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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Tuesday • July 23, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 291
IT’S A BOY!!
WORLD PAGE 8
SM NATIONAL
REMAIN ALIVE
SPORTS PAGE 12
BREAKFAST IS AN
IMPORTANT MEAL
HEALTH PAGE 19
U.K.’S KATE GIVES BIRTH TO ROYAL HEIR
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
How the federal Patient Protection and
Affordable Care Act will affect small busi-
nesses when it is implemented next year
was the main topic of conversation at an
informational forum in Redwood City yes-
terday morning.
The act will take effect in January 2014,
and require all Americans to have health
insurance. Currently, there are 5.3 million
uninsured Californians, according to
Covered California, the health care
exchange created as a result of the
Affordable Care Act.
Businesses with 50 employees or fewer
will not be mandated to provide their
employees with insurance, but experts on a
panel to discuss the act highlighted some of
the benefits for businesses providing health
insurance, including tax credits. Larger
companies will pay fees for either not offer-
ing insurance or not offering affordable
enough insurance plans to their employees.
The forum was organized by state Sen.
Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo, Assemblyman
Rich Gordon, D-Menlo Park, and
Assemblyman Kevin Mullin, D-South San
Francisco.
“There’s a lot of uncertainty surrounding
the act,” Mullin said at the event. “The
implementation is a large undertaking.”
The Redwood City-San Mateo County
Chamber of Commerce was a co-host of the
forum. Amy Buckmaster, chamber president
and CEO, said in a press release that the
chamber hears from many small businesses
Forum tackles health care act questions
Small businesses seek answers on Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act
Grand jury questions
county’s budget gap
Report claims deficit no longer exists
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Mateo County has not had a
structural deficit for the last 10 years,
despite using the alleged gap and the
use of reserves to balance the budget as
reason for voters to favor four tax
measures, according to the civil grand
jury.
The jury report released yesterday
claims the Board of Supervisors “sys-
tematically” excludes some or all of its
extra property tax revenue when pen-
ciling out its budget to create the
impression of a deficit despite having
a multi-million dollar surplus.
But board President Don Horsley and
County Manager John Maltbie counter that the jury is the
one that is wrong and that the county’s habit of not includ-
ing excess Educational Revenue Augmentation Funds is fis-
cally prudent.
“Had we thrown all caution to the wind and spent every
cent then we’d have real financial trouble,” Maltbie said.
Waste board change
set to move forward
More members signing on to elected
representation proposal for SBWMA
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
An idea that first emerged in 2005 out of Belmont may
soon transform how the area’s top waste agency conducts
its public business.
If three more agencies agree, the makeup of the South
Bayside Waste Management Authority board will shift from
being comprised of city staff to elected officials as recently
endorsed by a Blue Ribbon Task Force comprised of the
authority’s 12 member agencies.
Today, both the Belmont City Council and San Mateo
County Board of Supervisors will vote on whether to amend
the SBWMA’s joint powers agreement to change the board’s
See opinion page 9
See opinion page 3
Inside
Pull back curtain on
grand jury secrecy
County leasing both
Circle Star towers
See DEFICIT, Page 18
See BOARD, Page 20
ANGELA SWARTZ/DAILY JOURNAL
Students and parents at the Mills High School gym gather to speak out about AP test invalidations at a community meeting
last night.
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Hundreds of frustrated Mills High
School parents and students spoke out
at a community meeting last night in
Millbrae about the College Board’s
decision to invalidate Advanced
Placement exams taken this May
because of seating irregularities.
And legal action seems the likely
next step.
Last week, the San Mateo Union
High School District’s reported that
test distributor College Board invali-
dated tests in 11 AP subjects taken this
May because of seating irregularities.
The decision affected more than 200
students and resulted in more than 600
AP exams being canceled because stu-
dents tested in multiple subjects.
Educational Testing Service, the
College Board’s security provider that
administers the AP Exams, stated ETS
was notified by one student who com-
plained via email back in May.
During testing, Mills placed some of
the students in the library at tables sit-
ting diagonally across from each other
since Mills didn’t have enough class-
room space. The College Board regula-
tion manual stated this may lead to
invalidations since the ideal seating
arrangement states students are sup-
posed to sit in individual desks, facing
the same direction. The school district
confirmed that the ETS had no suspi-
cions of cheating, but ETS views it as
a problem with the test’s integrity.
During the meeting’s public com-
Parents prep lawsuit
Mills community frustrated over AP score invalidations
See HEALTH, Page 18
See MILLS, Page 20
Fisherman gets 230 pound
tuna despite capsized boat
LIHUE, Hawaii — A 54-year-old
fisherman is safe after his 14-foot boat
capsized as he was landing a 230-
pound tuna in the ocean off Hawaii.
The U.S. Coast Guard rescued
Anthony Wichman on Friday after
receiving a distress call from his wife.
Wichman was fishing about 10 miles
southwest of Port Allen on the island
of Kauai Friday morning when he
hooked the Ahi tuna. Coast Guard Lt.
Jessica Mickelson tells Hawaii News
Now that Wichman was able to use his
cellphone to call his wife for help.
The Coast Guard dispatched a heli-
copter to rescue Wichman. Friends
arrived on another boat and were able
to right Wichman’s boat. They towed
it — and the fish — back to port.
Dennis Farina, star of
‘Law & Order,’ dead at 69
NEWYORK — Dennis Farina, a one-
time Chicago cop who as a popular
character actor played a TV cop on
“Law & Order” during his wide-ranging
career, has died.
Death came Monday morning in a
Scottsdale, Ariz., hospital after Farina
suffered a blood clot in his lung,
according to his publicist, Lori De
Waal. He was 69.
For three decades, Farina was a char-
acter actor who displayed remarkable
dexterity, charm
and toughness,
making effective
use of his craggy
face, husky frame,
ivory smile and
ample mustache. He
could be as dapper
as Fred Astaire and
as full of threat as
Clint Eastwood.
His gift has been described as wry,
tough-guy panache, and audiences
loved him for it.
“Sometimes you can take those dra-
matic roles and maybe interject a little
humor into them, and I think the
reverse also works,” Farina said in a
2007 interview with the Associated
Press. “One of the funny things in life
to me is a guy who takes himself very
seriously. ”
Farina’s many films include “Saving
Private Ryan,” (1998), “Out Of Sight”
(1998), “Midnight Run” (1988),
“Manhunter” (1986), and his breakout
and perhaps most beloved film, “Get
Shorty” (1995), a comedic romp where
he played a Miami mob boss.
He recently completed shooting a
comedy film, “Lucky Stiff.”
Among his numerous TV roles was
Detective Joe Fontana on “Law &
Order” during the 2004-06 seasons,
replacing longtime cast member Jerry
Orbach in the ensemble.
“Law & Order” executive producer
Dick Wolf said he was “stunned and
saddened to hear about Dennis’ unex-
pected passing this morning. The
‘Law & Order’ family extends sympa-
thy and condolences to his family. ”
Also on TV, Farina was a regular in
the star-studded though short-lived
2011-12 HBO horse-track drama
“Luck.”
He starred in the 1980s cult favorite
“Crime Story,” and his stylish pri-
vate-eye drama “Buddy Faro” (1998)
was warmly received if little-watched.
He followed that up with a 2002 sit-
com flop, “The In-Laws.”
Last season he guest-starred on the
Fox comedy “New Girl.”
A veteran of the Chicago theater,
Farina appeared in Joseph Mantegna’s
“Bleacher Bums” and “Streamers,”
directed by Terry Kinney, among other
productions.
Born Feb. 29, 1944, Farina was
raised in a working-class neighbor-
hood of Chicago, the seventh child of
Italian immigrants.
After three years in the U.S. Army,
he served with the Chicago Police
Department for 18 years, both as a uni-
formed officer (he was there for the
1968 Chicago riots) and a burglary
detective, before he found his way into
acting as he neared his forties.
His first film was the 1981 action
drama “Thief,” directed by Michael
Mann — a future collaborator on
numerous projects as recently as
“Luck” — whom he had met through a
mutual friend.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Tuesday • July 23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
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Actor Philip
Seymour Hoffman
is 46.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1983
An Air Canada Boeing 767 ran out of
fuel while flying from Montreal to
Edmonton; the pilots were able to
glide the jetliner to a safe emergency
landing in Gimli, Manitoba.
“The most courageous act is
still to think for yourself. Aloud.”
— Coco Chanel, French fashion designer (1883-1971)
Actor Woody
Harrelson is 52.
Actor Daniel
Radcliffe is 24.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Ukraine’s team perform in the synchronized swimming team technical final during the World Swimming Championships
at the Sant Jordi arena in Barcelona, Spain.
Tuesday: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog in
the morning. Aslight chance of thunder-
storms. Highs in the mid 60s. Southwest
winds 5 to 10 mph.
Tuesday ni ght: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming mostly cloudy.
Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the
mid 50s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Wednesday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming
partly cloudy. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the mid
60s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Wednesday night: Partly cloudy in the evening then
becoming mostly cloudy. Patchy fog. Lows in the mid 50s.
Thursday through Sunday: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog.
Highs in the mid 60s. Lows in the mid 50s.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1885, Ulysses S. Grant, the 18th president of the United
States, died in Mount McGregor, N.Y., at age 63.
I n 1886, a legend was born as Steve Brodie claimed to have
made a daredevil plunge from the Brooklyn Bridge into New
York’s East River. However, there are doubts about whether
the dive actually took place.
I n 1888, author Raymond Chandler was born in Chicago.
I n 1914, Austria-Hungary issued a list of demands to Serbia
following the killing of Archduke Franz Ferdinand by a Serb
assassin; the dispute led to World War I.
I n 1945, French Marshal Henri Petain, who had headed the
Vichy government during World War II, went on trial,
charged with treason. He was convicted and condemned to
death, but the sentence was commuted.
I n 1951, Petain died in prison.
I n 1952, Egyptian military officers led by Gamal Abdel
Nasser launched a successful coup against King Farouk I.
I n 1967, a week of deadly race-related rioting that claimed
43 lives erupted in Detroit.
I n 1977, a jury in Washington, D.C., convicted 12 Hanafi
Muslims of charges stemming from the hostage siege at
three buildings the previous March.
I n 1986, Britain’s Prince Andrew married Sarah Ferguson
at Westminster Abbey in London. The couple divorced in
1996.
