Window to the Past, p3

DELPHOS
The
50¢ daily www.delphosherald.com FROM STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS news@delphosherald.com COLUMBUS — On the heels of news Thursday showing that yet another 3,371 people in the state had applied for unemployment benefits, Ohio’s unemployment rate for June was released showing a jump in the rate and a big loss of jobs. According to the latest report from the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS), the state’s jobless rate rose to 7.2 percent in June, up from 7.0 percent in both April and May. The rate is the highest in Ohio since last August. The state showed a loss of 12,500 jobs in June which was the second largest amount of any state. Data released by the U.S. Department of Labor on Thursday showed unemployment rates increasing in 28 states last month, partly because more Americans began searching for work and not all of them got jobs. The government does not count people as unemployed unless they are actively looking for work. The numbers showed a sharp increase in the number of people who had signed up for unemployment in Ohio. The state had the fifth-highest increase in the number

Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869

Ohio officials downplay higher unemployment numbers
in the week ending July 6. The job losses were blamed on layoffs in manufacturing, transportation, retail, and utilities. An ODJFS spokesman pointed out that more people are confident in the economy and because of that they have embarked on a job hunt. “When they become more confident that they’ll likely get a job, they actually start looking for a job,” said Benjamin Johnson, spokesman for the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services. “And we know that as the labor force grows, it often results in an increase (in the rate) because not all the people entering the labor force will get a job right away.” According to the report, the number of jobs dropped by 12,500 to just over 5.2 million while the number of unemployed increased by 8,000 to 413,000. Overall in the last 12 months, the number of unemployed has dropped by 5,000 people. The June 2013 rate of 7.2 percent is just marginally lower than the jobless rate in June 2012 when it was 7.3 percent. However, Ohio’s rate has consistently remained below the national rate, which was 7.6 percent last month. The state’s unemployment rate peaked during the last half of 2009 and early 2010 at 10.6 percent before starting its trek downward. State officials point to good economic news like that coming out of Toledo this week with the announcement by Chrysler that production on the new Jeep Cherokee should reach full production this September. The company has already hired 1,100 new workers for the Toledo plant which also makes the Jeep Wrangler. In May, Ohio saw a loss of 3,100 manufacturing jobs, another 3,000 positions in the educational and health services fields and 7,100 local government jobs.

Saturday, July 20, 2013

HERALD
Delphos, Ohio

Orioles win regular season Minor League championship, p6

Winget retiring from BBB

Upfront

Reser’s closing will have no direct impact on city schools
BY NANCY SPENCER Herald Editor nspencer@delposherald.com

Information submitted LIMA — After nearly 20 years as president and CEO of the Better Business Bureau serving West C e n t r a l Ohio, Neil Winget has announced he is retiring. Winget came to Lima in late 1976 as the Winget morning news reporter for WIMA and T-102 radio. He left WIMA in 1989 and worked for the Lima Area Chamber of Commerce for the next five years as the communications director. See WINGET, page 10

Accident closes U.S. 30 Friday morning

The Van Wert Post of the Ohio State Highway Patrol continues to investigate a mid-morning crash on U.S. 30 just east of the S.R. 66 interchange. The entrance ramp to U.S. 30 from S. R. 66 was closed during cleanup. No further information was available at press time. (Delphos Herald/Stacy Taff)

DELPHOS — Delphos City Schools Treasurer Brad Rostorfer is concerned Delphos will lose Reser’s Fine Foods in September but at the same time, feels fortunate it won’t impact the bottom line. Rostorfer said since the district does not have an income tax and tangible personal property tax has been phased out, the closure should not affect the district’s bottom line. “Real estate taxes will still be assessed for the property and someone will still own it and owe those,” he said. “I suppose it could go in to a delinquency situation but as a whole, the closure won’t have an immediate affect on the district’s budget.” He hopes S.B. 59, Gov. Kasich’s new biennial budget, includes a little something extra to replace a portion of the tangible personal property tax and so far, Delphos is one of the districts that will receive an increase in state funding. “Right now we are in line to receive a little more for special education and vocational education,” he added.

Sports
DYH hosting annual Golf Scramble The fifth annual DYH Golf Scramble (best ball) has been scheduled for Aug. 18 at the Delphos County Club. It is slated for a 1 p.m. shotgun start, with registration at noon. The price of $60 per player/$240 per team includes green fees, cart, meal, a $10 Goldsmith discount card, two drink tickets and a free golf club certificate (for members, $40 per player/$160 per team). There will be a Holein-One contest on all par-3 holes (a grand prize of $5,000); closest-to-the-pin ($50); Skins; 50/50 drawing; and other contests. Entry forms can be picked up at the DCC or Pat’s Donuts and Kreme in Delphos. Any questions, contact Jeff Stockwell (419-2361150) or Greg Gossman (419-905-9967).

Community weighs in for PEAK charity challenge
BY STEPHANIE GROVES Staff Writer sgroves@delphosherald.com DELPHOS—Twenty-one teams comprised of employees from a variety of local businesses have risen to the challenge— the Community Charity Weight Loss Challenge— to lose one half ton (1,000 pounds) in two months. Peak 24 Hour Fitness Lifestyle Coach and Membership Specialist Dianna Doyle said she, owner Jeff Schwieterman, trainers and life coaches started organizing and designing the program for the challenge at the end of June. They collaborated with the corporate office and integrated elements from the Thin and Healthy Program in Lima, called the ‘Big Give’, which targeted over 70 organizations and their leaders in past events. Doyle is extremely passionate about her role in the weight loss challenge and her ‘calling’ to help people attain their The newest Delphos Fire and Rescue paramedic in Delphos, Diane Pack, accepts her goals. She said she has witnessed many life-changing, weight loss success stories, which has inspired her enthusiasm for paramedic certificate from Firefighter/Paramedic Cory Meyer. Pack said Meyer was instrumental in her success in earning the designation. (Submitted photo) reaching out to as many people as she possibly can. “I had a list of businesses and hit the ground running with the informational packets and a list of charities,” Doyle said. “We wanted to give back to the community and keep charities local.” See CHALLENGE, page 10

There’s a new medic in town
BY NANCY SPENCER Herald Editor nspencer@delphosherald.com

Forecast
Partly cloudy today with a chance of showers and thunderstorms. Highs in the mid 80s. Mostly clear tonight with cooler temperatures around the lower 60s. See page 2.

Index

Safety Council saves 34 pct. on Workers Comp. rates
BY STEPHANIE GROVES Staff Writer sgroves@delphosherald.com DELPHOS—The Delphos Area Chamber of Commerce is still offering businesses the Safety Council Program, which is a program for businesses to promote safety and earn rebates. Completed registration forms must be submitted to the Delphos Area Chamber by Tuesday. Through a partnership with the Van Wert Area Chamber of Commerce and the Ohio Bureau of Worker’s Compensation, the Delphos Chamber is encouraging business owners to participate in the 2013-2014 Van Wert Area Safety Council Program. Last year, Van Wert and Delphos Area Safety Council members earned a total of $69,247.00 in rebates on their Workers’ Compensation rates. This represents a 34 percent increase in savings from the year before. Delphos Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Jennifer Moenter said the Safety Council Program is extremely beneficial for a company that may have been removed from Group Rating. Companies that have a lot of employees and many accidents could be removed from their group rating and/or pay higher premiums. “For example, if a company has premiums of $75,000, the potential rebate of 4 percent is $3,000,” Moenter detailed. “By meeting the program requirements, this rebate money far exceeds the fees/time involved with the Safety Council Program.”

DELPHOS — Becoming a paramedic is no easy task. The year-long course consists of 920 hours of training divided in to classroom lecture, lab hours and clinical/field internship rotations. In addition, time must be set aside to study. Diane Pack wasn’t afraid of a little hard work and got a hand from her co-workers at Delphos Fire and Rescue to make it through the Rhodes State Paramedic Program. “The class wasn’t easy and there were times I felt very frustrated,” Pack said. “I definitely didn’t do it alone. I had a lot of support from a few of our firefighters.” Pack was mentored through the program by Firefighter/Paramedic Cory Meyer. “I probably wouldn’t have made it through Peak 24 Hour Fitness Lifestyle Coach and Membership the class without his help and I definitely Specialist Dianna Doyle gives advice to Susan Lunz, a wouldn’t have gotten an ‘A’,” Pack said. “He ‘Weight Loss Challenge’ participant working out on station- had high expectations and would not settle for ary bike equipment. (Delphos Herald/Stephanie Groves) less than perfect and pushed for excellence.

Not living up to his expectations was never presented as an option.” Graduates of the prestigious Rhodes State Paramedic Program hold certifications in advanced cardiac life support, pediatric advanced life support and pre-hospital trauma life support in addition to being nationally registered paramedics. Pack earned an associate’s in applied science in public services in Criminal Justice from Rhodes State in June 2009. She only has two classes remaining to complete a second associate’s degree in emergency medical services. She is a member of Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society and the Delphos Optimists. She owns and operates champion Karate Center in Fort Jennings and works for Rhodes State College’s division of EMS. She joined the Delphos unit in April 2009 at a basic EMT. After only one year, Pack advanced to EMT-Intermediate. Pack plans to continue to serve the Delphos community as its newest paramedic.

Obituaries State/Local Opinion Community Sports Classifieds Television World briefs

2 3 4 5 6-7 8 9 10

The Safety Council Program is an initiative designed to increase safety awareness and give businesses a potential cost savings benefit through rebates on their Workers’ Compensation rates by providing a forum for safety and health information, education and networking in local communities. Program topics must be classified under occupational safety and health, risk management, workers’ compensation, BWC services, rehabilitation or environmental issues. See SAFETY, page 10

2 – The Herald

Saturday, July 20, 2013

www.delphosherald.com

One Year Ago Sr. Tina Petrick, SND, a native of Sandusky, has been an active resident of the sisters’ convent at St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church in Delphos for six years. She had spent three years teaching at a mission in Papua New Guinea and never quite got that mission work out of her blood. When the opportunity came up to return to the mission field in the same part of the world, the answer was yes. She said she likely would leave Delphos Aug. 13 or 14 and depart for New Guinea Aug. 16. 25 Years Ago – 1988 Wayne Suever recently began serving as platoon chief with the Delphos Fire Department. As platoon chief, he will be in charge of fire scenes and volunteer firefighters in the fire chief’s absence. Suever succeeds platoon chief Bob Osburn, who retired at the beginning of July. The department has two platoon chiefs. The other is Stan Wiechart. Brian C. Miller, a 1988 graduate of Ottoville High School, has been awarded an academic scholarship to attend Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, Terre Haute, Ind. He is also the recipient of a Catholic Ladies of Columbia academic scholarship. He is the son of Ruth and Ray Miller of Ottoville. A group of rimfire rifle shooters at the Black Swamp Rifle and Pistol Club met for the first time for informal competition. Best scores were posted by Jeff Warniment, Bill Henze and Bob Maloney. Matches were shot at oneinch targets at a distance of 100 yards bench-resting the rifles. 50 Years Ago – 1963 Nearly twice as many businesses, industries and professional men are members of the Delphos Chamber of Commerce than there were five years ago, William Gladen, chamber secretary, reported this week. The total membership at this date is 101, compared to 56 five years ago he said. In Holland, dairy farmers don’t call their cows in to the barn at milking time. They wheel a rack containing milk pails out to the pasture and milk the cows there. That’s one observation made by Tim Shenk during a five-month tour of Europe that took him, his wife Emma, and their son Tim through 18 countries. The Shenks, who farm on State Road east of Scott’s Crossing, sailed for Europe in August 1962. Terry Odenweller, Delphos, will serve as athletic chairman at Giffin College, Van Wert, for the 1963-64 term. Dave A. Gamble, graduate of Van Wert High School, is to be student president and James Sheets, a Logan high school grad, secretary-treasurer. 75 Years Ago – 1936 Harold S. Johnson of Chicago, world famous transport pilot, has performed many times at the country’s outstanding aviation meets. The ace flier will appear at Schramm flying field east of Delphos for two days, July 21-22. His famous all-metal Ford tri-motor skyliner will carry 14 passengers. A 15-mile flight is being offered at a nominal fee. Twenty pheasants secured from the Urbana state game reserve were released Tuesday evening in the Stallkamp woods, south of Delphos. The pheasants were secured through the efforts of the Old Time ‘Coon Hunters Association of Delphos and were released by James Counsellor and David Good, two members of the club. Ralph H. Grothouse of Delphos was given an award of merit July 18 for outstanding duty as guide at publicity headquarters while in CMTC training at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Ind. Young Grothouse is enrolled there with 1,888 other trainees from Ohio.

IT WAS NEWS THEN

For The Record
Joan Eddy

OBITUARIES
Sept. 20, 1927July 19, 2013

William ‘Bill’ Edgar Jarman
Jan. 22, 1932 July 16, 2013

The Delphos Herald
Nancy Spencer, editor Ray Geary, general manager Delphos Herald, Inc. Don Hemple, advertising manager Lori Goodwin Silette, circulation manager
Vol. 144 No. 26

Dolores Mae Remlinger

Sept. 21, 1931-July 18, 2013

CLEVELAND (AP) — These Ohio lotteries were drawn Friday: Mega Millions 16-20-24-39-42, Mega Ball: 46 (sixteen, twenty, twenty-four, thirty-nine, forty-two; Mega Ball: forty-six) Megaplier 3 (three) Pick 3 Evening 4-6-0 (four, six, zero) Pick 3 Midday 4-8-3 (four, eight, three) Pick 4 Evening

LOTTERY

Dolores Mae Remlinger, 81, of Kalida, died at 9:02 a.m. Thursday at St. Rita’s Medical Center in Lima. She was born Sept. 21, 1931, in Ottoville, to Harold and Velva (Schaeffer) Peters, who preceded her in death. On May 31, 1954, she married Carl H. Remlinger, who died Sept. 25, 1990. She is survived by seven children, Mark Remlinger, Bruce (Debra) Remlinger, Keith (Linda) Remlinger and Debra Miller all of Kalida, Jeffrey (Margaret) Remlinger of Plainfield, Ill., Diane (Kurt) Utrup of Glandorf and Dan (Samantha) Remlinger of Concord, NC.; 19 grandchildren; 12 great-grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews. She was also preceded in death by her sister, Stella (Donald) Briggs. Dolores was a homemaker. She had worked for Loving Care in Ottawa, Kids Count in Kalida, McDonalds in Ottawa, the Tap Room in Kalida and GTE Sylvania in Ottawa. She was a member of St. Michael Catholic Church, Kalida and its Altar Rosary Society. She was a charter member of the Ohio Polka Boosters, she taught CCD for 26 years until the age of 78 and was a Cub Scout Den Leader. She was a graduate of Ottoville High School. Dolores loved spending time with her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren, especially playing cards and games and attending their sporting events. She enjoyed volunteering at The Meadows of Kalida, traveling with her lady friends and their “pinky swears.” A Mass of Christian Burial will be 10:30 a.m. Tuesday at 7-3-3-0 St. Michael Catholic Church, (seven, three, three, zero) Kalida with the Rev. Mark Pick 4 Midday Hoying officiating. Burial will 8-3-0-4 follow in the church cemetery. (eight, three, zero, four) Visitation will be from 6-8 Pick 5 Evening p.m. Sunday and 2-8 p.m. 0-3-0-4-4 Monday at Love Funeral (zero, three, zero, four, four) Home, Ottawa. There will be Pick 5 Midday an Altar Rosary service at 7 6-8-8-0-3 p.m. Sunday and a scripture (six, eight, eight, zero, three) service at 6 p.m. Monday. Powerball Memorials may be made to Estimated jackpot: $141 milSt. Michael’s Catholic Church lion or its Religious Education Rolling Cash 5 Department. 28-32-33-35-37 Condolences can be (twenty-eight, thirty-two, thirexpressed at: www.lovefunerty-three, thirty-five, thirty-seven) alhome.com. Estimated jackpot: $100,000

Joan Eddy, 85, of Van Wert, died at 1:03 a.m. Friday in Van Wert Inpatient Hospice Center. She was born Sept. 20, 1927, in Paulding County, to Lewis H. and Wihelmina (Gombert) Myers, who preceded her in death. On April 23, 1950, she married Kenneth Eugene Arn at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in Paulding. He died Jan. 16, 1973. On March 31, 1980, she married Wilbur D. Eddy, who survives in Van Wert. Other survivors include two sons, Eugene (Drema) Arn and James (Diane) Arn of Grover Hill; a daughter, Helen (Gordon) Fuerst of Delphos; two stepsons, Leslie (Judy) Eddy of Haviland and Stanley (Chris) Eddy of Delaware, Ohio; three sisters-inlaw, Phyllis Myers and Ruby Myers of Van Wert and Colleen Myers of Haviland; nine grandchildren; four stepgrandchildren; 11 great-grandchildren and seven stepgreatgrandchildren. She is also preceded in death by three brothers, Lewis Jr., Maurice and Thomas Myers and a sister, Caroline “Connie” Smith. Funeral services will be at 10:30 a.m. Monday at St. Mark’s Lutheran Church in Van Wert, with Pastor Rita Baer officiating. Burial will take place at Middle Creek Cemetery in Grover Hill. Visitation will be 2-8 p.m. Sunday at Cowan & Son Funeral Home and one hour prior to the service at the church on Monday. Memorials can be made to The Church Food Bank.

