardner, 30th Foot Crimea 1854-56, three clasps, Alma, Inkermann, Sebastopol (James. Gardner. No.3015. XXX Regt.), contemporarily engraved in upright serif capitals, with unofficial rivets, top lugs pierced; Turkish Crimea, Sardinian die (NO3115 James Gardner 30th Regt.), engraved in upright serif capitals, last with corrections, edge bruising overall, otherwise very fine (2) £240-280
Medal Roll does not give entitlement to ‘Inkermann’ clasp.

C.J. & A.J. Dixon, 2000.

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249

x248 Pair: Private W. Welsh, 7th Hussars Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (Wm. Walsh [sic], 7th. Husrs.); Army Long Service & G.C., V.R. (1491 Pte. W Welsh 7th. Hussrs.), good very fine, mounted court style for display purposes (2) £380-420
1491 Private William Welsh, born Cork, Ireland, 1836; enlisted in the 7th Hussars, August 1855; served with the Regiment during the Indian Mutiny (the latest published transcript of the medal roll erroneously gives Welsh as being entitled to a no clasp medal; the recipient’s service papers confirm the Lucknow clasp); awarded L.S. & G.C., May 1877; discharged, May 1877, after 21 years and 293 days with the Colours, of which 12 years and 11 months were spent in India.

O.B.E. London Gazette 7.1.1918 Paymaster-in-Chief Henry Ashley Travers Cummins, R.N. ‘For services in connection with the War.’ Captain Henry Ashley Travers Cummins, C.B.E., Appointed Assistant Clerk, Royal Navy, December 1864; served in H.M.S. Octavia during the Abyssinia Campaign, 1867-68; promoted Assistant-Paymaster, December 1868; afterwards served in H.M.S. Minotaur, Flagship Channel Fleet; in 1871 took passage in Megaera for Australia- she was wrecked on St. Paul’s Island during the voyage, but the Officers and crew were saved; when serving in H.M.S. Rosario, Australian Station, February 1872-75, was lent to H.M.S. Pearl for duty as Assistant Secretary to the Commissioners for the annexation of Fiji; served in H.M.S. Warrior, Channel Fleet, 1875-78, and H.M.S. Flora, Cape of Good Hope Station, 1878-81; engaged during the Boer War of 1881 in carrying out both the duties of Account Officer and those of Secretary of the Cape Yard (received the special thanks of the Commodore in Command of the Station, and of the Flag Officer in Command of the Detached Squadron); transferred to the Retired List with the rank of Paymaster, January 1882, and appointed Cashier, Royal Naval Hospital, Great Yarmouth- ‘whilst there his services in coming to the aid of the Medical Officer in charge, who was being attacked by a lunatic, earned for him the thanks of the Admiralty; the outburst of the lunatic on that occasion was the cause of the death of one of the patients, and both the Medical Officer and Mr. Cummins themselves sustained serious injury.’ (Naval Who’s Who refers); appointed Paymaster of Contingencies, Admiralty, March 1890; promoted Paymaster Captain and Hon. Paymaster-in-Chief, 14.10.1914.

249 Three: Paymaster Captain H.A.T. Cummins [C.B.E.], Royal Navy Abyssinia 1867-68 (Clerk H.A.T. Cummins H.M.S. Octavia); British War Medal (Hon. Payr. Capt. H.A.T. Cummins, C.B.E., R.N.); Coronation 1911 (H.A.T. Cummins, R.N.), impressed in large serif capitals, nearly extremely fine, with the two pre-War miniature awards, and the recipient’s Great War Masonic Medal, silver (Hallmarks for Birmingham 1922), the reverse engraved ‘Bro. H.A.T. Cummins. No.2612.’ (3) £500-600
C.B.E. London Gazette 1.1.1919 Hon. Paymaster Captain Henry Ashley Travers Cummins, O.B.E., R.N. ‘In recognition of valuable services rendered in connection with the War.’

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252

253

250 Pair: Sergeant H. Brooks, Liverpool Regiment Afghanistan 1878-80, one clasp, Peiwar Kotal (1103. Pte. H. Brooks. 2/8th. Regt.), retaining rod replaced; India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Burma 1885-7 (1103 Sergt. H. Brooks 2d. Bn. L’pool R.), good very fine (2) £200-250 x251 Pair: Drummer E. Sheppard, Scots Guards Egypt 1882-89, dated, one clasp, Tel-El-Kebir (3242 Drumr. E. Sheppard. 1/... Gds.); Khedive’s Star 1882, reverse engraved ‘S. Gds. 3242’, pitting overall, nearly very fine (2) £160-200
3242 Drummer Ernest Sheppard, born Warminster, Wiltshire; enlisted Scots Guards, 1874; discharged 1886, after 12 years and 25 days with the Colours.

x253 Pair: Havildar Sheik Ismail, Queen’s Own Sappers and Miners Egypt 1882-89, dated, one clasp, Tel-el-Kebir (Havr. Sheik Ismail. Q.O. S&M.), file marks to latter part of name; Khedive’s Star 1882, unnamed as issued, good very fine (2) £140-180 x254 Pair: Major B.G. Vyvyan, 7th Bengal Native Infantry Egypt 1882-89, dated, no clasp (Major B.G. Vyvyan. 7th. Regt. B.N.I.); Khedive’s Star 1882, unnamed as issued, light contact marks, good very fine (2) £200-250
Lieutenant-Colonel Beville Grenville Vyvyan, Commissioned Ensign, June 1860; promoted Lieutenant, January 1862; Captain, November 1869; Major, June 1880; served with the 7th Bengal Native Infantry in Egypt; appointed Second in Command and Wing Commander; promoted Lieutenant-Colonel, June 1886.

x252 Pair: Private J. Ryan, Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry Egypt 1882-89, dated, one clasp, Tel-el-Kebir (1519. Pte. J. Ryan. 2/D of C. L.I.); Khedive’s Star 1882, unnamed as issued, light contact marks, very fine (2) £160-200

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255

255 Three: Sergeant A.W. Ferrett, Royal Engineers Egypt 1882-89, undated, one clasp, The Nile 188485 (17602. Driv: A.W. Ferrett. 4 Sec. T. Bn. R.E.); Army Long Service & G.C., V.R. (17602 Serjt: A.W. Ferrett. R.E.); Khedive’s Star 1884-6, reverse engraved ‘17602 2/Corpl. A.W. Ferrett 4/Sec. T.B. R.E.’, pitting to first from Star, nearly very fine, the LS&GC good very fine (3) £240-280
17602 Sergeant Arthur William Ferrett, born Southampton, 1860; enlisted in the Royal Engineers, January 1883; served with the Engineers in Egypt, September 1884 to November 1887, and Specially Commended by H.R.H. the Commander in Chief ‘for good services rendered during the Egyptian Campaign, 1884-85’; promoted Corporal, December 1889; Sergeant, December 1892; awarded L.S. & G.C., 1.1.1902; discharged, 22.12.1902, after 19 years and 332 days’ service, latterly serving with the 3rd Telegraph Battalion, R.E.

x256 Pair: Private C. Worthey, Coldstream Guards Egypt 1882-89, undated, one clasp, Suakin 1885 (5904 Pte. C. Worthey. 1/Col.. Gds.); Khedive’s Star 1884-6, reverse engraved, ‘5904 C.G.’, contact marks, therefore nearly very fine (2) £140-180
5904 Private Charles Worthey, born Langport, Somerset; enlisted Coldstream Guards, December 1883; discharged 1895, after 12 years with the Colours.

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257 x257 Three: Able Seaman J. Brooks, Royal Navy Egypt 1882-89, undated, no clasp (J. Brooks, Boy 1 Cl. H.M.S. Turquoise.); Naval Long Service & G.C., E.VII.R. (121095 James Brooks, Comd. Boatn., H.M. Coast Guard.); Khedive’s Star 1884-6, unnamed as issued, light pitting from Star, edge bruise to LS&GC, otherwise nearly extremely fine (3) £180-220
121095 Able Seaman James Brooks, born Somerset, December 1866; enlisted in the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class, October 1882; transferred to H.M.S. Turquoise, October 1884, and served during the Egyptian Campaign; advanced Able Seaman; transferred to HM Coastguard, December 1895; awarded L.S. & G.C., 3.2.1909; discharged dead as a result of pneumonia at Dawlish Coastguard Station, 13.1.1910.

258 Three: Private W. Jones, East Lancashire Regiment India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., one clasp, Relief of Chitral 1895 (992 Pte. W. Jones 1st. Bn. Lanc. Regt.); Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Johannesburg (992 Pte. W. Jones. E. Lanc: Regt.); King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (992 Pte. W. Jones. E. Lanc: Regt.), light contact marks, generally very fine (3) £240-280
992 Private Walter Jones, born Birmingham, 1866; enlisted in the East Lancashire Regiment, February 1885; served with the Regiment in India from January 1886, and in South Africa, January 1900 to November 1902; discharged 8.2.1906 after 21 years with the Colours.

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259 259 Pair: Private A. Mair, Seaforth Highlanders Queen’s Sudan 1896-98 (4342. Pte. A. Mair. 1/Sea Hrs.); Khedive’s Sudan 1896-1908, two clasps, The Atbara, Khartoum (4342 Private A. Mair 1st. Sea Highrs.), good very fine (2) £300-350
4342 Private Adam Mair, born Glasgow, 1871; enlisted in the Seaforth Highlanders, October 1892; served with the Regiment in Egypt and the Sudan, January 1898 to March 1900, and in South Africa, 2.3.1900-11.9.1902 (entitled to QSA with clasps Cape Colony, Transvaal, and Wittebergen, and KSA); discharged, 5.10.1904, after 12 years with the Colours.

261 x261 A Fine Sudan Pair to Lance Corporal R. Newman, 21st Lancers, Who Charged with ‘A’ Squadron at the Battle of Omdurman, 2.9.1898 Queen’s Sudan 1896-98 (3654. L/Cpl. R. Newman. 21/L’crs.); Khedive’s Sudan 1896-1908, one clasp, Khartoum (3654 Pte. R. Newman 21st. Lrs.), minor edge bruise to first, very fine (2) £2,400-2,800
3654 Lance Corporal R. Newman took part in the celebrated charge at Omdurman, 2.9.1898, whilst serving in Major H. Finn’s ‘A’ Squadron, 21st Lancers, one of whose four Troops was commanded by Lieutenant Winston Churchill, 4th Hussars.

x260 Seven: Staff Sergeant G.R. Watts, Army Service Corps Queen’s Sudan 1896-98 (S/12576 Pte. G.R. Watts. A.S.C.); Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg, Driefontein (12575. Pte. G.R. Watts. A.S.C.); King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (12575 Cpl. G.R. Watts. A.S.C.); 1914-15 Star, unnamed; British War and Victory Medals (S2SR-01762 S.Sjt. G.R. Watts. A.S.C.); Khedive’s Sudan 1896-1908, one clasp, Khartoum, unnamed as issued, generally good very fine (7) £300-400
S2SR-01762 Staff Sergeant George Robert Watts, born Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, 1872; enlisted in the Army Service Corps, February 1896; served with the Corps in Egypt and the Sudan, from July to October 1898, and in South Africa, from October 1899 to August 1902; promoted Corporal, April 1902; discharged, February 1908; re-enlisted and served with the Army Service Corps during the Great War on the Western Front from 4.9.1915.

x262 Five: Private T. Roe, Cameron Highlanders Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal (2496 Pte. T. Roe, 1st Cam’n: Highrs:), edge bruise; 1914-15 Star (3-6053. Pte. T. Roe. Cam’n Highrs.); British War and Victory Medals (3-6053 Pte. T. Roe. Cam’n Highrs.); Khedive’s Sudan 1896-1908, one clasp, Khartoum (2496 Pte. Roe 1 Cam. Highrs.), engraved in large sans-serif capitals, edge cut to last, toned, very fine or better (5) £200-240 x263 Pair: Private S. Hockey, Royal Scots Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Belfast (4085 Pte. S. Hockey. 1- R.Scots.); King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (4085 Pte. S. Hockey. 1- R.Scots.), both slightly later issues, contact marks, nearly very fine (2) £80-120 103

oRdeRS, deCoRAtionS, CAmPAign medALS And miLitARiA x264 Pair: Trooper J. Blewett, Johannesburg Mounted Rifles, Late Queenstown Rifle Volunteers Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Transvaal, Wittebergen (403 Pte. J. Blewitt. Queenstown R.V.); King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (1489 Tpr: J. Blewett. Johannesburg M.R.), nearly extremely fine (2) £80-120 x265 Pair: Private J. Etheridge, Royal Sussex Regiment Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, four clasps, Cape Colony, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill, Wittebergen (5456 Pte. J. Etheridge, 1st Rl. Sussex Regt.); King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (5456 Pte. J. Etheridge, 1st Rl. Sussex Regt.), edge bruising, therefore nearly very fine (2) £100-140 266 Three: Armourer Quarter Master Sergeant F.W. Affleck, Army Ordnance Corps Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, one clasp, Cape Colony (36, Qr. Mr. Sjt. F.W. Affleck, A.O.C.); King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (36. Armr: Q.M. Sergt: F. Affleck. A.O. Corps.), officially renamed; Army Long Service & G.C., E.VII.R. (36 Ar: Q.M. Serjt: F.W. Affleck. A.O.C.), good very fine (3) £80-100 x267 Four: Warrant Officer Class II W.L. Cox, Scottish Horse, Late 6th Dragoons Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, one clasp, Cape Colony (3536. Corpl. W.L. Cox. 6/Drgns.); 1914-15 Star (426 Sjt. W.L. Cox. 2-Sco. H.); British War and Victory Medals (426 A.W.O. Cl.2 W.L. Cox. Sco. H.). rank partially officially corrected on VM, traces of lacquer, good very fine (4) £160-200 268 Pair: Private F.C. Smith, Coldstream Guards Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, six clasps, Belmont, Modder River, Driefontein, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill, Belfast (9171 Pte. F.C. Smith, Cldstm: Gds:); King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (9171 Pte. F.C. Smith. Coldstream Guards.), minor official correction to unit on latter, good very fine Pair: Captain W.A. Rail, South African Forces British War and Victory Medals, bi-lingual type (Capt. W.A. Rail), good very fine (4) £140-180 269 Four: Private M.W. Ward, West Riding Regiment Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg, Transvaal (5697 Pte. M.W. Ward, W. Riding. Regt.); King’s South Africa 190102, two clasps (5697 Pte. M. Ward. W. Riding Regt.); 1914-15 Star (3-11189. Pte. M.W. Ward, W. Rid. R.); Victory Medal (3-11189 Pte. M.W. Ward. W. Rid. R.), nearly very fine or better (4) £120-160

268

270 Pair: Private T.H. Williamson, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Transvaal, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, unofficial rivets between first and second clasps (6529 Pte. T. Williamson, 1: Rl: Innis: Fus:); King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (6529 Pte. T. Williamson. Innis: Fus:), edge bruises to first, good fine or better (2) £140-180
6529 Private Thomas Henry Williamson, served with the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers during the Boer War and with the 3rd Battalion during the Great War; died 15.11.1918, and is buried in Belfast City Cemetery, Co. Antrim. Clasps confirmed.

x271 Four: Lieutenant H. Casbolt, Royal Artillery 1914 Star, with Bar (21790 B.Q.M. Sjt. H. Casbolt. R.F.A.); British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. H. Casbolt); Army Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Field Marshal’s bust’ type (21790 B.Q.M. Sjt. H. Casbolt. R.F.A.), good very fine (4) £120-160
Lieutenant Henry Casbolt, born November 1878; enlisted in the Royal Field Artillery, August 1897; advanced Battery Quarter Master Sergeant; served with 44th Brigade R.F.A. during the Great War on the Western Front from 16.8.1914; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Royal Artillery, 9.4.1915; promoted Lieutenant, 14.4.1917; retired, 23.1.1923.

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x272 Three: Private L.E. Burnett, Royal Fusiliers 1914 Star, with Bar (L-11051 Pte. L. Burnett. 1/R. Fus.); British War and Victory Medals (L-11051 Pte. L.E. Burnett. R. Fus.), very fine (3) £100-140
L-11051 Private Lawrence E. Burnett served with the 1st Battalion, Royal Fusiliers during the Great War on the Western Front from 20.9.1914.

273 Three: Captain R.A.C. Murray, Seaforth Highlanders 1914 Star, with Bar (Lieut: R.A.C. Murray. Sea: Highrs.); British War and Victory Medals (Capt. R.A.C. Murray.), good very fine or better (3) £250-300
Captain Rupert Auriol Conant Murray, born September 1882, the son of Colonel C.E.G. Murray, J.P., D.L.; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Seaforth Highlanders, 22.10.1902; promoted Lieutenant, 15.1.1908; served with the 1st Battalion during the Great War on the Western Front from 12.10.1914; died of wounds, 11.3.1915, and is buried in Lillers Communal Cemetery, France.

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oRdeRS, deCoRAtionS, CAmPAign medALS And miLitARiA 274 A Rare and Very Complete Great War Fighter Pilot’s Casualty Group of Three to Sergeant 1st Class Pilot W.J. Beadle, 1 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force, Who Claimed 3 Victories in His Nieuport, Before Being Killed in a Flying Accident, 24.4.1918 1914 Star, with Bar (986 2/A.M. W.J. Beadle. R.F.C.); British War and Victory Medals (986 Sgt. W.J. Beadle. R.F.C.), extremely fine, with the recipient’s Great War Bronze Memorial Plaque, ‘William James Beadle’, in card holder of issue, and the following related items: - Three named card boxes of issue, with Registered Envelope addressed to ‘Mrs. F.K. Beadle, 101 The Vale, Acton, W3’ - Two Glass Plate Negatives of recipient in uniform, one slightly damaged; photograph of recipient in uniform standing in front of his aircraft, and R.F.C. Wings (3) £2,000-2,500
986 Sergeant William James Beadle, born Wimbledon, London; entered Royal Flying Corps as 2 A.M., 3.12.1913; served as 1 A.M. with the Aircraft Park, France, from 16.8.1914; Corporal 1.11.1915; briefly served with 16 Squadron, St. Omer, before being posted back to the UK, November 1915; reverted to Sergeant 1st Class Pilot, 14.12.1916 and was awarded a Royal Aero Club Aviator’s Certificate (No. 5126), 26.4.1917; re-embarked for service in France as a Pilot at the beginning of May 1917; after an initial posting to 29 (Fighter) Squadron (Nieuports), Le Hameau, Beadle was sent for operational flying to 1 Squadron (Nieuports), Bailleul, 8.6.1917; the squadron mainly flew Offensive Patrols over the lines against the German circuses, and were heavily engaged in air combats as part of the 11th Wing of the 2nd Brigade; Beadle did not have to wait long to enter the fray, 12.6.1917, ‘Whilst on Northern Offensive Patrol, I saw a two seater Albatross at 10,000 feet over Boesinghe - I dived on it and fired 1 drum, evidently wounding the Observer as no attempt was made to return fire. H.A. put nose down and went N.E. when I dived again, firing and following him down and saw him crash in Polygon Wood. Decisive’ (Combat Report refers); he had another victory whilst on patrol over Gheluvelt, 2.7.1917, ‘While on Offensive Patrol, patrol attacked 6 E.A. scouts, I selected a machine with black and white markings which was getting away from one of our Nieuports and fired at close range - machine heeled over and over, then went down in a series of rolls and spins. Decisive’ (Ibid); five days later, Beadle claimed another victim, whilst on an Offensive Patrol of 6 Nieuports led by Second Lieutenant Fullard over Roulers; they engaged 10 enemy Scouts and ‘I dived on one Albatross Scout and fired a whole drum into it, after which he went into a very steep dive, then in an uncontrollable spin with engine on. At this time I was attacked from the rear by a yellow Scout with a tail like a Sopwith and three Albatross Scouts. I outclimbed them and rejoined the Patrol. Decisive.