I n 1997, the search for Andrew Cunanan, the suspected
killer of designer Gianni Versace and others, ended as police
found his body on a houseboat in Miami Beach, an apparent
suicide.
In 2011 , singer Amy Winehouse, 27, was found dead in her
London home from accidental alcohol poisoning.
Ten years ago: Anew audiotape purported to be from top-
pled dictator Saddam Hussein called on Iraqis to resist the
U.S. occupation.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
GROVE ENJOY LIVING BUMMER
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: Where Tarzan worked out —
AT THE JUNGLE GYM
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
CNUBH
RACTA
DEALOD
RILFAY
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
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Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Hot Shot, No.
3, in first place; Lucky Charms, No. 12, in second
place; and Solid Gold, No. 10, in third place. The
race time was clocked at 1:43.55.
5 0 2
16 20 24 39 42 46
Mega number
July 19 Mega Millions
14 25 27 38 58 6
Powerball
July 20 Powerball
10 13 18 22 23
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
7 9 2 4
Daily Four
5 7 7
Daily three evening
10 13 27 33 34 23
Mega number
July 20 Super Lotto Plus
Actress Gloria DeHaven is 88. Concert pianist Leon
Fleisher is 85. Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy is
77. Actor Ronny Cox is 75. Radio personality Don Imus is
73. Country singer Tony Joe White is 70. Rock singer David
Essex is 66. Actor Larry Manetti is 66. Singer-songwriter
John Hall is 65. Actress Belinda Montgomery is 63. Rock
musician Blair Thornton (Bachman Turner Overdrive) is 63.
Actress Edie McClurg is 62. Actress-writer Lydia Cornell is
60. Rock musician Martin Gore (Depeche Mode) is 52. Actor
Eriq Lasalle is 51. Rock musician Yuval Gabay is 50. Rock
musician Slash is 48. Rock musician Nick Menza is 45.
Dennis Farina
3
Tuesday • July 23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
UNINCORPORATED
SAN MATEO COUNTY
DUI. Awoman was arrested for driving while
intoxicated on North Cabrillo Highway
before 5:44 p.m. Wednesday, July 17.
Petty theft. A drill valued at $250 was
stolen from a vehicle on the 400 block of
Spruce Street before 9:55 a.m. Wednesday,
July 17.
Burglary. Three juveniles stole beer out of
a neighbor’s garage on the 500 block of
Highland Avenue before 12:35 a.m.
Wednesday, July 17.
Suspended license. A man was cited for
driving with a suspended license on the 700
block of Balboa Avenue in El Granada before
9:37 a.m. Tuesday, July 16.
DUI. A man was arrested for driving while
intoxicated on the 100 block of San Mateo
Road before 12:31 a.m. Tuesday, July 16.
DUI. A man was arrested for driving under
the influence on South Cabrillo Highway
before 10:36 p.m. Monday, July 15.
SAN MATEO
Disturbance. Aman was assaulted by three
men who had been doing drugs on the 500
block of East Third Avenue before 9:36 a.m.
Sunday, July 21.
Fraud. A debit card was stolen and fraudu-
lently used to make purchases on the 1900
block of Clinton Drive before 9:18 a.m.
Sunday, July 21.
Disturbance. Aperson was assaulted by a
co-worker on the 2400 block of Delaware
Street before 10:17 a.m. Saturday, July 20.
Theft. Aman snatched a person’s briefcase
on the 300 block of Baldwin Avenue before
10:04 a.m. Saturday, July 20.
Theft. Parts were stolen from a motorcycle
on the 100 block of El Camino Real before
9:20 a.m. Saturday, July 20.
Theft. A woman wearing medical scrubs
stole from a store on the 3000 block of
Bridgepointe Parkway before 8:08 p.m.
Friday, July 19.
Fraud. Someone passed a counterfeit $100
bill on the 100 block of East Third Avenue
before 4:57 p.m. Friday, July 19.
Disturbance. A disgruntled employee was
taken into custody at the Hillsdale Shopping
Center before 2:01 p.m. Friday, July 19.
MILLBRAE
Arre s t. A person was arrested for being
under the influence of a controlled substance
on the 200 block of Broadway before 7:19
p.m. Thursday, July 18.
Burglary. Avehicle was burglarized on the
first block of Rollins Road before 2 p.m.
Thursday, July 18.
Warrant arre s t . Aman was booked for hav-
ing an active warrant on the 600 block of
Hemlock Avenue before 10:04 a.m. Sunday,
July 14.
Burglary. Avehicle was burglarized on the
200 block of El Camino Real before 12:59
p.m. Sunday, July 14.
Petty theft. Someone reported a shoplifter
on the 800 block of Broadway before 5:25
p.m. Saturday, July 13.
Control l ed subst ance. A man was
booked for possessing a controlled sub-
stance and paraphernalia on the 500 block
of El Camino Real before 2:15 a.m.
Saturday, July 13.
Police reports
I’d rather have two in the bush
Aman was seen walking around holding
a dead pigeon on the 200 block of Park
Road in Burlingame before 12:38 p.m.
Tuesday, July 16.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Mateo County is now leasing both
Circle Star office towers to an offshoot of
Softbank, the telecom company which
owns a majority of Sprint Nextel and is
already committed to occupying one of the
San Carlos buildings.
In April, SoftBank Corp. contracted to
rent out the 103,948-square-foot tower at 1
Circle Star Way. On Tuesday morning, the
Board of Supervisors is expected to sign off
on a lease for its 103,904-square-foot sister
property, 2 Circle Star Way. The second
lease is estimated to bring in $3.25 million
annually after the county recoups its up-
front costs for improvements and $1.42
million broker fee. Taken with the first
building’s lease, the county stands to rake
in more than $6 million in yearly revenue.
“It is absolutely a good deal. With both
leases running concurrently for seven years
we should net out more than $30 million,”
said County Manager John Maltbie.
Softbank’s lease for 1 Circle Star included
right of refusal for the second building
which it exercised after another firm in June
signed a letter of intent to lease three floors.
Softbank countered with a proposal to lease
all floors minus the 44-square-foot control
room for the electronic billboard.
Maltbie said he understands the second
building will be populated not with
Softbank itself but other technology firms
with which it is aligned.
The 82-month lease expires in May 2020
with the option of extending it another 34
months with the rent adjusted to 100 percent
of the prevailing market rate.
The county purchased 1 and 2 Circle Star
Way, two four-story office buildings plus
parking, for $40 million two years ago as a
way to escape pricey leases for several
departments and relocate 911 dispatch.
However, officials ultimately decided leas-
ing the buildings was a more financially pru-
dent choice, particularly because making
Circle Star compliant for dispatch would
cost more than constructing an entirely new
building.
Maltbie said comparing whether the coun-
ty leasing the buildings or relocating its
own departments is the better financial deal
is “comparing apples and oranges.” Maltbie
said the original plan for the buildings was
conceived when the county had much greater
space needs but has since downsized.
“Our needs changed dramatically, ”
Maltbie said.
The lease with the county is actually
Starburst 1, Inc. a subsidiary of SoftBank
Corp. In October, SoftBank announced
plans to acquire 70 percent of Sprint Nextel
for $20.1 billion. CEO Masayoshi Son is
also rumored to have purchased a 9-acre
Woodside estate on Mountain Home Road
that at the time made it the most expensive
private residence on record in California and
potentially the nation.
The Board of Supervisors meets 9 a.m.
Tuesday, July 23 in Board Chambers, 400
Government Center, Redwood City.
County leasing both
Circle Star towers
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4
Tuesday • July 23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
5
Tuesday • July 23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
Turtle missing from PHS
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The Peninsula Humane Society is seeking the public’s
help to locate Pokey, a pet tortoise dropped off at the shel-
ter after hours after escaping from a Foster City yard and
who later wandered off.
Pokey, a brown African spurred tortoise, went missing
July 9 and his owner Audrey Throgmorton learned 10 days
later that another resident had found him but left him out-
side the shelter’s Airport Boulevard main entrance.
PHS/SPCA didn’t learn of the incident until July 19 when
Throgmorton contacted it. Shelter staff have searched the
property for days without luck.
Throgmorton has had Pokey since he hatched 18 years
ago. He is approximately 2 feet across and weighs 25-30
pounds. He is very gentle and does not bite but makes a
hissing sound and retreats into his shell when frightened.
He is used to people and being handled.
Throgmorton is offering a $100 reward for his safe return.
Anyone with information should contact Throgmorton at
audfang@yahoo.com or 619-9517.
South San Francisco Unified
School District Board member Liza
Normandy has pulled nomination papers
for one of the three four-year South San
Francisco City Council seats.
***
Redwood City Councilman Jeff Gee and former coun-
cilwoman Diane Howard qualified for the November ballot
by submitting enough signatures. Councilman John
Seybert has filed nomination papers with the city clerk.
Planning Commissioner Ernie Schmidt and business
owner Corrin Rankin have pulled papers.
***
Vice Mayor Charlie Broni t s ky has pulled papers to
run for another term on the Foster City Council. He joins
Gary Pollard and Bill Schwarz in the race so far.
A brown African spurred tortoise named Pokey has been
missing since July 9.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
El Camino Real is the area’s major
public transportation thoroughfare
and SamTrans has figured out a way to
better serve its customers along the
corridor by merging two routes into
one and have it run every 15 minutes.
Routes 390 and 391 will be replaced
by Route ECR starting Aug. 12.
The 390 and 391 routes are not inter-
changeable at some locations now and
each line runs only once every 40 min-
utes, according to a statement by
SamTrans spokeswoman Jayme
Ackemann.
With the new ECR line, every bus
goes to the same stops, so customers
do not have to worry about whether
they are on the right bus, according to
Ackemann’s statement.
El Camino Real provides the transit
agency with almost 50 percent of its
riders.
Route ECR began weekend operation
as a pilot project in August 2012 and
the service has proved to be popular
among weekend customers adding new
riders nearly every month since its
launch. Weekend ridership has
increased 4 percent since the route’s
launch last August.
The move is part of the SamTrans
Service Plan, which is a comprehen-
sive assessment of all bus service and
is intended to grow ridership and
improve efficiency.
Route ECR will not go into San
Francisco but every bus will go into
Palo Alto and run every 15 minutes.