William “Bill” Edgar Jarman, 81, of Delphos, died at 9:38 p.m. Tuesday at St. Rita’s Medical Center. He was born Jan. 22, 1932, in Delphos, to Edgar and Hazel (Grunden) Jarman, who preceded him in death. He is survived by two sons, Robert Jarman of Lima and Lester Jarman of Wapakoneta; a daughter, Sharol (Steve) Bubis of Columbus; a brother Leonard (Shirley) Jarman of Delphos; eight grandchildren; 14 great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews. He was also preceded in death by a sister, Virginia Halliwill and a brother, Kenneth Jarman. Mr. Jarman was a veteran of the Korean War serving in the Army. Funeral services will be at 2 p.m. Tuesday at Harter and Schier Funeral Home, with the Rev. David Howell officiating and military grave rites by the Delphos Veterans Council at the funeral home. Visitation will be from 12-2 p.m. Tuesday at the funeral home. Memorial contributions can be made to the family. To leave online condolences for the family, please visit www.harterandschier.com.

The Delphos Herald (USPS 1525 8000) is published daily except Sundays, Tuesdays and Holidays. The Delphos Herald is delivered by carrier in Delphos for $1.48 per week. Same day delivery outside of Delphos is done through the post office for Allen, Van Wert or Putnam Counties. Delivery outside of these counties is $110 per year. Entered in the post office in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as Periodicals, postage paid at Delphos, Ohio. 405 North Main St. TELEPHONE 695-0015 Office Hours 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to THE DELPHOS HERALD, 405 N. Main St. Delphos, Ohio 45833

TODAY IN HISTORY
Associated Press

The Delphos Herald wants to correct published errors in its news, sports and feature articles. To inform the newsroom of a mistake in published information, call the editorial department at 419-695-0015. Corrections will be published on this page.

CORRECTIONS

SCHROEDER, Alan D., 62, of Fort Jennings, Mass of Christian Burial will be at 10 a.m. today at St. Joseph Catholic Church, Fort Jennings, with Fr. Charles Obinwa officiating. Burial will follow in the church cemetery. Visitation will be one hour prior to the Mass at the church. Memorial donations may be made to St. Joseph Catholic Church, Alzheimer Association or the Putnam County Hospice. Condolences may be expressed at: www. lovefuneralhome.com.

FUNERAL

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119 N. Elizabeth St. Next to Don Jenkins Jeweler

WEATHER FORECAST Tri-county Associated Press TODAY: Partly cloudy with a 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Highs in the mid 80s. West winds 5 to 10 mph. TONIGHT: Mostly clear. Cooler. Lows in the lower 60s. Northeast winds around 5 mph. SUNDAY: Mostly sunny in the morning then becoming partly cloudy. Highs in the lower 80s. Northeast winds 5 to 10 mph. SUNDAY NIGHT: Partly cloudy through midnight then becoming mostly cloudy. A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Lows in the mid 60s. Southeast winds around 10 mph. MONDAY: Mostly cloudy with a 50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Highs around 80. MONDAY NIGHT: Partly cloudy with a 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Lows in the upper 60s. TUESDAY AND TUESDAY NIGHT: Partly cloudy with a 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Highs in the mid 80s. Lows in the mid 60s.

WEATHER

Mary Ann’s

UNDER NEW OWNERSH IP

Today is Saturday, July 20, the 201st day of 2013. There are 164 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On July 20, 2012, a gunman wearing a helmet, body armor and a gas mask opened fire inside a crowded movie theater in Aurora, Colo., during a midnight showing of “The Dark Knight Rises,” killing 12 people in one of the deadliest mass shootings in recent U.S. history. (Suspect James Eagen Holmes has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity to more than 160 counts of murder and attempted murder.) On this date: In 1861, the Congress of the Confederate States convened in Richmond, Va. In 1871, British Columbia entered confederation as a Canadian province. In 1917, the World War I draft lottery went into operation. In 1923, Mexican revolutionary leader Pancho Villa was assassinated. In 1944, an attempt by a group of German officials to assassinate Adolf Hitler with a bomb failed as the explosion only wounded the Nazi leader. President Franklin D. Roosevelt was nominated for a fourth term of office at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago. In 1951, Jordan’s King Abdullah I was assassinated in Jerusalem by a Palestinian gunman who was shot dead on the spot by security. In 1968, the first International Special Olympics Summer Games, organized by Eunice Kennedy Shriver, were held at Soldier Field in Chicago. In 1969, astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin became the first men to walk on the moon after reaching the surface in their Apollo 11 lunar module. In 1976, America’s Viking 1 robot spacecraft made a successful, first-ever landing on Mars. In 1982, Irish Republican Army bombs exploded in two London parks, killing eight British soldiers, along with seven horses belonging to the Queen’s Household Cavalry. In 1988, Massachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis received the Democratic presidential nomination at the party’s convention in Atlanta. Iranian leader Ayatollah Khomeini accepted a truce with Iraq, even though he said the decision was like drinking poison. In 1993, White House deputy counsel Vincent Foster Jr., 48, was found shot to death in a park near Washington, D.C.; his death was ruled a suicide. Ten years ago: Gen. John Abizaid, the top commander of coalition forces in Iraq, predicted that resistance to U.S. forces in Iraq would grow in coming months as progress was made in creating a new government to replace the dictatorial regime of Saddam Hussein. President George W. Bush welcomed Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi to his Texas ranch for a two-day visit. Ben Curtis, an unknown PGA Tour rookie in his first major championship, won the British Open. Five years ago: Pope Benedict XVI wrapped up a six-day World Youth Day Festival in Sydney, Australia, by challenging young people to shed the greed and cynicism of their time to create a new age of hope for humankind. Padraig Harrington became the first European in more than a century to win golf’s British Open two years in a row. One year ago: After years of preparation and months of buildup, London’s Olympic moment finally arrived as Royal Marine Martyn Williams carried the Olympic torch from a Royal Navy Sea King helicopter into the Tower of London on the shore of the River Thames. Today’s Birthdays: Actress-singer Sally Ann Howes is 83. Author Cormac McCarthy is 80. Rockabilly singer Sleepy LaBeef is 78. Senator Barbara A. Mikulski, D-Md., is 77. 4171 St. Rt. 235 Ada, OH 45810 419-634-0356
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Saturday, July 20, 2013

The Herald – 3

UNOH Students collecting backpacks for Oklahoma
Information submitted LIMA — Two organizations within the University of Northwestern Ohio are teaming up to collect backpacks and school supplies for families that were impacted by the EF-5 tornado in Moore, Okla., which destroyed thousands of homes and two elementary schools. Following the May 20 event, the Business Professionals of America and the UNOH Chapter of the American Marketing Association decided to make a difference in the lives of the young children, teachers and their families impacted by the tornado. Clearly marked bins have been set up at businesses around the community and items will be collected now through Aug. 8. The wish list of items includes: Pencils and pens Crayons Colored Pencils Scissors and glue One Subject Notebooks Folders Paper Gallon-sized Ziploc Bags Baby Wipes Bookbags Teaching Supplies And more Bins have been set up at the following locations: Tom Ahl Dealerships (all four locations) Huntington Bank (Market Street, Lima Mall, Shawnee Road, Spencerville locations) Taylor Kia UNOH Campus (100 Building, 13000 Building) Additional drop offs will occur during these special times: Friday – Limaland Motorsports Park July 28 – Lima Locos Baseball Game – First Pitch at 7 p.m. – Simmons Field – Free admission with a backpack Aug. 10 – UNOH Event Center between 9 a.m.–2 p.m. You can follow the collection on Facebook and Twitter: www.facebook.com/backpacksforoklahoma www.twitter.com/backpacksforokl Information submitted

If you think over 40 mpg for Hybrids is good, check this out
Window to the Past
BOB HOLDGREVE
Delphos is the inventor. Delphos Herald, June 17, 1897 ————— Freight Service Between Delphos and Lima According to the following, taken from the Lima Gazette, Motor Truck freight service will be established between Delphos and Lima in the near future: “Automobile freight service between Lima and surrounding towns will be started about Aug. 15, Ira Wagner, president of the Lima Rapid Transfer Co. announced last evening. Four big trucks with trailers will be used in the beginning. Other trucks will be carried to St. Marys, Celina, Ohio City, Wapakoneta, Mendon, Buckland, Cridersville, Spencerville, Delphos, Van Wert and other nearby towns. It will be especially desirable between Delphos and nearby towns if he canal project is successfully carried out here. The large freight barges would then unload merchandise for Lima, Van Wert, and other nearby towns at wharves in Delphos, and it would then be taken by trucks to the merchants and factories of those cities. Delphos Herald, July 26, 1919 ————— C.F. Lehmann Music Store to Move The work of moving the Lehmann Store into its new location is being completed. Mr. Lehmann has remodeled the building which he purchased some time back, the old Roth building, and has fitted it up as a convenient and attractive home for the business. Cases and furnishings which were in use in his old location in the Old National bank building have been installed on the first floor of his building. This room will be used for the sale of musical instruments and for the Giffte Shoppee. The second floor has been placed in good condition also and will be used in the main as a display room, for in, Mr. Lehmann has remodeled the pianos and other musical instruments. Steel ceilings have been installed in the rooms on both the first and second floors. A balcony on the first floor adds to the appearance of the room and also to the size of the display space. Large store rooms are provided at the rear of both floors. Delphos Herald, Mar. 21, 1927 ————— Lehmann Ad. The Sparton Electric Radio No A batteries to recharge — no B batteries to run down — no troublesome eliminators — just plug into the regular household circuit and enjoy beautiful music and entertainment uninterrupted. The Sparton 110-AC is truly the ideal that Radio lovers have been longing for. Nothing else to buy — complete with tubes. Beautiful twotone walnut five tube model with the special Sparton balanced circuit and two dial control. Come in and see this Wonderful Radio Today at C.F. Lehmann’s Music Store Delphos Herald, Mar. 1, 1927 ————— Will Erect New Building For Shoe Repairs Checkles Brothers started work Thursday morning on the moving of their building on North Main street, preparatory to the erection of a new building at this location. The old building, which was damaged by fire last December, will be moved back and a new building of brick with steel ceiling and fire-proof construction will be constructed. While the new building is under construction, the firm will continue its business in the old building at the rear of the lot. Delphos Herald, Mar. 10, 1927 ————— Delphos Eagles Band The Delphos Eagles’ band is to present an exceptionally fine appearance when it enters the big parade which will be staged at the convention of the Northwestern Volunteer Firemen’s Association here June 15. At a meeting of the band held Wednesday night, R.K. Zimmer, Columbus, conferred with the members of the band with regard to new

STATE/LOCAL

Fundraising auctions for VW Co. Fair free entertainment announced
VAN WERT — The Van Wert County Fair will be offering fair goers an improved selection of free entertainment this year. The free entertainment is supported by a grant from the Van Wert County Foundation, sponsorships and an annual fund raising auction. This year’s auction will be held at 10 a.m. July 27 at the Junior Fair Building, Van Wert County Fairgrounds. Bee Gee Realty & Auction Company are again donating their services to promote & conduct the auction. An additional quarter auction, to be held at 6:30 p.m. July 30 in the Junior Fair Building, is sponsored and conducted by Vickie Schulte and the Van Wert Vendors. This type quarter auction has become very popular in the Van Wert area. The auction will feature fresh flowers, farm produce, clothing and donations from direct sales vendors and home based businesses. The doors will open at 5:30 p.m. for item viewing and paddle selection. All proceeds from these auctions are used to fund selection of entertainment during the Van Wert County Fair for which there is no charge to view or attend. Free entertainment includes a wood carver, Bruiser Wrestling, kiddie tractor pull and events and performers in the entertainment tent. The July 27 auction has unique items and not the usual selection of household items, furniture, antiques, etc. The items to be auctioned are all donated by businesses, individuals and organizations. The donations come from the local area as well as from all over the USA. There will be a nice selection of gift certificates and gift cards that make good gifts or for your personal use. There will be a variety of sports items and celebrity memorabilia including equipment, photos, CDs, promo CDs, tickets to sporting events and theatrical performances, and amusement tickets. This is a chance to obtain new merchandise for a fraction of the retail price. Another unique group of items that will be available, also making good