Sergeant 1st Class Pilot W.J. Beadle

Confirmed by 2/Lt. Fullard and 2/Lt. Kelney’ (Ibid); at the end of July Beadle was sent to the Hospital Ship Carisbrooke Castle; before returning to the UK in August and being admitted to a hospital in Bethnal Green; being found fit for duty in December 1917, he was posted as a Pilot Instructor to 1 (Observer) School of Air Gunnery; Beadle was listed as ‘Missing Believed Drowned in Aeroplane Accident’, 22.4.1918; his body was never recovered, and he is commemorated on the Hollybrook Memorial, Southampton.

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x275 Three: Private F. Brailsford, Royal Army Medical Corps 1914 Star, with Bar (7664 Pte. F. Brailsford. R.A.M.C.); British War and Victory Medals (7664 Pte. F. Brailsford. R.A.M.C.), nearly very fine Pair: Private L. O’Neill, Canadian Infantry British War and Victory Medals (410164 Pte. L. O’Neill. 38- Can. Inf.), very fine Canadian Memorial Cross, G.V.R. (410163 Pte. C.J. O’Neil), good very fine (6) £120-160
410163 Private Clifford James O’Neil, native of Ottawa; served with the 38th Battalion, Canadian Infantry during the Great War; died 18.11.1916, and is commemorated on the Vimy Memorial, France.

x277 Seven: Warrant Officer Class I E. Holder, Royal Engineers 1914 Star (16789 L.Cpl. E. Holder. R.E.); British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaves (16789 T.W.O.Cl.1. E. Holder. R.E.); Defence and War Medals; Army Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Field Marshal’s bust’ type (1852134 W.O. Cl.2. E. Holder. R.E.); Meritorious Service Medal, G.VI.R. (1852134 W.O. Cl.1. E. Holder. R.E.), toned, generally very fine or better (7) £200-240
M.I.D. London Gazette 18.5.1917 Holder, No.16789 Engr. Clerk Serjt. E., Royal Engineers 16789 Warrant Officer Class I Ernest Holder served with the Royal Engineers during the Great War on the Western Front from 12.8.1914.

x276 Three: Staff Sergeant R. Knowles, Royal Army Veterinary Corps 1914 Star, with later slide Bar (310. Pte. R. Knowles. A.V.C.); British War and Victory Medals (Reg-310 T.S.Sjt. R. Knowles. A.V.C.), BWM lacquered, nearly very fine, together with a Silver War Badge, the reverse numbered ‘B147532’ (3) £100-140
310 Staff Sergeant Richard Knowles served with the Army Veterinary Corps during the Great War on the Western Front from 15.8.1914. Bar confirmed.

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278 A Great War and Second War Campaign Group of Eight to Sopwith Triplane Pilot, Captain, Later Wing Commander, C.H.B. Jenner-Parson, 8 Squadron Royal Naval Air Service and Royal Air Force, Who Was Recommended for the D.S.C. in 1917, and Drove Down Out of Control At Least 2 Enemy Aircraft, Sharing One Other 1914-15 Star (Flt. S. Lt. C.H.B. Jenner Parson, R.N.A.S.); British War Medal, unofficially engraved; Mercantile Marine War Medal (Charles H.B. Jenner-Parson); Victory Medal, M.I.D. Oak Leaves (G. [sic] H.B. Jenner-Parson. R.A.F.); 1939-1945 Star; Atlantic Star; Defence and War Medals, generally very fine or better, with silver (Hallmarks for Birmingham 1916) identity bracelet, ‘H. Jenner Parson. R.N.A.S.’, and two files of copied research (8) £280-320
M.I.D. London Gazette 11.12.1917 Flt. Lt. C.H.B. Jenner-Parson No. 8 Squadron, R.N.A.S. The Recommendation, dated 5.10.1917, states: ‘As a Flying Officer, he has done very good work, and has shown gallantry and skill in action.’ Recommended for a D.S.C., 26.9.1917 Flight Lieut. Charles Hugh Beresford Jenner-Parson, 8 Naval Sqdn. R.N.A.S. ‘This Officer has done consistently good work as a Pilot and has shown much skill and gallantry in action. He has shot down 2 Enemy machines and led many successful Patrols.’

Wing Commander C.H.B. Jenner-Parson (on left), next to Flight Lieutenant R.R. Soar, D.S.C.

Wing Commander Charles Hugh Beresford Jenner-Parson, born St. Vincent, West Indies, 1895; Flight Lieutenant, Royal Naval Air Service, 9.10.1915; carried out training at Cranwell, Eastchurch and Dover Air Stations; gained RAC Aviator’s Certificate in a Grahame-White Biplane, R.N.A.S. Chingford, 9.2.1916; posted as Pilot for operational flying to No. 5 Wing, Dunkirk, August 1916; took part in nine patrols that month, including two Fighter Patrols over the Ypres area and one Fighter Escort to a Bombing squadron; carried out a number of bombing raids the following month, including two on Ghistelles Aerodrome, and several Fighter Patrols over Dunkirk and the Fleet; on 7.9.1916 he failed to return from an attack on St. Denis Westerend Aerodrome, but was later reported to have landed safely at Boulogne; proceeded with the Detached Squadron under Squadron Commander G.R. Bromet for service with 22nd Wing Royal Flying Corps, Doullens, October 1916; reported sick the following month, returning to active service when posted to 8 (Naval) Squadron (Sopwith Triplanes), Dunkirk, 26.2.1917; as part of ‘C’ Flight he named his first Triplane ‘Brenda’ - much to his annoyance this was crashed by another pilot in March; his new aircraft, named ‘Angel’, led him to future success; he took part in two combats on 24.4.1917, including, ‘N.E. of Bethune. At 11am observed one two seater Albatross on his way home, this side of the lines.... I got into the sun and dived at him getting off several rounds at close range whereupon he dived steeply and I had to break off combat owing to gun jambing. I think that he was hit but lost sight of him while clearing jamb’; he was in action once again, 1.5.1917, ‘while chasing one E.A. observed a British machine, like a Martinside stall and go into a spin and on looking round saw a small white, E.A. over Lens. I at once left the first E.A. and attacked him at fairly close range, firing about 60 rounds, whereupon he went down in a vertical nose-dive but apparently under control’; on the 12th and the 20th of the same month he was involved in combats against formations of 15 and 9 Albatross Scouts, and on the latter date whilst on an Offensive Patrol over ‘Henin Lietard at about 8.15pm Flt. Lt. H. Jenner Parson opened fire on one at close range. This E.A. went down in a spin for about 2,000 feet, flattening out for a second, and then falling into a spin again. Flt. Lt. Jenner Parson could not watch it any further, but he is of the opinion

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that it was out of control’; three days later he shared with Flight Lieutenant Soar an enemy aircraft forced down out of control over La Bassee; on 28.5.1917, he single-handedly drove down out of control another aircraft west of Douai, ‘Flt. Sub. Lt. Jenner Parsons, in company with 5 other Sopwith Triplanes of No. 8 Naval Squadron, attacked a formation of 7 Albatross Scouts and 3 Aviatiks near Douai at 8.20pm. Diving on one of the scouts he observed tracers hit the engine, whereupon the H.A. stalled, side slipped, and went down out of control. The Pilot is confident that this machine must have crashed’; on 1.6.1917 he took on 4 twoseaters by himself, ‘while on a Special Mission [Arras to St. Eloi] I observed 4 H.A. above me. I climbed above them and opened fire at one machine, where upon the other three all closed in on me and attacked me, then followed a running fight. One of the H.A. then broke away and steered in a northerly direction. I followed him and getting close opened fire, firing a lot of rounds into him, tracers being observed entering him. The observer of the H.A. suddenly stopped firing and disappeared into the cockpit as if hit. My gun then jambed and I pulled out and when I next looked H.A. was nowhere to be seen... I turned back and engaged the remaining H.A. and drove them all east’; on the 12th June he shared in driving down another enemy aircraft out of control, this time over Arras; throughout July and September JennerParson continued to be involved in aerial combats, but none proved conclusive enough to add to his score (Recommended for D.S.C.; for further details of JennerParson’s service with 8 Squadron see Fighter Pilot on the Western Front, by Wing Commander E.D. Crundell, D.F.C., A.F.C, the latter being a squadron contemporary and close friend of his); posted to 12 Squadron (Sopwith Camels), Dunkirk, October 1917; he was promoted to Flight Commander, for meritorious service, 31.12.1917; returning to the UK in March 1918, was appointed as an Instructor at Redcar, April 1918; re-engaged Temporary Flying Officer, 29.8.1939; advanced Temporary Wing Commander, Technical Branch (Signals), 1.1.1945.

x279 Seven: Lieutenant-Colonel H.R. Herbert, Middlesex Regiment and Indian Army 1914-15 Star (Lieut. H.R. Herbert. Midd’x R.); British War and Victory Medals (Capt. H.R. Herbert.); General Service 1918-62, G.V.R., one clasp, S. Persia (Capt. H.R. Herbert), surname partially officially corrected; India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., three clasps, Afghanistan N.W.F. 1919, Waziristan 1919-21, North West Frontier 1930-31 (Capt. H.R. Herbert, S & T.C.), top lugs removed to facilitate mounting; Jubilee 1935; Coronation 1953, generally very fine, mounted courtstyle for display (7) £400-500
Lieutenant-Colonel Harold Rupert Herbert, born 1892; commissioned Second Lieutenant, Middlesex Regiment, 4.9.1912; served during the Great War with the regiment in the French Theatre of War from, 10.1.1915 (twice wounded); Captain 4.9.1916; attached Indian Army, 12.1.1918; served with Supply and Transport Corps, from July 1918; advanced Lieutenant-Colonel, A.D. S&T, Peshawar District, 25.2.1936.

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280 x280 Four: Major R.J.N. Norris, 7th (Duke of Connaught’s Own) Rajputs 1914-15 Star (Lieut. R.J.N. Norris, 7/Rajputs.); British War Medal (2-Lt. R.J.N. Norris.); Victory Medal, M.I.D. Oak Leaves (Capt. R.J.N. Norris,.); India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., two clasps, Waziristan 1919-21, Waziristan 1921-24 (Capt. R.J.N. Norris, 2-4 Rajputs.), last clasp loose on riband, generally very fine or better, mounted court-style for display (4) £200-250
M.I.D. London Gazette 5.4.1916 Lieutenant R.J.N. Norris, General Headquarters Staff (Euphrates Operations, 26th June to 25th July 1915). Major Reginald John Nelson Norris, born 1894; commissioned Second Lieutenant, 7th Rajputs, 22.1.1913; served during the Great War with the regiment in the Mesopotamian Theatre of War, November 1914-March 1916 (wounded).

282 Five: Petty Officer C.W. Mitchell, Royal Navy 1914-15 Star (J.16481, C.W. Mitchell, A.B., R.N.); British War and Victory Medals (J.16481 C.W. Mitchell. L.S. R.N.); Defence Medal; Naval Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Admiral’s bust’ type (J.16481 C.W. Mitchell. P.O. H.M.S. Titania), generally nearly very fine or better, mounted as worn, with the recipient’s related miniature awards (5) £80-100 x283 Five: Flight Sergeant C.H. Millson, Royal Air Force, Late Leading Telegraphist, Royal Navy 1914-15 Star (C.H. Millson Ldg Tel. R.N.); British War and Victory Medals (C.H. Millson Ldg Tel. R.N.); Jubilee 1935; Royal Air Force Long Service & G.C., G.V.R. (343869. F/Sgt. C.H. Millson. R.A.F.), BWM and VM officially renamed, contact marks, therefore nearly very fine, mounted for wear (5) £80-120
343869 Flight Sergeant Cecil Harcourt Millson, born London, 1894; joined Royal Navy as Boy Second Class, September 1910; service during the Great War as Leading Telegraphist included at H.M.S. Egmont and Exmouth, and in H.M.S. St. George, 1.7.1916-30.9.1916.

281 Eight: Leading Stoker C.E. Harrison, Royal Navy 1914-15 Star (K.20388, C. Harrison, Sto.1., R.N.); British War and Victory Medals (K.20388 C. Harrison. Sto.1 R.N.); 1939-1945 Star; Africa Star; Burma Star; War Medal; Naval Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Admiral’s bust’ type (K.20388. C.E. Harrison. L. Sto. H.M.S. Rowena.), light contact marks, nearly very fine or better, with Admiralty enclosure for the Second War awards (8) £100-140

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284 Four: Able Seaman T.W. Burnett, Royal Navy 1914-15 Star (149665. T.W. Burnett. A.B., R.N.); British War and Victory Medals (149665 T.W. Burnett. A.B. R.N.); Naval Long Service & G.C., E.VII.R. (149665 T.W. Burnett, Boatn., H.M. Coast Guard.), light contact marks, good very fine Three: Able Seaman W.F. Gilbert, Royal Navy 1914-15 Star (M.18907. W.F. Gilbert. A.B., R.N.); British War and Victory Medals (M.18907 W.F. Gilbert. JR. 4 R.N.), good very fine (7) £100-140 x285 Five: Chief Engine Room Artificer W.E.R. MacCabe, Royal Navy 1914-15 Star (271655. W.E.R. MacCabe. E.R.A.2. R.N.); British War and Victory Medals (271655 W.E.R. MacCabe. C.E.R.A.2. R.N.); Naval Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Admiral’s bust’ type (271655. W.E.R. MacCabe, C.E.R.A. 2Cl. H.M.S. Dido); France, Republic, Medaille Militaire, silver and enamel, with trophy suspension, very fine or better (5) £140-180
French Medaille Militaire London Gazette 15.9.1916 Engine Room Artificer (1st Cl.) William Ernest Reginald MacCabe, O.N. 271655 ‘In recognition of services during the War.’ 271655 Chief Engine Room Artificer William Ernest Reginald MacCabe, born Shrewsbury, Shropshire, January 1883; enlisted in the Royal Navy as Engine Room Artificer 4th Class, 15.6.1904; advanced Engine Room Artificer 1st Class and served during the Great War in H.M.S. Attack; promoted Chief Engine Room Artificer, 1.10.1917; awarded L.S. & G.C., 4.7.1919; discharged, 14.6.1926.

286 Four: Sergeant A. Dawson, Royal Engineers 1914-15 Star (36921 Spr: A. Dawson. R.E.); British War and Victory Medals (36921 A.Sjt. A. Dawson. R.E.); Service Medal of the Order of St. John (31891. D/Supt. A. Dawson. Kent S.J.A.B. 1944.), good very fine Three: Private J.E. Death, Devonshire Regiment British War Medal (64919 Pte. J.E. Death. Devon. R.); Coronation 1937; Service Medal of the Order of St. John, with three Additional Award Bars (3061. Sgt. J.E. Death. (Ipswich 1st.) Div. No.10 Dist. S.J.A.B. 1923), very fine (7) £80-120 x287 Four: Petty Officer A.L. Brown, Royal Navy 1914-15 Star (234559 A.L. Brown, L.S., R.N.); British War and Victory Medals (234559 A.L. Brown. P.O. R.N.); Italy, Kingdom, Messina Earthquake Medal 1908, silver (A.L. Brown, L.S., H.M.S. “Minerva”.), good very fine (4) £180-220
234559 Petty Officer Albert Leslie Brown, born Shepherd’s Bush, London, February 1889; enlisted in the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class, 22.8.1905; served in H.M.S. Minerva as Ordinary Seaman from 22.9.1908, during which time he participated in the rescue operations after the Messina Earthquake, 1908, and was one of the men from the Naval force who landed from the ships to give assistance; promoted Able Seaman, 12.2.1909; Leading Seaman, 5.2.1915; invalided out of the service, 18.3.1918.

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x288 Four: Officer’s Chief Cook C.A. Tenton, Royal Navy 1914-15 Star (364721. C. Tenton, O.C.C., R.N.); British War and Victory Medals (364721 C. Tenton. O.C.C. R.N.); Russia, Imperial, Medal for Bravery, Fourth Class, silver, reverse officially numbered ‘1013297’, nearly very fine (4) £200-250
364721 Officer’s Chief Cook Charles Augustus Tenton, born Croydon, Surrey, October 1876; enlisted in the Royal Navy, 14.4.1906; posted for service in H.M.S. Dreadnought as Officer’s Cook, 25.3.1911; served during the Great War in H.M.S. King George V, 1914-16.12.1915 and H.M.S. Revenge, 1.2-17.12.1916, and present at the Battle of Jutland, 31.5-1.6.1916; promoted Officer’s Chief Cook, 10.5.1917; discharged, 30.6.1924. Russian Medal for Bravery unconfirmed.

x290 Four: Sergeant A.J. Hancock, Army Service Corps 1914-15 Star (M2-119037. Pte. A.J. Hancock. A.S.C.); British War and Victory Medals (M2-119037 Sjt. A.J. Hancock. A.S.C.); Belgium, Kingdom, Croix du Guerre, A.I.R., bronze, nearly extremely fine (4) £60-80
Belgian Croix de Guerre London Gazette 12.7.1918 M2/119037 Sergeant Allan James Hancock, Army Service Corps (Kirriemuir) ‘For distinguished service rendered during the course of the campaign.’ M2-119037 Sergeant Allan James Hancock served with the Army Service Corps during the Great War on the Western Front from 1.10.1915.

x289 Four: Battery Quarter Master Sergeant A. Gooseman, Royal Field Artillery 1914-15 Star (50557 Sjt. A. Gooseman. R.F.A.); British War and Victory Medals (50557 B.Q.M. Sjt. A. Gooseman. R.A.); France, Republic, Croix de Guerre, reverse dated ‘1914-1917’, bronze, with bronze palme on riband, nearly extremely fine (4) £80-120
French Croix de Guerre London Gazette 14.7.1917 50557 Sergeant Arthur Gooseman, Royal Field Artillery ‘For distinguished services rendered during the course of the campaign.’ 50557 Battery Quarter Master Sergeant Arthur Gooseman served with the Royal Field Artillery during the Great War on the Western Front from 31.8.1915.

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oRdeRS, deCoRAtionS, CAmPAign medALS And miLitARiA 291 Three: Stoker W.J. Eveleigh, Royal Navy, Killed in Action at the Battle of Jutland Aboard H.M.S. Invincible, 31.5.1916 1914-15 Star (K.14736. W.J. Eveleigh, Ch. Sto., R.N.); British War and Victory Medals (K.14736 W.J. Eveleigh. Sto.1 R.N.), extremely fine, with the recipient’s Great War Bronze Memorial Plaque (William John Eveleigh), with card holder; named card box of issue for the BWM and VM; and three post cards of H.M.S. Invincible (3) £200-240
K.14736 Stoker William John Eveleigh, born Symondsbury, Dorset, June 1889; enlisted in the Royal Navy as Stoker II Class, 23.4.1912; promoted Stoker I Class, 24.4.1913; transferred to H.M.S. Invincible, 3.8.1914, and served in her during the Great War; present at the Battle of Heligoland Bight, 28.8.1914, and the Battle of the Falklands, 8.12.1914, when H.M.S. Invincible and H.M.S. Inflexible sank the German armoured cruisers Scharnhorst and Gneisenau; killed in action at the Battle of Jutland, 31.5.1916, when H.M.S. Invincible suffered a direct hit to her midships magazine, which blew her in half, and sank within 90 seconds, with the loss of all but six of her crew of 1,032 Officers and ratings; Eveleigh is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial.

295 Three: Captain J.A. Weston, Royal Fusiliers 1914-15 Star (2.Lieut. J.A. Weston. R. Fus.); British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaves (Capt. J.A. Weston.), extremely fine (3) £80-120
M.I.D. London Gazette 15.6.1916 Weston, Lt. (temp. Capt.), J.A., Royal Fusiliers Captain John Archibald Weston, born Endmoor, Kendal, Westmoreland, February 1896, the son of Colonel John Wakefield Weston, M.P., Border Regiment; educated at Rugby; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Royal Fusiliers, 1.10.1914; served with the Regiment during the Great War on the Western Front from 26.11.1914; promoted Lieutenant, 21.5.1915; appointed Adjutant and temporary Captain, 1st Battalion, 1.10.1918; died of pneumonia, 23.5.1920, and is buried in Aldershot Military Cemetery.