“With ECR, customers can throw
away the schedule,” Deputy Chief
Executive Officer Chuck Harvey wrote
in a statement. “The service is intend-
ed to be ‘spontaneous use,’ which
means that a customer can walk out to
El Camino and expect a bus every 15
minutes without consulting a schedule.
Route ECR will take them anywhere
they want to go along the corridor. ”
Additional SSP changes will be
rolled out in January 2014.
Route ECR will provide service to all
Caltrain and Bay Area Rapid Transit
stations along the route — South San
Francisco and San Bruno BART can be
accessed via a short walk from El
Camino Real — as well as other key
transit centers served by routes 390
and 391, according to Ackemann’s
statement.
In other transit news:
Construction crews have begun
excavating and removing portions of
the road at the new San Bruno Caltrain
station to lower the streets and allow
for greater vehicle clearance under the
crossings. Once completed, the clear-
ance for each intersection will be
approximately 15 feet. The work will
require road closures on Angus, San
Mateo and San Bruno avenues between
now and Sept. 2.
SamTrans streamlines
El Camino Real service
“With ECR, customers can throw away the schedule....The
service is intended to be ‘spontaneous use,’ which means that
a customer can walk out to El Camino and expect a bus every
15 minutes without consulting a schedule.Route ECR will
take them anywhere they want to go along the corridor.”
— Deputy Chief Executive Officer Chuck Harvey
By Valeria Fernandez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NOGALES, Ariz. — U.S. authorities
have detained eight activists who asked
to be allowed to re-enter the United
States from Mexico on humanitarian
grounds in a protest against American
immigration policies.
Customs and Border Protection offi-
cials detained the activists Monday after
they filed applications for humanitarian
parole at the Nogales border crossing to
try to return to the United States.
CBPofficials said they could not com-
ment on specific cases but under immi-
gration law all applicants for admission
bear the burden of proof to establish
they are eligible to enter the country.
Domenic Powell, a spokesman for the
National Immigrant Youth Alliance, said
the group hadn’t been taken to a deten-
tion center as of Monday afternoon.
He said the alliance would continue to
pressure federal authorities to let the
eight activists “go back home” to the
U.S.
Margo Cowan, a lawyer for the group,
says she will file asylum applications
on behalf of the activists if they are
denied humanitarian parole.
On the U.S. side of the border, about
60 people waiting for the activists
chanted in Spanish, “No papers, no
fear.”
Three activists left the U.S. and trav-
eled to Mexico expressly to participate
in the protest. The group wants to draw
attention to the huge jump in deporta-
tions carried out under the Obama admin-
istration, and reaffirm their attachment
to the country where they were raised.
Youth activists detainedwhile trying to enter U.S.
6
Tuesday • July 23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Party buses stolen
Three party buses were stolen Saturday
night in Burlingame, according to police.
They were parked behind some office
buildings in a parking lot on the 400 block
of Airport Boulevard and were yet to be
recovered by yesterday afternoon,
Burlingame police Sgt. Don Shepley told
the Daily Journal.
The buses are owned by Fremont-based
Empire Elite Limo, which has a corporate
office down the road from where the buses
were stolen.
Neck slasher, accomplice arrested
Two men are in custody following a brawl
in San Carlos Thursday morning that put a
22-year-old Foster City
resident in the hospital
with a sliced neck,
according to the San
Mateo County Sheriff’s
Office.
The altercation took
place at about 3:30 a.m.
on the 400 block of
Laurel Avenue.
Arrested were Redwood
City resident Jason
Spears, 20, and San
Carlos resident Brenden
Hobson, 22.
Hobson allegedly
sliced the victim’s neck
with a letter opener
before Spears allegedly
punched him in the face,
according to the Sheriff’s
Office.
Charges include being
drunk in public, battery and assault with a
deadly weapon.
Spears was arrested the morning of the
incident but Hobson fled the scene. He
turned himself over to police Sunday night,
according to the Sheriff’s Office.
Man killed trying to help I-280 crash
victims ID’d as Redwood City resident
Aman who was killed while attempting to
help crash victims on Interstate 280 early
Sunday morning has been identified by the
San Mateo County Coroner’s Office as 32-
year-old Redwood City resident Kirk
Peterson.
The crash was reported north of Woodside
Road at about 2:40 a.m.
Apreliminary investigation indicated that
the 25-year-old driver of a black Honda,
Vallejo resident Charles Miranda, allowed
his car to clip the rear of a Toyota SUV, caus-
ing the Toyota to go out of control and
strike the center divider, California
Highway Patrol Officer Art Montiel said.
Peterson saw the crash and pulled over to
the road’s right shoulder in his Jeep, then
attempted to run across southbound lanes to
assist the victims. He was struck and killed
by an oncoming Infiniti SUV, Montiel said.
Two people in the SUV suffered minor
injuries.
Miranda has been charged with driving
under the influence causing bodily injury
and was in court Monday afternoon, accord-
ing to the San Mateo County District
Attorney’s Office.
Anyone who might have witnessed the
incident should call the CHP at 369-6261.
Man nabbed in Daly City after
robbing Burlingame bank
A man was arrested after robbing a
Burlingame bank late Monday morning, a
police sergeant said.
The man went into a bank branch in the
1100 block of Broadway just before noon,
said he had a gun and demanded money from
a teller, Burlingame police Sgt. Don
Shepley said. AWells Fargo branch is locat-
ed in the block.
The suspect took cash and left the bank
on foot.
Adescription of the robber was broadcast
to law enforcement agencies in the region,
and he was later detained by Daly City
police in that city and then taken into cus-
tody by Burlingame police, Shepley said.
No injuries were reported during the rob-
bery and a gun was never seen, Shepley
said.
Palo Alto man dies, wife
injured in Lake Tahoe plane crash
A Palo Alto man died and his wife was
injured in a plane accident in Lake Tahoe
Monday morning, authorities said.
Asingle-engine Mooney M20 crashed in
a wooded area less than a mile east the Lake
Tahoe Airport in South Lake Tahoe after tak-
ing off at 11:15 a.m., Federal Aviation
Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said.
Two people were on board.
Aman died in the crash, while the man’s
wife suffered moderate injuries and was
taken to a hospital in Reno, El Dorado
County sheriff’s Lt. Pete Van Arnum told
reporters at the scene.
Van Arnum identified the couple as Steven
and Karen Lefton.
Karen Lefton had been trapped in the
plane when an off-duty nurse came upon the
crash while walking her dog in the area, he
said.
The nurse provided aid to the injured
woman and alerted authorities.
The FAA and the National Transportation
Safety Board are investigating the accident.
I
n April, Sequoia
Hi gh School
was awarded a
$250,000 grant to con-
tinue SAFE (Sequoia
A f t e r s c h o o l
F o c u s e d
Enrichment) program
for next year and beyond until 2019-20.
SAFE provides tutoring (math, English,
Spanish), homework assistance for all sub-
jects, and enrichment (chess, culinary arts,
ceramics, advanced dance, peer mediation,
physical conditioning, horsemanship, pad-
dling, etc. classes after school primarily for
Ti t l e I students, but all students are wel-
come.
***
Mercy High School Burlingame sen-
ior Grace Osborne recently won the Serra
International Club Essay Award.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school news. It
is compiled by education reporter Angela Swartz.
You can contact her at (650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or
at angela@smdailyjournal.com.
Local briefs
Jason Spears
Brenden
Hobson
Jack Dugoni, of Our Lady of Angels, the 2013 Burlingame Citywide Spelling Bee Champion
speller, with Elaine Chen from Lincoln Elementary, right, and third place winner Rebekah
Coleman from McKinley Elementary. Dugoni and his teammates, Brendan Bhatnagar and
Jack Hansen, gave Our Lady of Angels the privilege of keeping the Lions Trophy this year.The
2013 Burlingame Citywide Spelling Bee was held at the Lions Hall April 17.The seven elementary
schools in Burlingame sent a team of three students to represent their school in the competition.
Students from Franklin, Lincoln, McKinley, Roosevelt,Washington, Our Lady of Angels and St.
Catherine of Siena competed. Wordmaster Leonard Froomin presented the words to the
students and, if requested, a definition, the derivation, and its use in a sentence. The student
team from Our Lady of Angels prevailed this year. The two words that champion Dugoni
needed to spell to win were “collaborate”and “condense.”
LOCAL/NATION 7
Tuesday • July 23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Jeff Shuttleworth
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
Less than two weeks before BARTwork-
ers could resume their strike, union lead-
ers alleged Monday that management’s
chief negotiator has a long history of
engaging in hardball tactics and accused
him of engaging in unfair bargai ni ng.
Roxanne Sanchez, the president of
Service International Union Local 1021,
which represents 1,430 mechanics, cus-
todians and clerical workers, said Thomas
Hock and his company, Professional
Transit Management, have been named in
47 complaints with the National Labor
Relations Board since 2001 and he’s been
involved in negotiations that have result-
ed in seven transit strikes since 2005.
Speaking at a news conference outside
the Caltrans building in Oakland, where
contract talks have been taking place,
Sanchez alleged that Hock has engaged in
“surface bargaining,” which she said is a
technique designed not to make progress
and to create a public backlash against
BART workers.
Sanchez also alleged that Hock is
unavailable for 10 of the 14 days remain-
ing before the contract for BART employ-
ees expires on Aug. 4 and called for BART
General Manager Grace Crunican or
another top executive to come to the bar-
gaining table to try to reach an agree-
ment.
However, Crunican said she still sup-
ports Hock because “he’s a great negotia-
tor who has settled a lot of contracts.”
She said Hock has negotiated more than
400 labor contracts since 1972 and in
that time only two unfair labor practice
charges alleging bad faith bargai ni ng
have been filed against him.
Crunican said one of those complaints
was withdrawn by the union that filed it
and in the second case there was no find-
ing of bad faith bargai ni ng.
Crunican also alleged that SEIU nego-
tiators haven’t been at the bargaining
table “40 percent of the time” since con-
tract talks began on April 1.
The general manager said she’s not at
the bargaining table every day but she’s
fully informed about the talks and is
available at all times.
Members of SEIU Local 1021 and mem-
bers of Amalgamated Transit Union Local
1555, which represents 945 station
agents, train operators and clerical work-
ers, went on strike on July 1 but late on
July 4 they agreed to extend their previ-
ous contract for 30 days, until Aug. 4, and
return to work the afternoon of July 5.