In 1927, a Whippet automobile set a record in a coast-to-coast trip averaging 43.28 mpg. The Whippet coach cost $625 and was a stock automobile, and they are sold at the Delphos Overland Co. Delphos Herald, Feb. 29, 1927 ————— B&O Railroad Started in 1827 State and Baltimore joined with representatives of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad here today in the celebration of the hundredth anniversary of the charter to the railroad to operate the FIRST general freight and passenger line on this continent. On Feb. 28, 1827, the state of Maryland authorized a newly organized company to construct a railroad from the city of Baltimore to some point on the Ohio River. This grant was the beginning of railroading on the Western Hemisphere. The founders of that first railroad project were farseeing enough to realize the value of a rail connection between the sea at Baltimore and the great mid-continental waterways transportation system which they planned to tap at the Ohio River. But the builders of those first railroads could not have dreamed that the United States was to fill the continent from Atlantic to Pacific within less than a century the rapid development of all facilities which were to bring Baltimore almost as near to San Francisco as it was then to Boston. Delphos Herald, Feb. 28, 1927 ————— Delphos Lost a Chance Delphos has let a chance to secure a manufactory slip through her finger, as the following dispatch from Bowling Green will show: “A company has been formed here to manufacture patent railroad crossings, and a factory will be built in the near future. W.R. Cochran of

parade uniforms and the band boys decided to raise money for this purpose. Handsome uniforms of the Hussar Type were selected. They will be blue trimmed with gold. White capes trimmed with black astrakhan and black astrakhan caps with gold tops will complete the uniforms. On the fronts of the caps will be gold eagles and on the sides will appear the name ‘Delphos’. The uniforms will probably be worn for the first time at the Fireman’s convention. They will be kept for parade purposes only, the old uniforms being used for other purposes or occasions. W.G. Point, leader of the band, announced Thursday that he had contracted with the Dixie Jubilee Singers for two concerts to be given on April 18 and 19. These concerts will be held at the Jefferson auditorium. The proceeds will be put in a fund for the new uniforms. The Dixie Jubilee Singers were in Delphos recently and sang for the Kiwanis Club. They provided excellent entertainment and the people of Delphos will have a treat in store for them on the dates mentioned. Delphos Herald, Mar. 3, 1927 ————— Dog Does Not Like Suicide Their dog’s distaste of suicide, or at least to gas as a way to commit suicide was responsible for the rescue alive of an accountant and his wife who attempted to asphyxiate themselves. Because they wished that their dog should accompany them into the beyond, they had shut their dog up in the house with them and locked windows and doors. The dog had different views. As soon as the gas became unpleasant, he sought fresh air by jumping through the glass window pane. Running to the porter, the dog barked until the latter investigated. The dog’s master and mistress resuscitated and now all three are trying to make the best of life. Delphos Herald, Mar. 2, 1927 —————

A beautiful jade bracelet from Laudick’s Jewelry, Van Wert Chamber of Commerce Chamber Bucks $25.00 certificate, Jack Hanna book with an autographed photo and four passes to the Columbus Zoo, Tony Stewart NASCAR autographed photo, and rock band Steppenwolf autographed photo. (Submitted photo) gifts for family and friends, are vacation and excursion trips. These are offered by agents at a minimum starting price and the price Bee Gee bangs the gavel at represents a donation to the auction proceeds. This is a great opportunity to select an excursion trip or a vacation of a life time. Check out these special travel offerings on the websites listed below. Check the fair website at vanwertcountyfair.com the week before the Saturday, July 27 auction for a listing of the auction items. The Bee Gee Realty & Auction Co. website has full details of the auction at beegeerealty.com/ bg/auctions.asp?ID=518. You also may contact the fair office at (419) 238-9270 or vwfair@ bright.net for further auction information. Donations of items are

accepted anytime before the auction if you would like to support this fund raiser. Fair office hours are 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday-Friday and 9 a.m.-noon Saturday. Donations could be tax deductible and a receipt can be furnished. The Van Wert County Fairgrounds, operated by the Van Wert County Agricultural Society, is a 501(c)(3) organization. The Van Wert County Fairgrounds extends their sincere thank you to all individuals, businesses, and organizations that continue to donate and support the free entertainment offered during the Van Wert County Fair. A special thank you is given to Bee Gee Realty & Auction Co. and Vicki Schulte and the Van Wert Vendors for their generous donation of their time and services for conducting the auctions. This year’s fair dates are Aug. 28 through Sept. 2. Advance ticket prices, both season and membership, remain at $18 (equals $3 per day entry) and single day gate entry has been reduced to $5 per day for the 2013 fair. See you at the fair and the upcoming auctions!

DELPHOS HERALD
THE
Nancy Spencer, editor 419-695-0015 ext. 134 nspencer@delphosherald.com

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4 — The Herald

VIEWPOINT

Saturday, July 20, 2013

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“Few of us ever live in the present. We are forever anticipating what is to come or remembering what has gone.” — Louis L’Amour, storyteller

DEAR EDITOR: Christian belief holds that almighty God created the heavens and the earth and humankind in his image. We then, as created beings do not have divine authority to elevate or denigrate other created beings based upon skin color, ethnicity, weight, intellect, talent or any other attribute assigned by the creator. Our nation’s founders held that equality was intended by God. Of course, my comments are prompted by the recent Travon Martin/George Zimmerman situation in which a young man lost his life. The one who fired the fatal shot was found not guilty by a jury of his peers. Our laws are based upon the Ten Commandments. Our judicial system is not perfect and justice is not always blind. At times, some will differ with a verdict and have the right to voice pleasure or displeasure. I disagreed with the “not guilty” verdict in the O.J. Simpson case. I accepted it. The news media reported much jubilation and celebration by some. I agreed with the “not guilty” verdict in the Martin/Zimmerman case and accepted it. The news media reported much displeasure by some. Some who were displeased by the verdict chose to manifest it in unlawful, violent, terroristic and destructive behavior, some of which was condoned and encouraged by those they look to for leadership. Such behavior should be dealt with under our system of laws. Rioting advocates and indeed is the attempt to rule by mob, the antithesis to rule by law. WASHINGTON — It is My hope and my prayer is that we become as our creator intended and that we look to those easy to understand how everyin leadership whose view of humankind transcends all. one in the Trayvon Martin/ Larry Semonde George Zimmerman case Lima feels. If I were Martin’s mother, DEAR EDITOR, Read your article in the Saturday newspaper about “The Ice Man,” This article really hit I’d want his killer’s heart on a platter. If I were Zimmerman’s home with me because I was an Ice Man in the late 1930s. I worked for the Steinle Brewery Co. one whole summer and fall. I worked with Leonard mother, I’d be grateful my son escaped greater injury, howand Clarence Lause at the time. I don’t know who wrote this article but there is a lot more to tell about being an ice man. ever he managed. If I were African-American, It was hot, hard and sometimes long work to do. I could probably write this whole page about I would fear for my sons and what we did that summer. I do have an ice pick like the one in the picture, the top one. These picks and tongs were a be furious at a system that condones vigilantism, and big part of this job. then acts as though naming a I really liked the article because I had something to do with it a long time ago. teen’s death a “tragedy” ends I only wish you really did know what an “ice man” really did in a day’s work. Yours, the discussion. The list could go on. The Arthur J. Grothouse point is that this is one of those DEAR EDITOR: rare instances in which everyWind turbines are incompatible with farming one is right within his/her own My home is on 65 acres 3/4 mile from 100 wind turbines. Your county’s residents have experience. Blacks are right to asked me what their future holds. I implore Van Wert County to avoid making the same mistake perceive that Martin was folthat McLean County did in destroying thousands of acres of what was once the most produc- lowed because he was black, tive soil in the world by permitting wind turbines without protecting residents and agricultural but it is wrong to presume that businesses with safe setbacks. Farming and living in a peaceful rural community is gone once recognizing a racial characterturbines come. istic is necessarily racist. It has Choosing turbines will cause you to give up access to environmentally friendly methods of been established that several protecting waterways from nitrogen runoff by planting cover crops aerially. Aerial applicators burglaries in Zimmerman’s reserve the right not to spray within one mile of a turbine. Our past state association president neighborhood involved prisaid, “Aerial application can be done in maybe 10% of the fields inside wind farms, but it isn’t marily young black males. worth somebody’s life to get in there and try to do that.” Many fields will lose the option to Picture Zimmerman’s protect their crops aerially. If a plane hits a tower, blade, or unmarked meteorological tower, the neighbor and defense witleaseholder can be sued by the developer for damages. A farmer here testified that he will never ness Olivia Bertalan hiding in be able to spray his field by air again: he can’t get insurance. When offered more turbines, he her locked bedroom with her declined, stating he wouldn’t have gotten the first ones had he known. Farmers have a right to infant and a pair of rusty scisdo what they want on their own property, but they do not have a right to put up a wind turbine sors, while two young males, which may deprive their neighbor of their livelihood, income they get from farming. Can the later identified as Africancounty be sued for approving this as an unfair business practice? Will your neighbor sue you American, burglarized her to recover damages they’ll suffer from decreased yields and increased costs because of your home. They ran when police turbine? arrived. Soil compaction and crushed field tiles from heavy cranes is permanent and occurs repeatThis is not to justify what edly during 60 year leases. Tile removal and raised access roads in fields create drainage subsequently transpired nightmares. Farmers seldom get the same yields after destroying their fields with wind tur- between Zimmerman and bines. Wind turbines are completely incompatible with farming. You choose - farm or place an Martin but to cast a dispasindustrial power plant in the middle of a once a productive field. sionate eye on reality. And You cannot do both. It’s inexcusable for Van Wert County to ignore evidence from victims no, just because a few black of other wind farms. Deny permits which will endanger the health, safety and livelihood of youths caused trouble doesn’t your citizens. mean all black youths should www.edwardjones.com Learn more - Windaction, www.fairwindenergy.org. be viewed suspiciously. This Kim Schertz is so obvious a truth that it Hudson, Ill shouldn’t need saying and

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

So it’s that time again. As you read this, I will be taking my hubby to the airport for his annual trip to our niece’s national dance championships in Ocean City, Md. With a week without my hubby and best friend stretching before me, I ask myself, “What to do, what to do?” I have plans for Saturday and I’m going to make sure I get a couple meals from the Immaculate Conception Parish Festival on Sunday. Those meals are sooooo good and well worth the price and trip to get them. I’m getting two because I was really upset with myself last year for only getting one. I would have enjoyed having another on Monday or Tuesday. And of course, that would mean no cooking. And so the rest of the week lays before me. Little Ringo will fill a lot of time. He will mope around, glancing at the bedroom chair where his master usually sits while watching TV or playing his game on his phone. Ringo will come up to me and put his little furry head in my lap and give those oh-so-sad puppy dog eyes, imploring me to produce his best friend so they can play. I’ll have to make sure I keep him occupied when I’m home. A restless doggie is sometimes an ornery doggie. My husband and Ringo had a final bonding moment Friday morning at the DelphosGillmor Reservoir. They were there before 6 a.m. and watched the sunrise together. That dog can walk his paws off. He loves to walk and sniff and wander and chase a scent. Now it’s just the two of us. I’ll take a picture of our little guy each day and send it to my husband and I’m sure they’ll “talk” each evening when he calls. But we all know it won’t be the same. Jay will reprise his role as “Prop Uncle,” making sure everything for Lotus’ dance team is ready to go on stage and then haul it out there when the time comes.

What to do, what to do
NANCY SPENCER

On the Other hand
He really enjoys interacting with her, his sister and brother-in-law and all the dance company parents. He has some opportunity for downtime and uses it to eat the most amazing French fries ever (his words) and to walk the boardwalk. He’ll picked up a few souvenirs and take in the ambiance of the boardwalk — live music and performers and just a ton of people. He said you have to practically walk sideways to get through the crowd. His big day will be Friday. That’s when all the teams and duos and solos that made it through the week will compete for the top spots. Hopefully, the company sponsoring the championships will have a good stream so I can watch online as well. My heart swells with pride when I see on that stage. To me, she is a winner all the time. I held her when she was just a baby and talked to her on phone and got pictures of her every few months. She likes to fish and swim and of course, dance. But to her, it’s just something she does and does really well. She takes the trophies and fuss in stride the same as she does classes and her grueling schedule. We now have a collection of her trophies, medals and such. To some it may seem a little strange to walk into a our computer room and see the “Lotus” corner. We’re not stalkers, we are just so proud of her. So now I just have to fill the middle part of my week. What to do, what to do.

The road to bedlam
KATHLEEN PARKER

Point of View
yet, if we are honest, we know that human nature includes the accumulation of evolved biases based on experience and survival. In the courtroom, it’s called profiling. In the real world, it’s called common sense. One thing we can all agree upon without much strain is that this incident — this senseless, heartbreaking death — never should have happened. Zimmerman, who began acting as a watchman in 2004 and had made more than 40 calls to authorities over the years, never should have left his car once he had notified police, who told him to stay put. We also can surmise that Zimmerman would not have followed Martin if Zimmerman weren’t carrying a gun. If Martin were perceived as dangerous, wouldn’t an unarmed individual keep his distance until police arrived? Thus, we conclude that Zimmerman’s actions led to the confrontation that ultimately resulted in a fight that ended with the fatal shooting. It never should have happened. And it didn’t have to. The jury obviously felt that Zimmerman acted in selfdefense or, at least, that the state failed to prove otherwise. It must have been a terrible conclusion to reach because, no matter what the legal definitions that guided them, it seems impossible that someone’s young son, guilty of nothing, should die while his killer walks. Adages become such for a reason: The law is an ass. By the definitions, instruc-

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Ensuring Ohio workers have the skills needed to fill open jobs
BY US SENATOR SHERROD BROWN Last week, I heard from Daniel Brewer, a Navy veteran from Cincinnati who could not find a good paying job after returning from Afghanistan. Though Daniel had substantial training in the Navy, moving home to Ohio, he had trouble translating his skills into the civilian workforce. Daniel’s experience is all too common. Time and time again I’ve heard similar stories throughout Ohio: biotech firms, high-tech manufacturers, and small busiBrown nesses are hiring for open positions, but can’t find the workers with the right skills to fill these job openings. With too many Ohioans still unable to find work, we should be doing all that we can to ensure that our workers are qualified to fill Ohio jobs. See BROWN, page 10

tions and evidence — in other words, by the book — the jurors ruled as they could and justice feels ill-served. So, yes, we understand how everyone feels. But feelings are like weather — they come and go and shift with time. Part of maturity — and fundamental to civilization — is learning to process feelings through thought, reflection and, in this case, debate. Instead, in the wake of the Zimmerman verdict, feelings have been magnified and exploited by enablers — from certain members of the media, who seem more like rapacious rabble-rousers than journalists, to professional activists who, in fact, thrive on disorder. This is a good time to recognize that activists with television shows are not, in fact, journalists. When Al Sharpton went to Florida to organize demands that Zimmerman be charged, he was acting as the civil rights activist he is, not as a broadcast journalist he plays on television. Now, as he proceeds to organize protests in 100 cities, he has a global bullhorn with which to sound his fury. With such instigation, grass-roots quickly erupt into wildfires. News organizations can’t ignore news, obviously, but which came first: The death threats? Or the TV correspondent speculating whether Zimmerman would need to fear for his life? As soon as passions cool, assuming we let them, the discussion that needs to take place surrounds a question: What was George Zimmerman doing walking around his neighborhood armed and loaded? In what world is this normal behavior? The answer: Not a world most of us want to live in. Let’s start there. Kathleen Parker’s email address is kathleenparker@ washpost.com.

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Saturday, July 20, 2013

The Herald — 5

COMMUNITY
Landmark
The Humane Society of Allen County has many pets waiting for adoption. Each comes with a spay or neuter, first shots and a heartworm test. Call 419-991-1775.