296 Three: Private J. McGowan, Seaforth Highlanders 1914-15 Star (3-8010 Pte. J. Mc.Gowan. Sea: Highrs.); British War and Victory Medals (3-8010 Pte. J. McGowan. Seaforth.), BWM officially renamed, nearly very fine General Service 1918-62, G.VI.R., one clasp (2), Palestine (2819318 Pte. C. Hopkins. Seaforth.); Malaya (19042914 Pte. H. Munro. Seaforth.), good very fine Second World War Medals (10), 1939-1945 Star (2); Africa Star, with copy 8th Army Bar; Burma Star; Italy Star; copy France and Germany Star; Defence Medal (2); War Medal (2), generally good very fine or better (15) £90-110 297 Three: Second Lieutenant L.J.P. Thomas, Rifle Brigade, Late Honourable Artillery Company 1914-15 Star (3288 Pte. L.J.P. Thomas. H.A.C.); British War and Victory Medals (2.Lieut L.J.P. Thomas.), good very fine (3) £80-120
Second Lieutenant L.J.P. Thomas, Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Rifle Brigade, 28.6.1918.

292 Three: Warrant Officer Class I A. White, Royal Engineers 1914-15 Star (1426 F. of W. S.Mjr. A. White. R.E.); British War and Victory Medals (1426 W.O. Cl.I .A. White. R.E.), very fine Three: Lieutenant J.W. Bennett, Inland Water Transport British War Medal (Lieut. J.W. Bennett); Mercantile Marine War Medal (John W. Bennett); Victory Medal (Lieut. J.W. Bennett.), good very fine (6) £60-80 293 Three: Second Lieutenant B. Sutton, Royal Artillery, Late Honourable Artillery Company 1914-15 Star (784. Dvr. B. Sutton. H.A.C.); British War and Victory Medals (2.Lieut B. Sutton.), good very fine (3) £80-120
Second Lieutenant B. Sutton, Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Royal Artillery , 24.6.1918.

x294 Three: Sapper J.S. Applin, Royal Engineers 1914-15 Star (66426 Spr: J.S. Applin. R.E.); British War and Victory Medals (66426 Spr. J.S. Applin. R.E.), good very fine India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., one clasp, North West Frontier 1930-31 (3700 L-Nk. Samsher Gurung. 1-6 G.R.), polished, nearly very fine General Service 1918-62, G.VI.R., one clasp, Malaya (10955 3rd. P.C. Abdul. Razak P. Talib. F.of M. Pol.), good very fine India Service Medal, unnamed, nearly very fine (6) £70-90

298 Three: Private E.J. Blow, Honourable Artillery Company 1914-15 Star (2697 Pte. E.J. Blow. H.A.C.); British War and Victory Medals (2697 Pte. E.J. Blow. H.A.C.), good very fine British War Medal (2) (Major R. Wightman; 10310 Pte. R.J. Wilson. H.A.C. -Inf.-), good very fine Victory Medal (2) (650 Gnr. G.S. Bowen. H.A.C. Art.-; 4432 Dvr. S.L. West. H.A.C. -Art.-), good very fine (7) £60-80
Major R. Wightman, Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Honourable Artillery Company, 4.7.1916.

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Lieutenant O.E. Worsley in his S.5

299 A Great War Group of Three to Seaplane Pilot Flight Lieutenant O.E. Worsley, Royal Naval Air Service and Royal Air Force, Part of The British Team that Won The Schneider Trophy, 26.9.1927, and Set A World Speed Record in the Process British War and Victory Medal, M.I.D. Oak Leaves (Lieut. O.E. Worsley. R.A.F.); Iraq, Kingdom, Active Service Medal, one clasp, 1930-31, very fine or better, with a large file of copied research, including several photographic images, one of which shows the recipient wearing a 1914-15 Star alongside his other medals (3) £250-350
M.I.D. London Gazette 3.6.1919 Lt. Oswald Ewart Worsley (Egypt & Palestine) ‘This Officer has carried out many long and successful patrols. He has always worked with keenness and alacrity.’ Flight Lieutenant Oswald Ewart Worsley, ‘born at Kensington, London, in 1898, and was educated at Merton House and Westbourne Schools. He joined up as a mechanic in the R.N.A.S. in 1914, became Flight Officer in January, 1917, and was promoted Flight Sub-Lieutenant in the following June. On formation of the R.A.F. he was made Flight-Lieutenant, and during 1918 he served in the Mediterranean and was specially mentioned in dispatches. He left the Service in 1919, but returned as a short service officer in July, 1921, and was granted a permanent commission early in 1925.’; gained R.A.C. Flying Certificate (no. 7296), 4.5.1917; appointed Flight Sub-Lieutenant, Royal Naval Air Service 27.6.1917; subsequent service included at Vendome, Cranwell and Calshot; posted as a Pilot to the Seaplane Base, Alexandria (Shorts 184), April 1918; carried out numerous patrols and convoy escorts from May; was part of a crew that flew a Large America F3 that carried out a return flight from Alexandria to Suda Bay, Crete, November 1918; this was requested by General Salmond and was for the express purpose of escorting a Handley-Page to Alexandria; having re-entered service after the War he was part of the team that

The Schneider Trophy score-board

won the Schneider Trophy for Britain at Venice 1927 - when they also set a world speed record; Flight gives the following ‘The Trophy Race for seaplanes, originally scheduled to take place at Venice on Sunday, September 25th, had to be postponed until Monday, September 26th, owing to unfavourable weather conditions. By Monday midday the conditions had improved, and the race was held, resulting in a win for Great Britain, at the impressive average speed of 453.282 km/h (281.54mph). The winning machine, the Supermarine S.5 geared with Napier engine, was piloted by Flight-Lieutenant Webster. Second place was secured by Flight-Lieutenant Worsley on another Supermarine S.5, similar to the winner but fitted with a direct-drive Napier engine. His average speed was 439.472 km/h (272.96mph)....The total length of the course was 350kms (217 miles)’; posted to 503 (County of Lincoln) Squadron, Waddington, November 1928.

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x300 Seven: Jemadar Ghulam Mohammed, Punjab Regiment British War Medal (323 Sepoy Ghulam Mohd, 92 Pjbis.); Victory Medal, erased; India General Service 1936-39, two clasps, North West Frontier 1936-37, North West Frontier 1937-39 (Jemdr. Ghulam Mohd. 4-8 Punjab R.); 1939-1945 Star; Africa Star; Defence and War Medals, BWM worn, otherwise very fine Pair: Havildar Wahid Ullah, 20th Infantry British War Medal (1424 Hav. Wahid Ullah, 20 Infy.); Indian Army Meritorious Service Medal, G.V.R. (1424 Havr. Wahid Ullah, 20/Infy.), suspension claw tightened on BWM, nearly very fine Seven: Havildar Shah Sawar, Punjab Regiment India General Service 1936-39, one clasp, North West Frontier 1937-39 (8593 Hav Sheh Sawar, 5-8 Punjab R.), with minor official corrections; 1939-1945 Star; Italy Star; Defence and War Medals; General Service 1918-62, G.VI.R., one clasp, S.E. Asia 1945-46, unnamed as issued by Pakistan authorities postPartition; Coronation 1953, good very fine (16) £120-150 301 A Great War Fighter Pilot’s Campaign Group of Five to Lieutenant L.S.V. Gedge, 43 Squadron, Royal Air Force, Who Was Credited With At Least 3 Victories, One of Which According to His Log Book Was a Member of the ‘Flying Circus’ British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. L.S.V. Gedge. R.A.F.); 1939-1945 Star; Defence and War Medals, BWM with official corrections, V.M. officially renamed, generally very fine, with photocopies of two of recipient’s Log Books, photographic images and a comprehensive file of research (5) £180-220
Lieutenant Sydney Victor Lathom Gedge (1897-1973), born Westminster and known as Lathom Gedge; educated at Albion House, Margate; The Gymnasium at Bonn, Germany; the Ecole Continental, Lausanne, Switzerland and Merchant Taylor’s School, Northwood; served as a Cadet, 2nd Artist Rifles, O.T.C., from 8.6.1916; commissioned Temporary Second Lieutenant (On Probation), Royal Flying Corps, 26.1.1917; posted as Pilot to “A” Flight, 43 (Fighter) Squadron (Sopwith 1 1/2 Strutters and then Camels), Treizennes, France, 5.5.1917; transferred to “B” Flight in November of the same year; initially flying Reconnaissance Patrols and Photography missions Gedge did not have to wait long to have his first success, ‘A patrol of six Sopwiths of 43 Squadron met nine hostile scouts. Capt. K.L. Gopsill & 2nd Lt. E.H. Jones drove down one scout but were then attacked by two others, and 2nd Lt. Jones was wounded. He continued fighting and after firing 20 rounds one attacking scout burst into flames and fell. 2nd Lt. C.H. Harriman & 2/A.M. O’Shea hit another scout in which the pilot was believed to have been killed and the machine fell out of control; while still another was sent down out of control by 2nd Lt. L. Gedge and C.S.M. L.M. Lava’ (R.F.C. Communiques 1917-18, refers); whilst carrying out a Line Patrol over Armentieres - Lens - Arras, 12.6.1917, ‘Observer [Corporal Collins] wounded by direct hit by “Archie” ’ (Log Book refers); four days later with Private Blatherwick as his Observer, ‘We bought down 1 E.A. which was seen to crash

Lieutenant L.S.V. Gedge

in Lens’ (Ibid); Gedge had a change of luck whilst flying a Photographic Reconnaissance, 2.7.1917, ‘Scrap with 8 E.A. over Douai. Got separated - Bloody Awful!! “Wind Up” ’ (Log Book refers); in August 1917 he was primarily involved in Reconnaissance work over enemy trenches, including 15.8.1917, ‘Dived on Troops marching along Hot Road and Bois de Quartorze; the party was about 700 strong and was scattered by M. Gun fire. Fired on M. Transport and cyclists. Dived and fired on Highgate Trench which was seen to be full of men’ (Squadron Report, refers); two days later he was in action with Blatherwick again, when they shot down an enemy aircraft in flames, ‘while taking photographs over Sallamines we were attacked by 4 Albatross Scouts and 8 other machines behind them I opened fire on the nearest one. After seeing a spurt of flame come from him I turned and fired on the other one and saw him no more. 1 drum was fired into each machine. The second machine was hit in the engine and turned and dived East’ (Combat Report refers); on 20.8.1917 both Pilot and Observer were on the receiving end whilst on patrol from La Bassee to Gavrelle, ‘Centre Section shot through by Albatross Scout. “Wind Up!!” ’ (Log Book refers); throughout October he had a number of indecisive combats, and continued this in to November, whilst on Offensive Patrol between Wavrin and Seclin, 8.11.1917, ‘on receiving notice of the presence of this machine, I went up and immediately attacked the 2 str. from behind, at a range of 400 yds. The machine went into a steep dive, but I did not see what happened as I was attacked from above by an Albatross Scout, which then went off. I did not see any signs of a 2 str. machine anywhere afterward’ (Combat Report, refers); posted 44 Squadron (Sopwith Camels), Hainault Farm, Essex,18.1.1918; whilst serving with the latter squadron he was involved in home defence against German bombing raids, most notably in the night attacks on London 29/30.1.1918 when the Germans despatched four Giants of Rfa 501 and also in response to the attack of 28 Gothas and three Giants, 19/20.5.1918; as a result of the latter bombing raid 49 people were killed and 177 injured; posted to 33 Squadron 22.11.1918; discharged 13.6.1919; he became a solicitor in later life.

117

oRdeRS, deCoRAtionS, CAmPAign medALS And miLitARiA 302 Family Group: Pair: Gunner N.D. Metcalf, Royal Artillery British War and Victory Medals (L-12531 Gnr. N.D. Metcalf. R.A.), VM officially renamed, very fine, with the recipient’s Sailors and Soldiers Free Buffet at Victoria Station Christmas 1916 Souvenir pouch, and British Legion lapel badge Pair: Attributed to Fusilier J. Metcalf, Royal Northumberland Fusiliers 1939-1945 Star; War Medal, extremely fine, in named card box of issue, addressed to ‘Mrs. A. Metcalf, 11 River View, Prudhoe on Tyne, Northumberland’ Family Group: Four: Attributed to Flight Lieutenant J.S. Barr, Royal Air Force 1939-1945 Star; Africa Star; Italy Star; War Medal, extremely fine, with Air Council enclosure, in named card box of issue, addressed to ‘F/L J.S. Barr, Old Enton, Witley, Surrey’ Pair: Mrs. L.L. Barr Defence and War Medals, extremely fine, in named card box of issue, addressed to ‘Mrs. L.L. Barr, Old Enton, Witley, Surrey’, together with her British Red Cross Society Proficiency in Red Cross First-Aid Badge, gilt and enamel, the reverse named ‘16716 L. Grimley’, in card box of issue; and British Red Cross Society 3 Years’ Service Badge, gilt and enamel, the reverse numbered ‘7273’, with Second Award Bar and integral top riband bar, in numbered card box of issue Pair: Attributed to Corporal H.G. Sylvester, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve 1939-1945 Star; War Medal, extremely fine, in named card box of issue, addressed to ‘Mrs. E.M. Sylvester, 44 The Drove, Andover, Hants’ Second World War Medals (9), 1939-1945 Star; France and Germany Star (2); Defence Medal (3); War Medal (3), generally very fine or better, together with an R.A.F. cap badge (21) £120-150
4273522 Fusilier John Metcalf, the son of Gunner Nicholas Dobson Metcalf, Royal Artillery, and Annie Jane Metcalf, of Prudhoe on Tyne, Northumberland; served with the 8th Battalion, Royal Northumberland Fusiliers during the Second World War; taken Prisoner of War at Dunkirk; died in captivity in Poland, 4.10.1942, and is buried in Krakow Rakowicki Cemetery, Poland. Flight Lieutenant John Stoddart Barr, Commissioned Flying Officer, Medical Branch, Royal Air Force, 14.11.1941; promoted Flight Lieutenant, 14.11.1942; married Miss Lorna Lavinia Grimley. 1157864 Corporal Harry Garnet Sylvester, died 21.5.1943, and is buried in Brookwood Military Cemetery, Surrey.

303 Pair: Second Lieutenant L.P. Bennett, Royal West Surrey Regiment British War and Victory Medals (2. Lieut. L.P. Bennett.), extremely fine Pair: Private G. Angelinetta, Rifle Brigade British War and Victory Medals (S-2062 Pte. G. Angelinetta. Rif. Brig.), file marks to BWM, otherwise very fine 1914 Star, with copy Bar (578 Gnr: J.C.H. Shaw. R.G.A.), nearly very fine 1914-15 Star (3120 Pte. W. Bartram. 15-Lond. R.), good very fine British War Medal (2) (21323. Cpl. C.W. Bullows. R.F.C.; 48980 Pte. W.J. Stevens. E. Surr. R.), nearly extremely fine Mercantile Marine War Medal (Alan P. Williams), good very fine Victory Medal (2) (2417 Pte. A. Phillips. Som. L.I.); bi-lingual reverse type (Sjt. G. Watson. S.A.S.C.), good very fine or better British Red Cross Society War Medal, unnamed as issued, good very fine, with integral top riband bar Great War Silver War Badge, reverse impressed ‘300782’, good very fine Allied Victory Medals (5), for Belgium, Czechoslovakia, Greece, Italy, and the United States of America, bronze, generally good very fine (lot) £150-200
Second Lieutenant Leslie Punsfer Bennett, served during the Great War with the 4th Battalion, Queen’s (Royal West Surrey) Regiment; died of wounds, 16.2.1917, and is buried in Bray Military Cemetery, France. S-2062 Private Gilbert Angelinetta, born Wootton Bassett, Wiltshire; enlisted in the Rifle Brigade and served with the 7th Battalion during the Great War; killed in action on the Western Front, 30.7.1915, and is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium.

x304 Pair: Second Lieutenant N. Freeman, Royal West Surrey Regiment British War and Victory Medals (2.Lieut. N. Freeman), nearly extremely fine Great War Bronze Memorial Campbell), good very fine (3) Plaque (John £50-70
Second Lieutenant Noel Freeman, born Cilwendeg Park, Pembrokeshire; educated at The Old Ride, Bournemouth, and at Lancing College; served with the 3rd Battalion, Queen’s (Royal West Surrey) Regiment during the Great War; killed in action on the Western Front whilst attached to the 7th Battalion, 5.4.1918, and is buried in VillersBretonneux Military Cemetery, France. There are several men with the name John Campbell listed on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission roll.

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July 25, 2013 - London 305 Pair: Gunner C. Morgan, Honourable Artillery Company British War and Victory Medals (624945 Gnr. C. Morgan. H.A.C. -Art.-), good very fine Pair: Driver D.H. Clement, Honourable Artillery Company British War and Victory Medals (626032 Dvr. D.H. Clement. H.A.C. -Art.-), extremely fine (4) £50-70 306 Pair: Driver R.D. Barratt, Honourable Artillery Company British War and Victory Medals (625570 Dvr. R.D. Barratt. H.A.C. -Art.-), extremely fine, in named card box of issue Pair: Driver J.O. Williams, Honourable Artillery Company British War and Victory Medals (6618 Dvr. J.O. Williams. H.A.C. -Art.-), nearly extremely fine (4) £50-70 307 Pair: Sergeant C.S.S. Cross, Honourable Artillery Company British War and Victory Medals (4621. Sjt. C.S.S. Cross. H.A.C. -Inf.-), nearly extremely fine Pair: Private C. Rawlings, Honourable Artillery Company British War and Victory Medals (11520 Pte. C. Rawlings. H.A.C. -Inf.-), nearly extremely fine (4) £50-70 308 Pair: Private C.P. Bennett, Honourable Artillery Company British War and Victory Medals (10778 Pte. C.P. Bennett. H.A.C. -Inf.-), nearly extremely fine Pair: Private L. Herbert, Honourable Artillery Company British War and Victory Medals (10345 Pte. L. Herbert. H.A.C. -Inf.-), nearly extremely fine (4) £50-70 309 Pair: Private P.K. Brown, Honourable Artillery Company British War and Victory Medals (10340 Pte. P.K. Brown. H.A.C. -Inf.-), nearly extremely fine Pair: Private N.P. Marks, Honourable Artillery Company British War and Victory Medals (11079 Pte. N.P. Marks. H.A.C. -Inf.-), nearly extremely fine (4) £60-80
10340 Private Patrick Kirkwood Brown, born Dalston, London; enlisted in the Honourable Artillery Company and served during the Great War with the 2nd Battalion; died of wounds on the Western Front, 15.10.1917, and is buried in Outtersteene Communal Cemetery, France.

310 Pair: Private H.E. Davies, Honourable Artillery Company British War and Victory Medals (10774 Pte. H.E. Davies. H.A.C. -Inf.-), good very fine Pair: Private A.T. Howlings, Honourable Artillery Company British War and Victory Medals (3453 Pte. A.T. Howlings. H.A.C. -Inf.-), minor edge bruise to BWM, good very fine (4) £50-70 311 Pair: Private F.E.C. Staff, Honourable Artillery Company British War and Victory Medals (10751 Pte. F.E.C. Staff. H.A.C. -Inf.-), good very fine Pair: Private A.G. Trowsdale, Honourable Artillery Company British War and Victory Medals (9369 Pte. A.G. Trowsdale. H.A.C. -Inf.-), nearly extremely fine (4) £50-70 312 Pair: Private T. Windsor, Honourable Artillery Company British War and Victory Medals (D-20 Pte. T. Windsor. H.A.C. -Inf.-), nearly extremely fine, in named card box of issue, with Record Office enclosure Pair: Private C.B. Wise, Honourable Artillery Company British War and Victory Medals (11280 Pte. C.B. Wise. H.A.C. -Inf.-), good very fine (4) £50-70 313 Pair: Private A.C. Medhurst, Royal West Kent Regiment British War Medal (1712 Pte. A.C. Medhurst R.W. Kent R.); Territorial Force War Medal (1712 Pte. A.C. Medhurst. R.W. Kent R.), extremely fine (2) £160-200
1712 Private A.C. Medhurst, served during the Great War with the Royal West Kent Regiment in India; subsequently invalided home. This is the recipient’s full entitlement; he is not entitled to the Victory Medal.