The four-and-a-half day strike clogged
local highways and caused commuting
headaches for Bay Area residents.
BART management said state mediators
who brokered the 30-day contract exten-
sion were informed that Hock wouldn’t be
available from July 24 to July 28 and
agreed there would still be ample time to
negotiate a contract.
The key issues in the contract talks are
wages, employee contributions for health
care and retirement costs, and safety.
Among those who joined Sanchez in
criticizing Hock were Josie Mooney, one
of SEIU Local 1021’s lead negotiators,
and ATU Local 1555 spokesman Leo Ruiz.
Sanchez said “there’s still a huge divide
between the parties and very serious dif-
ferences at this late date.”
But Crunican was more hopeful that a
settlement can still be reached, saying,
“There are still two weeks to go and that’s
a good amount of time.”
She said, “We’re here to get a settle-
ment.”
Labor leaders accuse BART
negotiator of hardball tactics
By Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — If President Barack
Obama’s new focus on the economy sounds
familiar, that’s because he’s done it before.
Since the first year of his presidency,
Obama has been launching — and re-launch-
ing — initiatives on the economy. Some
came with new policy proposals, others with
catchy slogans.
Remember 2011’s “Winning the Future”
campaign? Or the “We Can’t Wait” initiatives
that followed later that year? Just a few
months ago, Obama was headlining the
“Middle Class Jobs and Opportunity Tour.”
So far there’s no slogan attached to the
White House’s latest initiative, which kicks
off Wednesday in Galesburg, Ill. The presi-
dent’s advisers are billing his remarks as a
major address on the economy, though no
new initiatives are expected to be announced.
“I’m going to talk about where we need to
go from here, how we need to put behind us
the distractions and the phony debates and
nonsense that somehow passes for politics
these days, and get back to basics,” Obama
said Monday as he addressed Organizing for
Action, the non-profit group backing his
agenda.
Obama said Wednesday’s speech would
kick off a months-long effort to refocus on
the economy and start exploring “some big
and bold ideas” — some he’s offered previ-
ously, and some new ones, too. Aides said
those fresh policy proposals would come in a
series of follow-up speeches planned through
September, most of which will be narrowly
targeted on issues like housing, retirement
security and expanding access to education.
White House spokesman Jay Carney said
Obama’s repeated attempts to orient his pub-
lic agenda on the economy should serve as a
reminder that “the president has always been
focused on these issues.”
“That doesn’t mean we don’t need to con-
tinue to remind people that improving the
economic situation in America is the princi-
ple reason why our fellow citizens elect and
send people to Washington,” Carney said.
But congressional Republicans, who con-
tinue to be a roadblock for many of the pres-
ident’s economic proposals, dismissed the
White House’s new public relations push as a
retread of old ideas.
“We’ve seen this song and dance before,”
said Brendan Buck, a spokesman for House
Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio. “Whether
it’s his health care law, his job-destroying
energy policies, or the mountain of regula-
tions piling up, it’s the president’s own poli-
cies that are responsible for this new normal
of weak economic growth and high unem-
ployment.”
Obama’s latest economic
push has a familiar feel
REUTERS
Barack Obama delivers remarks at an Organizing for Action dinner in Washington, D.C.
WORLD 8
Tuesday • July 23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
by
Special:
4 Speakers
By Sylvia Hui and Gregory Katz
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON — Champagne bottles
popped and shouts of “Hip! Hip!
Hooray!” erupted outside
Buckingham Palace on Monday as
Britain wel-
comed the birth
of Prince
William and his
wife Kate’s first
child, a boy who
is now third in
line to the
British throne.
Hundreds of
Britons and
tourists broke
into song and
dance outside the
palace gates as
o f f i c i a l s
announced that
the future king
was born at 4:24
p.m., weighing
8 pounds, 6
ounces (3.75
kilograms), at
central London’s St. Mary’s
Hospital — the same place where
William and his brother Harry were
born three decades ago.
The imminent arrival of the royal
baby was the subject of endless
speculation on social media and
was covered for days on live televi-
sion around the world, but in the
end the royal family managed to
keep it a remarkably private affair.
In line with royal tradition, a
terse statement announced only the
time of birth, the infant’s gender
and that mother and child were
doing well. It gave no information
about the baby’s name, and officials
would say only that a name would
be announced “in due course.”
“Her Royal Highness and her
child are both doing well and will
remain in hospital overnight,” it
said. William also issued a brief
statement, saying “we could not be
happier.”
Officials said William, who was
by his wife’s side during the birth,
would also spend the night in the
hospital.
William’s press aides had talked
about preserving Kate’s “dignity”
throughout the pregnancy, and the
way the birth was handled showed
that the palace’s impressive stage-
craft could give the royals a bubble
of privacy even in the age of Twitter
and 24-hour news broadcasts.
Just before 6 a.m., 31-year-old
Kate, also known as the Duchess of
Cambridge, entered the hospital
through a side door, avoiding the
mass of journalists camped outside.
Officials did not announce she was
hospitalized until more than an
hour later.
Later, as the world media gathered
outside filled hours of airtime with
speculation, the baby’s birth went
unannounced for nearly four hours,
allowing the royal couple the pri-
vate time they needed to act like a
regular family — a goal 31-year-old
William has cherished.
He was able to tell his father,
Prince Charles, and grandmother,
Queen Elizabeth II, about the birth
and enjoy his wife’s company with-
out having to cope with the over-
whelming media and public desire
for information.
By nightfall, the public still
knew very few details, but most
people seemed satisfied with the
day’s events. London’s landmarks,
including the London Eye, lit up in
the national colors of red, white and
blue, and the city had a party atmos-
phere unmatched since last sum-
mer’s Olympics.
Outside the hospital, a man
dressed as a town crier in traditional
robes and an extravagant feathered
hat shouted the news and rang a
bell.
Acar carrying the announcement
drove from the hospital to the
palace, where the news was greeted
with shrieks of “It’s a boy!” and
strains of “For He’s a Jolly Good
Fellow.” A large crowd rushed
against the palace fences to catch a
glimpse of an ornate, gilded easel
displaying a small bulletin formal-
ly announcing the news.
The framed sheet of paper became
the target of a thousand camera
flashes as people thrust their smart-
phones through the railings. Hours
after the initial announcement,
crowds were still surging forward to
get near the easel. Some placed
presents and bouquets in front of
the palace, while others waved
Union Jack flags and partied on the
streets to celebrate.
It’s a boy! U.K.’s Kate gives birth to royal heir
HOMEBIRTHING
Most peopletakeahospital birthfor grantedthese
days, but just a few decades ago the custom
among royals — as it was among commoners —
was to give birth at home.
Queen Elizabeth II was born at 17 Bruton Street in
London,a private family home,and she gave birth
to her sons Charles, Andrew and Edward in
Buckingham Palace. Her only daughter, Princess
Anne, was born at Clarence House, also a royal
property.
That changed by the 1980s,when Princes William
and Harry were both born at the private Lindo
Wing of St. Mary’s hospital in central London.
William and Kate’s first child — a prince — was
born Monday in the very same wing.
HOMESCHOOLING
For a long time, royals were educated in private.
The queen was taught at home by her father,
tutors and governesses, and never mingled with
commoners at a school, college or university.
Charles was the first royal heir to have gone to
school, and William and Kate, who were both
educated at independent schools, will doubtless
have their son do the same.
DADSINTHEDELIVERYROOM
William said he would be there with Kate when
she gave birth, in line with the expectations of
many modern parents — and he delivered on
that promise. He follows in the footsteps of his
father, Charles, who declared how much he
relished being in the delivery room in a letter to
his godmother, Patricia Brabourne.
“I am so thankful I was beside Diana’s bedside the
whole time because by the end of the day I really
felt as though I’d shared deeply in the process of
birth,”Charles wrote shortly after William’s birth.
Things were quite different when Charles was
born. When the queen (then Princess Elizabeth)
went into labor,her husband,Prince Philip,was off
playingsquashinthepalace—out of restlessness,
not indifference, noted Charles’ biographer
Jonathan Dimbleby.
OFFICIALINTRUDERS
In the early 1900s — and probably before —
custom dictated that government officials should
be present when a royal was born. When the
queen was born in 1926, for example, the home
secretary was present among the doctors.
The current home secretary,Theresa May,said the
centuries-old tradition required the official to
attend “as evidence that it was really a royal birth
and the baby hadn’t been smuggled in.”
Fortunatelyfor Kate—thepracticewasabolished
years ago by George VI.
The custom is thought to have been linked to the
so-called “warming pan plot” of 1688, when
rumors swirled that the supposed child of James
II was sneaked into the delivery room in a long-
handledbed-warmingpan.Some40to60people
were said to have dropped in to witness the birth.
HOWMANYNAMES?
Now that the baby’s gender is known,the biggest
guessing game surrounding the royal birth is the
name. Most royals have three to four first names,
usually in a combination that honors previous
monarchs or relatives. The queen’s full name is
Elizabeth Alexandra Mary,after her mother,great-
grandmother and grandmother,and William’s full
name is William Arthur Philip Louis.
The bookmakers had the shortest odds on
Alexandra, Charlotte, Elizabeth for a girl, and
George or James for a boy. It could take a while
for the public to find out the future king’s name.
When William was born,it took a full week before
his name was announced.
ANDTHELASTNAME?
The royals don’t require a surname. The correct
title when referring to the new prince will be His
Royal Highness Prince (name) of Cambridge. If
required,current membersof theroyal household
may use Mountbatten-Windsor, the surname
adopted in 1960 for all of the queen’s children.
(That name combines Windsor, the family name
adoptedbyKingGeorgeVin1917toreplaceSaxe-
Coburg-Gotha, and Prince Philip’s family name,
Mountbatten).
Prince William, the heir of Charles, the Prince of
Wales,isknownasFlight Lt.Waleswhenonmilitary
duty.
CHRISTENING
Royal babiestendtobeofficiallychristenedseveral
days to weeks after they are born, and there are a
few potential places this could take place for the
new baby.
The queen was christened in the private chapel at
Buckingham Palace, while both William and his
father Charles were christened in the palace’s
Music Room.
APLAINOLDEASELVS. TWITTER
The traditional way the palace announces a royal
baby’s birth to the world is as quaint as it gets: A
messenger with the news travels by car from the
hospital toBuckinghamPalace,carryingapieceof
paper detailing the infant’s gender, weight and
time of birth. The bulletin is then posted on a
wooden easel on the palace’s forecourt for
everyone to see.