PET CORNER

Senior Citizens Center

Calendar of Events

TODAY 9-11:30 a.m.— Delphos Project Recycle at Delphos Fuel and Wash. 9 a.m. to noon — Interfaith Thrift Store is open for shopping. St. Vincent dePaul Society, located at the east edge of the St. John’s High School parking lot, is open. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. — Delphos Postal Museum is open. 12:15 p.m. — Testing of warning sirens by Delphos Fire and Rescue. 1-3 p.m. — Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241 N. Main St., is open. 7 p.m. — Bingo at St. John’s Little Theatre. SUNDAY 8-11:30 a.m. — Knights of Columbus benefit for St. John’s School at the hall, Elida Ave. 1-3 p.m. — The Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241 N. Main St., is open. MONDAY 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. — Ottoville Branch Library is open. 11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff St. 6:30 p.m. — Shelter from the Storm support group meets in the Delphos Public Library basement. 7 p.m. — Ottoville village council meets at the municipal building. Marion Township Trustees meet at the township house. 7:30 p.m. — Delphos Eagles Aerie 471 meets at the Eagles Lodge. TUESDAY 11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff St. 7 p.m. — Delphos Area Simply Quilters meets at the Delphos Area Chamber of Commerce, 306 N. Main St. 7:30 p.m. — Alcoholics Anonymous, First Presbyterian Church, 310 W. Second St. 8:30 p.m. — Elida village council meets at the town hall. WEDNESDAY 9 a.m. - noon — Putnam County Museum is open, 202 E. Main St. Kalida. 11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff St. Noon — Rotary Club meets at The Grind. 6 p.m. — Shepherds of Christ Associates meet in the St. John’s Chapel. 7 p.m. — Bingo at St. John’s Little Theatre. THURSDAY 9-11 a.m. — The Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241 N. Main St., is open. 11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff St. 5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith Thrift Store is open for shopping. 7:30 p.m. — American Legion Post 268, 415 N. State St. FRIDAY 7:30 a.m. — Delphos Optimist Club, A&W DriveIn, 924 E. Fifth St. 11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff St.

Those of you who have heard me speak about the US Postal Service in general terms have heard me say, “The US Post Office was one of the most innovative agencies of the government. In fact, almost every aspect of life has been influenced or affected by the fact that there was a mail service in the US.” OK, you don’t seem all that impressed but you should be. American and foreign automobile manufacturers seem to be blazing new roads with the introduction of electric vehicles. It seems like they are just springing into the marketplace. Look at the Chevy Volt, the Nissan Leaf and of course the luxury end of electric innovation – the $85,000 seven-passenger Tesla (fully-equipped, highend model). I had to stifle a laugh when I passed a Cadillac ESV hybrid just the other day. But the truth is, this is old news. Let’s trek back to 1899, when the US Post Office Department was just beginning to experiment with motorized vehicles vs. the good old horse and carriage. At that time in history automobile manufacturers could be found dotting the landscape from coast to coast – Columbia, Winton, Daimler, Auburn, Krebs, Ford, and Packard. The very first motor-driven vehicles were steam powered. These vehicles were then followed by electric models and finally the gasoline powered engine. Ironically,

Going Green in 1899
around 1900, electric land vehicles in America outsold all other types of cars. Then in the several years following 1900, sales of electric vehicles took a nosedive as a new type of vehicle came to dominate the marketplace. The first experiment for mail collection with the use of an electric vehicle took place in Buffalo, N.Y., on July 2, 1899. The superintendent of city delivery rode in a Columbia electric automobile where he collected mail from 40 boxes in an hour and a half. In order to complete the same task with a horse drawn wagon it would have taken more than twice that amount of time. Later in Cleveland, Ohio, (one of the original places for city delivery) an electric vehicle produced by Winton Motor Company was used by a letter carrier who collected 126 boxes in an area of over 22 miles in just two hours and 26 minutes. To add to the magnitude of this accomplishment, this was done in December in a snowstorm. This same route was considered a six hour job when using a horse and wagon. The Postmaster of Detroit Michigan experimented with an electric vehicle produced by Wood Motor Company in 1900. He also tested a gasoline powered vehicle and determined that the gas powered vehicle was preferable to the electric ones since they did not have to spend an equal amount of time charging their batteries as they did in moving the mail. He passed his rec-

ommendations on to Postal Headquarters but as can be the case, the first contracts for vehicles were for electric models. As you may recall rural delivery began in 1896 and some carriers who had to provide their own transportation used electric and gas powered vehicles. The road system was very crude and many that weather and wear and tear could make some roads totally impassible for these new machines. When you come to the museum take a good look at the pictures of vehicles that line the walls opposite the rural sleigh. One in particular has me out scouring for even a skeleton of this 1916 vehicle. I’ll give you a hint, it has 3 wheels but no part of the vehicle is enclosed. The words Harley-Davidson are prominently painted on the side car. Now that would be quite a find. So when you read about 21st century mail delivery in electric cars, from Segways, and on T-3s, stop and think that there has been over 110 years of R & D from that organization that has been binding the nation together for over 250 years. NOTE: We are coming up on the last week or two to sign up for our Williamsburg and Monticello trip. Nowhere else can you find a six day/ five night trip packed with all the entertainment and activities anything like what you’ll find when you travel with MPH Tours. Call me for more information @ 419-303-5482.

If you’re looking for a clown of a puppy, Karla is your girl. This 5-month-old beagle mix was found as a stray and has earned a reputation at the Humane Society of Allen County as being a real comedian. Karla is friendly with lots of energy and loves to play.

A friend of the Humane Society of Allen County went fishing and all they caught was Hook. This 2-month-old kitten was found by a pond, extremely lethargic with an upper respiratory infection. Now he’s a loving and playful kitten with soft fur, beautiful eyes and adorable pink paw pads.

The following pets are available for adoption through The Van Wert Animal Protective League:

M, 3 years, shots, dew-clawed, neutered, black/gray/ white, named Figero Kittens M, F, 9 weeks, shots, dewormed, black and white, white and gray M, F, 7 weeks, calico, gray

Cats M, 3 years, shots, neutered, yellow, black and white, name Buttercup and Rexy

M, F, 6 months, angora, gray striped
M, F, orange, tabby M. 6 months, gray, tiger

Dogs

Lab/Beagle/Dalmation, M, 3 years, fixed, shots white with black spots, name Casper Shepherd mix, F, 3 years, fixed, yellow, name Foxy Mix, F, 1 year, black and brown, medium size, name Lucy Boxer, M, 1 year, shots, fawn color, name Rocky For more information on these pets or if you are in need of finding a home for your pet contact The Animal Protective League from 9-5 weekdays at (419) 749-2976. If you are looking for a pet not listed, call to be put on a waiting list in case something becomes available. Donations or correspondence can be sent to PO Box 321, Van Wert, OH 45891.

Pyrenees Lab, M, 3 1/2 years, blonde, shots, name Carson

Black Lab, F, 4 years, name Lily Rat Terrier, F, 11 years, spayed, name Zay Shepherd mix, F, 3 years, black and brown, name Bella

Happy Birthday
July 21 Mick Pohl Chris Britt Cheryl Sickels July 22 Jasmine Boop

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6 – The Herald

Saturday, July 20, 2013

Delphos Minor League regular season

SPORTS

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Jimenez finds the fun in a tough day at Muirfield
Associated Press GULLANE, Scotland — Miguel Angel Jimenez looked like the only guy who was having fun. On a punishing day at Muirfield — the course with a reputation as the fairest links of them all — leave it to a 49-year-old Spaniard who enjoys the simple pleasures in life to make such a demanding test at the British Open seem like just another round of golf. There was calamity all around him Friday. Zach Johnson lost the lead with a 3-putt from 10 feet. Brandt Snedeker, regarded as one of the best putters in golf, took four putts from 15 feet. Tiger Woods played well enough to be only one shot behind and rarely smiled. Jimenez, with his frizzy red hair bunched into a ponytail, made his way around Muirfield with only two bogeys for an even-par 71 that gave him a 1-shot lead over Woods, Lee Westwood, Henrik Stenson and Dustin Johnson going into the weekend. What’s a 49-year-old doing with the 36-hole lead at the British Open? “Why? I have not the right to do it? Only the young people can do it?” Jimenez asked. “Why? I’m fine. We keep playing golf and still get myself on the golf course and that’s the secret. Enjoy yourself what you do in life. That’s what I’m doing.” For so many others, it was tough to enjoy anything about a course that brought the easterly wind for the first time all week and greens that hit warp speed even after tournament officials hand-watered the putting surfaces overnight. Woods went 12 holes without a birdie, saving his round with a collection of tough pars, and finished with a 6-iron from 212 yards to 15 feet for a birdie and a 71. Westwood matched the best round of the day with a 68, while Stenson had a 70. Both of them had a double bogey on their cards. Dustin Johnson got himself into such a predicament on the 15th that his only option from a bunker was to aim sideways into the rough. He shot 72. “Every hole is playing hard,” Johnson said. “You don’t get any breaks. You’ve really got to grind it out. It’s tough off the tee. It’s tough on your approach shot and it’s tough putting.” Phil Mickelson was in range of the lead until a 4-putt on the 16th hole, his second double bogey of the day. That was one hole after Mickelson made a par putt that would have gone 15 feet by if he had missed. Zach Johnson couldn’t think of too many poor shots he hit in the blazing sunshine, except maybe for a pitching wedge he punched from 158 yards that bounded over the back of the 15th green. He chipped to 10 feet and took three putts from there for a double bogey, and he dropped one more shot on the final hole for a 75. “I enjoy difficult tests,” said Johnson, who won the 2007 Masters in the toughest conditions at Augusta in more than 50 years. “I think everyone does. ‘Fun’ … you’ve got to use that term loosely. What’s fun about it is that we don’t see this but once a year.” The reference was to links golf, though such brown, brittle conditions have not been seen at the Open since Hoylake in 2006; the greens there weren’t nearly that quick. Mickelson added the Muirfield greens in these conditions were faster than Augusta. Jimenez, who was at 3-under 139, has his own definition. “The fun does not mean you have the biggest smile and start laughing all day,” he said. “Fun is when you enjoy what you’re doing. I play golf and I enjoy it. And it’s fun to me, no? Sometimes you can see me serious because of a situation but having fun doesn’t mean that you are falling on the ground and start laughing.” See GOLF, page 7

The Orioles, by virtue of the head-to-head tie-breaker, took the Delphos Minor League regular-season championship. Members of the team are, front from left, batboy Josh Mueller, Robbie Schaeffer, Jarrod Radabaugh, Devin Sanders, Landon Elwer and Dillon Cross; second row, Addison Brunswick, Curtis Mueller, Keaton Jackson, Austin Pohlman and Colin White; and back, head coach Paul Radabaugh and assistant coaches Todd Elwer and Jason Cross. Absent are Austin Giesige and batboy Carson White. (Delphos Herald/Jim Metcalfe)

The Reds who took second are made up of, front from left, Landon Grothouse, Drake Fittro, Troy Pseekos, J.J. Bonifas, T.J. Sevitz, Mattie Sevitz, Gavin Fittro and Wesley Schier; row two, Isaiah Antrican, John Pseekos, Justin Mox, Seth Brinkman, Zach Granc and Cole Sevitz; and back, coach Brad Metzger, Logan Kehres and Brad Trentman. Four of the teams in the eight-team league won trophies for the Fourth of July and end-of-season tournaments.

Phillips drives in 3, Reds beat Pirates 5-3
CINCINNATI (AP) — Brandon Phillips drove in three runs with a bases-loaded double on Friday night, and Mike Leake got the better of left-hander Francisco Liriano for the third time this season, leading the Cincinnati Reds to a 5-3 victory over the Pittsburgh Pirates that tightened the NL Central. The third-place Reds moved to within three games of second-place Pittsburgh. The Pirates lead their season series 6-5. The Reds sent nine batters to the plate for four runs in the fifth off Liriano (9-4), who had his shortest outing of the season. Chris Heisey’s infield single drove in the first run, and Phillips’ double off Justin Wilson made it 5-0. Heisey also had a solo homer off Liriano, who is 0-3 in three starts against Leake and the Reds this season. Leake (9-4) gave up solo homers to Starling Marte, Andrew McCutchen and Russell Martin in the sixth inning. Manny Parra fanned Pedro Alvarez with runners on second and third to end the seventh. Aroldis Chapman struck out two in the ninth while getting his 22nd save in 25 chances. The Ohio River rivals have produced the majors’ most painful pairings this season. Nineteen batters have been hit by pitches — the Reds 10 times, the Pirates nine times — in their 11 games. Nobody was hit on Friday, a rare game that didn’t leave a mark. The Pirates emerged from the All-Star break with their best record in 37 years. Their 56 wins were their most at the break since the World Series champion Pirates of 1971 had 57 wins. Pittsburgh’s overriding question: Can it avoid another second-half meltdown and break a two-decade streak of losing? The Reds are trying to

NASCAR suspends use of aerial camera systems
Associated Press DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — NASCAR suspended the use of aerial camera systems Friday, nearly two months after a Fox Sports cable snapped and injured fans and damaged some cars at Charlotte Motor Speedway. Ten people were injured during the CocaCola 600 when part of the drive rope landed in the grandstand. Three people were taken to hospitals and were checked out and released soon after. “NASCAR has decided, in collaboration with its broadcast partners, to suspend all media partner usage of aerial camera systems that hang over race tracks,” NASCAR wrote in a statement. “The safety of our competitors and our fans remains NASCAR’s No. 1 priority and until total evaluation and analysis have been completed, usage of this particular technology enhancement and any similar enhancements, has been suspended.” Fox successfully used the CATCAM system

duplicate what they did last season, when they went on a surge after the break and ran away to the NL Central title. First, they need to get healthy. Top starter Johnny Cueto, setup men Sean Marshall and Jonathan Broxton, and cleanup hitter Ryan Ludwick are still on the disabled list. Heisey took over in left field when Ludwick got hurt, then pulled his right hamstring and missed nearly two months. His solo shot on Friday gave him three homers since his return. Shin-Soo Choo singled during Cincinnati’s four-run fifth, extending his hitting streak to 13 games, matching his career high.