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314

x314 Five: Major G.A. Webb, 9th Northern Bengal Mounted Rifles British War Medal (Maj. G.A. Webb.); Jubilee 1935; Coronation 1937; Indian Volunteer Forces Officer’s Decoration, G.VI.R., silver, reverse engraved, ‘Maj. G.A. Webb 9th Northern Bengal Mtd. Rfls. I.D.F.’, lacking top riband bar; Volunteer Force Long Service & G.C., G.V.R. (Lieut: G.A. Webb Northern Bl: Mounted Rifles), generally very fine or better (5) £300-400
Major George Augustus Webb commissioned 9th Northern Bengal Mounted Rifles, Indian Defence Force, 1.4.1917.

x316 Five: Major L.H. Tomkins, Indian Army India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., two clasps, Waziristan 1919-21, Waziristan 1921-24 (Lieut. L.H. Tomkins, 106 Pnrs), file marks over rank; India General Service 1936-39, one clasp, North West Frontier 1936-37 (Major L.H. Tomkins, I.A.O.C.); 1939-1945 Star; Burma Star; India Service Medal, generally very fine (5) £160-200
Major Leslie Herbert Tomkins, born 1900; commissioned Second Lieutenant, Indian Army, 29.1.1920; advanced Major 29.1.1938.

315 Pair: Corporal T. Meadows, Manchester Regiment British War Medal (1735 Pte. J. Meadows Manch. R.); Territorial Efficiency Medal, G.V.R. (3511162 Cpl. J. Meadows. 5-Manch. R.), very fine British War Medal (3) (12910 Gnr. J. Mahon. R.A.; 12878 Pte. A. Berry. S. Lan. R.; 203776 Pte. S. Lloyd. Manch. R.), first and third officially renamed, very fine (5) £70-100

x317 Five: Daffadur Ratan Singh, 20th Lancers India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., one clasp, North West Frontier 1930-31 (8 Daf. Ratan Singh. 20 Lrs.); 1939-1945 Star; War Medal; India Service Medal; Pakistan Independence Medal 1947, nearly extremely fine Four: Sepoy Ghulam Hussain, 11th Sikh Regiment India General Service 1936-39, one clasp, North West Frontier 1937-39 (12507 Sep. Ghulam Hussain , 5-11 Sikh R.); 1939-1945 Star; Pacific Star; War Medal, the Pacific Star partially silver-plated, nearly very fine (9) £120-160

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319 318 Pair: Private G. Jenkins, Hampshire Regiment India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., one clasp, North West Frontier 1935 (5495033 Pte. G. Jenkins. Hamps. R.); India General Service 1936-39, one clasp, North West Frontier 1936-37 (5495033 Pte. G. Jenkins. Hamps. R.), minor edge bruise to first, good very fine (2) £120-160 319 Nine: Chief Petty Officer J.J. Blacklock, Royal Navy 1939-1945 Star; Atlantic Star, with France and Germany Bar; Africa Star; Burma Star, with Pacific Bar; Italy Star; War Medal, M.I.D. Oak Leaf; Korea 1950-53, 1st ‘Britt: Omn:’ type (C/K 65976 J.T. Blacklock C.P.O.S.M. R.N.); United Nations Medal for Korea; Naval Long Service & G.C., G.VI.R. (K.65976 J.J. Blacklock. S.P.O. H.M.S. Renown.), very fine or better (9) £220-260
M.I.D. London Gazette 18.1.1944 Chief Stoker John Joseph Blacklock, C/K.65976 (Gillingham, Kent) ‘For gallant and distinguished services in H.M. ships... Warspite... in operations in the Mediterranean from the time of the entry of Italy into the war until the surrender of the Italian fleet.’

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oRdeRS, deCoRAtionS, CAmPAign medALS And miLitARiA 320 Five: G.F.C. Burden, Royal Air Force 1939-1945 Star; Air Crew Europe Star; Italy Star; Defence and War Medals, nearly extremely fine, with Air Council enclosure, and card box of issue, addressed to ‘G.F.C. Burden Esq., 41 Southwater Road, St. Leonards on Sea, Sussex’; together with an R.A.F. Cap Badge and Button; and the recipient’s Royal Air Force Athletic and Cross Country Association Team Championships Medal, bronze, the reverse engraved ‘1934 1 Mile Junior Relay Race Runners-up’ (5) £200-240 x321 Seven: Trooper W.F. Tompsett, Westminster Dragoons 1939-1945 Star; Africa Star, with 8th Army Bar; Italy Star; France and Germany Star; Defence and War Medals; Efficiency Medal, G.VI.R., with ‘Territorial’ scroll suspension (7896426. Tpr. W.F. Tompsett. W. Dgns.), generally good very fine, mounted for wear (7) £100-140 322 Eight: Sapper H.T. Emmerson, Royal Engineers, Late Royal Signals 1939-1945 Star; Africa Star; Italy Star; Defence and War Medals; Korea 1950-53, 1st ‘Britt: Omn:’ type (2044926 Sigmn. H.T. Emmerson. R. Sigs.); United Nations Medal for Korea; General Service 1918-62, E.II.R., one clasp, Near East (22974245 Spr. H.T. Emmerson. R.E.), number partially officially corrected on last, very fine (8) £160-200 x323 Five: Lieutenant F.O. Noome, South African Air Force 1939-1945 Star; Africa Star; Defence and War Medals; Africa Service Medal, all officially named ‘102200 F.O. Noome’, nearly very fine Five: Naik Ujir Sing Gurung, 3rd Gurkha Rifles 1939-1945 Star; Burma Star; Defence Medal; War Medal (38530 W/S/Nk. Ujir Sing Gurung, 3 G.R.); Indian Independence Medal 1947 (38530 Nk. Ujir Sing Gurung. R.C., 3 G.R.), file marks to edge of Defence Medal, nearly very fine (10) £100-140
102200 Lieutenant Frederick Owen Noome, born 1919; served during the Second World War with No.227 Squadron, South African Air Force; killed in action when shot down off the Greek coast, 6.9.1942, and is commemorated on the Malta Memorial. The first operational No.227 Squadron of the Second World War was formed 20.8.1942 by the re-designation of a detachment of Beaufighters from No.235 Squadron on Malta. The new Squadron became operational on the same day, providing a fighter escort for No.39 Squadron. The Squadron flew escort missions in August-October, before starting to fly offensive patrols of its own from November. The pressure of continuous operations from Malta slowly took its toll, and in February 1943 the Squadron was withdrawn from operations and dispersed.

324 Six: Flight Lieutenant W.G. Randall, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve 1939-1945 Star; France and Germany Star; Defence and War Medals; Imperial Service Medal, E.II.R. (Walter George Randall); Cadet Forces Medal, E.II.R. (Act. Flt. Lt. W.G. Randall. R.A.F.V.R. (T)), good very fine (6) £100-140 325 Three: Superintendent J. Gittings, Warwickshire Police Defence Medal; Coronation 1953; Police Long Service & G.C., G.VI.R. (Supt. John Gittings), nearly extremely fine, mounted court style as worn (3) £70-90 326 Pair: Leading Electrical Mechanic (Air) P.A. Samuel, Royal Navy Korea 1950-53, 1st ‘Britt: Omn:’ type (L/SFX. 788665 P.A. Samuel A/L.E.M. (A). R.N.), officially renamed; United Nations Medal for Korea, good very fine (2) £70-90 x327 Pair: Trooper E.R. Solomon, Royal Armoured Corps Korea 1950-53, 1st ‘Britt: Omn:’ type (22516639 Tpr. E.R. Solomon. R.A.C.); United Nations Medal for Korea, good very fine (2) £140-180 x328 Pair: Private D. Bell, Royal Scots Korea 1950-53, 1st ‘Britt: Omn:’ type (22663179 Pte. D. Bell. R.S.), file marks to edge; United Nations Medal for Korea, very fine (2) £140-180 x329 Pair: J.S. Bert, Australian Forces Vietnam 1964-73 (44433 J.S. Bert); Vietnam, Republic, South Vietnam Campaign Medal, with 1960 Bar, gilt and enamel, reverse engraved ‘44433 J.S. Bert’, nearly extremely fine (2) £180-220

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330

x330 Three: Gunner M.T. Sewell, Royal Artillery General Service 1962-2007, one clasp, Northern Ireland (24333530 Gnr. M.T. Sewell RA); South Atlantic 1982, with rosette (24333530 Gnr M T Sewell RA); Army Long Service & G.C., E.II.R., with ‘Regular Army’ bar suspension (24333530 Gnr M T Sewell RA), minor edge nicks, generally good very fine, mounted for display (3) £450-550 x331 Pair: Private B. Douglas, Royal Scots General Service 1962-2007, one clasp, Northern Ireland (24530624 Pte. B. Douglas RS); Gulf 199091, one clasp, 16 Jan to 28 Feb 1991 (24530624 Pte. B Douglas RS), generally very fine or better, mounted court-style for display (2) £280-320 x332 Pair: Private J.W. Gallagher, Royal Anglian Regiment General Service 1962-2007, one clasp, Northern Ireland (25007030 Pte J W Gallagher R Anglian); United Nations Protection Force Medal (UNPROFOR), extremely fine (2) £50-70

331

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CORONATION, JUBILEE, MERITORIOUS, LONG SERVICE AND EFFICIENCY DECORATIONS AND MEDALS

H.M.S. Leander 333 Imperial Service Medal (4), E.VII.R., ‘Star’ type (John Brennan); G.V.R., circular type, 1st ‘coinage head’ type (Lilian Maude Lane.); G.VI.R. (John Leisk Finlayson.); E.II.R. (Lewry Towner), nearly extremely fine Jubilee (Metropolitan Police) 1887, with 1897 bar (PC, H. Russell. W. Div:), nearly very fine Coronation 1902, bronze, unnamed as issued, nearly very fine Jubilee 1935, unnamed as issued, extremely fine Coronation 1937, unnamed as issued, very fine Coronation 1953, unnamed as issued, light contact marks, good very fine (9) £180-220 x334 Imperial Service Medal (2), G.V.R., circular type, 1st ‘coinage head’ type (Isabella Simpson.); E.II.R. (Thomas Smith Lindsay), nearly extremely fine Indian Army Long Service & G.C. (2), G.V.R. (470 Driver Jetha Singh. 28th. Mtn. By.); G.VI.R. (1468 L-Hav. Bhag Ali, 10-2 Punjab R.), nearly very fine Pakistan Independence Medal 1947 (28839 Rfn Ibrahim 13 FF Rif), nearly very fine Service Medal of the Order of St. John (22155 A/Sis. G. Bland. No.4 Dis. S.J.A.B. 1940.), good very fine (6) £70-90 x335 Imperial Service Medal, G.V.R., circular type, 2nd ‘Coronation robes’ type (Edward Peter Gray), extremely fine, in case of issue Army Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Field Marshal’s bust’ type (1403092 Bmbr. J. Merritt. R.G.A.), traces of lacquer, good very fine Naval Long Service & G.C., G.VI.R. (2) (J.97583 G.G. Hopgood. A.B. H.M.S. Leander.; K.63959 R.W. Smith. Sto.1. H.M.S. Orion.), latter partially officially corrected, nearly extremely fine, with postcard photographs of both H.M.S. Leander and Orion Special Constabulary Long Service Medal, G.VI.R. (Harold Shill), nearly extremely fine (5) £70-90
J.97583 Able Seaman George Charles Hopgood, born Southampton, 12.1.1905; enlisted in the Royal Navy, serving as Boy Second Class in H.M.S. Impregnable, 18.6.1920; transferred to H.M.S. Malaya, 30.4.1921, and was aboard during her visit to her donors in Malaya, taking H.R.H. the Duke of Connaught to India on the way; on her return she was ordered to Constantinople in response to the Chanak crisis, and carried the deposed Sultan to Malta and exile; advanced Ordinary Seaman, 12.1.1923; Able Seaman, 19.7.1923; subsequently transferred to H.M.S. Leander; awarded L.S. & G.C., 20.12.1937. K.63959 Stoker 1st Class R.W. Smith, served in H.M.S. Orion on the America and West Indies station, 1937-39; awarded L.S. & G.C., 24.3.1939.

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July 25, 2013 - London

336

336 Empress of India 1877, gold, about extremely fine, scarce £3,000-4,000 x337 Empress of India 1877, silver, unnamed as issued, good very fine £300-350 x338 Jubilee 1887, silver, unnamed as issued, nearly extremely fine £70-90

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339 (part)

340

339 Delhi Durbar 1903, silver, unnamed as issued, extremely fine, lacking top riband buckle Delhi Durbar 1911, silver, unnamed as issued, extremely fine £120-160 340 Visit of the Prince and Princess of Wales to India 1905-06, small oval medal, silver, good very fine £60-80
Silver medals were presented to all hands aboard H.M. Ships Renown and Terrible, and the Royal Yacht Osborne.

x343 Army Long Service & G.C., V.R. (823. Corpl. J. Fitzgerald. 6th. Dragns.), very fine £80-120
823 Corporal John Fitzgerald, born Youghal, Co. Cork, 1846; enlisted in the 6th Dragoons, March 1867; promoted Corporal, March 1884; awarded L.S. & G.C., March 1886; discharged, June 1895, after 28 years and 104 days with the Colours.

341 Meritorious Service Medal, G.V.R., 1st ‘Field Marshal’s bust’ type (5385 Gnr: E. Ormonde, R.G.A.), obverse polished, nearly very fine £70-90
M.S.M. London Gazette 3.6.1919 5385 Gnr. Ormonde, E., 23rd Siege By., Royal Garrison Artillery (Dublin) ‘In recognition of valuable service rendered with the Armies in France and Flanders.’

x344 Army Long Service & G.C., V.R. (1886 Serjt. R. Gauld. 1st. Bn. 25th. Regt.), minor edge bruise, good very fine £70-90
1886 Sergeant Robert Gauld, born Huntley, Aberdeenshire 1821; enlisted as 1636 Private, 1st (Royal Scots) Foot, February 1841; transferred to the 25th (King’s Own Borderers) Foot, April 1842; promoted Corporal, September 1851; Sergeant, August 1854; discharged, May 1862, after 21 years and 116 days with the Colours, of which 13 years were spent in India.

342 Army Long Service & G.C., V.R. (875. Sqdn. C. Maj. H. Merrill. 2nd. Life Gds.), rank partially officially corrected, nearly extremely fine National Fire Brigade Association Long Service Medal, silver (Hallmarks for Birmingham 1920), unnamed, good very fine (2) £120-160
875 Squadron Corporal Major Harry Merrill, born Long Buckley, Northamptonshire, 1856; enlisted in the Life Guards, November 1875; promoted Corporal, April 1880; Corporal of Horse, January 1883; Troop Corporal Major, October 1886; transferred to the Middlesex Yeomanry, December 1895; discharged, with the rank of Squadron Corporal Major, 28.9.1901, after 25 years and 330 days with the Colours.

345 Army Long Service & G.C., V.R. (2234 Chas, Burns. 27th. Regt.), suspension claw re-affixed, good very fine £70-90
2234 Private Charles Burns, born Newry, Co. Down, October 1830; enlisted in the 27th (Inniskilling) Regiment of Foot, September 1848; awarded L.S.&G.C., 1869; discharged, October 1869, after 21 years and 22 days with the Colours, of which 13 years were spent in India.

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346

348

352

x346 Army Long Service & G.C., V.R. (Pte. 1670. W. Dorrington. 66th. Regt. 1859), impressed naming, rank and year additionally engraved, minor edge nicks, nearly extremely fine £70-90
1670 Private William Dorrington, born Spitalfields, London, 1822; enlisted in the 66th (Berkshire) Foot, March 1841; awarded L.S. & G.C., September 1859; discharged, April 1862, after 21 years and 19 days with the Colours.

349 Naval Long Service & G.C., V.R. (Henry West, Ch. Boatn., H.M. Coast Guard.), good very fine £70-90
Chief Boatman Henry West, born Titchfield, Hampshire, January 1854; enlisted in the Royal Navy, January 1872; promoted Able Seaman, January 1875; Petty Officer, May 1877; transferred to the Coast Guard as Boatman, August 1882; advanced Chief Boatman, November 1890; awarded L.S.& G.C., February 1894; retired, January 1909.

347 Army Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Field Marshal’s bust’ type (1130 Ar: S. Sjt: J.S. Brockett. A.O.C.), extremely fine Volunteer Force Long Service & G.C., V.R. (3700 Gr. J. Millar 1st. F.V.A.), very fine Territorial Force Efficiency Medal, G.V.R. (463171 Spr M.D. Woodward. R.E.), good very fine Miniature Awards: Efficiency Decoration, G.V.R., with top ‘Territorial’ riband bar; Territorial Efficiency Medal, G.V.R., good very fine, both on H.A.C. riband (5) £120-150 x348 Naval Long Service & G.C., V.R. (Richd. Rayner, Sh. Cook 2nd. Cl. H.M.S. Lily), nearly extremely fine £70-90
96692 Chief Cook Richard Rayner, born Portsmouth, November 1856; enlisted in the Royal Navy as Cook’s Mate, April 1876; advanced Chief Cook, December 1890; retired, October 1897.

x350 Naval Long Service & G.C. (2), E.VII.R. (173939 S.G. Clogg, P.O. 1Cl, H.M.S. Defence.); G.V.R., 1st ‘Admiral’s bust’ type (198426 R.T. Solomon. Ldg. Btn. H.M.S. Pegasus.), good very fine (2) £70-100 351 Naval Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Admiral’s bust’ type (198314. G.F. Urry, A.B. H.M.S. Vernon), nearly very fine Royal Naval Reserve Long Service & G.C., 1st ‘Admiral’s bust’ type (160 E.D.W. Perkins. E.R.A. R.N.R.), one initial officially corrected, extremely fine Royal Fleet Reserve Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 2nd ‘coinage head’ type (SS. 119769 (Ch, B.18890) T.W. Ferrand. Sto.1. R.F.R.), extremely fine (3) £70-90 352 Indian Army Long Service & G.C. (Europeans), H.E.I.C. Arms (Staff Sergt. W. Collins Comst. Dept.), extremely fine £500-600 127

oRdeRS, deCoRAtionS, CAmPAign medALS And miLitARiA x353 Indian Army Long Service & G.C., G.V.R. (75 WCarr. Dhanna Singh, 1-2 Punjab R.), good very fine Indian Army Meritorious Service Medal, G.V.R. (194 Hav. Jaimal Singh, 10-16 Punjab R.), test cut to edge, nearly very fine Efficiency Medal, G.V.R., with ‘India’ scroll suspension (Pte. T.E. Bennett, 1-E.I.Ry.R., A.F.I.), good very fine (3) £100-140 354 Indian Army Long Service & G.C., G.V.R. (2) (219 W-Carr. Mughli, 18 Cav.; 1455 L-Nk. Mohd. Khan, 2-1 Punjab R.), very fine or better Indian Army Meritorious Service Medal, G.VI.R. (5479 C.H. Maj. Pola Khan, 10-6 Raj. Rif.), nearly extremely fine (3) £100-140 355 Volunteer Officer’s Decoration, V.R., Colonial ‘V.R.I.’ type, silver (Hallmarks for Birmingham 1896) and silver-gilt, reverse engraved in running script ‘Major Walter Saise E.I. Ry: Vol: Rifles.’, with integral top riband bar, nearly extremely fine, with the recipient’s Science and Art Department National Prize in Science Medal, silver, young head profile of Queen Victoria by William Wyon on obverse, edge impressed in serif capitals ‘Walter Saise. Organic Chemistry. 1869.’, this extremely fine, in embossed leather fitted box of issue (2) £280-320
Major Walter Saise, V.D. (1854-1937), known as ‘The Father of Indian Coal Mining’, was born in Bristol and educated at the Bristol Trade School and at the Royal School of Mines, London. In 1876 he was appointed assistant manager of the East Indian Railway Collieries at Giridih, Bihar, and was promoted to Superintendent in 1882, a position he held for the next 23 years. During his tenure he was responsible for raising the output to more than 650,000 tons per annum. Loved by his workforce, he worked tirelessly to improve their working conditions, organised trips for them to Calcutta, imported rice from Burma in times of famine, and stamped out plague by a campaign against rats. In 1909 he visited Afghanistan for a year as consulting mining engineer and geologist to the Amir Habibullah, before retiring back to England, where he was called to the Bar at Gray’s Inn, stood for Parliament, and served as the first chairman of the Insurance Committee for National Health Insurance. During his career he published several papers, his masterpiece being ‘The Igneous Rocks of the Giridih Coal Field.’ The Science and Art Department National Prize Medals were awarded in gold, silver, and bronze following public examinations in eight main groups of subjects, and were intended to encourage and stimulate talent at local schools throughout Britain, especially amongst the lower and middle classes.