This time, however, the Palace announced the
news by press release.
In the old days the announcement was made to
the wider public by a reader on radio, but today
that’s replaced by the Internet and social media:
After the announcement was made, officials
postedthenewsonTwitter tomillionsof followers
worldwide.
TONANNYORNOT
William and Kate have not made any public
announcements about hiring a nanny to help
them bring up their son.Many expect the couple
to be more hands-on parents than earlier
generations of royals, and some have speculated
that because of the couple’s close ties with Kate’s
parents, Michael and Carole Middleton will also
have a big role in helping Kate with the baby.
Nannies have always been central to bringing up
royal babies. Charles was famously close to his
nannies, and William and Harry also enjoyed a
bondwiththeir former nannyTiggyLegge-Bourke
— who was so well known that she herself
frequently appeared in the news.
AWELCOMEWITHABANG
Some things don’t really change.A 62-gun salute
from the Tower of London and a 41-gun salute
fromGreenPark,near BuckinghamPalace,wereto
welcome the baby into the world with a bang,
just as it did when previous royals were born.
REUTERS
Crowds of people try to look at a notice formally announcing the birth of a son to Britain’s Prince William and
Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, placed in the forecourt of Buckingham Palace.
Ten royal baby traditions to know
Prince William
Duchess of
Cambridge
OPINION 9
Tuesday • July 23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
By John L. Maltbie
T
he 21st century allows everyone
with an Internet connection or a
smartphone to access thousands
of public records and voice an opinion.
Have a strong feeling about a local issue?
Tweet it, Facebook it or Pin it. We’ll get
i t .
Online access builds upon long-estab-
lished laws and codes governing open
meetings and open data. The Brown Act
requires that the public’s business be done
in public. The California Public Records
Act and the federal Freedom of
Information Act give you the right to
access information about your local, state
and federal governments.
State law requires that every candidate
for elected office and holders of key posi-
tions complete and file publicly available
disclosure statements with investments,
sources of income, property holdings and
other information. Openness and trans-
parency are the foundations of democracy.
So you might be surprised to learn that
one of the most potentially powerful civil
institutions in California is cloaked in a
veil of secrecy: the civil grand jury.
The civil grand jury consists of 19 men
and women who look into the functions of
local government and, ideally, root out
inefficiency or corruption. Yet they per-
form this watchdog function behind solid-
ly closed doors. They are chosen in secret,
meet in secret, question witnesses in
secret, deliberate in secret.
This culture of secrecy undermines the
grand jury’s credibility and effectiveness.
In its most recent report on the county’s
use of excess Educational Revenue
Augmentation Funds, the civil grand jury
demonstrates an abysmal lack of under-
standing of the principles and practices of
budgeting and financial management.
Either the grand jury was uninformed or
misinformed regarding
the county’s use of this
funding source. Of
course we’ll never know
because we’ll never
learn about their deliber-
ations.
What’s the issue? The
civil grand jury criti-
cized the county’s budg-
eting practices, coming to the bizarre
conclusion the county is somehow not
fully accounting for all revenue.
Had the civil grand jury taken the time
to read its own 2012 fiscal year audit
report, it would have discovered 10 sepa-
rate references to the use of excess ERAF
as well as a separate paragraph in the con-
troller’s accompanying message. The
issue has been thoroughly discussed at
meetings of the Board of Supervisors
(archived online by video and text) and is
a matter of public record which the jury
was free to peruse had it chosen to do so.
(What is excess ERAF? In a nutshell, the
county and local cities get back some of
their property tax revenue used by the
state to meet its obligation to fund local
schools when this revenue is in excess of
the amount needed by the schools.
These additional funds are called excess
ERAF. As property tax revenue and
school’s needs change from year to year,
the county budgets — plans for — about
half of what it expects to receive in excess
ERAF. The other half is used for reserves
or other one-time purposes.)
The civil grand jury can provide a valu-
able service in the investigation of gov-
ernment operations. To be effective, the
civil grand jury must conduct itself and
produce reports that are professional,
accurate and fair. To gauge these things,
the public should know something about
the civil grand jury and its business. At a
minimum, the applications for grand juror
should be made public — the public has a
right to know who’s conducting business
on behalf of the public.
Like office holders and key officials,
grand jurors should be required to fill out
financial disclosure forms and a conflict-
of-interest statement. How else is the pub-
lic going to know if conclusions reached
by the civil grand jury are a result of bias-
es or even the financial interests of cer-
tain jurors?
The civil grand jury does not need a
cloak of secrecy to conducts its work. The
U.S. Congress and the California
Legislature both have investigative func-
tions yet they manage to conduct their
business in public. Even such weighty
matters as the appointment of a Supreme
Court justice or the impeachment of the
president of the United States are conduct-
ed in public. Criminal grand juries issue a
transcript — and it deals with the very
freedom of individuals, not accounting
functions.
San Mateo County is one of only two of
California’s 58 counties with AAAcredit
ratings from the nation’s two largest rat-
ings firms. Our controller and Office of
Budget and Performance have received
numerous awards for excellence in finan-
cial reporting. We take a conservative
approach to budgeting uncertain funding
sources, and few sources are more uncer-
tain than excess ERAF. In fact, the gover-
nor’s budget could strip San Mateo County
of tens of millions of dollars in excess
ERAF in its latest budget.
Good thing we didn’t budget all of it.
John Maltbie is the county manager for San
Mateo County.
President Obama
Editor,
In his address to the nation last week
following the verdict in the Trayvon
Martin-George Zimmerman trial, President
Obama has asked us all to think about
what we have learned. The fact that there
has been such a passionate reaction to the
verdict, and the president’s subsequent
remarks, shows how our country continues
to wrestle with the entire milieu of race,
history, education, opportunity, justice
and how do we make all this work? Our
president brings an important perspective
to all these issues and his words resonate,
not just because he is the president, but
because he has spoken to us with the faith
and hope of a simple American citizen.
Michael Traynor
Burlingame
Fatwa
Editor,
Letter writer Patricia Gray has much
more faith in the Supreme Leader of Iran
than I do (“Jackie Speier’s town hall meet-
ing” in the July 19 edition of the Daily
Journal).
Iran would not be the first Islamic coun-
try to have nuclear weapons. Pakistan has
had them for years and I don’t believe that
they are any less devout than the Iranian
mullahs. No responsible person wants a
war with Iran. However, it is the height of
irresponsibility to base our security on a
fatwa. Iran is aiding the Syrian govern-
ment, fomenting trouble in Lebanon and
arming Hamas in Gaza. Do we really want
to take a chance and let them get nuclear
weapons? I hope not and I hope that they
will understand that a we will not tolerate
a terrorist state like Iran to have the ulti-
mate in weapons of mass destruction.
Gil Stein
Aptos
Pull back curtain on grand jury secrecy
Uniformly
attractive
N
ext time a California Highway
Patrol Officer asks if I know why I
was pulled over, I have the perfect
answer.
“It’s so I can check
our your sexy uni-
form!”
Let the officer mull
that over while I con-
template the speeding
or cellphone ticket I’m
sure I’ll still receive.
Perhaps there can still
be frisking.
Aperson in just
about any uniform has long made many a
person go weak in the knees although
frankly those associated with say French fry
technician or orderly don’t quite carry the
same aesthetic quality as a sooty-faced fire-
fighter or white-capped nurse. But for those
seeking a uniform that makes others hope
they’re packing a fully-loaded weapon, little
beats law enforcement. How else to explain
the penchant for police officer costumes by
Magic Mike and Village People wannabes?
Now, that long-held stereotype has moved
beyond sloshy bachelorette parties and
best-selling pin-up calendars because
www.uniformdating.com has confirmed it is
true. This site is sort of like eHarmony
meets Aramark. Out of 1,000 people sur-
veyed, California Highway Patrol ranks
number one for appealing law enforcement
uniforms. Maybe the agency should change
its name to the California Hotness Patrol.
The blue and khaki ensemble beat out
patrols in Texas, New York, Florida and
Massachusetts which is no small feat when
you consider that (and this is verbatim from
the press release) “America is home to some
of the most iconic and may we add lust-
inducing cop uniforms in the world.” And
apparently, the majority of those with a soft
spot for uniforms is still specifically long-
ing for the days of Ponch and Jon.
The PR machine behind the dating site
has a different spin on the outcome, con-
cluding that the CHP uniform “in lighter
colours is seen to be less threatening than
the more traditional paramilitary blacks and
blues of forces such as the NYPD.” This
statement proves several things. First, the
company’s flak is obviously British which
explains why any American force is alluring
enough to cross the pond. Bobbies might
be polite, help pedestrians across the street
and come equipped with an accent but the
helmet and club does little in the way to
induce toe curling and hair flipping. On the
other hand, this pat explanation also means
SWATmembers are out of luck at making the
masses want to, ahem, cop a feel.
Uniformdating.com aficionados want their
law enforcement confident but not aggres-
sive, authoritative but not intimidating. In
fact, the public relations firm goes on to say
the California Highway Patrol outfit sug-
gests that people want a partner who is
“warm” and “easygoing.” Because isn’t that
what you immediately think when pulled
over — hey, that officer approaching with
the ticket book in hand appears oh so warm
and easygoing!
The company further notes that all top-
ranked state forces wear hats which indicates
that, and again I’m not making this up,
“police in hats — especially traditional hats
such as the Smokey Bear — are seen to have
more authority.” In other words, all a person
needs is the right headgear to jump-start
anybody’s internal forest fire.
Yet, www.uniformdating.com is shooting
itself in the foot with this proclamation
because those looking for a little love — or
even the chance to earn a one-night badge
of dishonor — should eschew the bars, the
churches and most certainly the website.
Love is in the air and lust is on the road so
get thee to the highway and put the pedal to
the metal. And when pulled over? Just claim
you’re trying out speed dating.
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat”
runs every Tuesday and Thursday. She can be
reached by email: michelle@smdailyjour-
nal.com or by phone (650) 344-5200 ext.