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES DIVISION OF WILDLIFE Weekly Fish Ohio Fishing Report! CENTRAL OHIO Buckeye Lake (Fairfield/Licking/Perry counties) - Channel catfish are being caught around Lieb’s Island and Fairfield Beach areas use cut shad or shrimp. Largemouth bass are being caught along cover; target vegetation, points and riprap using spinner baits, crankbaits and plastics. Hybrid-striped bass can be caught using spinners or drifting chicken livers between Seller’s point and the north ramp. Hargus Creek Lake (Pickaway County) - A large population of largemouth bass measuring 8-12 inches, with some larger, can be found at this 146-acre lake near Circleville. Fish main lake points, secondary points with riprap and dropoffs using crankbaits, spinner baits and tubes for consistent catches. A fair population of 6- to 7-inch bluegill and redear sunfish can be caught using nightcrawlers suspended by a bobber; for a change, try fishing crickets or use a fly rod and present floating spiders or poppers for bluegill. Electric motors only. NORTHWEST OHIO

Lake LeComte, Fostoria #5 (Hancock County) - Lake LeComte is three miles southwest of Fostoria on Hancock Country Road 23 and has populations of bluegill, black and white crappie, largemouth/smallmouth/white bass and brown bullhead. The Division of Wildlife has stocked yellow perch, saugeye and channel catfish in the reservoir. Gizzard shad is the main forage species, so using baits that mimic shad can be productive when pursuing saugeye and bass. Crappie have been biting recently; try minnows in the southeast corner. Boats are allowed on the reservoir, with a 9.9-HP restriction. Sandusky Bay (Ottawa/Erie counties) - Once the water levels settle down from recent storms, anglers should be able to catch some nice channel catfish. Public fishing accesses include the Willow Point Wildlife Area off of Wahl Road, Pipe and Pickerel creeks and the Sandusky Bay Bridge Fishing Access off of SR 2; try worms, shrimp, or chicken livers fished on the bottom. NORTHEAST OHIO Highlandtown Lake (Columbiana County) - Classic summer bass patterns continue to pro-

Wildlife Ohio

at the Daytona 500 and the Sprint All-Star race at Charlotte. ESPN.com wrote Friday that ESPN had planned to use the Batcam system next weekend for the Brickyard 400 at Indianapolis and the Aug. 11 race at Watkins Glen, N.Y. “We have an excellent working relationship with NASCAR and totally understand their position,” Rich Feinberg, ESPN’s vice president of motorsports production, told ESPN.com. “We look forward to beginning our NASCAR Sprint Cup schedule at Indianapolis and televising 17 great weeks of racing.” Getting Dirty: Go ahead, spill the dirt. NASCAR is set for its first dirt race in more than 40 years on Tuesday when the Truck Series hits Eldora Speedway. The last time one of NASCAR’s top touring series competed on dirt was Sept. 30, 1970, when Richard Petty won a NASCAR Sprint Cup Series (called the Grand National Division at that time) race at the North Carolina State Fairgrounds in Raleigh. See RACING, page 7

duce on this quiet, hill country lake; try top-water baits during low-light conditions or crankbaits near offshore structure for largemouth bass feeding on gizzard shad. The catfish bite has been pretty steady, with worms and chicken livers doing well, but commercial stinkbait has also been producing lately. Sunfish continue to bite well on worms under a bobber but small jigs have also produced some good catches lately. LaDue Reservoir (Geauga County) - Crappie have been biting well on the 22 and 422 overpasses; anglers are using perch rigs tipped with minnows, also catching lots of bonus white perch. Largemouth bass have been biting well, particularly during low light; target offshore structure and weedbeds with top-water lures, weedless frogs, spinnerbaits and Carolina-rigged soft plastics. Channel catfish have been taking the occasional bluegill angler by surprise, with several reports of good catches on worms fished under a bobber. SOUTHEAST OHIO Piedmont Lake (Belmont County) - Channel catfish anglers should try nightcrawlers using

tight-line techniques in the shallow coves of the lake; these can usually be caught using nightcrawlers and chicken livers. Flathead catfish are also found in the lake; try bluegill as bait and fishing the area close to the marina. Largemouth bass may still be caught in the very early morning and late at night when the weather is a bit cooler; try rigging a worm “wacky-style” for a different presentation. Lake Snowden (Athens County) - The high water and hot temperatures left over from the recent storms have not created the best conditions for anglers but with a little planning and some patience, you can still find some fish. Largemouth bass are going to be moving deeper this time of year to take advantage of the cooler water but will come into the shallows between dusk and dawn to feed; target them at this time using plastic worms or crankbaits. Channel catfish may provide the best opportunity in muddy conditions since they are not primarily sight feeders; target shallow coves and bats at night using any of the typical catfish baits like nightcrawlers, chicken livers or any of the prepared baits. See WILDLIFE, page 7

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Saturday, July 20, 2013

The Herald — 7

Golf

(Continued from page 6)

Smith part of Team Work

Trey Smith, an upcoming sophomore at Delphos Jefferson, is a member of Team Work (15 and under) AAU Basketball squad that won the Platinum Championship of the prestigious Adidas Invitational Tournament in Indianapolis from July 10-14. The tournament started with over 90 teams in the 15 and under division and 38 teams qualified for the Platinum (highest) bracket through pool play with the remaining teams divided over the gold, silver and bronze brackets. Team Work cruised through pool play with no game closer than 22 points. The squad opened tournament play with a hard-fought 57-54 victory over Hoop Dreams (KY). They posted victories over Wisconsin Playground Warriors 46-40, Grand Rapids Storm 64-48, Houston Defenders 64-59 (OT) and Iowa Barnstormers 57-46 to earn a spot in the Championship game. Work brought home the title with a 96-88 win over the Compton Magic (Los Angeles). The championship is the current highlight of a season that has also included tourney titles at the King James Classic and the Lake Erie District National Qualifier. The team currently sports an impressive 36-5 record. In addition to Smith (No. 24 in the picture), teammates hail from Medina HS, Mentor HS, Dublin Coffman HS, Dublin Jerome HS, Athens HS, New Concord John Glenn HS, Walsh Jesuit H and Magnolia (WV) HS. Smith and his teammates are now off to Orlando, Fla., where they will compete in the AAU Super Showcase and the AAU Nationals (where they will play up in the 16 and under division). As a side note, Dakota Mathias of Elida was a member of the 17U team that won the Gold Bracket (second level) in the same tournament. (Photo submitted)

Wildlife

(Continued from page 6)

SOUTHWEST OHIO Stillwater River (Miami County) - Smallmouth bass are being caught using artificial and real soft craws, lead-headed jigs tipped with a curly tail or other soft bait. The best color choices are black and green or pumpkinseed. East Fork (Clermont County) - Largemouth bass are being caught using plastic worms, banded crankbaits or top-water baits such as buzzbaits, particularly early in the morning and late in the evening; cast along the points, buck brush, banks and in the areas with submerged trees or brush. Jig the worm on the bottom; keep the shiners or minnows moving in the top 2-3 feet of water. Channel catfish are being caught using minnows or chicken liver; larger channel cats are being caught on nightcrawlers, Nitro worms (green nightcrawlers) or chicken livers along the bottom and near any rock wall and at least 18 feet deep. Bluegill are hitting on meal/wax/red worms under a bobber and about 2-5 feet deep. Cast anywhere around the docks, standing wood or downed trees. Hybridstriped bass are being caught trolling near the main beach, campground beach and the flat near the Army Corp ramp; start watching for schools of shad acting skittish on the surface and be ready to cast a twister or bait into the school. OHIO RIVER Water levels on the Ohio River have been unusually high in the past weeks due to the abnormally large rainfall events. While levels have gone down in many places, the release of water still creates strong currents and unfavorable conditions; anglers are encouraged to check water levels before deciding to fish. LAKE ERIE Regulations to Remember: The daily bag limit for walleye on Ohio waters of Lake Erie is 6 fish per angler; minimum size limit is 15 inches. … The daily bag limit for yellow perch is 30 fish per angler on all Ohio waters of Lake Erie. … The trout and salmon daily bag limit is 5; minimum size limit is 12 inches. … The black bass (largemouth/smallmouth) daily bag limit is 5 per angler with a 14-inch minimum size limit. Western Basin: Walleye fishing was good over the past week; the best areas were between West and Middle Sister islands, off of Crane Creek, Northwest Reef (W of North Bass Island) and between Kelleys Island Shoal and the Canadian border. Trollers have been catching fish on worm harnesses or with divers and spoons; drifters are using worm harnesses with bottom-bouncers or are casting mayfly rigs. … Yellow perch fishing was good over the past week; the best areas have been the gravel pit, “B” can of the Camp Perry firing range, between Rattlesnake Island and West Reef, between Kelleys Island and Lakeside and E of the Kelleys Island airport. Perch-spreaders with

shiners fished near the bottom produce the most fish. … Smallmouth bass fishing has been very good around South Bass Island; anglers are using soft craws, tube jigs and crankbaits. Largemouth bass fishing has also been good in harbors and nearshore areas around Catawba and Marblehead. Central Basin: Walleye fishing has been good at the weather buoy between Vermilion and Lorain near the Canadian border, in 20-24’ of water NE of Rocky River, in 32-42’ of water N of Edgewater, in 68-72’ NE of Geneva and in 68-72’ N of Ashtabula; anglers are trolling dipsy/jet divers with worm harnesses and yellow, orange, pink, green and purple spoons with copper backs. … Yellow perch fishing has been excellent in 39-43’ off of Avon Point, Edgewater, Eastlake/Mentor, Fairport Harbor, Ashtabula and Conneaut. Shore anglers are catching a few fish off the East 55 Street pier in Cleveland, the Mentor Headlands pier and the short pier on the Grand River; spreaders with shiners fished near the bottom produce the most fish. … Smallmouth bass fishing has been excellent in 15-25’ around harbor areas in Cleveland (5-20’ of water), Fairport Harbor, Geneva, Ashtabula and Conneaut. Largemouth bass are also being caught in the same areas; anglers are using crankbaits, spinnerbaits, tube jigs, curly tail grubs, soft craws and leeches. … White bass has been fair in the evenings off Euclid Beach and Sims Park in Euclid and the short pier in Fairport Harbor; anglers are using agitators with jigs and small spoons. … The water temperature is 74 degrees off of Toledo and 68 degrees off of Cleveland, according to the nearshore marine forecast. … Anglers are encouraged to always wear a U.S. Coast Guard-approved personal flotation device while boating. ——-

Racing

DOW Controlled Deer Opportunities The Division of Wildlife (DOW) conducts annual hunts on a number of areas that are normally closed to hunting. All applicants (adults and youth) must possess a current hunting license to apply for controlled hunts. Apply online for $3 per hunt. The application period is through July 31. Participation is determined by computer-generated random drawings. Applications may not be faxed or e-mailed. Application fees are nonrefundable. Hunters may apply for and participate in, either as hunter or partner, no more than a single

hunt per area, per year. Hunters who fail to adhere to this risk disqualification and forfeiture of their application fee. Drawings will be held for each area and each hunt date in early August for the early waterfowl hunts and in September for all others. Applicants can view the status of their application by visiting the Wild Ohio Customer Care Center at WildOhio.com (click on “Manage Your Customer Account” and follow the prompts). Hunters chosen to participate will be notified by mail. In addition to instructions for obtaining your permit, you will receive information/rules specific for the hunt. If you are not drawn, you will not receive a refund, nor will you be notified. Unless otherwise noted, hunters are limited to a single deer of either-sex. In those cases where a hunter may take more than one deer, only one deer may be antlered. Hunters may use either the $15 antlerless or $24 either-sex permit. Although the $15 antlerless permits will be valid statewide only through the Sunday following Thanksgiving Day, they may be used during all DOW-controlled hunts throughout the entire 2013-14 season. However, they will only be available to purchase through the Sunday following Thanksgiving Day. Bag limits and tagging requirements apply during all controlled hunts. New for the 2013-14 season, hunters are limited to a SEASON bag limit of NINE deer. However, deer taken during controlled hunts do NOT count against this limit. Hunters may take an additional six deer during DOW-controlled hunts. However, regardless of method of take, season, or hunt, all hunters are limited to a single buck per season. Unless otherwise noted, the adult hunts listed below are partner hunts. At least one of the hunters must be 18 years or older. In the case of the NASA hunts, if one of the hunters is under the age of 18, the other hunter must be 21 years or older. The DOW offers a number of hunts for mobility-impaired hunters. These are NOT partner hunts, unless noted otherwise. Mobilityimpaired hunters must be accompanied by a non-hunting attendant who must possess a current hunting license and deer permit. The DOW is also pleased to offer a number of excellent youth hunting opportunities. To be eligible to participate in a youth hunt, you must be 17 years or younger at the time of application. Youth hunters must be accompanied by a non-hunting adult 18 years or older and unless otherwise noted, the adult must possess a current hunting license and deer permit. To ensure the safety of all participants, adults may not supervise more than two hunters during all youth hunts. Any exceptions to this are noted under the hunt description.

If he cared to look behind him, Jimenez might have reason to be concerned. The biggest name was Woods, already a 4-time winner this year who has been steering his way around Muirfield with mainly irons that go forever on the rock-hard fairways. More ominous is that he is making so many important putts, even if they are for par. “There will be no surprise to me if he’s picking up the claret jug on Sunday night,” said Graeme McDowell, who played with Woods and was seven shots behind. “But I’m not writing off the rest of the field. There’s quality players here in this field and I’m certainly not writing myself off. But if he continues to play the way he’s playing, he’s going to be tough to beat.” Westwood surged to the top of the leaderboard with a 31 on the front nine and one more birdie at the 12th but dropped three shots on the last six holes. Even so, he gave himself another chance to capture his first major in what already is banner sporting year for England. The last Englishman to win the British Open was Nick Faldo in 1992 at Muirfield. Angel Cabrera, among six players who had a share of the lead at one point Friday, dropped five shots over the last three holes for a 72. Even so, he was only two shots behind at 1-under 141 along with Zach Johnson, Martin Laird (71) and Rafael Cabrera-Bello (74). Only nine players remained under par on a course that is playing to an average of just under 75. Jordan Spieth, the 19-year-old Texan, was closing in on the lead until a double bogey on the 15th, followed by two more bogeys that dropped him to a 74. That still was enough to put him in the large group at 1-over 143 that included Mickelson, Masters champion Adam Scott, Bubba Watson, Ian Poulter, Charl Schwartzel and Darren Clarke, who has all but vanished since winning the claret jug two years ago at Royal St. George’s. Clarke had a 71 despite a quadruple-bogey. Most players prefer a firm, fast and fiery golf course. Some of them are starting to feel burned, even Schwartzel, who had a 68. There were 23 players separated by only five shots going into the weekend and 10 of them were major champions. “I think it’s going to be a good test to be able to separate yourself if you’re playing well,” Mickelson said. “The great thing about tomorrow is that now all the players that are in contention will be on the course at the same time. And that’s going to be key.” Some players won’t be around at all. U.S. Open champion Justin Rose shot a 77 and missed the cut. Rory McIlroy shot 40 on the front nine to take himself out of the tournament. He had a 75 for another weekend off in what is becoming a long, troublesome year.