355 (part) 357 Territorial Decoration, E.VII.R., silver (Hallmarks for London 1909) and silver-gilt, extremely fine, with integral top riband bar, this lacking pin £100-140 358 Efficiency Medal, G.VI.R., with ‘India’ scroll suspension (Pte. I.D. Hutton. B.& N.W. Ry. Bn., A.F.I.), minor official correction, extremely fine £50-60 x359 Indian Title Badge, G.VI.R., First Class breast Badge for Hindus, ‘Sardar Bahadur’, silver and enamel, reverse engraved ‘Khan Bahadur Abdul Rahim Khan Khoso 1st. Jany. 1944’, enamel almost all missing, central medallion worn, therefore fine Indian Recruiting Badge, G.VI.R., reverse officially numbered ‘3908’, central portrait worn, nearly very fine, lacking integral top riband bar Great War Bronze Memorial Plaque (Dilu Pun), very fine (3) £60-80
There are several men with the name Dilu Pun on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission roll.

356 Volunteer Force Long Service & G.C. (2), V.R., ‘Regina et Imperatrix’ type (Lieut. G.E. Trueman Northern Bl. Mtd. Rifles); G.V.R. (Pte. M. McMillan, 3 Bn. E.I. Ry.R. (A.F.I.)), edge nicks to latter, good very fine or better (2) £130-160

360 Indian Title Badge, G.V.R., Second Class breast Badge for Hindus, ‘Rao Bahadur’, reverse engraved ‘Ghanashgam Nilkanth Nadkarni’, some file marks to reverse, very fine India Service Medal, unnamed as issued, good very fine Pakistan Independence Medal (Tufail Ahmad P.C. 910), very fine Indian Police Independence Medal 1950, unnamed as issued, very fine Indian Recruiting Badge, G.VI.R., reverse officially impressed ‘3630’, good very fine, with integral top riband bar (5) £80-120

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HONOURS AND AWARDS BESTOWED UPON MONSIEUR P.A. LAMBIN, BELGIAN RAILWAYS
361 Belgium, Kingdom, Order of Leopold, Civil Division, Commander’s neck Badge, 86mm including crown suspension x 56mm, gold and enamel, French motto, hairline enamel crack to reverse, therefore nearly extremely fine, with neck riband, in J. Heremans, Schaerbeek, case of issue, with lapel rosette, together with the following related items: - The recipient’s miniature awards, comprising the Belgian Order of Leopold; Civic Decoration; and Medal for the Reign of Leopold II; the French Legion of Honour; the Russian Order of St. Stanislas; the Japanese Order of the Sacred Treasure; and the Danish Order of the Dannebrog; the Prussian Order of the Crown missing, mounted Continental style on a double braided gilt chain with fixing pins at either end - The recipient’s United States of America, Fifth Universal Postal Congress Member’s Medal, Washington 1897, silver - Bestowal Document for the Belgian Order of Leopold, Commander, dated Lacken, 28.11.1910, with Ministry of Foreign Affairs enclosure - Bestowal Document for the Belgian Order of Leopold, Officer, dated Wiesbaden, 31.3.1899, with Ministry of Foreign Affairs enclosure, and Ministry of Railways, Posts, and Telegraphs congratulatory letter - Bestowal Document for the Belgian Order of Leopold, Chevalier, dated Brussels, 21.7.1891, with Ministry of Foreign Affairs enclosure, and Ministry of Railways, Posts, and Telegraphs congratulatory letter - Bestowal Document for the Commemorative Medal for the Reign of Leopold II, dated Brussels, 31.10.1905 - Two portrait photographs of the recipient (lot) £250-300

Monsieur P.A. Lambin

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362

364

362 Denmark, Kingdom, Order of the Dannebrog, Knight’s breast Badge, C.IX.R. (1863-1906), 57mm including crown suspension x 26mm, gold and enamel, nearly extremely fine, in fitted case, with the following Documents: - Bestowal Document for the Danish Order of the Dannebrog, Knight, dated Copenhagen, 12.4.1894, with various enclosures, Belgian Permission to wear document, and Ministry of Railways, Posts, and Telegraphs congratulatory letter £380-420 363 France, Third Republic, Legion of Honour, Officer’s breast Badge, 57mm including wreath suspension x 43mm, gold and enamel, minor enamel damage to laurel wreath, otherwise nearly extremely fine, with rosette on riband, in Athus Bertrand, Paris, case of issue, with lapel rosette, and the following Documents: - Bestowal Document for the French Legion of Honour, Officer, dated Paris, 21.3.1905, with Ministry of Foreign Affairs enclosure and Belgian Permission to wear document £120-160

364 Germany, Prussia, Order of the Crown, Knight’s breast Badge, by Sy and Wagner, Berlin, 41mm, gold and enamel, maker’s mark between arms of cross, extremely fine, in embossed fitted case of issue, with the following Documents: - Bestowal Document for the Prussian Order of the Crown, Knight, dated 12.7.1896, with Belgian Permission to wear document, and various Ministry of Railways, Posts, and Telegraphs enclosures and congratulatory letters £200-250

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365 Japan, Empire, Order of the Sacred Treasure, Third Class neck Badge, 52mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, sacred beads all present, good very fine, with neck riband, in rio-nuri lacquered fitted box of issue, with lapel rosette, and the following Documents: - Bestowal Document for the Japanese Order of the Sacred Treasure, 3rd Class, with Belgian Permission to wear document, and Imperial Railway Bureau of Japan congratulatory letter, dated 22.7.1903 £250-300

365

366 Russia, Imperial, Order of St. Stanislas, Second Class neck Badge, by Eduard, St. Petersburg, 49mm, gold (56 zolotniki) and enamel, maker’s name and mark on reverse, 1896-1908 kokoshnik mark and gold mark on suspension ring, nearly extremely fine, with neck riband, in embossed red leather box of issue, with lapel rosette, and the following Documents: - Bestowal Document for the Russian Order of St. Stanislas, Second Class, dated 24.10.1907, with Russian Railways enclosure letter and Belgian Permission to wear document £1,400-1,800

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HONOURS AND AWARDS BESTOWED UPON NEW YORK JUSTICE VICTOR J. DOWLING

Justice Victor J. Dowling

Justice Victor James Dowling (1866-1934) was an American lawyer and politician from New York. Educated at the New York University School of Law, he was admitted to the bar in 1887, and practiced in New York City. He served as a member of the New York State Assembly in 1894, and the New York State Senate from 1901 to 1904. Appointed a Justice of the New York Supreme Court in 1905, he sat on the Appellate Division from 1911, and was Presiding Justice of the bench from 1927 to 1931.

x367 France, Third Republic, Legion of Honour, Officer’s breast Badge, 55mm including wreath suspension x 42mm, gold and enamel, minor enamel damage to one obverse and one reverse tip, and one laurel leaf on wreath suspension, therefore nearly extremely fine, with rosette on riband £70-90

x368 France, Kingdom, Order of St. Lazarus and Our Lady of Mount Carmel, an Early 20th Century Knight Grand Cross set of Insignia, neck Badge, 57mm x 52mm, gilt and enamel; Star, 85mm, silver, gilt, and enamel, central medallion on Star slightly loose, minor enamel damage, nearly very fine (2) £80-120

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July 25, 2013 - London

370

x369 Great Britain, The Most Venerable Order of St. John, Commander’s neck Badge, silver and enamel, nearly extremely fine, with Associate’s neck riband and related miniature award, in damaged case of issue £40-50 x370 Italy, Kingdom, Order of the Crown, Commander’s neck Badge, 51mm, gold and enamel, the gold suspension ring embellished with 13 small diamonds, extremely fine, with neck riband and lapel rosette, in fitted leather case, the lid surmounted with a crowned ‘VE’, and embossed ‘Justice Victor J. Dowling New York City’ £250-300 x371 Patriarchy of Jerusalem, Cross of the Holy Sepulchre, Commander’s neck Badge, with wreath, 89mm including crown suspension x 43mm, gilt and enamel, with compartment for fragment of the True Cross, lacking securing pin, very fine Equestrian Order of St. Mary of Bethlehem, Grand Officer’s Star, 83mm, gilt and enamel, extremely fine, in case of issue, together with various other miscellaneous Vatican and unofficial awards (lot) £80-100

373

x372 Malta, Order of Malta, a Fine Quality Knight of Justice’s neck Badge, 142mm including crown and trophy of arms suspension x 57mm, silver-gilt and enamel, trophy suspension with Latin Cross, minor enamel restoration to one reverse tip, otherwise about extremely fine, with neck riband £400-500 x373 Malta, Order of Malta, Knight of Grace’s neck Badge, 108mm including crown and bow suspension x 47mm, silver-gilt and enamel, suspension with Latin Cross, good very fine, with neck riband, miniature award, and lapel rosette, in fitted leather case, the lid embossed ‘Victor J. Dowling’ £180-220 133

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July 25, 2013 - London x374 Romania, Kingdom, Order of the Crown, 2nd type, Grand Officer’s set of Insignia, by Bijuteria Weiss, Bucharest, neck Badge, 47mm, silver-gilt and enamel, with maker’s mark on suspension ring; Star, 66mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, with maker’s cartouche on reverse and silver marks on pin, about extremely fine, with neck riband and lapel rosette (2) £300-400

x375 San Marino, Republic, Order of San Marino, 2nd type, Grand Officer’s set of Insignia, by Raviolo & Gardino, Rome, neck Badge, 90mm including crown suspension x 55mm, silver-gilt and enamel; Star, 76mm, silver, silver-gilt and enamel, maker’s cartouche on reverse, central medallion on Star slightly loose, otherwise nearly extremely fine, with neck riband, in case of issue, the lid embossed ‘His Excellency Victor J. Dowling’ (2) £400-500 377 x376 Sweden, Kingdom, Order of Vasa, Knight’s breast Badge, 60mm including crown suspension x 39mm, gold and enamel, extremely fine £140-180

x377 Vatican, Holy See, Order of the Holy Sepulchre, Civil Division, Knight Grand Cross Star, by Tanfani & Bertarelli, Rome, 85mm, silver, gold, and enamel, maker’s cartouche on reverse, about extremely fine £300-400

x378 Vatican, Holy See, Order of the Holy Sepulchre, Civil Division, Commander’s neck Badge, 76mm including bow suspension x 53mm, silver-gilt and enamel, good very fine, on bow riband, in case of issue £120-150

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380

x379 Vatican, Holy See, Order of St. Gregory, Knight’s breast Badge, by Tanfani and Bertarelli, Rome, 61mm including wreath suspension x 43mm, silver-gilt and enamel, maker’s cartouche on reverse of wreath, lacking obverse central medallion, the reverse medallion re-affixed on the obverse, minor enamel damage, therefore good fine, in case of issue £50-70

x380 Vatican, Holy See, Chamberlain’s Collar Chain, comprising of ten medallions inscribed ‘CS’, 1150mm, silver-gilt and enamel, with Badge Appendant, 68mm including Papal tiara suspension x 51mm, silver-gilt and enamel, about extremely fine, rare, in Giomini, Rome, fitted case of issue £2,000-2,500

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FOREIGN ORDERS, DECORATIONS AND MEDALS

381

382

x381 Afghanistan, Kingdom, Order of the Gold Star, Second Class Star, 80mm, silver and gold, maker’s marks on reverse, with single suspension loop, nearly extremely fine, scarce £250-350 x382 Afghanistan, Kingdom, Order of Independence, Second Class Star, of local manufacture, 85mm, silver and gilt, retaining pin re-affixed, nearly very fine, scarce £200-300 383 Austria, Empire, Order of Leopold, Commander’s neck Badge, War-time issue, 74mm including crown suspension x 40mm, bronze-gilt and enamel, enamel damage to one reverse arm, very fine £80-120

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Sir Karl Popper

384 The Austrian Honour Badge for Merit Awarded to Sir Karl Popper, One of the Outstanding Philosophers of the Twentieth Century Austria, Republic, Honour Badge for Merit, Second Type, Sixth Class, ‘Commander in Gold without Star’ neck Badge, 68mm including eagle suspension x 49mm, gilt and enamel, extremely fine, with neck riband and lapel rosette, in Anton Reitterer, Vienna, case of issue, together with Bestowal Document and enclosure in presentation booklet named to Sir Karl Popper, Ph.D., M.A., and dated 17.3.1976 £80-120
Sir Karl Raimund Popper, C.H., (1902-94) was born at Himmelhof, Vienna, the son of Dr. Simon Popper, an Austrian barrister of Jewish descent. His intellectual life spanned more than 75 years, with little interruption. He made outstanding (in some cases revolutionary) advances in the philosophy of science, social and political philosophy, and the history of philosophy among others. Sir Peter Medawar, a winner of the Nobel Prize for Medicine, said of him in 1972: ‘I think Popper is incomparably the greatest philosopher of science that has ever been.’ Popper spent his formative years in Vienna, where his family passed onto him his twin interests in life: a deep interest in philosophy, and a love of music. Whilst teaching mathematics and physical science at a secondary school in Vienna, he completed and published his first major work, The Logic of Scientific Discovery. Owing to his Jewish background, and the political climate in Austria at the time, Popper left his native land in 1937, and spent the War-years in New Zealand, where he wrote his twovolume masterpiece, The Open Society and Its Enemies, published in 1945. It proved him to be the most formidable and effective critic of totalitarianism, demolishing Marxism in particular, and establishing his international reputation. After the War he took up a post at the London School of Economics, was knighted in 1965, and despite retiring from academic life in 1969, continued to publish books and articles, and give lectures all over the world until his death. He was awarded many academic honours and prizes, was appointed a Fellow of the Royal Society, and in 1982 was made a Companion of Honour.
PROVENANCE:

Spink, November 2006

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385

387

385 Belgium, Kingdom, Order of Leopold, Civil Division, Commander’s neck Badge, 84mm including crown suspension x 54mm, gold and enamel, French motto, minor enamel damage to wreath, otherwise nearly extremely fine £400-500 386 Belgium, Kingdom, Order of Leopold, Civil Division, Commander’s neck Badge, 88mm including crown suspension x 55mm, gold and enamel, French motto, significant enamel damage, therefore nearly very fine, with neck riband £140-180 x387 China, Republic, Order of the Precious Tripod, Fourth Class neck Badge, 61mm, silver-gilt and enamel, reverse officially numbered ‘547’, nearly very fine, with neck riband £300-400 WWW.SPinK.Com

July 25, 2013 - London

388 x388 China, Republic, Warlord Merit Medal, Yan Xishan at centre, gilt and enamel, nearly very fine £400-500 x389 Egypt, Kingdom, Order of the Nile, First Class Star, by J. Lattes, Cairo, 94mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, maker’s name and silver marks on reverse, good very fine £200-250

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oRdeRS, deCoRAtionS, CAmPAign medALS And miLitARiA 393 France, Third Republic, Legion of Honour, Chevalier’s breast Badge, 53mm including wreath suspension x 40mm, silver and enamel, minor enamel damage, very fine France, Republic, Medaille Militaire, with ‘Trophy of Arms’ suspension, silver, gilt, and enamel, gilding rubbed in places, nearly very fine France, Republic, Croix de Guerre, reverse dated ‘19141918’, bronze, extremely fine, with bronze star emblem on riband France, Republic, Allied Victory Medal, bronze, extremely fine France, Republic, Commemorative Medal for the Great War, bronze, good very fine, together with a ‘Verdun’ Commemorative Medal United States of America, Silver Star, gilt and silver, extremely fine, in case of issue, with enamel lapel riband bar United States of America, Bronze Star, bronze, good very fine, in case of issue, with enamel lapel riband bar United States of America, Purple Heart, gilt and enamel, minor corrosion to shield on obverse, otherwise extremely fine, in case of issue, with enamel lapel riband bar (9) £60-80

390

x390 Egypt, Kingdom, Order of the Nile, Second Class neck Badge, by J. Lattes, Cairo, 92mm including crown suspension x 63mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, maker’s name and silver marks on reverse, nearly extremely fine £180-220 x391 Egypt, Kingdom, Judge’s Badge, 115mm x 85mm, silver-gilt and enamel, good very fine, scarce £200-300 x392 France, Kingdom, Second Restoration 1815-30, Legion of Honour, Chevalier’s breast Badge, 65mm including crown suspension x 45mm, silver, gold, and enamel, poincon mark obverse tassel, minor enamel damage to one point of arm, otherwise good very fine £150-200 WWW.SPinK.Com

391

July 25, 2013 - London x394 France, Third Republic, Legion of Honour, Chevalier’s breast Badge, 55mm including wreath suspension x 41mm, silver, gilt, and enamel, minor enamel damage to tips, therefore nearly very fine France, Republic, Croix de Guerre, bronze, reverse dated ‘1914-1918’, nearly very fine, with bronze palme on riband France, Republic, Evaders Medal (2), bronze, good very fine France, Second Empire, St. Helena Medal, bronze, good very fine France, Republic, Medal for the Franco-Prussian War 1870-71, bronze, very fine France, Republic, Madagascar Medal 1895, silver, with ‘1895’ silver oak leaves Bar, good very fine France, Republic, Morocco Medal 1909, silver, with ‘Maroc’ bar, good very fine France, Republic, Dardanelles Campaign Medal, bronze, good very fine France, Republic, Allied Victory Medal, bronze, very fine (10) £60-80 x395 France, Republic, Medaille Militaire, silver and silvergilt, nearly very fine France, Republic, Croix de Guerre, bronze, reverse dated 1914-1916, very fine, with silver star emblem on riband, and a ‘Union des Mutiles Anciens 1916 Combattants Grande Guerre’ silver and enamel wound badge France, Republic, Cross for Military Valour, bronze, good very fine Kuwait, Emirate, Liberation Medal, Fourth Class, bronze and enamel, good very fine Russia, Soviet Union, Medal for the 30th Anniversary of Victory in the Second World War 1975, gilt, extremely fine Russia, Soviet Union, Veterans of Labour Medal, silvered, extremely fine (6) £40-50 396 France, Republic, Croix de Guerre (16), reverse dated ‘1914-1915’ (2); reverse dated ‘1914-1916’; reverse dated ‘1914-1917’ (5); reverse dated ‘1914-1918’ (5); reverse dated ‘1939’ (2); reverse dated ‘19391940’, bronze, generally nearly very fine or better, with collectively 5 palm and 15 Star emblems on ribands, and one miniature Croix de Guerre lanyard (16) £150-200

399 397 France, Republic, Tonkin Chine Annam Medal 188385, Army type, silver, minor edge bruising, good very fine £60-80 398 France, Republic, Madagascar Medal 1883-86, silver, nearly extremely fine France, Republic, Dahomey Medal 1892, silver, minor edge bruise, otherwise extremely fine (2) £80-120 399 Germany, Brunswick, Order of Henry the Lion, Military Division, Knight’s First Class breast Badge, 59mm x 40mm, silver-gilt and enamel, with silver-gilt crossed swords, crown and wreath suspension resoldered, minor enamel damage to reverse central medallion, otherwise nearly extremely fine £200-300
Possibly a composite piece. The Knight’s First Class breast Badge, in silver gilt, with un-gilded silver crossed swords across the badge was awarded between 1909 and 1918, and is not recorded as having been issued with silver-gilt swords.