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BUSINESS 10
Tuesday • July 23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 15,545.55 +1.81 10-Yr Bond 2.488 -0.003
Nasdaq3,600.39 +12.77 Oil (per barrel) 106.71
S&P 500 1,695.53 3.44 Gold 1,334.60
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Monday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
McDonald’s Corp., down $2.69 at $97.58
The hamburger chain said that its second-quarter profit rose 4 percent
but its results fell short of Wall Street expectations.
Kinross Gold Corp., up 43 cents at $5.57
Shares of the Canadian gold and silver mining company rose as the price
of gold climbed above $1,300 an ounce.
Tower International Inc., down $3.15 at $19.85
The auto parts maker posted a second-quarter loss and said its largest
stakeholder plans to sell 6 million shares in a public offering.
Nasdaq
Yahoo Inc., down $1.25 at $27.86
Activist investor Dan Loeb and two other directors nominated by his
hedge fund are leaving the Internet company’s board of directors.
DreamWorks Animation SKG Inc., down $1.13 at $23.77
Shares of the animation studio dropped after its new movie,“Turbo,”
had a weak debut weekend at the box office.
Federal-Mogul Corp., up $3.27 at $13.95
The auto parts supplier said that it returned to profitability in the second
quarter thanks to cost cutting.
Carmike Cinemas Inc., down 89 cents at $18.89
The movie theater operator reported second-quarter net results that fell
short of what Wall Street analysts expected.
Himax Technologies Inc., up $1.57 at $6.74
Google Inc. is investing in Himax, which makes chips used in Google
Glass, the Internet search company’s eyeglass-enabled devices.
Big movers
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Mining companies
and banks helped the stock market
overcome some disappointing quarter-
ly performances on Monday.
Poor second-quarter results from a
handful of large U.S. companies
weighed on stocks. McDonald’s Corp.
fell after its results missed expecta-
tions and it warned of a tough year
ahead. Media company Gannett
dropped after its revenue fell short of
financial analysts’ expectations.
But gold and copper prices boosted
mining companies, and that helped
nudge the market to another all-time
high.
Investors are looking ahead a busy
week of corporate earnings. More than
150 companies in the Standard &
Poor’s 500 stock index are reporting
quarterly earnings over the next four
days.
For the most part, corporations have
reported results that have beaten ana-
lysts’ expectations, though there have
been some big letdowns. On Friday,
Microsoft plunged after it reported
declining revenue and a big write-off
on its new tablet computer. Coca-Cola
slumped last Tuesday after the compa-
ny said it sold fewer soft drinks in
North America.
“Earnings are not stellar,” said Brad
Reynolds, chief investment officer at
investment adviser LJPR. “It just
seems that the market is OK with
that.”
Investors were more than OK with
gold Monday. Its price climbed above
$1,300 for first time in a month, giv-
ing mining stocks a big lift.
Gold gained $43.10, or 3.3 percent,
to $1,336 an ounce. Copper rose 4
cents, or 1.3 percent, to $3.19 per
pound.
Among mining companies,
Newmont Mining rose $1.66, or 5.8
percent, to $30.35. Freeport-
McMoran Copper & Gold gained 59
cents, or 2.1 percent, to $29.15.
Gold plunged last month because
investors thought the Federal Reserve
was close to ending its economic stim-
ulus. That pushed up interest rates. And
when rates rise, it costs investors
more to hang onto gold, which pays
no interest.
But with the Fed now willing to con-
tinue the stimulus, rates are falling.
The S&P 500 index rose three
points, or 0.2 percent, to 1,695.53 on
Monday. The index is at an all-time
high, though trading volumes were
lower than average.
Five of the 10 industry group in the
S&P 500 rose. Gains were led by finan-
cial companies, which have posted
some of the strongest earnings for the
quarter so far. They are expected to
report average earnings growth of 23
percent. Bank of America added 17
cents, or 1.2 percent, to $14.92.
The Dow Jones industrial average
rose nearly 1.8 points, or 0.01 per-
cent, to 15,545.55. The slump in
McDonald’s stock weighed on the
index. The restaurant chain’s stock fell
$2.69, or 2.7 percent, to $97.58.
The Nasdaq composite climbed
12.77 points, or 0.4 percent, to
3,600.39.
One sector that struggled was home-
builders. Sales of previously occupied
homes slipped in June to an annual rate
of 5.08 million, the National
Association of Realtors said Monday.
As a result, Pulte Group fell 22 cents,
or 1.1 percent, to $19.14. Lennar fell
73 cents, or 2.1 percent to $34.80.
The stock market has surged in July
following a tough June. Fed Chairman
Ben Bernanke spooked investors on
June 19, when he seemed to signal that
the Fed’s tapering of bond purchases
would start later this year. Then, after a
couple of weeks of panic in stock and
bond markets, Bernanke dialed things
back on July 10. That’s when he told
the National Bureau of Economic
Research, in a speech in Cambridge,
Mass., that the economy still needed
help from the Fed’s low rates.
S&P edges higher, helped by gold miners
By Christopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — U.S. sales of previously
occupied homes slipped in June to a season-
ally adjusted annual rate of 5.08 million but
remain near a 3 1/2-year high.
The National Association of Realtors said
Monday that sales fell 1.2 percent last
month from an annual rate of 5.14 million in
May. The NAR revised down May’s sales, but
they were still the highest since November
2009.
Despite last month’s dip, home sales have
surged 15.2 percent from a year ago. Sales
have recovered since early last year, buoyed
by job gains and low mortgage rates.
Still, mortgage rates have surged in recent
weeks over concern that the Federal Reserve
could slow its bond-buying programs later
this year. The Fed’s bond purchases have
helped keep long-term mortgage and other
rates low.
Higher mortgage rates slowed sales last
month of higher-priced homes in states such
as California and New York, the Realtors
group said.
The average rate on a 30-year fixed mort-
gage leapt to 4.46 percent by the end of June
from 3.81 percent at the end of May. The rate
was 4.37 percent last week.
That rate increase could hamper sales in
coming months, economists said. But most
expect housing to continue to recover,
though at a slower pace.
“There’s little doubt the housing market
slowed in the summer as mortgage rates
rose,” Dan Greenhaus, chief global strategist
at BTIG LLC, an institutional brokerage,
said in a note to clients. “Housing is still
expected to grow and contribute to economic
output. It just may not be at the pace we’ve
seen of late.”
Sales of previously occupied homes in
June reflect contracts that were mostly
signed in April and May, when mortgage
rates were lower. Rising rates can cause some
signed contracts to fall through if buyers no
longer qualify for mortgages at higher rates.
The one factor that’s likely most holding
back sales is a limited supply of homes
available. Though more sellers put their
homes on the market in June, the supply
remained unusually low — nearly 8 percent
less than a year ago.
At the current sales pace, the number of
homes for sale would be exhausted in 5.2
months. That’s below the six months’ sup-
ply that’s consistent with a healthy housing
market.
U.S. home sales dip but remain near 3 1/2-year high
By Michael Liedtke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Netflix’s revival of
the comedy series “Arrested Development”
didn’t reel in as many subscribers to the
Internet video service as Wall Street had
hoped, turning a solid second-quarter earn-
ings report into a reality check.
Even though Netflix’s profit more than
quadrupled, the report released Monday
flopped among investors because it didn’t
live up to the lofty expectations propelling
the company’s high-flying stock. The
shares have nearly tripled since the begin-
ning of the year, raising the pressure on
Netflix Inc. to deliver specular numbers.
That didn’t’ happen during the three
months ending in June, despite the much-
anticipated return of “Arrested
Development” after a seven-year absence.
Netflix’s stock slid $15.11, or 5.8 percent,
to $246.80 in extended trading after the
numbers came out.
“It was a very good quarter, by most stan-
dards, but that doesn’t cut it when your stock
has risen by 200 percent,” said Pacific Crest
analyst Andy Hargeaves.
Netflix picked up 630,000 U.S. sub-
scribers during the three months ending in
June. That performance was slightly above
the mid-range target set by Netflix Inc.’s
management in April. But the Los Gatos,
Calif., company also had predicted it might
end the period with as many as 880,000
more subscribers — a goal that many
investors evidently were hoping would be
reached.
Expectations had been raised by the
Memorial Day weekend release of 15 new
“Arrested Development” episodes. The com-
edy starring Jason Bateman and Michael
Cera had built a cult following before its
cancellation by the Fox network in 2006,
after three seasons.
In a letter to shareholders, Netflix CEO
Reed Hastings credited “Arrested
Development” for providing a “small but
noticeable bump” in subscribers. He praised
the company for being able to add more sub-
scribers during the first half of this year than
it did last year, despite intensifying compe-
tition from other Internet video services run
by Amazon.com Inc. and Hulu.
Netflix has added 2.7 million subscribers
so far this year, up from 2.5 million at the
same time last year.
Netflix’s 2Q report flops despite soaring earnings
By Michael Liedtke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Apple’s latest quar-
terly results are likely to illustrate why
investors are clamoring for the maker of the
iPhone and the iPad to come out with anoth-
er trend-setting device.
The report, due out after the stock market
closes Tuesday, is expected to show that
Apple Inc. is making less money as more
customers buy its lower-priced iPhones and
iPads instead of the top-of-the-line models.
Other consumers increasingly are bypass-
ing Apple products altogether as smart-
phones and tablet computers running
Google’s Android software win more fans.
Those dynamics have changed the way
that Wall Street — and even parts of Main
Street — view Apple. Once regarded as an
indomitable innovator, Apple now looks
vulnerable and perhaps a step behind
Google Inc. and the leading Android disci-
ple, Samsung Electronics Co.
If analysts’ projections pan out, Apple’s
earnings fell during the three months that
ended in June, marking the second consecu-
tive quarter of decline. The slump follows a
decade-long streak of earnings growth that
ended at the start of the year. Analysts sur-
veyed by FactSet are expecting, on average,
earnings of $7.34 per share, down from
$9.32 per share a year ago.
Meanwhile, analysts are forecasting little
or no revenue growth for the first time since
the debut of the iPhone six years ago.
Analysts are expecting $35 billion in rev-
enue for the period, its fiscal third quarter. It
was $35 billion at the same time last year.
Those would be impressive numbers for
most companies, but the bar has been set
high for Apple since the introduction of its
iPhone triggered an upheaval that has
changed the way people engage with tech-
nology.
Will Apple’s latest results be latest letdown?
McDonald’s predicts tough
year despite new items
NEWYORK — McDonald’s is mixing up
its menu with healthier, fresher sounding
items such as its chicken McWraps, but not
enough customers are biting.