Creamer, Recari, Walsh lead Marathon; Park lurking SYLVANIA — Paula Creamer hasn’t won an LPGA Tour event in the past three years. Yet the memories of the times she has triumphed always give her a lift when needed most. Creamer, who won the tournament five years ago when it was known as the Jamie Farr Toledo Classic, shared the lead and top-ranked Inbee Park was lurking nearby Friday after the second round of the Marathon Classic. “You know when to step on the gas and when not to,” she said. “When you get a rhythm going out here it kind of takes care of itself. Experience, in any case, takes care of the issues that you have out there. It’s just being confident.” In the 2008 event, she shot a career-best 11-under 60 in the first round and followed up with a 65, then held off all challengers for a 2-shot victory. With a host of big names bunched high on the leaderboard through 36 holes of the Marathon, she knows she can’t put it on cruise control. But she also feels good about her chances. Creamer has won nine times on tour but not since the 2010 U.S. Women’s Open. She shot a 3-under 68 on Friday on the heels of an opening 66 to pull even with Alison Walshe and Spain’s Beatriz Recari at 8-under 134. Recari, who picked up her second career tour win earlier this year, had the day’s low round with a 65. She climbed from a tie for 19th after opening with a 69. She had made the cut in 46 consecutive tournaments before shooting an 81 in the opening round and missing out on the weekend at the U.S. Women’s Open three weeks ago at Sebonack. Recari sounded as if she had mixed feelings about the streak ending. “No, I didn’t have any weight on my shoulders,” she said. “I would have loved to continue it and it was a disappointment not to make it. But I’ve had some time to reflect and I’m actually pleased that it happened because it was a good lesson that I had to learn.” Walshe, the first-round leader after a 65, hasn’t won in her four years on the LPGA Tour. But she showed some backbone by turning things around after bogeying her first hole on Friday. Jacqui Concolino followed a 67 with a 68 and was alone in fourth, a shot back. The pack at 6 under included the world’s top-ranked pro, Park and topranked amateur, Lydia Ko. They were joined by Chie Arimura. Park is the hottest commodity in the LPGA these days, with six wins already — including the first three major championships — this year. She had won her last three starts before finishing 14th last week. She finished off a 69 in heat and high humidity at Highland Meadows Golf Club. The 25-year-old South Korean felt pleased with her putting. In other words, the rest of the pack might want to look out. Ko also birdied her final two holes to polish off a 67. The 16-year-old South Korean-born New Zealander, is in prime position to make a run at her second victory on the LPGA Tour. She was the youngest player ever to win a tour event last year at the age of 15 at the Canadian Women’s Open, shortly after winning the U.S. Women’s Amateur. She easily made the cut in suburban Toledo, her 22nd in 22 starts against professionals. Arimura had a 67. Defending champion So Yeon Ryu (69), rising American star Lexi Thompson (71) and Jodi Ewart Shadoff (68) were all at 5 under Mark Rypien leads American Century Championship STATELINE, Nev. — Former NFL quarterback Mark Rypien had an eagle and three birdies Friday to take a 2-point lead after the first round of the American Century Championship. Rypien finished with 27 points at Edgewood Tahoe Golf Course under the modified Stableford scoring system that awards graduated points for pars or better. He eagled the par-5 16th, hitting a hybrid club to 8 feet.

(Continued from page 6)

There are five 8-lap qualifying events and a 15-lap last-chance race to come up with the 30 competitors (regularly 36 in the Truck Series) who will start the 150-lap race at the Tony Stewart-owned track. The race is broken into three segments of 60, 50 and 40 laps. Set the DVR so the kids can watch the next day. The green flag drops at 9:30 p.m. ET on Speed. “I really feel like this is a way for NASCAR to get back to the roots of the sport,” analyst Kenny Wallace said. “We’ve had a lot of fans express their concerns that we’ve forgotten our roots, country music, Saturday night racing, etc. I just really look at this as a home run, no matter what.” Iron Man: NASCAR Sprint Cup driver Josh Wise missed the memo that he should be off this weekend. With a rare break in Cup action, Wise will still line up for some serious action on Sunday in the form of a triathlon. Wise is participating in a 70.3-mile half-Ironman that will include a 1.2-mile swim in Lake Michigan, a 56-mile bike course and a 13.1-mile run in Racine, Wis. Wise has been training for the July 21 event in Racine for about a year. At the most intense part of his training, Wise was swimming five miles, biking 150 miles and running 20 miles per week. In these final days before the race, he will carry a lighter training schedule to allow his body to recover and be in prime condition for Sunday. “I’ve always trained really hard to be in good shape in the race car and this just added a fun element to that for me and goals for me to set,” he said.
Wolff makes full F1 test debut at Silverstone SILVERSTONE, England — Showing no signs of exhaustion despite completing the equivalent of almost two grand prix races, Susie Wolff had one final job in the Silverstone heat on Friday. Fresh from her full Formula One test debut, the British driver wanted to dispel any suggestions that she hadn’t earned her position at Williams. As a development driver, it is Wolff’s job to convince the team she can cut it on the track. And it has nothing to do with her gender. Completing 89 laps of the British Grand Prix circuit was her first big chance to do so on the road to becoming the first female driver on the F1 grid

in almost 40 years. What Wolff won’t do is use that landmark to her advantage. “I’ve been asked that I seem very reluctant to play the ‘female card’,” the 30-year-old Scot explained. “But ultimately a race team is only going to put the best driver they can in their race car.” “If that has kind of more meaning because I am female, then of course I’ll use that to my advantage. But I am not going to play that card as a way of ‘Give me the right now because I am a girl’.” No, Wolff wants to be judged on her driving ability and speed. To make the F1 grid, she would need to gain a “super license” which was reported last year to cost 10,000 euros plus 1,000 euros for each subsequent world championship point. “It’s so bloody expensive,” Wolff said. Surely her husband would pay for it, inquired one journalist. That raised the issue of Toto Wolff, the former executive director of Williams, who recently left to join rival Mercedes as motorsport director. “I pay for my own racing stuff,” she stressed, before tackling the issue head on: “There are so many questions and people saying I’m only where I am because of him. “Make no qualms: he supports me a lot. I’m incredibly lucky to have him as a husband because there’s not many guys who would support their wives going into Formula One … but ultimately, the team had the decision about who was driving today. He had nothing to do with that and he just wanted to come as a husband, not the position he is in.” In front of more than 7,000 spectators, she set the ninth-fastest lap of 1 minute, 35.093 seconds. F1 championship leader Sebastian Vettel set the pace, with a lap of 1:32.894. Wolff started racing at the age of 8 after her parents bought her and her brother karts. Her early success led her to Formula Renault, the British F3 Racing Series and then, in 2006, she joined Mercedes-Benz as one of its drivers for the German Touring Car Championship. Her high point in DTM came in 2010 when she became the first woman in 20 years to finish twice in the points before focusing on breaking into F1. Not since Italian driver Lella Lombardi in 1976 has a woman raced in F1. Giovanna Amati was given an opportunity by the Brabham team in 1992 but squandered three chances to qualify. Wolff will assess later in the year what her prospects are of getting a spot into the driver line-up. Formula One championship leader Sebastian Vettel was the fastest on the final day of a special in-season testing session with new tires. The 3-time defending series champion completed 78 laps in his Red Bull at Silverstone on Friday during the tire test sanctioned by the sport’s rulers to quash the threat of a revolt by teams.

­
Description­

Quotes of local interest supplied by EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS Close of business July 19, 2013
Last­Price­ Change
-4.80­ +2.72­ -23.66­ -0.0800­ +0.6500­ -0.0600­ +0.3000­ -0.3400­ +0.43­ -0.4800­ +0.6400­ -0.17­ -0.01­ +0.10­ +0.6800­ -0.2300­ -0.07­ -0.02­ -0.7200­ -0.1300­ +0.1100­ +2.0600­ -0.2100­ +0.3000­ -0.0200­ +0.0900­ -4.04­ -0.3900­ +1.0700­ +0.0100­ +0.02­ -0.4800­ +0.21­ +0.1900­ -0.02­ +0.7400

STOCKS

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Classifieds
Minimum Charge: 15 words, 2 times - $9.00 Each word is $.30 2-5 days $.25 6-9 days $.20 10+ days Each word is $.10 for 3 months or more prepaid

8 – The Herald

Saturday, July 20, 2013

www.delphosherald.com

To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122
FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free or less than $50. Only 1 item per ad, 1 ad per month. BOX REPLIES: $8.00 if you come and pick them up. $14.00 if we have to send them to you. CARD OF THANKS: $2.00 base charge + $.10 for each word.

DELPHOS HERALD
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869

555

Garage Sales/ Yard Sales

670 Miscellaneous
LAMP REPAIR Table or Floor. Come to our store. Hohenbrink TV. 419-695-1229

Deadlines: 11:30 a.m. for the next day’s issue. Saturday’s paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday Monday’s paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
We accept

THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the price of $3.00. GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per word. $8.00 minimum charge. “I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR DEBTS”: Ad must be placed in person by the person whose name will appear in the ad. Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regular rates apply

YARD SALE! Thurs-Sat 8am-5pm. 227 E. Suthoff St. Junior girl clothes: size small/medium, bikes for everyone & tons of misc.

‘Sis’ can’t help ‘Ashley’ until she helps herself
Dear Annie: My people will “judge” 32-year-old sister, her. She doesn’t play “Ashley,” got herself any sports and isn’t into trouble. From in any club, because my earliest memo- they’re “lame.” Also, ries, she has always she always needs one lied. She recently got friend by her side so out of drug rehab, she won’t be alone. She may be inbut it doesn’t seem to have helped. My secure, but it’s reparents and Ashley’s ally starting to make biological mom con- me resentful. What sistently bail her out should I do? —California of trouble, D e a r whereas Califormy other nia: These siblings high-mainand I have tenance to learn friends from our don’t realmistakes. ize how Ashley exhausting is jobless they are to and colbe around. lecting If you think governcan ment as- Annie’s Mailbox you gently tell sistance and is on Facebook her that her insecuriall day long, but says ties are getting the she is “trying.” Ash- best of her, go ahead. ley is a manipulative But it’s a delicate con artist. I believe balance. If you think there also may be she will turn on you, some mental illness. it might be best to She is divorced and ignore what you can has three children, and spend as little and her actions are time in her company not in their best in- as possible. Dear Annie: This terests. I’ve caught her in a few lies since is in response to rehab, and I’m at the “Wanting No Repoint where if I see grets,” who wants to her again, I may blow divorce his wife and up. I have a big heart, go back to his exbut I cannot find it in fiancee. I was married for me to forgive her for the terrible things she 27 years when I ran has done and the hurt into my ex-boyfriend she has caused. The from high school. stress is causing me My marriage wasn’t horrible, just boring. physical pain. Ashley is still my My ex was sweet, loving sister, and I love her. wonderful, How do I help her and made me feel 17 without getting angry again. We decided to about the poor deci- get divorced and fisions she continues nally be together. It only took six to make? —Ashley’s months for me to Sis Dear Sis: You can- realize what a hornot help Ashley until rible mistake I had she is willing to help made. Everything I herself, and that may disliked about him never happen. We un- in high school was times derstand your anger a thousand and frustration, but worse. I’d forgotyou’ll feel better if ten his flaws and had you can simply ac- convinced myself he cept that this is who was perfect. “Wantshe is. Please con- ing” needs to take centrate your efforts off the rose-colored on those children. glasses and rememThey need stability ber why he didn’t and solid role mod- marry his ex in the els in their lives, and first place. You were correct you can provide both. Can you take them to when you told him to the park after school? try working through Help with home- his problems with his work? Cook them a wife. Even if things meal or take them don’t work out, he out on the weekends? should hold off getWhatever hours you ting too involved can give them will be with his ex. He may realize that he was time well spent. Dear Annie: There lucky to have gotten is a girl in our group out of their engageof friends who is re- ment the first time. ally starting to annoy My ex will always me. She constantly have a special place has her phone in her in my heart, but not hand. She also won’t enough to live with do certain things be- him. —Been There, cause she’s worried Done That

www.delphosherald.com

Home Health Aide
Part-time, Putnam County. Must be flexible, work weekends, pick up extra shifts. Prompt, reliable, dependable, good work ethic. Application online or pick-up at: Community Health Professionals 602 E. Fifth St., Delphos OH 45833 ComHealthPro.org
Price Reduced!

105 Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can place a 25 word classified ad in more than 100 newspapers with over one and a half million total circulation across Ohio for $295. It’s easy...you place one order and pay with one check through Ohio Scan-Ohio Advertising Network. The Delphos Herald advertising dept. can set this up for you. No other classified ad buy is simpler or more cost effective. Call 419-695-0015 ext. 138

Garage Sales/ 555 Yard Sales
1310 CHRISTINA St. Thursday (7/18) 5-9pm, Friday (7/19) 10am-7pm, Saturday (7/20) 9am-12p Many baby items, Baby clothes girls/boys newborn-3T, maternity, baby crib/changing table, desk, dresser, TV chest, night stand. 21397 LEHMAN Road (West of town). 4-wheeler, wood swingset, yard cart, refrigerator/cooler, boys 2T, girls 4T-6, womens & mens large, household items. Friday 9am-5pm, Saturday 9am-2pm.

592 Wanted to Buy

805 Auto
2001 CHRYSLER Town and Country LX. Approx. 122,000 miles. Ph: 419-303-5212

Raines Jewelry
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry, Silver coins, Silverware, Pocket Watches, Diamonds.

Cash for Gold
2330 Shawnee Rd. Lima (419) 229-2899

080 Help Wanted
DRIVER(S) WANTED-Local company is in need of part-time delivery drivers. All deliveries are to Ohio and surrounding states. Must be able to move skids with a pallet jack and secure load properly. No CDL is required. Driver must submit to pre-employment physical/drug screening and random drug screening during employment. Must pass MVR and have clean driving record. Retirees welcome. Send replies to Box 113 c/o Delphos Herald, 405 N. Main St., Delphos, OH 45833 JOB FAIR R&R Employment. Tuesday July 23rd. 10AM-2PM. 147 E. Main St. Van Wert, OH 45891. Hiring! CNC Operators; Maintenance; RN; LPN. Accepting applications for CNA Classes starting in August. OPENING FOR CDL Driver with 3yrs. experience having safe driving record. Travel mostly in Ohio and Kentucky. 35¢/mile with a minimum of $135. Possibility of dedicated trip in the future. Call 419-303-3007 OTR SEMI DRIVER NEEDED Benefits: Vacation, Holiday pay, 401k. Home weekends, & most nights. Call Ulm’s Inc. 419-692-3951

640 Financial

$164,900-Ft Jennings SD 3 bedroom, 2 bath brick/vinyl ranch home with open floor plan on 1.24 acre lot. Many updates. Includes 24’x24’ attached garage and 36’x24’ Morton building. Move in ready!(42) Brad Stuber 419-236-2267/Derek Watkins 419-303-3313

305

Apartment For Rent

Brick ranch with 3 bedrooms and 2 full baths. Remodeled in 2004. Detached 2 car garage built in 2008.(51) Mike Reindel 419-2353607 Cute 3 bedroom, 1 bath 1 ½ story on nice 66x132 lot. Built in 1920, appx. 1378 sq. ft. of living area, enclosed breezeway. (122) Bonnie Shelley 419-230-2521 1-1/2 story home with 3BR/1BA and over 1800 sq ft living space. Many updates including updated bath w/whirlpool tub/shower, newer windows, roof & water heater. Basement. Detached garage w/loft. (75) Barb Coil 419-3023478

Price Reduced! $99,900-Elida SD

1BR APT for rent, appliances, electric heat, laundry room, No pets. $425/month, plus deposit, water included. 320 N. Jefferson. 419-852-0833.