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400 Germany, Prussia, Iron Cross 1813, an Early c. April 1813 Second Class breast Badge of original design, silver and two-piece iron centre, section of reverse cast iron plate missing, otherwise nearly very fine, rare £200-300

400

401 Germany, Prussia, Iron Cross 1813, a ‘Battlefield Relic’ Second Class breast Badge of original design, silver and two-piece iron centre, iron centre somewhat pitted, therefore good fine, the silver frame good very fine, rare £200-300
PROVENANCE:

Excavated in Belgium on the site of a 1813-15 ‘Freedom War’ Battlefield.

401

402 Germany, Prussia, Iron Cross 1813, ‘Velvet’ First Class breast Badge, velvet and fabric, velvet worn on three arms of cross, therefore good fine, rare £80-120
The ‘Velvet’ Iron Cross was an unofficial, improvised Badge usually constructed in a variety of styles by former army veterans for use as a decoration on occasions such as Memorial Day parades, reunions, or funerals of old comrades. They were worn on civilian clothing after their original Badge had either been lost or returned to the General Ordens Kommission in Berlin.

402

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403 403 Germany, Prussia, Iron Cross 1870, Second Class breast Badge, with 25 Year Oak Leaves, silver and iron centre, very fine £200-250 404 Germany, Prussia, Iron Cross 1870, Second Class breast Badge, silver and iron centre, good very fine, on non-combatant riband £200-250 405 Germany, Prussia, Iron Cross 1914, First Class breast Badge, domed construction, silver and iron centre, reverse privately numbered ‘851776’, nearly extremely fine £100-140 406 Germany, Prussia, Iron Cross 1914, First Class breast Badge, domed construction, silver and iron centre, nearly extremely fine £100-140 x407 An Imperial German Iron Cross Group of Six Germany, Prussia, Iron Cross 1914, Second Class breast Badge, silver and iron centre; Germany, Prussia, Reserve Decoration, First Class Cross, for Twenty Years’ Service, silver and bronze-gilt; Germany, Imperial, Franco-Prussian War Medal 1870-71, bronze, three clasps, Sedan, Worth, Weissenburg; Germany, Prussia, Koniggratz Cross 1866, gilt; Germany, Imperial, Centenary Medal 1897, gilt; Germany, Mecklenburg-Schwerin, Military Merit Cross 1914, Second Class breast Badge, gilt, good very fine, mounted as originally worn, with the recipient’s riband bar, and a portrait photograph (6) £80-120

404

406 408 A Great War ‘1918’ Iron Cross German Group of Three to Gunner L. Preller, Bavarian Field Artillery Regiment Germany, Prussia, Iron Cross 1914, Second Class breast Badge, silver and iron centre; Germany, Bavaria, Military Service Cross, Third Class with Swords, zinc; Germany, Imperial, 1914-18 Honour Cross, Combatants’ type with Swords, bronze, very fine or better, mounted as originally worn, with the recipient’s riband bar, and the following related documents: - Bestowal Document for the Iron Cross Second Class, named to ‘Launfurd Preller, 6 Bayer FeldartillerieRegiments’ and dated 7.6.1918, together with a related named document (3) £80-120 409 A Prussian Great War ‘1916’ Iron Cross for Gallantry to A.G.A. Mallow Germany, Prussia, Iron Cross 1914, Second Class, silver and iron centre, very fine, with the recipient’s Military Pass Book, giving the date of the award of his Iron Cross as 22.3.1916 £50-70 410 Germany, Prussia, Iron Cross 1914, Second Class breast Badge (4), silver and iron centre, generally very fine or better, one stamped ‘K.O.’ on ring, another stamped ‘800’ on ring, one on non-combatant riband (4) £100-140

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411

411 Indian States, Patiala, Royal Family Order, breast Badge, by Garrard, London, 67mm including crown suspension x 35mm, gold and enamel, maker’s name on reverse, extremely fine, of the highest rarity, in fitted case of issue £2,000-3,000
The insignia of the Royal Family Order of Patiala comprised a Collar, Badge, and Star worn by Maharaja Bhupendra Singh during grand ceremonies; and a breast Badge worn by male members of the Royal Family.

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412

x412 Iraq, Kingdom, Order of the Two Rivers, Civil Division, Knight’s breast Badge, by Garrard, London, 62mm including wreath suspension x 46mm, silvergilt and enamel, nearly extremely fine, with crown emblem on riband, in case of issue £300-400 x413 Japan, Empire, Order of the Rising Sun, Third Class neck Badge, 82mm including paulownia flowers x 54mm, silver-gilt and enamel, with red cabochon in centre, nearly extremely fine £180-220

413

x414 Japan, Empire, Order of the Rising Sun, Fourth Class breast Badge, 70mm including paulownia flowers x 46mm, silver-gilt and enamel, with red cabochon in centre, gilding rubbed in parts, enamel damage to top paulownia flower, therefore very fine Japan, Empire, Order of the Rising Sun, Seventh Class breast Badge, 31mm x 28mm, silver and enamel, good very fine, with original riband with full hook and eye assembly Japan, Empire, Order of the Rising Sun, Eighth Class breast Badge, 31mm x 28mm, silver, very fine, with original riband with full hook and eye assembly Japan, Empire, Order of the Sacred Treasure, Eighth Class breast Badge (2), 37mm, silver, nearly very fine, one with original riband with full hook and eye assembly (5) £100-140 147

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417 (part)

x415 Japan, Empire, Order of the Sacred Treasure, Third Class neck Badge, 54mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, sacred beads all present, very fine, with neck riband and lapel rosette £140-180 x416 Japan, Empire, Order of the Golden Kite, Sixth Class breast Badge, 57mm x 42mm, silver-gilt, extremely fine, with original riband with full hook and eye assembly Japan, Empire, Order of the Golden Kite, Seventh Class breast Badge, 57mm x 42mm, silver and silvergilt, good very fine, with original riband with full hook and eye assembly (2) £140-180 x417 Japan, Empire, Order of the Golden Kite, Seventh Class breast Badge, 52mm x 42mm, silver and silvergilt, extremely fine, on original ribbon with full hook and eye assembly, in rio-nuri lacquer case of issue, with lapel rosette Japan, Empire, Red Cross Membership Medal, Japanese issue, silvered, very fine, in box of issue, with lapel bow riband and enclosure document (2) £100-140 x418 Japan, Empire, Taisho Enthronement Medal 1915 (2), silver and silver-gilt, very fine or better, one with original riband with full hook and eye assembly Japan, Empire, Showa Enthronement Medal 1928, silver, on original ladies’ bow riband, nearly extremely fine, scarce to a lady

A.E. Fraser, Esq.

Japan, Empire, Red Cross Membership Medal (2), silver, nearly extremely fine, one on ladies’ bow riband, both with rosettes on riband (5) £70-90 x419 Japan, Manchukuo, Order of the Auspicious Clouds, Eighth Class breast Badge, 46mm, silver, good very fine £60-80 420 Malaysia, Johore, Order of the Crown of Johore, Second Class set of Insignia, Attributed to A.E. Fraser, Esq., by Benson, London, neck Badge, 75mm including crown suspension x 58mm, silver, gold, and enamel, maker’s name on reverse; Star, 84mm, silver, gold, and enamel, with gold retaining pin, maker’s name on reverse, about extremely fine, with neck riband, in case of issue, with a portrait image of the recipient (2) £800-1,200
Alexander Edmund Fraser, Esq. (1863-1937), born Inverness-shire, the elder brother of Colonel Henry Francis Fraser, C.M.G., D.S.O.; Appointed Attaché, HM Diplomatic Service, June 1888; promoted Third Secretary, June 1890; Second Secretary, December 1893; appointed a Member of the King’s Bodyguard (Royal Archers) in Scotland; Baliff Grand Cross of the Order of St. John, and served as Librarian of the Order from 1913. For the Medals awarded to Colonel Henry Francis Fraser, C.M.G., D.S.O., see Lot 2

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420 x421 Malta, Order of Malta, Knight of Justice’s neck Badge, 104mm including crown and trophy of arms suspension x 46mm, gilt and enamel, trophy suspension with Latin Cross, good very fine £60-80 x422 Netherlands, Kingdom, Java War Medal 1825-30, bronze, nearly extremely fine £100-140 423 Russia, Imperial, Order of St. Stanislas, Third Class breast Badge, 39mm, gold (56 zolotniki) and enamel, obscured maker’s mark on reverse, gold mark on suspension ring, nearly very fine, with a Continentalstyle ring suspension £500-600 x424 Russia, Imperial, Cross of the Order of St. George, Fourth Class, 34mm, silver, reverse numbered ‘382368’, very fine £100-140

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427

425 Russia, Imperial, Order of St. Nicholas the Miracle Worker, breast Badge, with Swords, 35mm, gilt and enamel, good very fine £200-300
The Order of St. Nicholas the Miracle Worker came in one class and was instituted in 1929 by H.I.M. Kyrille Vladimirovitch, a cousin of Tsar Nicholas II and, following the murder of the Romanov family, the pretender to the throne. The Badge of the Order could be obtained by any Russian veteran of the Great War, and had to be bought by the recipient.

426 Russia, Imperial, Medal for the Russo-Japanese War 190405, bronze, small mark to obverse, otherwise good very fine £60-80 x427 Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Order of Osmania, Third Class neck Badge, 82mm including Star and Crescent suspension x 64mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, about extremely fine, with neck riband, in case of issue £350-450

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428

x428 Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Order of Medjidieh, Second Class set of Insignia, neck Badge, 70mm including Star and Crescent suspension x 57mm, silver, gold applique, and enamel, with mint mark on reverse; Star, 82mm, silver, gold applique, and enamel, with mint mark and silver marks on reverse, extremely fine, with neck riband, in case of issue (2) £700-900

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429

430

x429 Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Order of Medjidieh, Third Class breast Badge, 76mm including Star and Crescent suspension x 63mm, silver, gold applique, and enamel, with silver mark on reverse, good very fine, with neck riband, in case of issue £350-450 x430 Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Order of Medjidieh, Fourth Class breast Badge, 74mm including Star and Crescent suspension x 58mm, silver, gold applique, and enamel, with mint mark and silver mark in reverse, nearly very fine, with rosette on riband £200-250 WWW.SPinK.Com

July 25, 2013 - London

431

432

433

x431 Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Order of Medjidieh, Fourth Class breast Badge, 80mm including Star and Crescent suspension x 65mm, silver, gold applique, and enamel, with mint mark and silver marks on reverse, good very fine £200-250 x432 Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Order of Medjidieh, Fourth Class breast Badge, 73mm including Star and Crescent suspension x 58mm, silver, gold applique, and enamel, with mint mark and silver marks on reverse, good very fine £200-250 153

x433 Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Order of Medjidieh, an Early Fifth Class breast Badge, 68mm including Star and Crescent suspension x 48mm, silver, gold applique, and enamel, good very fine £180-220 x434 Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Gallipoli Star 1915, silver and enamel, reverse stamped ‘B.B.& Co.’, good very fine £70-90

oRdeRS, deCoRAtionS, CAmPAign medALS And miLitARiA x436 United States of America, China Relief Expedition Campaign Medal 1900-01, Army type, bronze, very fine United States of America, Allied Victory Medal, bronze, three clasps, Meuse-Argonne, Aisne-Marne, St. Mihiel, very fine United States of America, China Service Campaign Medal 1937-57, bronze, nearly extremely fine United States of America, American Defense Service Medal 1939-41, bronze, extremely fine United States of America, American Campaign Medal 1941-46, bronze, good very fine United States of America, Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal 1941-46, bronze, good very fine United States of America, European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal 1941-45, bronze, extremely fine United States of America, World War II Victory Medal, bronze, extremely fine United States of America, Korean Service Campaign Medal 1950-54, bronze, nearly extremely fine United States of America, Vietnam Service Campaign Medal 1964-73, bronze, good very fine Miniature Awards: United States of America, Army Distinguished Service Cross; Navy Distinguished Service Cross; Air Force Distinguished Service Cross; Army Distinguished Service Medal; Navy Distinguished Service Medal; Air Force Distinguished Service Medal; Defense Distinguished Service Medal; Silver Star; Legion of Merit; Bronze Star, gilt, bronze, and enamel, generally extremely fine (20) £50-70 x437 A Collection of United States Great War Commemorative Medals A Collection of Approximately 25 Great War Commemorative Medals, issued by the States of Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, and Oregon; the Counties of Fresno CA, La Porte IN, Lewis NY and Norfolk VA; and the Cities of Albany NY, Amsterdam NY, Cambridge IL, Kansas City MO, New Haven CT, New York NY, Niles OH, Reading MA, and Richmond VA, silvered and bronze, some with top riband bars, generally very fine or better United States of America, Allied Victory Medal, with ‘Ypres-Lys’ bar, bronze, good very fine (lot) £40-60

435

x435 United States of America, Military Order of the Dragon, China 1900 (Lieut. Sidney Morton 24th. Punjab Infantry No.180.), with original riband and top bronze ‘pagoda’ suspension brooch, nearly extremely fine £1,000-1,400
Captain Sidney Morton, Commissioned Second Lieutenant, January 1896; served in the campaign on the North West Frontier of India with the Malakand Field Force under Sir William Lockhart as Provost Marshal, 1st Brigade, 1897-98, and took part in the defence of Malakand and the engagement at Landakai; later served with the Buner Field Force in the same role (Medal with two clasps); promoted Lieutenant, April 1898; posted to the 24th Punjabis, and served with them during the China Campaign, 1900; promoted Captain, 22.1.1905.

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MINIATURE AWARDS
x438 Miniature Awards: An Unattributed M.B.E. Group of Three The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 2nd type, Military Division, Member’s (M.B.E.) Badge; Defence and War Medals, good very fine, mounted as worn, the M.B.E. on a Lady’s bow riband Miniature Awards: An Unattributed M.C. Group of Four Military Cross, G.VI.R.; South Atlantic 1982, with rosette; General Service 1962-2007, one clasp, Northern Ireland; Jubilee 1977, of modern manufacture, good very fine, mounted court style as worn, housed in a glazed frame Miniature Awards: An Unattributed A.F.C. Group of Eight Air Force Cross, E.II.R.; 1939-1945 Star; Air Crew Europe Star; Africa Star; Burma Star; Defence and War Medals; General Service 1962-2007, no clasp [sic], of modern manufacture, good very fine, mounted court style as worn Miniature Awards: Crimea 1854-56, four clasps, Alma, Balaklava, Inkermann, Sebastopol; Turkish Crimea, Sardinian die; Queen’s Sudan 1896-98; Khedive’s Sudan 1896-1908 (2), no clasp; one clasp, Khartoum, good very fine (lot) £30-40 439 Miniature Awards: The D.C.M. Group of Six Attributed to Captain R.W. Cryer, Honourable Artillery Company Distinguished Conduct Medal, G.V.R.; 1914 Star, with Bar; British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaves, this full size; France, Republic, Croix de Guerre, reverse dated ‘1914-1915’; Italy, Kingdom, War Cross, good very fine, with a souvenir programme for the presentation of a Sword of Honour to the recipient to Commemorate his receiving the D.C.M. and Croix de Guerre, and his Commission into the H.A.C. (6) £40-60
D.C.M. London Gazette 14.1.1916 1520 Lance-Corporal R.W. Cryer, Honourable Artillery Company, T.F. ‘For conspicuous gallantry and good work. After four nights in an advanced listening-poet, he volunteered to go on a difficult and dangerous reconnaissance with an Officer, and rendered the greatest assistance and support. In one action he showed great courage, and was invaluable in rendering first aid to the wounded.’ M.I.D. London Gazette 6.1.1919 Cryer, Lt. (A./Capt.) R. W., D.C.M., 2nd Bn., Honourable Artillery Company (Infantry) ‘For distinguished and gallant services and devotion to duty in Italy during the period February 26th, 1918, to midnight, September 14th, 1918.’ France, Croix de Guerre London Gazette 24.2.1916 1520 Lance-Corporal Roland Walter Cryer, Honourable Artillery Company (Territorial Force) ‘In recognition of distinguished service during the campaign.’ Italy, War Cross London Gazette 17.5.1919 Lieutenant (acting Captain) Roland Walter Cryer, D.C.M., Honourable Artillery Company ‘For distinguished services rendered during the course of the campaign.’ Captain Ronald Walter Cryer, D.C.M., enlisted in the Honourable Artillery Company, 24.8.1914; served with the 1st Battalion during the Great War on the Western Front from 18.9.1914; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, H.A.C., 1.10.1916; promoted Lieutenant, 19.7.1917; Acting Captain, 24.10.1917.
PROVENANCE:

Lovell Collection

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LIFE SAVING AWARDS

440

441

440 Royal Humane Society Silver Medal, unsuccessful (Edwin Norrish, July. 8. 1905), edge bruise, very fine £300-350 x441 Royal Humane Society, small bronze medal, successful (Alfred Turner, A.B. H.M.S. Malta, 10 Septr 1885.), good very fine, with integral bronze top riband £100-140

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MISCELLANEOUS

442 442 Fifeshire Volunteers Reward of Merit Medal 1802 A large circular engraved medal with embossed thistle floriate border, 60mm, silver (indistinct Hallmarks for Edinburgh), obverse featuring a central Royal Crown above ‘GR’, ‘Reward of Merit’ on riband above, ‘Fifeshire Volunteers’ below, reverse inscribed ‘Won by Ensign R. Wilkie. Best Shot with Ball at the Hundred Yards Target Practice 27th April 1802’ within laurel wreath, minor dinting, otherwise nearly extremely fine, with integral silver floriate loop suspension £240-280
Lieutenant Robert Wilkie, Commissioned Ensign, Eastern District of Fifeshire Volunteers, February 1802; promoted Lieutenant, September 1803; transferred to 2nd Battalion, Fifeshire Local Militia, September 1808. Due to the uncertainty that exists with the original provenance and manufacture of some early engraved Volunteer Medals, this Lot is sold as viewed.

443 Marquess of Dufferin and Ava Prize Medal, 51mm, silver, obverse featuring the Coat of Arms of the Marquess, surrounded by the inscription ‘Presented by the Marquess of Dufferin and Ava’; the reverse featuring the insignia of the Orders of St. Patrick, the Bath, the Star of India, St. Michael and St. George, and the Indian Empire, Marquess’s Coronet above, and surrounded by the inscription ‘Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports 1894’, extremely fine, rare, in Wyon, London, case of issue £100-150
Frederick Hamilton-Temple-Blackwood, First Marquess of Dufferin and Ava, K.P., G.C.B., G.C.S.I., G.C.M.G., G.C.I.E. (1826-1902), Statesman, Ambassador to St. Petersburg, Constantinople, and Paris; Governor-General of Canada; Viceroy of India; and Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports.