The world’s biggest hamburger chain on
Monday reported a second-quarter profit
that rose 4 percent but fell short of Wall
Street expectations. It also said July sales
are expected to be relatively flat and
warned of a tough year ahead, given the
heightened competition and rough eco-
nomic conditions around the world.
“We don’t have as much pricing power, ”
said CEO Don Thompson, noting that the
company wouldn’t be able to easily charge
more for its food without the risk of scar-
ing off customers.
Loeb to sell 40M Yahoo
shares as he leaves board
SAN FRANCISCO — Activist investor
Dan Loeb is leaving Yahoo’s board with a
windfall after a 15-month stint that vindi-
cated his crusade to shake up the long-
slumping company under new leadership.
Yahoo Inc. is spending $1.16 billion to
buy back 40 million of the shares that
Loeb’s hedge fund, Third Point LLC, began
buying in 2011 around the same time
Yahoo was ushering out Carol Bartz as its
CEO.
Third Point is being paid $29.11 per
share, more than double the average of
$13.77 per share that it paid while accumu-
lating a 5.8 percent stake in Yahoo.
Business briefs
<< Reddick saves the day, page 13
• San Mateo National continues postseason trek, page 12
Tuesday, July 23, 2013
NO, NO, NO: LINCECUM SHELLED IN FIRST START AFTER NO-HITTER >> PAGE 12
I
did something Sunday I never thought
would happen: I had a golf discussion
with my mom. Alegitimate, thought-
provoking talk about professional golf.
We were watching television and the
highlights of Phil Mickelson’s first British
Open win when my mom pointed out the
crawl at the bottom of the screen.
“Did you see that?” Mom asked.
When I said I missed it, she said, with the
right amount of amazement, “It said
Mickelson birdied four of the final six
holes!”
The fact she knew
who Mickelson was
was impressive
enough, but when
she realized he had
a blazing finish,
that put her over
the top in my
book.
When we figured
out Tiger Woods fin-
ished tied for sixth,
mom asked, “Why
don’t you think
Tiger wins anymore? Do you think it’s
mental?”
Wow. That’s the bombshell of all ques-
tions when it comes to golf. Mom thinks
Woods’ I’m-better-than-you attitude, his
hubris, has been his downfall. She won-
dered if all “the prostitutes” he was with
contributed to his downfall.
After informing her most, if not all, of
his extramarital affairs were just with nor-
mal, “non-working” women, I gave her my
Mom might
be on to
something
See LOUNGE, Page 14
See 49ERS, Page 13
By Ronald Blum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Former National League MVP
Ryan Braun was suspended without pay for the
rest of the season and the postseason Monday,
the first penalty from baseball’s investigation
of players reportedly tied to a Florida clinic
accused of distributing performance-enhancing
drugs.
The Milwaukee Brewers star accepted the 65-
game penalty, 15 games more than the one he
avoided last year when an arbitrator overturned
his positive test for elevated testosterone
because the urine sample had been improperly
handled.
“I am not perfect. I realize now that I have
made some mistakes. I am willing to accept the
consequences of those actions,” he said in a
statement.
Braun, injured Yankees star Alex Rodriguez
and more than a dozen players were targeted by
MLB following a report by Miami New Times in
January that they had been connected with
See BRAUN, Page 14
By Michael Wagaman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Cornerback Eric
Wright failed his physical with the San
Francisco 49ers, nullifying a trade to bring
him to Northern California from Tampa Bay.
He was subsequently released by the
Buccaneers.
San Francisco coach Jim Harbaugh
declined to say specifically what portion of
the physical Wright failed and made just a
brief statement on the sit-
uation.
“We don’t ever talk
about that,” Harbaugh
said Monday. “The infor-
mation is he didn’t pass
his physical, he’s not on
the team.”
Thus ends a quirky four-day stretch that
began after the 49ers appeared to have
acquired the former second-round draft pick
from Tampa Bay on Friday in exchange for a
conditional draft pick in 2014.
Shortly thereafter, reports surfaced that
Wright had been arrested a week earlier in
Los Angeles on an unspecified misdemeanor
charge. It’s unclear if the 49ers were aware of
Wright’s situation when they made the trade.
Wright was arrested in 2012 on felony
DUI charges and was suspended for four
games last season by the NFL for violating
the performance-enhancing drug policy in
his first season with the Bucs. Wright signed
a five-year, $35.3 million contract with the
Bucs prior to the 2012 season.
Wright fails physical,
trade from Bucs void
NFC West
preseason
capsules
See page 13
INSIDE
Milestones
All-Star Game — 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011,
2012
NLRookie of the Year — 2007
NL MVP — 2011
SPORTS 12
Tuesday • July 23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Back to reality: Lincecum
roughed up in loss to Reds
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Bronson
Arroyo pitched a seven-hitter for
his sixth career shutout, beating
Tim Lincecum and the San
Francisco Giants 11-0 Monday
night for his
first victory at
AT&T Park and
No. 100 with
the Cincinnati
Reds.
Arroyo (9-7)
struck out six
and didn’t walk
a batter in his
15th career
complete game, a 108-pitch gem
that ended in 2 hours, 45 minutes.
Derrick Robinson finished it with
a tough catch in deep center.
Devin Mesoraco and Shin-Soo
Choo homered in the second
inning off Lincecum, pitching for
the first time since his no-hitter at
San Diego.
Jay Bruce also hit a solo homer,
Todd Frazier added a three-run dou-
ble and Robinson, a late addition
to the lineup, had three hits.
Lincecum (5-10) was roughed up
in his first start since throwing his
first career no-hitter in a 148-pitch
performance July 13.
The two-time NL Cy Young
Award winner received a rousing
ovation during pregame introduc-
tions, then immediately strug-
gled while pitching on eight
days’ rest after tossing the 15th
no-hitter in franchise history and
seventh since the club moved
West in 1958.
The Giants were handed their
most lopsided shutout loss since
getting beaten 11-0 by Arizona on
Aug. 27, 2009.
Cincinnati denied Bruce Bochy
his 1,500th career victory as a
manager. He is trying to become
the 21st skipper to reach the mile-
stone. Detroit’s Jim Leyland and
Cincinnati’s Dusty Baker are the
only active managers with more
victories.
Lincecum matched his career
high by allowing three home runs,
the third time he’s done it. He was
tagged for eight runs and nine hits
in 3 2-3 innings, hardly the way
the right-hander wanted to perform
after his gem at Petco Park.
Cincinnati opened an 11-game
West Coast trip that takes the Reds
to all three California NL West
cities with an emphatic win
against the defending World Series
champions. San Francisco rallied
from a 2-0 deficit in the NL divi-
sion series last fall to stun the
Reds — becoming the first team in
major league history to rally from
three games down in a best-of-five
series with three straight road
wins.
The teams will play a traditional
doubleheader Tuesday in which the
Reds will wear their Sunday home
uniforms — white pants with red
tops — as the visiting team and
bat last in the nightcap, a makeup
for a July 4 rainout at Great
American Ball Park.
Choo began the game with a
double and Robinson followed
with a bunt single, then Frazier
doubled three batters later.
Tim Lincecum
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The San Mateo National 9-10
Little League baseball All-Stars
know a thing or two about surviv-
ing.
And then thriving.
So, when they arrived in San
Jose on Monday knowing they
needed to win in order to stay alive
in the Division 2 Northern
California Little League tourna-
ment, the boys from San Mateo,
true to form, did not crumble under
the pressure.
Instead, behind some solid
pitching and big hits, San Mateo
beat Fresno 13-3 and continue
with its hopes of being a state
champion.
“We bounced back today They
(Fresno) are a very good team,”
said San Mateo National manager
David Villar. “But today we hit the
ball well.”
Well enough that it only took
San Mateo four innings to mercy-
rule Fresno and secure another
game which will take place
Thursday against Rocklin.
“They’re a scrappy bunch,”
Villar said. “They swing the bat
really well and they play defense
really well. They don’t strike out.
They put the ball in play and they
make the other team make plays.
It’s a very balanced team. From 1
through 12, they’re all inter-
changeable parts.”
On Monday, Nico Button carried
the load for San Mateo from the
mound. He pitched three strong
innings and gave way to Connor
Brady, who got the last three outs
of the game.
At the plate, Jack Yuretich had a
huge day. He accounted for three
hits, including two doubles.
One of the biggest swings
belonged to Kai Lim, though. It
was his bases-loaded triple that
drove in three and got the offen-
sive ball rolling for San Mateo.
Jason Villar had a pair of hits, a
single and a double. His teammate
Tyler Berkson duplicated the feat.
“They have a very strong mind-
set,” David Villar said. “They’re
very confident. I can’t say enough
about how well they’ve played
together as a team and the chem-
istry they have. It’s a very good
team to coach. It’s a fun team to
coach because everyone does what
we ask them to do.”
Looking forward to Thursday
against Rocklin, David Villar said
his team is ready to roll.
“We have all of our pitching
together,” he said, alluding to
Yuretich, San Mateo’s No. 1
starter. “Everyone is available.
Everyone down the line is going
to be ready to battle.”
San Mateo National bounces
back, continues Division 2 run
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STANFORD — American teenag-
er Madison Keys wandered around
the Stanford University campus
wondering what it would have
been like had she chosen school
over tennis.
This would have been her fresh-
man year.
“I could be going to college
soon,” Keys said. “I’m pretty
happy where I am.”
Keys, one of 11 Americans
ranked in the top 100, beat No. 8
seed Magalena Rybarikova 6-2, 6-
2, in the first round of the
$795,000 Bank of the West
Classic on Monday.
Her likely major? “Something
that doesn’t have math it,” she
said.
Keys, ranked a career-high 44th,
played a typical match in topping
the 39th-ranked Slovakian for the
second time in three career meet-
ings.
Keys recorded four aces and had
three double faults.
She won 70 percent of her first
serve points. In 40 previous
matches this season, the 18-year-
old phenom averaged 3.8 aces and
1.35 double faults per match while
winning 69.7 percent of her first-
serve points.
Keys earns upset at Bank of the West
SPORTS 13
Tuesday • July 23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The move to trade for Wright
immediately raised eyebrows after
Harbaugh’s comments during the
team’s June minicamp when he
made it clear he wouldn’t accept
players breaking the NFL’s policy
on performance-enhancing drugs
for a perceived edge.