$65,000-Elida SD

828 N. Franklin. Fri. 9a-4pm, Sat. 9am-?. Vintage glassware, RENT OR Rent to Own. clothes, purses, house1,2 or 3 bedroom mobile hold furnishings home. 419-692-3951 9223 W. State Rd., just off of 309 & Defiance 425 Houses For Sale Trail. Saturday 9am-1pm Name brand clothes: 634 N. JEFFERSON ST. American Eagle, Old 3-BR, 1-Bath ranch. 2 Navy, New York & Co. car garage. Remodeled Patio furniture, home kitchen, central air. Multi- goods, childrens clothple updates. MOVE-IN ing, several Name Your READY. $98,500. Call Own Price items. Something for everyone. 419-605-8553 FOR SALE: 1977, 21ft. Thompson boat. 175H.P. Mfg./Mobile 430 OMC motor, inboard/outHomes For Sale board, new prop. Trailer 2BR WITH Utility room included. Asking $1800. addition and large Can be seen at 626 N. barn/work shop. Ulm’s 1, Scott St. or call lot 64. 419-692-3951 419-695-8365

325

Mobile Homes For Rent

IS IT A SCAM? The Delphos Herald urges our readers to contact The Better Business Bureau, (419) 223-7010 or 1-800-462-0468, before entering into any agreement involving financing, 615 S. Cass. business opportunities, Friday 9am-4pm, Saturor work at home opporday 9am-1pm. Dressers, tunities. The BBB will aschanging table, TV sist in the investigation stand, boys clothes of these businesses. 0-18mos, maternity (This notice provided as clothes, household items a customer service by & misc. The Delphos Herald.)

660 Home Services

$74,000-Delphos SD

LIGHTNING PROTECTION SYSTEMS
•FREE INSPECTIONS •FREE ESTIMATES
•UL APPROVED MATERIALS •ALUMINUM & COPPER

ROBBIN’S

FARM FOR SALE Approx. 30 acres in Union Twp, Van Wert County. Approx. 20 ac tillable w/ balance wooded. (188) Devin Dye 419-303-5891
00070347

State Wide Service Commercial-Residential

Car Care

Transmission, Inc.
• automatic transmission • standard transmission • differentials • transfer case • brakes & tune up

Geise

Joe Miller Construction
Experienced Amish Carpentry Roofing, remodeling, concrete, pole barns, garages or any construction needs. Cell

Home Improvement

567-644-6030

BUILDING & REMODELING
Roofing, Garages, Room Additions, Bathrooms, Kitchens, Siding, Decks, Pole Barns, Windows. 30 Years Experience

Construction

TSB

SELF-STORAGE
Security Fence •Pass Code •Lighted Lot •Affordable •2 Locations
Why settle for less?

DELPHOS

SAFE & SOUND

Dick CLARK Real Estate

S
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville

ervice
419-692-6336

AT YOUR

419-910-0419 800-582-0218

Tom Reek Trenton, OH

Shop Herald Classifieds for Great Deals

OPEN HOUSE

www.DickClarkRealEstate.com

Delphos • $94,900 Jack Adams 419-302-2171
View all our listings at dickclarkrealestate.com

1:00-2:30 p.m. 514 S. Cass Street

SUNDAY, JULY 21

Dick CLARK Real Estate

Don’t make a move without us!

675 W. Market St., Suite 120, Lima, OH Phone: 419-879-1006 Phone: 419-695-1006 312 N. Main St. Delphos, OH

419-236-1496 Elida, OH 567-204-1391 419-692-5143 home/office
* Experience Counts *
Construction

B&B Carwashing & Professional Detailing

N UNEVE ETE? CONCR
Concrete leveling of floors, sidewalks, patios, steps, driveways, pool decks, etc.
Call Dave cell

Is Your Ad Here? 419-235-2631
Miscellaneous

NOTICE OF EXAMINATION

COMMUNITY SELF-STORAGE
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s

419 695-0015
Repairs
Tim Andrews

Call Today

419-235-1067
VONDERWELL CONTRACTING CONCRETE LEVELING

Mike

GREAT RATES NEWER FACILITY

MASONRY RESTORATION

AMISH CARPENTERS
ALL TYPES OF CONSTRUCTION
Build or Remodel
For all your metal siding and roofing needs contact us.

WORK WANTED
Any • Carpentry • Framing • Siding •Roofing • Pole Barns •Any repair work FREE ESTIMATES 30 years experience!

DAY’S PROPERTY MAINTENANCE LLC
Brent Day 567-204-8488
• Mowing • Landscaping • Lawn Seeding

Chimney Repair

The Delphos Civil Service Commission will be conducting an open examination for the position of Custodian for the Delphos City Schools. The Candidate should be available to begin work with the start of the school year. The examination will be held at 7:00 p.m. on Wednesday, August 7, 2013. It will take place at the Jefferson Middle school Cafeteria. Applicants should enter through the north door off of Third Street. A grade of 70% is required to successfully pass the examination. The passing scores will also serve as an eligibility list. This eligibility list shall be valid for a period of one year. CLASSIFICATION POSITION: Custodian (Two positions available) SALARY: Per Classified Salary Schedule HOURS: 3 hours per day available at Landeck 5 hours per day available at the high school BENEFITS: Some are available MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS/BACKGROUND: Any combination of education and experience that demonstrates the required knowledge, skills and abilities to perform the job functions; previous experience in maintenance and/or repairs; and over 4 years of related experience.

419-204-4563
Welding
Fabrication & Welding Inc.

FOR FREE ESTIMATE

260-585-4368
POHLMAN BUILDERS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK SERVICE FREE ESTIMATES FULLY INSURED

Quality

419-339-0110

GENERAL REPAIR - SPECIAL BUILT PRODUCTS

ROOM ADDITIONS

419-733-6309

GESSNER’S PRODUCE
AVAILABLE NOW! HOME GROWN SWEET CORN PEACHES AND VINE RIPE TOMATOES ALWAYS FRESH!
419-234-6626

TRUCKS, TRAILERS FARM MACHINERY RAILINGS & METAL GATES
CARBON STEEL STAINLESS STEEL ALUMINUM

Applications and job descriptions can be obtained at the Administrative Building located at 234 North Jefferson Street between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. Monday through Friday beginning July 22 through July 26, 2013. All applications must be mailed to: The Delphos Civil Service Commission, P.O. Box 45, Delphos, Ohio 45833. All applications must have a postmark of no later than Friday, August 2, 2013. Any applications which are postmarked after this date shall be considered invalid and will not be accepted. Applicants, on the night of the examination, you must bring a valid Ohio Driver’s license and proof of military service, if applicable.

Wednesday, July 31, 2013— 6:00 p.m. 1140 S. Bredeick St., Delphos, Ohio
House—Contents—DoDge truCk

ESTATE AucTion

POHLMAN POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential & Commercial • Agricultural Needs • All Concrete Work

Pave-Rite
• Paving • Seal Coating • Traffic Control TOM REEK

Free Estimates Quality Work

OPEN 7 DAYS 9 AM - 5 PM Sundays 11-5 PM

5745 Redd Rd., Delphos

Larry McClure

419-692-SOLD 419-453-2281
Check out all of our listings at: www.tLrea.COm

1140 S. Bredeick St., delphoS, ohio House will sell at 6:00 p.m. Real estate: A tremendous buy will be available on this 2 bedroom bungalow located on S. Bredeick St. in Delphos. It has an attached garage and vinyl siding. Come prepared to buy—shouldn’t you be interested if it only sells for $5,000 to $10,000? Call 419238-5555 teRms: $2,000 down day of auction. Balance due by August 23, 2013.

greAt InVestMent oPPortunItY
HouseHold Goods: Come to our ROOM WARS AUCTION! As we don’t have a lot of personal property, we will be selling it by the room. We have a bedroom suite, kitchen dinette, tools, VHS tapes and Frigidaire stackable washer & dryer and much more….. 2003 dodGe dakota: Very affordable Dodge pickup truck. Don’t miss this auction!

Tree Service
NEW LISTING! 22696 Rd O-22, Ottoville: 3,500 Sq. Ft living space, Brick & Vinyl Ranch on Fin Bsmt. 40’ x 60’ Insulated Shop. Excellent quality inside and out. Don’t miss out. Call Tony; 419-233-7911. 828 N. Main, Delphos: 4 BR, Newer shingles. Nice interior. Owner wants offer. Tony: 233-7911. Established Putnam County Daycare: Business, and real estate. Call Denny for more details: 532-3482. FOR RENT: 2 BR apartment in Ottoville. W/D hook-up. Garage. Patio. No smoking. No pets. Call Tony: 419-233-7911 FOR RENT: 311 W. 5th, Delphos: 3 BR, 1 Bath. Affordable Living!!! $55K Tony: 233-7911. LOTS FOR SALE Ottoville SD Lots: Next to school. Call Tony Kalida Golf Course: 2 Avail. Tony: 233-7911. Kalida Country: Call Denny: 532-3482

L.L.C.

9557 St. Rt. 66, Delphos, OH 45833

419-692-5749

419-339-9084 cell 419-233-9460

Mark Pohlman

1-800-582-0218
419-910-0419

Classifieds Sell! To advertise call 419-695-0015

Fitzgerald Power Washing & Painting
Interior, Exterior, Residential, Commercial, Decks, Fences, Houses, Log Homes, Stripping, Cleaning, Sealing, Staining, Barn Painting, Barn Roofs FREE ESTIMATES Insured • References A+ rating with the Better Business Bureau

• Trimming & Removal • Stump Grinding • 24 Hour Service • Fully Insured

KEVIN M. MOORE

(419) 235-8051
TEMAN’S
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning • Deadwooding Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal Since 1973

OUR TREE SERVICE

PRICE REDUCED AGAIN!!! 337 Walnut, Ottoville: 3 BR, 2 Bath, Updated throughout. Fish Pond, Garage & Stg Bldg. Take a look, you will be impressed. Tony: 233-7911 New Listing: 279 E. Canal, Ottoville: 3-4 BR, 2 Bath, 2 Sty. Great front porch. Fenced yard. Garage. Own for less than rent! Tony: 233-7911. 115 Harper, Elida: PRICE REDUCED 3 BR, 2 Baths, Brick Ranch. 4th Br & FR in Fin Bsmt. Beautiful location. Call Judy: 419-230-1983 1400 S. Clay, Lot #4: 3 BR Ranch style home in Delphos. $30’s. Call Judy: 419-2301983. 101 Auglaize, Ottoville: 5 BR, 3 Bath Home with countless updates. 2 Car Garage, Bsmt. Space Galore. Call Tony: 233-7911

teRms: Cash or check with proper ID. selleR: George Rodney Estate; Robert Young, Attorney— Young & Yarger Attorneys at Law; Van Wert Co. Probate Court Case #20131064

419-303-3020

Bill Teman 419-302-2981 Ernie Teman 419-230-4890

419-692-7261

www.BeeGeeRealty.com BEE GEE REALTY & AUCTION CO., LTD 122 N Washington St., Van Wert, Ohio 45891 | 419-238-5555 Auctioneers: Bob Gamble, CAI, Broker; Dale Butler, Broker; Ron Medaugh, Broker; DD Strickler & Andy Schweiterman Apprentice Auctioneer: Robert Priest Member of Ohio & National Auctioneers Associations.

www.delphosherald.com

Saturday, July 20, 2013

The Herald –9

Tomorrow’s Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Poor eating habits and a lack of exercise could be at the base of your sluggishness. Analyze your lifestyle honestly, and do something about the flaws that you find. Monday, July 22 Several new alliances are likely to be developed in the year ahead, and each will overlap and intermingle with the others. All will be of value to you in many different but extremely constructive ways. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Hastily committing yourself to an agreement isn’t likely to serve your best interests, so stop and think about what it is you’re saying before you open your mouth. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- If you allow a matter of some importance to be brushed aside, it could create a new series of problems that will only compound your recent difficulties. Stop procrastinating and tackle problems head-on. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -You’ll be more inclined to take risks today, which could cause you to get involved in a project that has only a very slim chance of success. Make sure that you can live with the consequences if it fails. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -Usually, you’re not easily intimidated by others, yet today you might do something against your better judgment due to peer pressure. Be careful. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Although you might be able to get your points across quite easily, it doesn’t mean they’ll be well-received. You could make your case and create enemies simultaneously. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Be on guard when it comes to contributing financially to something, even if it involves close friends. You could suffer a loss, along with everyone else, and relationships could be damaged. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- If you decide to get involved in a competitive situation, don’t underestimate your opposition. To be on the safe side, assume your challenger to be a worthy one. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- There is a strong possibility that you might have to deal with a few responsibilities that won’t be to your liking. Unfortunately, they will be things you simply can’t ignore. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -Unless you are discriminating about the company you keep, you could easily find yourself drawn into a situation that could bring nothing but trouble. Choose your pals wisely. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Be honest with yourself about whether or not you deliberately drew someone into a situation that has ended up causing him or her problems. Only virtuous intentions can be excused. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Don’t say anything to someone in confidence that you would not want relayed to other people. If you say something unkind, you’d better believe that it will be shouted on the rooftops for everyone to hear. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -There is a possibility that you could expect more from others than they are prepared to give or you would be prepared to give them, especially when it comes to material matters. This attitude is self-defeating.
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HI AND LOIS

Your talent and imagination are likely to take you right to the top in your field of endeavor in the coming months. Strive to use these gifts with every ounce of commitment that you have Sunday, July 21 CANCER (June 21-July 22) -Have fun and enjoy yourself, but not at the expense of others. If you singe anyone’s fingers in your quest for happiness, your pleasure will quickly turn sour. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Even though major accomplishments are possible, you might still fall short of your mark. Self-doubts could overwhelm you if you’re fool enough to believe them. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -Be fair in your dealings with others, but don’t go overboard by making self-penalizing concessions. There’s nothing wrong with expecting good things to happen for you. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -This should be a rewarding day as long as you don’t do anything at the last minute to take the edge off your victory. It’s not smart to alter something that’s working so well. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -Just because conditions in general tend to favor you today, that doesn’t mean you should lower your guard. If you do, your fragile success might collapse. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- There’s no need for you to embellish your achievements. Should you do something worthy of praise, the events will speak loudly for themselves and the accolades will be justified. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Don’t be stingy in involvements with your friends. Yet, by the same token, don’t think that you have to break the bank in order to win acceptance. Let moderation be your watchword. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- It’s OK to be proud of your achievements when speaking to your friends, but don’t call a project finished when you still have abundant loose ends that must be tied down. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) In order to appease family and friends today, you might feel obligated to promise them much more than you can deliver. It’s best to be honest with both them and yourself. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -Even if asked, it might not be too wise to advise a friend on how s/he should handle a financial matter. Although you’ll mean well, your suggestion could make matters worse. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Don’t make the mistake of trying to force your opinions on someone who doesn’t want to hear them. Something that you feel strongly about might nonetheless be totally wrong for your listener.