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–––––––– 447 ––––––– 444 Royal Tournament Prize Medal (2), silver (Hallmarks for London 1938), reverse engraved ‘1939 Tug of War 110 Stone Army R.A.S.C. Feltham Sgt. A. Young’; bronze, reverse engraved ‘R.A.F. Halton 1927 Bayt. Combats. A.C. Brooks. Lee-on-Solent’, nearly extremely fine, in Mappin and Webb, London, and Carrington, London, fitted cases of issue (2) £80-120 x445 A Collection of Army Temperance Medals Soldiers’ Total Abstinence Association, Association Medal, silver (STA.6), with top ‘For Merit’ silver riband bar, good very fine Army Temperance Association: India, 6 Month Medal (Crookshank Cross), bronze (ATAI.1), good very fine Army Temperance Association: India, 1 Year Medal, silver (ATAI.2), good very fine Army Temperance Association: India, 3 Year Medal (2), silver (ATAI.3), good very fine Army Temperance Association: India, 8 Year Medal, silver and silver-gilt (Hallmarks for London 1902), (ATAI.8) with top silver riband bar, very fine Army Temperance Association: India, Association Medal, silver (ATAI.14), good very fine Army Temperance Association: India, Queen Victoria Commemorative Medal, silver (ATAI.15), very fine Royal Army Temperance Association, 6 Month Medal (2), bronze (RATA.1), nearly extremely fine Royal Army Temperance Association, 1 Year Medal (2), silver; silvered (RATA.2), very fine Royal Naval Temperance Society, 1 Year Medal, silvered and enamel (RNTS.3), with top ‘Fidelity’ riband bar, very fine (13) £50-70
The Crookshank Cross for 6 months’ abstinence is named after George Cruickshank [sic] (1792-1878), an illustrator of political and social satirical caricatures. In 1860 he raised a corps of Temperance Rifle Volunteers, which became the 24th Surrey Rifle Volunteer Corps (Havelock’s Own) in 1861.

x446 Queen Victoria South Africa 1900 Chocolate Box A Queen Victoria Christmas 1900 Chocolate Box, complete with original chocolate as given, unusually posted back to England, the packaging with British South Africa Company stamps with B.S.A.P. Camp, Bulawayo cancellations; Customs Declaration (the contents described as ‘Queen’s Chocolate’), and Cape of Good Hope parcel label, addressed to ‘M.T. Mead, The Windmill, Cornwall Road, Brixton’ £100-150 x447 A Silver Cigarette Box A fine quality Cigarette Box, 89mm x 63mm x 32mm, silver (Hallmarks for London 1902), the lid and sides depicting a tavern scene, the base inscribed ‘Major General Allgood, C.B., Commander A.G. Allgood, R.N., R. Allgood, Royal Irish Rifles, to A.J. Allgood, 22nd Feb: 1904.’ £150-200
Major-General George Allgood, C.B. (1827-1907), Commissioned Ensign, December 1846; promoted Lieutenant, September 1848; served with the 49th Bengal Native Infantry during the Second Sikh War at the siege and capture of Mooltan, and the action of Soorajkhoond (slightly wounded, Medal with clasp); served with the Quarter Master General’s Department as A.Q.M.G. to General Sir Colin Campbell throughout the Indian Mutiny 1857-59, and was present at the Relief of Lucknow, including the storming of the Sekunderbagh and the Shah Nujeef; the Battle of Cawnpore (slightly wounded); the action at Kala Nuddee; the Siege and Capture of Lucknow; the battle of Bareilly; and the affair at Shahjehanpore; served on during the Oude Campaign, and present at he engagements at Doondea Khera, Burjeedia, Musjeedia, and Ruptee (several times Mentioned in Despatches, Brevet of Major, Medal with two clasps); served as D.Q.M.G. to General Sir John Michel during the China Campaign 1860, and was present at the capture of the Taku Forts, and in the advance on and occupation of Pekin (Mentioned in Despatches, Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel, Medal with two clasps); served in the Umbeyla Campaign with the Peshawur Valley Field Force as A.Q.M.G., and was present at the capture of the Crag Picquet (slightly wounded, Mentioned in Despatches, Medal with clasp, and appointed a Companion of the Order of the Bath); promoted Colonel, April 1868; Major-General, November 1869; retired 1869.

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448

448 Riband Collection A Fine Riband Collection, inspired by the riband charts in Ribbons and Medals by Captain H. Taprell Dorling, D.S.O., R.N., comprising the ribands of approximately 282 British and Foreign Orders, Decorations, and Medals, starting with the ribands of the V.C., Naval V.C., and G.C., British Orders of Knighthood; Decorations for Gallantry (including both the original horizontal and subsequent diagonal striped ribands for the D.F.C., A.F.C., D.F.M., and A.F.M.); Campaign Medals up to 1939; Coronation and Jubilee Medals; Decorations and Medals for Long and Efficient Service; and finishing with Foreign Orders, Decorations, and Medals, from a variety of countries including Belgium, Finland, France (including the decorative ribands for the China and Mexican Campaigns), Greece, Italy, Japan, Montenegro, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Turkey, and the United States of America, mounted in a glazed framed measuring 660mm x 315mm; together with a copy of Ribbons and Medals by Captain H. Taprell Dorling, D.S.O., R.N. £80-120

THE END OF THE SALE

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Notes

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AUCTION RESULTS
SALe: SALe no: dAte: v enUe:
Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria 13001 Thursday 25 April 2013 London

Spink & Son Ltd 69 Southampton Row Bloomsbury London WC1B 4ET Tel: (020) 7563 4000

The following prices in sterling do not include the buyer’s premium and are rounded to the nearest pound. Lots which did not sell are not shown. Spink & Son are not responsible for typographical errors or omissions.
Lot 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 Price £4,200 £42,000 £1,000 £32,000 £3,800 £2,600 £2,100 £4,500 £13,000 £5,800 £4,000 £2,200 £3,200 £280 £500 £1,600 £16,000 £550 £1,200 £190 £110 £60 £100 £500 £1,050 £750 £320 £520 £450 £320 £270 £320 £320 £250 £170 £300 £4,800 £1,400 Lot 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 Price £1,000 £550 £380 £200 £1,300 £750 £800 £2,200 £1,600 £290 £160 £450 £450 £290 £140 £180 £350 £210 £220 £200 £160 £380 £580 £270 £190 £120 £130 £1,400 £140 £230 £240 £160 £130 £210 £140 £210 £100 £260 Lot 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 112 113 114 115 116 Price £230 £380 £150 £240 £380 £280 £230 £280 £170 £140 £100 £110 £260 £350 £260 £160 £140 £160 £180 £260 £110 £120 £160 £160 £165 £230 £200 £120 £750 £580 £260 £60 £120 £130 £100 £90 £400 £80 Lot 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 Price £140 £120 £2,100 £5,200 £750 £1,800 £750 £1,100 £900 £850 £850 £850 £800 £550 £600 £550 £520 £550 £420 £520 £420 £520 £4,500 £18,500 £3,000 £2,400 £2,900 £3,800 £1,600 £650 £4,200 £1,600 £8,000 £7,000 £1,700 £5,200 £2,800 £2,700 Lot 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 Price £1,800 £2,300 £750 £2,700 £6,000 £3,200 £3,800 £1,300 £250 £200 £320 £2,900 £2,200 £1,500 £260 £600 £420 £700 £200 £1,300 £1,900 £450 £380 £350 £220 £180 £380 £240 £350 £250 £320 £200 £210 £200 £150 £150 £170 £140 Lot 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 Price £170 £280 £250 £140 £290 £160 £200 £160 £700 £240 £280 £500 £280 £450 £520 £650 £300 £380 £290 £240 £420 £320 £350 £70 £120 £800 £240 £350 £380 £180 £240 £160 £950 £90 £300 £120 £160 £900

Lot 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287

Price £50 £90 £120 £70 £350 £480 £320 £420 £1,400 £180 £120 £210 £120 £520 £160 £160 £260 £230 £150 £220 £160 £350 £240 £180 £130 £180 £200 £2,400 £480 £180 £280 £130 £180 £280 £110 £120 £160 £380 £260 £300 £120 £120 £110 £200 £90 £350 £130 £130 £120 £270 £160 £350 £170 £220 £350

Lot 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343

Price £230 £260 £270 £700 £950 £1,000 £180 £110 £420 £190 £200 £480 £330 £480 £700 £350 £260 £140 £380 £100 £120 £140 £120 £210 £210 £180 £130 £130 £140 £150 £100 £200 £180 £160 £80 £200 £100 £100 £120 £160 £240 £100 £150 £150 £110 £230 £120 £210 £270 £160 £190 £260 £100 £150 £150

Lot 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398

Price £250 £200 £220 £700 £170 £220 £160 £100 £100 £110 £80 £180 £70 £160 £120 £130 £250 £90 £100 £200 £210 £220 £230 £220 £220 £280 £260 £180 £210 £150 £190 £130 £220 £200 £190 £130 £180 £190 £70 £150 £60 £100 £150 £70 £160 £50 £150 £140 £70 £70 £50 £220 £120 £60 £130

Lot 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454

Price £70 £110 £80 £110 £60 £100 £90 £70 £120 £90 £70 £70 £90 £70 £70 £70 £70 £140 £50 £50 £130 £200 £60 £110 £110 £70 £130 £70 £270 £80 £240 £70 £70 £60 £70 £750 £170 £180 £130 £120 £2,200 £450 £260 £180 £1,100 £230 £240 £120 £220 £70 £70 £4,000 £350 £180 £40

Lot 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 473 474 476 477 478 479 481 482 483 484 485 488 489 490 491 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499 500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 510 511 512 513 514

Price £220 £130 £150 £1,400 £70 £480 £190 £160 £60 £80 £120 £2,400 £150 £650 £320 £350 £160 £90 £140 £70 £95 £100 £900 £80 £2,200 £210 £40 £70 £1,300 £1,400 £1,300 £1,000 £700 £190 £90 £110 £200 £200 £140 £450 £350 £120 £70 £130 £90 £160 £320 £420 £190 £380 £1,300 £310 £90 £110 £90

Lot 515 516 517 518 519 520 521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531 532 533 534 535 536 537 538 539 540 541 542 543 544 545 546 547 548 549 550 553 554 555 556 557 558 559 560 561 562 563 564 565 566 567 568

Price £120 £120 £90 £170 £140 £120 £120 £210 £140 £90 £120 £170 £120 £250 £160 £100 £85 £90 £750 £120 £120 £100 £180 £240 £400 £130 £100 £150 £500 £130 £160 £110 £140 £850 £50 £500 £60 £60 £170 £200 £320 £2,000 £400 £80 £260 £40 £500 £1,300 £210 £150 £220 £200

TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR BUYERS
These conditions set out the terms on which we (Spink and Son Limited of 69 Southampton Row, Bloomsbury London WC1B 4ET (company no. 04369748)) contract with you (Buyer) either as agent on behalf of the Seller or as principal if we are the Seller. You should read these conditions carefully. 1 DEFINITIONS The following definitions in this condition apply in these conditions. Auctioneers’ Margin Scheme Buyer’s Premium Certificate of Authenticity Expert Committee Forgery means a VAT margin scheme as defined by HM Revenue & Customs; means the charge payable by you as a percentage of the Hammer Price, at the rates set out in clause 5.1 below; means a certificate issued by an Expert Committee confirming the authenticity of a Lot; means a committee of experts to whom a Lot may be sent for an extension in accordance with clause 3.4.3; means a Lot constituting an imitation originally conceived and executed as a whole with a fraudulent intention to deceive as to authorship, origin, age, period, culture or source where the correct description as to such matters is not reflected by the description in the catalogue and which at the date of the auction had a value materially less than it would have had if it had been in accordance with the description in the catalogue. Accordingly, no Lot shall be capable of being a Forgery by reason of any damage and/or restoration work of any kind (including re-enamelling); means the amount of the highest bid accepted by the auctioneer in relation to a Lot; means any item deposited with us for sale at auction and, in particular, the item or items described against any Lot number in any catalogue; the amount below which we agree with the Seller that the Lot cannot be sold; means the owner of the Lot being sold by us; Spink and Son Limited, our subsidiaries and associated companies. value added tax chargeable under VAT and any similar replacement or additional tax; and means the symbols detailing the VAT status of the Lot details of which are set out at the back of the catalogue. the first session of the sale. If accepted by us, such request shall have the same effect as notice of an intention to question the genuineness or description of the Lot for the purposes of clause 5.13 (Refund in the case of Forgery) of these Terms and Conditions and the provisions of clause 5.13 (Refund in the case of Forgery) shall apply accordingly. 3.4.2 Notice of a request for an expert opinion or Certificate of Authenticity must give the reason why such opinion is required and specify the identity of your proposed expert which will be subject to agreement by us. We reserve the right, at our discretion, to refuse a request for an expert opinion or Certificate of Authenticity including (without limitation) where the proposed expert is not known to us. 3.4.3 If we accept a request for an expert opinion or Certificate of Authenticity we will submit the Lot to the Expert Committee. You acknowledge and accept that the length of time taken by an Expert Committee to reach an opinion will vary depending on the circumstances and in any event is beyond our control. 3.4.4 We will not normally accept a request for an extension on account of condition. Any Lot described in the catalogue as having faults or defects may not be returned even if an expert opinion or Certificate of Authenticity cites other faults or defects not included in the catalogue description, other than in the case of a Forgery. 3.4.5 Should Spink accept a request for an extension under the foregoing provisions of this paragraph, the fact may be stated by the Auctioneer from the rostrum prior to the sale of the Lot. 3.4.6 It should be noted that any stamp accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity is sold on the basis of that Certificate only and not on the basis of any other description or warranty as to authenticity. No request for an extension will be accepted on such a stamp and the return of such a stamp will not be accepted. 4 AT THE SALE 4.1 Refusal of admission Our sales usually take place on our own premises or premises over which we have control for the sale, and we have the right, exercisable at our complete discretion, to refuse admission to the premises or attendance at an auction. 4.2 Registration before bidding You must complete and sign a registration form and provide identification before making a bid at auction. Please be aware that we usually require buyers to undergo a credit check. Some lots may be designated, prior to the auction, as “Premium Lots”, which means a deposit may be required before placing a bid on the item for sale. Information will be posted on our website in such an event.

Hammer Price Lot Reserve Seller Spink Group VAT VAT Symbols 2 SPINK’S ROLE AS AGENT 2.1

All sales undertaken by us either at auction or privately are undertaken either as agent on behalf of the Seller or from time to time, as principal if we are the owner of the Lot. Please note that even if we are acting as agent on behalf of the Seller rather than as principal, we may have a financial interest in the Lot. The contract for the sale of the Lot will be between you and the Seller.

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BEFORE THE SALE 3.1 Examination of goods You are strongly advised to examine personally any goods in which you are interested, before the auction takes place. Condition reports are usually available on request. We provide no guarantee to you other than in relation to Forgeries, as set out in clause 5.13 of these Terms and Conditions. Catalogue descriptions 3.2.1 Statements by us in the catalogue or condition report, or made orally or in writing elsewhere, regarding the authorship, origin, date, age, size, medium, attribution, genuineness, provenance, condition or estimated selling price of any Lot are merely statements of opinion, and are not to be relied on as statements of definitive fact. Catalogue illustrations are for guidance only, and should not be relied on either to determine the tone or colour of any item or to reveal imperfections. Estimates of the selling price should not be relied on as a statement that this price is either the price at which the Lot will sell or its value for any other purpose. 3.2.2 Many items are of an age or nature which precludes their being in perfect condition and some descriptions in the catalogue or given by way of condition report make reference to damage and/or restoration. We provide this information for guidance only and the absence of such a reference does not imply that an item is free from defects or restoration nor does a reference to particular defects imply the absence of any others. 3.2.3 Other than as set out in clause 5.13, and in the absence of fraud, neither the Seller nor we, nor any of our employees or agents, are responsible for the correctness of any statement as to the authorship, origin, date, age, attribution, genuineness or provenance of any Lot nor for any other errors of description or for any faults or defects in any Lot. 3.3 Your Responsibility You are responsible for satisfying yourself as to the condition of the goods and the matters referred to in the catalogue description. Extensions – Stamps only 3.4.1 If you wish to obtain an expert opinion or Certificate of Authenticity on any Lot (other than a mixed Lot or Lot containing undescribed stamps) you must notify us in writing not less than forty-eight hours before the time fixed for the commencement of

3.2

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4.3

Bidding as Principal When making a bid (whether such bids are made in person or by way of telephone bids operated by Spink, commission or online or email bids), you will be deemed to be acting as principal and will be accepting personal liability, unless it has been agreed in writing, at the time of registration, that you are acting as agent on behalf of a third party buyer acceptable to us. Commission Bids If you give us instructions to bid on your behalf, by using the form provided in our catalogues or via our website, we shall use reasonable endeavours to do so, provided these instructions are received not later than 24 hours before the auction. If we receive commission bids on a particular Lot for identical amounts, and at auction these bids are the highest bids for the Lot, it will be sold to the person whose bid was received first. Commission bids are undertaken subject to other commitments at the time of the sale, and the conduct of the auction may be such that we are unable to bid as requested. Since this is undertaken as a free service to prospective buyers on the terms stated, we cannot accept liability for failure to make a commission bid. You should therefore always attend personally if you wish to be certain of bidding. On-line Bidding We offer internet services as a convenience to our clients. We will not be responsible for errors or failures to execute bids placed on the internet, including, without limitation, errors or failures caused by (i) a loss of internet connection by either party for whatever reason; (ii) a breakdown or problems with the online bidding software and/or (iii) a breakdown or problems with your internet connection, computer or system. Execution of on-line internet bids is a free service undertaken subject to other commitments at the time of the auction and we do not accept liability for failing to execute an online internet bid or for errors or omissions in connection with this activity. Telephone Bids If you make arrangements with us not less than 24 hours before the sale, we shall use reasonable endeavours to contact you to enable you to participate in bidding by telephone, but in no circumstances will we be liable to either the Seller or you as a result of failure to do so. Currency Converter At some auctions, a currency converter will be operated, based on the one month forward rates of exchange quoted to us by Barclays Bank Plc or any other appropriate rate determined by us, at opening on the date of the auction. Bidding will take place in a currency determined by us, which is usually sterling for auctions held in London. The currency converter is not always reliable, and errors may occur beyond our control either in the accuracy of the Lot number displayed on the converter, or the foreign currency equivalent of sterling bids. We shall not be liable to you for any loss suffered as a result of you following the currency converter. Video images At some auctions there will be a video screen. Mistakes may occur in its operation, and we cannot be liable to you regarding either the correspondence of the image to the Lot being sold or the quality of the image as a reproduction of the original. Bidding Increments Bidding generally opens below the low estimate and advances in the following order although the auctioneer may vary the bidding increments during the course of the auction. The normal bidding increments are: Up to £100 by £5 £100 to £300 by £10 £300 to £600 £320-£350-£380-£400 etc. £600 to £1,000 by £50 £1,000 to £3,000 by £100 £3,000 to £6,000 £3,200-£3,500-£3,800-£4,000 etc. £6,000 to £20,000 by £500 £20,000 and up Auctioneer’s discretion

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4.9

4.10 Bidding by Spink 4.10.1 We reserve the right to bid on Lots on the Seller’s behalf up to the amount of the Reserve (if any), which will never be above the low estimate printed in the auction catalogue. 4.10.2 The Spink Group reserves the right to bid on and purchase Lots as principal. 4.11 The Auctioneer’s Discretion The auctioneer has the right at his absolute discretion to refuse any bid to advance the bidding in such manner as he may decide to withdraw or divide any Lot, to combine any two or more Lots and, in the case of error or dispute, to put an item up for bidding again. Spink Uni (07/11) (20)

4.12 Successful Bid Subject to the auctioneer’s discretion, the striking of his hammer marks the acceptance of the highest bid, provided always that such bid is higher than the Reserve (where applicable), and the conclusion of a contract for sale between you and the Seller. 4.13 After Sale Arrangements If you enter into any private sale agreements for any Lot with the Seller within 60 days of the auction, we, as exclusive agents of the Seller reserve the right to charge you the applicable Buyer’s Premium in accordance with these Terms and Conditions, and the Seller a commission in accordance with the terms of the Seller’s agreement. 4.14 Return of Lot Once your bid has been accepted for a Lot then you are liable to pay for that Lot in accordance with these Terms and Conditions. If there are any problems with a Lot then you must notify us within 7 days of receipt of the Lot, specifying the nature of the problem. We may then request that the Lot is returned to us for inspection. Save as set out in clause 5.13, the cancellation of the sale of any Lot and the refund of the corresponding purchase price is entirely at our sole discretion. We will not normally exercise that discretion if the Lot is not received by us in the same condition that it was in at the auction date. AFTER THE AUCTION 5.1 Buyer’s Premium In addition to the Hammer Price, you must pay us the Buyer’s Premium at a rate of 20% of the final Hammer Price of each Lot. 5.2 Value Added Tax Other than in respect of Zero-rated Lots (o) VAT is chargeable on the Hammer price and the Buyer’s premium of daggered (†) and (Ω) lots at the standard rate (currently 20%), and on lots marked (x) at the reduced rate (currently 5% on the Hammer price and 20% on the Buyer’s premium). VAT on Margin scheme lots (identified by the absence of any VAT symbol next to the lot number) is payable at 20% on the Buyer’s premium only. 5.3 VAT Refunds General 5.3.1 As we remain liable to account for VAT on all Lots unless they have been exported outside the EU within 3 months of the date of sale, you will generally be asked to deposit all amounts of VAT invoiced. However, if a Spink nominated shipper is instructed, then any refundable VAT will not be collected. In all other cases credits will be made when proof of export is provided. If you export the Lot yourself you must obtain shipping documents from the Shipping Department for which a charge of £50 will be made. 5.3.2 If you export the Lot you must return the valid proof of export certificate to us within 3 months of the date of sale. If you fail to return the proof of export certificate to us within such period and you have not already accounted to us for the VAT, you will be liable to us for the full amount of the VAT due on such Lot and we shall be entitled to invoice you for this sum. 5.3.3 To apply for a refund of any VAT paid, the proof of export certificate must be sent to our Shipping Department clearly marked ‘VAT Refund’ within 3 months of the date of sale. No payment will be made where the total amount of VAT refundable is less than £50 and Spink will charge £50 for each refund processed. VAT Refunds - Buyers from within the EU 5.3.4 VAT refunds are available on the Hammer Price and Buyer’s Premium of Daggered (†) and Investment Gold (g) Lots. You must certify that you are registered for VAT in another EU country and that the Lot is to be removed from the United Kingdom within 3 months of the date of sale. 5.3.5 Where an EU buyer purchases a Lot on which import VAT has been charged, no refund of VAT is available from us. It may be possible to apply directly for a refund on form VAT 65 to HM Revenue & Customs Overeseas Repayment Section, Londonderry. VAT Refunds – Buyers from outside the EU 5.3.6 Where a Lot is included within the Auctioneers’ Margin Scheme and evidence of export from the EU is produced within 3 months of the date of sale, the VAT on Buyer’s Premium may be refunded. 5.3.7 Where the Lot is marked as a Daggered (†) or Investment Gold (g) Lot the VAT charged on the Hammer Price may be refunded where evidence of export from the EU is produced within 3 months of the date of sale. A refund of VAT charged on the Buyer’s Premium can also be made on receipt of proof of business as a collectibles dealer. 5.3.8 Where the Lot is marked as an Omega (Ω) Lot or an Import VAT (x) Lot and evidence of export from the EU is produced within 3 months of the date of sale, the VAT charged on both the Hammer Price and Buyer’s Premium may be refunded. Where required, we can advise you on how to export such Lots as a specific form of export evidence is required. Where we advise you on the export of the Lots, please be aware that the ultimate responsibility in respect of obtaining a valid proof of export certificate will lie with you and we will not be responsible for your failure to obtain such certificate.