BLONDIE

BEETLE BAILEY

SNUFFY SMITH

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10 – The Herald

Saturday, July 20, 2013

www.delphosherald.com

Obama says Martin ‘could have been me’
BY JULIE PACE AP White House Correspondent WASHINGTON (AP) — In a rare and public reflection on race, President Barack Obama called on the nation Friday to do some soul searching over the death of Trayvon Martin and the acquittal of his shooter, saying the slain black teenager “could have been me 35 years ago.” Empathizing with the pain of many black Americans, Obama said the case conjured up a hard history of racial injustice “that doesn’t go away.” Obama’s personal comments, in a surprise appearance in the White House press room, marked his most extensive discussion of race as president. For Obama, who has written about his own struggles with racial identity but often has shied away from the subject in office, the speech signaled an unusual embrace of his standing as the nation’s first black president and the longing of many African-Americans for him to give voice to their experiences. “When you think about why, in the African- American community at least, there’s a lot of pain around what happened here, I think it’s important to recognize that the African- American community is looking at this issue through a set of experiences and a history that doesn’t go away,” Obama said during his 20-minute remarks. A Florida jury last week acquitted George Zimmerman of all charges in the February 2012 shooting of Martin, an unarmed 17-year-old. The verdict was cheered by those who agreed that Zimmerman was acting in self-defense, while others protested the outcome, believing Zimmerman had targeted Martin because he was black. Despite his emotional comments on the case, the president appeared to signal that the Justice Department was unlikely to file federal civil rights charges against Zimmerman. Traditionally, he said, “these are issues of state and local government,” and he warned that the public should have “clear expectations.” Following the verdict, some civil rights leaders called on Obama to lead a national conversation on race. But the president has resisted. Before Friday, his only comment on the verdict had been a written statement in which he called Martin’s death a tragedy and appealed for calm. But throughout the week, the president kept track of the national response to the verdict, particularly by black Americans, and had discussions with his family, aides said. He was ready to address the verdict earlier this week during a round of interviews with Spanish language television stations, but the matter never came up. On Thursday, he told his senior advisers that he felt the country needed to hear from him — not in an interview or speech, just a frank discussion of his views and experiences. He spoke from the podium in the White House briefing room with no notes. Even as the president urged the public to accept the verdict — “once the jury’s spoken, that’s how our system works” — he gave voice to the feelings held by many angered by the jury’s decisions. There’s a sense, Obama said, “that if a white male teen was involved in the same kind of scenario, that, from top to bottom, both the outcome and the aftermath might have been different.” The president spoke emotionally about Martin’s parents, Sybrina Fulton and Tracy Martin, saying they had displayed incredible grace and dignity. He never mentioned the feelings of Zimmerman, whose brother has said the former defendant has faced numerous death threats. Martin’s parents released a statement following the remarks, saying, “President Obama sees himself in Trayvon and identifies with him. This is a beautiful tribute to our boy.” Zimmerman’s brother, Robert, also welcomed the president’s remarks, telling Fox News that “the American people need to have some time to digest what really happened and to do that soul searching the president spoke of.” Despite that fact that Obama’s race has been central to the narrative of his political rise, he has rarely addressed the matter as a public figure. He last spoke about race in a substantial way as a presidential candidate in 2008 in addressing criticism over incendiary comments made by his former pastor, Rev. Jeremiah Wright. In 2009, Obama stumbled when commenting on the arrest of a black Harvard professor in the professor’s home, saying the police “acted stupidly.” The president was forced to retract his statement, then held an awkward “beer summit” at the White House with the professor, Henry Louis Gates, and the white arresting officer. But on Friday, Obama spoke poignantly about the distrust that shadows many African-American men, saying that they can draw nervous stares on elevators and hear car locks clicking when they walk down the street. “There are very few African-American men in this country who haven’t had the experience of being followed when they were shopping in a department store,” he said. “That includes me.” In a departure from his typical caution on legal matters, the president also waded into the thorny debates on racial profiling and Florida’s “Stand Your Ground” law, despite the fact that neither was formally raised during Zimmerman’s trial. Obama said it would be useful “to examine some state and local laws to see if they are designed in such a way that they may encourage the kinds of confrontation” that led to Martin’s death. He questioned whether a law that sends the message that someone who is armed “has the right to use those firearms even if there is a way for them to exit from a situation” really promotes peace and security.

House votes to replace ‘No Child’ education law

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans voted Friday to dismantle the troubled No Child Left Behind law for evaluating America’s students and schools, saying states and local school districts rather than Washington should be setting rules for ensuring that kids are getting good educations. The legislation would eliminate federally required testing of students, which has been controversial from the start. But the measure passed with no Democratic support and drew a veto threat from the Obama administration, which said it would be a “step backward” in efforts to better prepare children for colleges and careers and to bring improvements to low-performing schools. Democrats in the Senate, where they hold the majority, are working on their own bill. It would also give states greater flexibility in designing school improvement standards. But it would maintain the authority of the federal education secretary to approve those plans. A Senate vote on that legislation is unlikely until autumn. The House bill, which Republicans named the Student Success Act and Democrats dubbed the Letting Students Down Act, passed 221-207, with every Democrat, and 12 Republicans voting against it. That partisanship comes against a background in which nearly everyone agrees that No Child Left Behind, while achieving some successes in improving achievement levels, is too inflexible and needs a major overhaul. The law was passed by Congress in 2001, a bipartisan effort led by, among others, current House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, and the late Sen. Ted Kennedy, D-Mass. President George W. Bush was a strong supporter and signed it into law in early 2002. It required that all students be able to read and do math at their actual grade level by 2014. But the Obama administration, in a tacit acknowledgement that the goal was unattainable, last year began offering waivers to states that came up with their own federally approved plans to prepare students for college and careers and to measure student and teacher performance. To date, 39 states and the District of Columbia have been granted waivers.

New Ford system helps warn police of approaches Boat rolls backward
DEARBORN, Mich. (AP) — Police could soon be getting some extra backup — from their cars. Ford Motor Co. has a new surveillance system for police cars that automatically sounds a chime, locks the doors and puts up the windows if it detects someone approaching the car from behind. The system — which Ford is patenting — is the first of its kind. “It’s like insurance. You hope you never need it. But if you do, it gives the officer a few extra seconds of warning,” says Marc Ellison, vice president of operations at Auburn, Calif.-based InterMotive Inc., which helped Ford develop it. Backup cameras and sensors usually only work when a car is in reverse. The new system, dubbed “Surveillance Mode,” allows an officer to use them while the car is parked. An image from the backup camera is beamed onto the rearview mirror, so the officer can keep an eye on the rear of the car. If someone comes too close, four sensors on the rear bumper will detect them. The system works during the day and at night, when officers are often the most vulnerable. It can be turned off if officers are in high traffic areas with a lot of pedestrians. InterMotive sells Surveillance Mode for $248.33 as a standalone option. It’s $75 when part of a package of other options, including a dimmer for interior lights if the officer doesn’t want to be seen and a system that automatically turns down the radio if a call comes in over two-way radio. If a police car doesn’t have a backup camera, the system just uses the sensors. The company said it anticipates that the system will eventually be available to consumers. Surveillance Mode is the brainchild of Randy Freiburger, a Ford engineer who works with police and ambulance customers to make sure the company’s vehicles are meeting their needs. He got the idea last August while accompanying Yoon Nam, a deputy with the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department. Nam was asked to respond to a report of a possible drug offense in a gritty area of Compton, Calif. She told Freiburger to stay in the car and radio for help if he needed it while she went to talk to the suspect. When the suspect took off running and Nam followed him, Freiburger found himself alone, with another sus(Continued from page 1) pect approaching him. Nam tried not to lose sight of Freiburger, and she radioed for help. Both suspects were eventually caught and convicted of drug crimes. But a shaken Freiburger wanted to help make police feel less vulnerable when they’re on patrol. No one keeps track of the number of police officers killed each year in their cars, but it’s not uncommon for criminals to target officers there, says Steve Groeninger, a spokesman for the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund. In 2011, Virginia Tech police officer Deriek Crouse was fatally shot in his parked patrol car at close range while conducting a traffic stop on campus. Earlier this year, Massachusetts Institute of Technology officer Sean Collier was also killed in his cruiser, allegedly by the suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings. Nam, who has since been promoted to a detective, says she would often work alone when she was on patrols. When she was making traffic stops, or had a suspect detained in her vehicle, the suspect’s friends or family members would frequently approach her car. “We’re trained to look up and look around at all times, but having that extra feature in the vehicle would help,” she said. Police are already helping improve the system. Ellison says InterMotive plans an upgrade that will make the brake lights automatically come on when someone is approaching based on comments from an officer who was testing it. No cars with the new system had been sold as of mid-July, but Ford hopes it will give police departments another reason to consider its cars. Ford dominated the police market for decades with the Crown Victoria sedan, but it lost some sales after it discontinued the rear-wheel-drive Crown Victoria in 2011 and replaced it with all-wheel-drive police vehicles based on the Taurus sedan and Explorer SUV. Some departments that prefer rear-wheel-drive cars for their speed in chases have switched to the Dodge Charger or Chevrolet Caprice. Spokespeople for Dodge and Chevrolet said they aren’t yet offering systems like Ford’s. None of the company’s would reveal their current share of the police car market. SANDUSKY (AP) — A boat on a ride at an Ohio amusement park has accidentally rolled backward down a hill, injuring all seven people on it. The Cedar Point amusement park says operators stopped the Shoot the Rapids ride Friday evening after the accident, which occurred on the ride’s first hill. It says park police, medical technicians, ride operators and park visitors helped passengers off the boat.

at Cedar Point; 7 hurt
Cedar Point officials won’t say how the boat landed after rolling downhill. They say six of the seven boat passengers have been treated at the park and released and the other has been taken to a hospital for evaluation. Cedar Point is in Sandusky, along Lake Erie between Cleveland and Toledo. It bills itself as the best amusement park in the world. The accident is being investigated.

Winget

(Continued from page 1)

Challenge

Brown

“We thought the ‘Challenge’ would draw seven or eight teams,” Schwieterman said. “This turned our slowest time of the year into our busiest day of the year.” “It was amazing, before the weigh-in this past Monday we had 16 teams,” Doyle said excitedly. “By Monday at 5 p.m., there was an explosion of people and we had 20 teams, which was my ultimate goal.” At this time, there are 21 teams signed up for the event comprised of individuals who are fire fighters, secretaries, restaurant staff and office staff. There is plenty of room for more groups. The cost to register a

group of four is $99, which will allow each team member a nine week membership with access to Zumba, Kick Boxing, strength training and fat burning classes; personal training and life coach sessions; and access to exercise equipment. Schwieterman said that due to the incredible response, the first place team winners—those who lose the most weight—will receive $1000 for their charity. Individuals who lose the most weight will also be celebrated with the winners in first, second and third places receiving, in consecutive order, $500 for their personal use, a free one-year membership to Peak 24 Hour Fitness and a choice of one pair of ath-

letic shoes. Doyle said the staff at Peak are busy working with the new members getting them scheduled for MRT’s (metabolism re-training). On the nutritional side of the program, participates are encouraged to list 20 foods they love to eat with the goal of integrating those foods into their diet. Each participant also has access to personalized mini-life coaching sessions where they will gain social and emotional advice to help them achieve their goals. Peak Personal Trainer Michael Trentman said it is easy for people who just start going to the gym to get frustrated. “They tend to muddle through it when they have

not been educated on fitness and don’t know what to do,” Trentman detailed. “We work from three fronts; nutrition, exercise and movement and cardio.” “We want to help people make wise, healthy decisions and remove the barriers to their success,” Doyle explained. Doyle said by following the program exactly as prescribed, members get the results they want. Team and individual winners of the Community Charity Weight Loss Challenge will be announced during the Canal Days festivities on Sept. 21. For more information, contact Peak 24 Hour Fitness at 419-695-7325.

Safety

He came on board at the BBB in 1994 and has remained there ever since. “I took the position at the BBB because in looking at the duties needed to perform the job, I realized they fit every thing else I had done in life. I had been in the retail business, worked in industry, broadcasting, and public relations,” Winget aid. “All of the skills I learned in these areas came in very handy at the BBB.” He also said he expected to be at the BBB for about 10 years and then retire, but that 10 turned into nearly 20. “It’s the best job I ever had because it was a way I could help people in a very direct way,” he said. Winget’s retirement will take effect on July 31. He will be replaced by the current BBB Branch Manager, Cheryl Parson, who has been with the BBB since 1996. Her new title will be president of the BBB, West Central Ohio Branch.

(Continued from page 1)

“In the past few years, guest speakers have included topics on “Slips, trips and falls”; creating healthy work environments; book keeping practices; and electrical, first aid and first responder’s safety,” Moenter said. Safety Council Program Membership includes: • One admission to all meetings — including breakfast. Additional guests may attend for $8 per meeting. • One admission to the Facility Tours

(Continued from page 4)

Since 2007, I’ve convened more than 215 roundtables across Ohio’s 88 counties, listening to community and business leaders, workers, and entrepreneurs on ways to strengthen our economy. A theme that developed early on was that despite high unemployment, employers are having a hard time finding workers with the skills necessary to fill the available jobs. As a result, job openings in high-growth industries, like healthcare, clean energy, and biosciences, and even the manufacturing sector, are going unfilled. According to Forbes, Ohio ranks 10th per capita in the nation among states expecting the biggest looming skilled labor shortage – due, in part, to an aging population and limited workforce training resources. The skills gap exists – especially for careers in high-tech fields. This

gap denies workers new opportunities they deserve and undermines our nation’s economic competitiveness. It also limits our state’s ability to attract new jobs and businesses. In response to the stories I heard during my early roundtables throughout Ohio about the need to close the skills gap, I first introduced the Strengthening Employment Clusters to Organize Regional Success (SECTORS) in 2008. Last week, I reintroduced it with Senator Susan Collins (R-ME). The SECTORS Act creates partnerships between educators, industry, and workforce training boards to ensure that workers have the right skills to get hired in high-tech, emerging industries with good-paying jobs. If we’re going to attract new employers, we need to ensure that local workforce development efforts support the needs of local industries. That’s what this bill does.

It means community colleges, whether it’s Cincinnati State, TriC, Zane State, and Sinclair State or Rhodes State, and workforce investment boards, industry, and labor, working together to serve local needs. We know economic development and workforce skills training go hand-in-hand. We’ve seen this in Youngstown with NAMII. When the skilled workers are there, more investments follow. It’s not only good for businesses; this legislation is also important for Ohio families. America has a unique opportunity to address the skills gap that prevents hardworking Americans—like Daniel Brewer—from finding good jobs and prohibits eager-to-grow companies from hiring the skilled workers needed to expand. We close the skills gap by going directly to the source of Ohio’s economic might: our skilled workers and innovative businesses.

Trivia

• One admission to the Annual Awards Ceremony • Take-Away Safety Information from each meeting • Updates on the latest BWC programs and discount options • Opportunity to speak with a BWC regional representative at each meeting • Opportunity to network with other local companies Contact the Delphos Area Chamber of Commerce at 419-695-1771 with any questions regarding the Safety Council Program.

Answers to Friday’s questions: Hollywood performer-director Jodie Foster, as an 8-year-old, provided the voice of Pugsley Addams, the son in The Addams Family animated TV cartoon series in 1973. The series lasted 16 episodes. A cryptogram is something written in code or cipher. A cryptogam is a plant or plantlike organism such as a fern, fungus, moss or alga, which reproduces by means of spores instead of seeds. Today’s questions: Where is First Street on the list of the most common street names in the United States? For the 2002 re-release of ET: The ExtraTerrestrial , what was changed digitally about the federal agents who try to stop the bike-riding youngsters from fleeing with the ailing alien? Answers in Monday’s Herald.

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