5.4

Payment 5.4.1 You must provide us with your full name and permanent address and, if so requested, details of the bank from which any payments to us will be made. You must pay the full amount due (comprising the Hammer Price, the Buyer’s Premium and any applicable VAT) within seven days after the date of the sale. This applies even if you wish to export the Lot and an export licence is (or may be) required. 5.4.2 You will not acquire title to the Lot until all amounts due have been paid in full. This includes instances where special arrangements were made for release of Lot prior to full settlement. 5.4.3 Payment should be made in sterling by one of the following methods: II(i) Direct bank transfer to our account details of which are set out on the invoice. All bank charges shall be met by you. Please ensure that your client number is noted on the transfer. i(ii) By cheque or bank draft made payable to Spink and Son Ltd and sent to Spink at 69 Southampton Row, Bloomsbury, London WC1B 4ET. Please note that the processing charges for payments made by cheques or bank drafts drawn on a non-U.K bank shall be met by you. Please ensure that the remittance slip printed at the bottom of the invoice is enclosed with your payment. (iii) By Visa or Mastercard. A charge of 2% will be applied. Payments exceeding £5,000 can normally only be made by the card holder in person whilst on our premises. 5.4.4 Payments should be made by the registered buyer and not by third parties, unless it has been agreed at the time of registration that you are acting as an agent on behalf of a third party. 5.5 Invoices Invoices may consist of one or more pages and will show: Zero rated Lots (o); no symbol Lots sold under the Auctioneers’ Margin Scheme; Lots marked (g) special scheme Investment Gold; Daggered Lots (†), imported Lots marked (x) and (Ω), (e) Lots with Zero rated hammer for EU VAT registered buyers. 5.6 Collection of Purchases 5.6.1 Unless we specifically agree to the contrary, we shall retain items sold until all amounts due to us, or to the Spink Group, have been paid in full. 5.6.2 Unless we notify you to the contrary, items retained by us will be covered in accordance with our policy which is available for inspection at our offices from the date of sale for a period of seven days or until the time of collection, whichever is sooner. After seven days or from the time of collection, whichever is the earlier, the Lot will be entirely at your risk. 5.6.3 Our policy will not cover and we are unable to accept responsibility for damage caused by woodworm, changes in atmospheric conditions or acts of terrorism. 5.7 Notification We are not able to notify successful bidders by telephone. While Invoices are sent out by mail after the auction we do not accept responsibility for notifying you of the result of your bid. You are requested to contact us by telephone or in person as soon as possible after the auction to obtain details of the outcome of your bids to avoid incurring charges for late payment. 5.8 Packing and handling 5.8.1 We shall use all reasonable endeavours to take care when handling and packing a purchased Lot but remind you that after seven days or from the time of collection, whichever is sooner, the Lot is entirely at your risk. Our postage charges are set out at the back of the catalogue. 5.8.2 It is the responsibility of the Buyer to be aware of any Import Duties that may be incurred upon importation to the final destination. Spink will not accept return of any package in order to avoid these duties. The onus is also on the Buyer to be aware of any Customs import restrictions that prohibit the importation of certain collectibles. Spink will not accept return of the Lot(s) under these circumstances. Spink will not accept responsibility for Lot(s) seized or destroyed by Customs. 5.8.3 If the Buyer requires delivery of the Lot to an address other than the invoice address this will be carried out at the discretion of Spink. 5.9 Recommended packers and shippers If required our shipping department may arrange shipment as your agent. Although we may suggest carriers if specifically requested, our suggestions are made on the basis of our general experience of such parties in the past and we are not responsible to any person to whom we have made a recommendation for the acts or omissions of the third parties concerned. 5.10 Remedies for non-payment or failure to collect purchases 5.10.1 If you fail to make payment within seven days of your stipulated payment date set out in your invoice, we shall be entitled to exercise one or more of the following rights or remedies: 5.10.1.1 to charge interest at the rate of 2% per month compound interest, calculated on a daily basis, from the date the full amount is due;

5.10.1.2 to set off against any amounts which the Spink Group may owe you in any other transaction the outstanding amount remaining unpaid by you; 5.10.1.3 we may keep hold of all or some of your Lots or other property in the possession of the Spink Group until you have paid all the amounts you owe us or the Spink Group, even if the unpaid amounts do not relate to those Lots or other property. Following fourteen days’ notice to you of the amount outstanding and remaining unpaid, the Spink Group shall have the right to arrange the sale of such Lots or other property. We shall apply the proceeds in discharge of the amount outstanding to us or the Spink Group, and pay any balance to you; 5.10.1.4 where several amounts are owed by you to the Spink Group in respect of different transactions, to apply any amount paid to discharge any amount owed in respect of any particular transaction, whether or not you so direct; 5.10.1.5 to reject at any future auction any bids made by you or on your behalf or obtain a deposit from you before accepting any bids. 5.10.2 If you fail to make payment within thirty-five days, we shall in addition be entitled: 5.10.2.1 to cancel the sale of the Lot or any other item sold to you at the same or any other auction; 5.10.2.2 to arrange a resale of the Lot, publicly or privately, and, if this results in a lower price being obtained, claim the balance from you together with all reasonable costs including a 20% seller’s commission, expenses, damages, legal fees, commissions and premiums of whatever kind associated with both sales or otherwise, incurred in connection with your failure to make payment; or 5.10.2.3 take any other appropriate action as we deem fit. 5.11 Failure to collect Where purchases are not collected within seven days after the sale, whether or not payment has been made, you will be required to pay a storage charge of £2 per item per day plus any additional handling cost that may apply. You will not be entitled to collect the Lot until all outstanding charges are met, together with payment of all other amounts due to us. 5.12 Export Licence 5.12.1 If required we can, at our discretion, advise you on the detailed provisions of the export licensing regulations. Where we advise you in relation to export licensing regulations the ultimate responsibility in respect of any export will lie with you and we will not be responsible for your failure to apply for any necessary licences. 5.12.2 If the Lot is going to be hand carried by you, you may be required to produce a valid export licence to us or sign a waiver document stating that a licence will be applied for. 5.12.3 You should always check whether an export licence is required before exporting. Export licences are usually obtained within two or three weeks but delays can occur. 5.12.4 Unless otherwise agreed by us in writing, the fact that you wish to apply for an export licence does not affect your obligation to make payment within seven days nor our right to charge interest on late payment. 5.12.5 If you request that we apply for an export licence on your behalf, we shall be entitled to recover from you our disbursements and out of pocket expenses in relation to such application, together with any relevant VAT. 5.12.6 We will not be obliged to rescind a sale nor to refund any interest or other expenses incurred by you where payment is made by you despite the fact that an export licence is required. 5.13 Refund in the case of Forgery 5.13.1 A sale will be cancelled, and the amount paid refunded to you if a Lot (other than a miscellaneous item not described in the catalogue) sold by us proves to have been a Forgery. We shall not however be obliged to refund any amounts if either (a) the catalogue description or saleroom notice at the auction date corresponded to the generally accepted opinion of scholars or experts at that time, or fairly indicated that there was a conflict of opinions, or (b) it can be demonstrated that the Lot is a Forgery only by means of either a scientific process not generally accepted for use until after publication of the catalogue or a process which at the date of the auction was unreasonably expensive or impracticable or likely to have caused damage to the Lot. Furthermore, you should note that this refund can be obtained only if the following conditions are met: 5.13.1.1 you must notify us in writing, within seven days of the receipt of the Lot(s), that in your view the Lot concerned is a Forgery; 5.13.1.2 you must then return the item to us within fourteen days from receipt of the Lot(s), in the same condition as at the auction date; and

Spink Uni (07/11) (20)

5.13.1.3 as soon as possible following return of the Lot, you must produce evidence satisfactory to us that the Lot is a Forgery and that you are able to transfer good title to us, free from any third party claims. 5.13.2 In no circumstances shall we be required to pay you any more than the amount paid by you for the Lot concerned and you shall have no claim for interest. 5.13.3 The benefit of this guarantee is not capable of being transferred, and is solely for the benefit of the person to whom the original invoice was made out by us in respect of the Lot when sold and who, since the sale, has remained the owner of the Lot without disposing of any interest in it to any third party. 5.13.4 We shall be entitled to rely on any scientific or other process to establish that the Lot is not a Forgery, whether or not such process was used or in use at the date of the auction. 6 LIABILITY Nothing in these Terms and Conditions limits or excludes our liability for: 6.1 death or personal injury resulting from negligence; or 6.2 any damage or liability incurred by you as a result of our fraud or fraudulent misrepresentation. 7 COPYRIGHT 7.1 We shall have the right (on a non-exclusive basis) to photograph, video or otherwise produce an image of the Lot. All rights in such an image will belong to us, and we shall have the right to use it in whatever way we see fit. 7.2 The copyright in all images, illustrations and written material relating to a Lot is and shall remain at all times our property and we shall have the right to use it in whatever way we see fit. You shall not use or allow anyone else to use such images, illustrations or written material without our prior written consent. 8 VAT You shall give us all relevant information about your VAT status and that of the Lot to ensure that the correct information is printed in the catalogues. Once printed, the information cannot be changed. If we incur any unforeseen cost or expense as a result of the information being incorrect, you will reimburse to us on demand the full amount incurred. 9 NOTICES All notices given under these Terms and Conditions may be served personally, sent by 1st class post, or faxed to the address given to the sender by the other party. Any notice sent by post will be deemed to have been received on the second working day after posting or, if the addressee is overseas, on the fifth working day after posting. Any notice sent by fax or served personally will be deemed to be delivered on the first working day following despatch. 10 ADDITIONAL PROVISIONS The following provisions of this clause 10 shall apply only if you are acting for the purposes of your business. 10.1 Limitation of Liability Subject to clause 6, we shall not be liable, whether in tort (including for negligence) or breach of statutory duty, contract, misrepresentation or otherwise for any: 10.1.1 loss of profits, loss of business, depletion of goodwill and/or similar losses, loss of anticipated savings, loss of goods, loss of contract, loss of use, loss of corruption of data or information; or 10.1.2 any special, indirect, consequential or pure economic loss, costs, damages, charges or expenses. 10.2 Severability If any part of these Terms and Condition is found by any court to be invalid, illegal or unenforceable, that part may be discounted and the rest of the conditions shall continue to be valid and enforceable to the fullest extent permitted by law. 10.3 Force majeure We shall have no liability to you if we are prevented from, or delayed in performing, our obligations under these Terms and Conditions or from carrying on our business by acts, events, omissions or accidents beyond our reasonable control, including (without limitation) strikes, lock-outs or other industrial disputes (whether involving our workforce or the workforce of any other party), failure of a utility service or transport network, act of God, war, riot, civil commotion, malicious damage, compliance with any law or governmental order, rule, regulation or direction, accident, breakdown of plant or machinery, fire, flood, storm or default of suppliers or subcontractors. 10.4 Waiver 10.4.1 A waiver of any right under these Terms and Conditions is only effective if it is in writing and it applies only to the circumstances for which it is given. No failure or delay by a party in exercising any right or remedy under these Terms and Conditions or by law shall constitute a waiver of that (or any other) right or remedy, nor preclude or restrict its further exercise. No single or partial exercise of such right or remedy shall preclude or restrict the further exercise of that (or any other) right or remedy. 10.4.2 Unless specifically provided otherwise, rights arising under these Terms and Conditions are cumulative and do not exclude rights provided by law. Spink Uni (07/11) (20)

10.5 Law and Jurisdiction 10.5.1 These Terms and Conditions and any dispute or claim arising out of or in connection with them or their subject matter, shall be governed by, and construed in accordance with, the law of England and Wales. 10.5.2 The parties irrevocably agree that the courts of England and Wales shall have exclusive jurisdiction to settle any dispute or claim that arises out of, or in connection with, Terms and Conditions or their subject matter.

Postal Charges
Prices for books (items sent by this method are not covered by insurance)
Weight Up to 1kg Up to 2kg UK £8 for any weight £8 for any weight EU £12 £18 Rest of the World £15 £25

Prices for all other items including postage and packaging
Invoice Value Up to £1,500 Up to £10,000 Above £10,001 UK £10 £20 £20 EU £15 £30 £50 Rest of the World £20 £40 £60

Shipments of more than 2kg or volumetric measurement of more than 2kg have to be sent by courier. Certain countries may incur extra charge when courier services are required by our insurance policy. For lots sent by courier please contact Auctionteam@spink.com for calculation of any further relevant cost in addition to the above charges. Value Added Tax (VAT) Charging of (VAT) at Auction The information shown on this page sets out the way in which Spink intends to account for VAT. i. Auctioneers’ Margin Scheme 1. Where possible, we will offer Lots for sale under the Auctioneers’ Margin Scheme. Such Lots can be identified by the absence of any VAT symbol next to the Lot number in the catalogue and will not be subject to VAT on the Hammer Price. 2. Where Lots are sold using the Auctioneers’ Margin Scheme to VAT–registered businesses, the VAT included within the Buyers’ Premium is not recoverable as input tax. Upon request on sale day, we will issue invoices that show VAT separately on both the Hammer Price and the Buyer’s Premium. This will enable VAT-registered businesses to recover the VAT charged as input tax, subject to the normal rules for recovering input tax. ii. Zero-Rated Lots Limited Categories of goods, such as books, are Zero-rated (o) for VAT in the United Kingdom. Such Lots are offered under the Auctioneers’ Margin Scheme. In these circumstances no VAT will be added to the Buyer’s premium. Daggered Lots Lots which are Daggered (†) in the catalogue are subject to VAT at 20% on both the Hammer Price and the Buyer’s Premium. Starred and Omega Lots Lots which are marked (x) in the catalogue are subject to VAT at 5% on the Hammer price plus 20% on the Buyer’s premium. Lots which bear the Omega symbol (Ω) are subject to VAT at 20% on the Hammer Price and on the Buyer’s Premium. Such Lots bear VAT because the Lot is liable for VAT at this rate on importation into the EU. Investment Gold Lots Lots marked (g) in the catalogue are exempt from VAT on the Hammer Price and are subject to VAT at 20% on the Buyer’s Premium. A refund of VAT charged on the Buyer’s Premium can also be made on receipt of proof of business as a collectibles dealer. Imported Lots Lots which are marked (x) and Lots which bear the Omega symbol (Ω) have VAT charged on the Hammer Price and Buyers’ Premium because they have been imported into the United Kingdom from outside the EU. In these cases we have used a temporary importation procedure, which in effect means that the point of importation is deferred until the Lot has been sold. At this point the Buyer is treated as the importer and is liable to pay the import VAT due. We will collect the VAT from you and pay it to HM Customs and Excise on your behalf.

iii.

iv.

v.

vi.

SALE CALENDAR 2013
STAMPS 6 July 9/10/11 July 15/16 August 10 September 10 September 21 September 21/22 September 22 October 23-24 October 13-14 November 11 December COINS 6 July 21 August 10/11 September 24 September 25 September 1 October 3 December BANKNOTES 6 July 17 July 10/11 September 1/2 October 8 October 5 December MEDALS 25 July 21 November BONDS AND SHARES 6 July 10/11 September 28 November AUTOGRAPHS 10/11 September The Collector’s Series Sale New York 317 The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale Bonds and Share Certificates of the World Hong Kong New York London CSS06 317 13017 Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria London London 13002 13003 The Collector’s Series Sale The David Kirch Collection of English Provincial Banknotes Part IV: Yorkshire and The North The Collector’s Series Sale World Banknotes The Ibrahim Salem Collection of African Banknotes World Banknotes Hong Kong London New York London London London CSS06 13035 317 13018 13037 13034 The Collector’s Series Sale Tibetan Coins from the Nick Rhodes Collection The Collector’s Series Sale North East Indian Coins from the Nick Rhodes Collection Ancient, British & Foreign Coins and Commemorative Medals World Coins Ancient, British & Foreign Coins and Commemorative Medals Hong Kong Hong Kong New York London London London London CSS06 13020 317 13019 13014 13039 13015 The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale British East Africa and Uganda - The Award Winning Collections of George T. Krieger The Award Winning “Medina” Collection of India and States, Part III The Japanese Occupation Issues of South East Asia Stamps and Covers of South East Asia Important British Empire Revenues A Series of Single Vendor British Empire Sales The Collector’s Series Sale Great Britain Stamps and Postal History Hong Kong London New York London London Singapore Singapore London London London London CSS06 13027 144 13040 13028 13038 13030 13041 13042 13043 13044

WINES July September An Evening of Exceptional Wines An Evening of Exceptional Wines Hong Kong Singapore SFW03

The above sale dates are subject to change

Spink offers the following services:
– VALUATIONS FOR INSURANCE AND PROBATE FOR INDIVIDUAL ITEMS OR WHOLE COLLECTIONS – – SALES ON A COMMISSION BASIS EITHER OF INDIVIDUAL PIECES OR WHOLE COLLECTIONS –

£25

© Copyright 2013

STAMPS COINS BANKNOTES MEDALS BONDS & SHARES AUTOGRAPHS BOOKS WINES

69 Southampton Row, Bloomsbury, London WC1B 4ET www.spink.com

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