Even though Wright was never
officially on the 49ers roster,
Harbaugh emphasized his message
is still the same.
“That hasn’t changed,” he said.
“I think our guys do a good job of
playing within the rules.”
Harbaugh avoided questions
about 49ers linebacker Ahmad
Brooks’ legal issues. Brooks
allegedly hit teammate Lamar
Divens in the head with a bottle
multiple times during an alterca-
tion on June 8 but avoided prose-
cution when the Santa Clara dis-
trict attorney’s office declined to
file charges because of insufficient
evidence.
Brooks has met with team offi-
cials regarding the incident but
Harbaugh declined to say what, if
any, discipline the veteran line-
backer will face.
“Had conversations (with him)
but not that we’re going to talk
about out here,” Harbaugh said.
“I’m not publicly discussing what
our conversations have been with
Ahmad or any of our players.”
The 49ers held the third day of
training camp practice for rookies
onl y. Veterans report on
Wednesday, one day before the
first full team workout.
Michael Crabtree, San
Francisco’s leading receiver in
2012, won’t be among them — at
least not on the field. Crabtree
underwent surgery on his right
Achilles tendon after tearing it
during a practice May 21 and is
still in the early stages of rehabil-
itation.
The 49ers aren’t ruling out
Crabtree returning at some point
during the season.
“I wouldn’t categorize it as
ahead of schedule because he is
just starting to move on it,”
Harbaugh said. “It’s just been
healing but it looks great. That’s
from the words of the doctor. ”
The news on Kyle Williams is
more encouraging. Harbaugh said
he is very optimistic Williams
will be able to practice when the
veterans check in. Williams is
coming back from a knee injury
suffered late last season.
SANFRANCISCO49ERS (11-4-1)
OPENCAMP: July 25
LASTYEAR: 49ers returned to Super Bowl for
first time in 18 years, chasing sixth champi-
onship, but fell to Baltimore, with second-year
coach Jim Harbaugh’s team missing multiple
chances from 5-yard line in waning moments.
Unlike last summer, when starting lineups on
both sides of ball remained nearly intact, there
are new faces at prominent positions as two-
time NFC West champions try to defend title in
much-improved division featuring Seattle and
St. Louis.
IMPORTANT ADDITIONS: WR Anquan Boldin, S
Craig Dahl, K Phil Dawson, QB Colt McCoy, CB
Nnamdi Asoumgha.
IMPORTANTLOSSES: QB Alex Smith, S Dashon
Goldson, TE Delanie Walker, K David Akers, WR
Randy Moss.
CAMPNEEDS: Third-year QB Colin Kaepernick
must find groove with new wideouts in hurry.
Kaepernick, A.J. Jenkins and Ricardo Lockette
began that process with workouts in Atlanta
during offseason. Getting more snaps will cer-
tainly help Kaepernick after he began 2012 as
backup to Alex Smith. Top wideout Michael
Crabtree is sidelined after surgery on torn right
Achilles tendon in May, big blow to Niners. But
they had already acquired Boldin from Ravens
before Crabtree went down, and his role will be
even greater now. Several newcomers join sec-
ondary and must be integrated into system.
EXPECTATIONS: 49ers will count on more con-
sistency from kicking game as Dawson replaces
Akers. Dawson went 29 for 31 last season in
14th year with Browns, making all 13 of
attempts from 40 yards or beyond, including 7
for 7 from 50-plus. Akers missed 13 field goals in
2012. All-Pro DL Justin Smith returns from par-
tially torn left triceps that required offseason
surgery. He anchors one of league’s top defens-
es past two seasons, aided by stars Patrick Willis,
Aldon Smith, NaVorro Bowman and Carlos
Rogers. With solid lines and big-time playmak-
ers, 49ers look to get that one more victory in
postseason.
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS (11-5)
OPENCAMP: July 25
LASTYEAR: Seahawks were seconds from play-
ing in NFC championship game in season few
expected when rookie Russell Wilson became
starting quarterback. Wilson proved right choice
by coach Pete Carroll, and Seahawks beat
Washington in wild-card round for first road
playoff win since 1983. Somewhat lost in
Wilson’s rise and performance and antics of cor-
nerback Richard Sherman were All-Pro seasons
from running back Marshawn Lynch and safety
Earl Thomas. Seattle had best scoring defense in
NFL.
IMPORTANT ADDITIONS: WR Percy Harvin, DE
Cliff Avril, DE Michael Bennett, DT Tony
McDaniel, CB Antoine Winfield, rookie DT Jesse
Williams, rookie DT Jordan Hill, rookie RB
Christine Michael, QBs Tarvaris Jackson and
Brady Quinn.
IMPORTANTLOSSES: RB/KR Leon Washington,
LB Leroy Hill, QB Matt Flynn, TE Anthony McCoy,
DT Alan Branch, CB Marcus Trufant.
CAMPNEEDS: Improving mediocre pass rush
that could be without sacks leader Chris
Clemons (knee) to start season. It was offseason
priority with additions of Avril, Bennett,
McDaniel, Williams and Hill, coupled with move
of Bruce Irvin to outside linebacker; Irvin is sus-
pended for first four games for violating per-
formance-enhancing drug policy. Deciding who
will back up Wilson will be another training
camp competition, along with settling guard
positions.
EXPECTATIONS: Many feel Seahawks are in
select group labeled Super Bowl contenders.
New defensive coordinator Dan Quinn will try
and build on what Gus Bradley (now Jaguars
head coach) started, but with more pieces to
play with. Harvin’s addition to offense that aver-
aged nearly 33 points over final nine games of
season makes trying to slow down Wilson and
Co. even more terrifying.
ST. LOUISRAMS (7-8-1)
OPENCAMP: July 25
LASTYEAR: Refreshed from one-year coaching
break, Jeff Fisher combined with GM Les Snead
on roster makeover. Franchise shook off worst
five-year stretch (15 wins) in NFL history, as
league’s youngest team improved from two
wins in 2011, and went 4-1-1 in tough division.
QB Sam Bradford had best statistical season,
aided by strong showing from line. Rookies CB
Janoris Jenkins and DT Michael Brockers made
impact as starters, defense tied for NFL lead
with 52 sacks behind big years from Chris Long
and Robert Quinn, team’s first duo with double-
digit sacks since 2000.
IMPORTANT ADDITIONS: TE Jared Cook, OT
Jake Long, rookie WRs Tavon Austin and
Stedman Bailey, rookie OLB Alec Ogletree.
IMPORTANTLOSSES: RB Steven Jackson, WR
Danny Amendola, S Quintin Mikell, S Craig Dahl,
LB Rocky McIntosh.
CAMPNEEDS: Finding RB combination to
replace Jackson’s workhorse contribution
among Daryl Richardson, Isaiah Pead and rookie
Zac Stacy. Develop chemistry between Bradford
and new crop of pass catchers led by Austin.
Fine-tune attack that could feature pass-catch-
ing TEs Cook and Lance Kendricks. Prepare
Ogletree to start alongside team’s top two tack-
lers, James Laurinaitis and Jo-Lonn Dumbar. Find
replacements at both safety spots. Develop
chemistry on new-look OL, with Rodger Saffold
moving to right tackle to make room for Long.
EXPECTATIONS: Rams anticipate more growing
pains from roster that has gotten even younger.
Team has no winning seasons since 2003,
appears poised to end drought.
ARIZONACARDINALS (5-11)
OPENCAMP: July 25
LASTYEAR: Got off to surprising 4-0 start, then
lost 11 of last 12 thanks to worst offense in NFL.
Quarterback and line were main culprits. Kevin
Kolb had team’s only success at QB, but went
down with season-ending torn cartilage. Unable
to pass or run effectively, Cardinals were blown
out more often than not. Coach Ken
Whisenhunt, who directed team to Super Bowl
in 2008 season, was fired, as was general man-
ager Rod Graves.
IMPORTANT ADDITIONS: Coach Bruce Arians,
QB Carson Palmer, RB Rashard Mendenhall,
rookie OG Jonathan Cooper, LB Karlos Dansby,
LB Lorenzo Alexander, LB Jasper Brinkley, rookie
LB Kevin Minter, rookie S Tyrann Mathieu.
IMPORTANTLOSSES: S Adrian Wilson, QB
Kevin Kolb, QB John Skelton, RB Beanie Wells, S
Rashad Johnson, ILB Paris Lenon, S Kerry
Rhodes, OG Adam Snyder, CB William Gay, WR
Early Doucet, RB LaRod Stephens-Howling.
CAMPNEEDS: With camp moved from
Flagstaff to team’s home stadium in Glendale,
emphasis will be on getting players comfortable
with new offensive and defensive system
brought by Arians. Plenty of work ahead
between Palmer and primary receivers Larry
Fitzgerald, Andre Roberts, Michael Floyd and
Rob Housler. On defense, with top LB Daryl
Washington suspended for first six games for
violating league’s substance abuse policy,
adjustments in personnel must be made.
EXPECTATIONS: Arians, NFL Coach of the Year
for work as interim boss in Indianapolis, gets at
age 60 to finally run show, and he’s relishing
opportunity. He even brought in longtime
Indianapolis offensive coordinator Tom Moore
as top assistant. Cardinals aren’t expected to do
much in tough division, but if line can keep
immobile Palmer on his feet, it could be exciting
offense with downfield game Arians loves.
NFC WEST
PRESEASON CAMP CAPSULES
Continued from page 11
49ERS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HOUSTON — Josh Reddick put
Oakland on top with a two-run
homer in the eighth inning and
the Athletics remained perfect this
season against the Houston Astros
with a 4-3 victory Monday night.
Chris Young hit a solo homer for
the A’s, who are 10-0 against their
new AL West foes this season and
15-1 all-time. The Astros have
lost six straight overall.
Houston took an early 3-0 lead
thanks in part to Oakland tying a
season high with three errors.
Young’s shot cut the lead to one in
the seventh before Reddick’s drive
to right field off Wesley Wright (0-
4) made it 4-3.
Young also tripled for another
big game in his hometown.
Three of Young’s nine homers
this season have come at Minute
Maid Park, and he’s hit eight home
runs with 30 RBIs in 22 career
games in Houston.
Ryan Cook (3-2) pitched a per-
fect seventh for the win and Grant
Balfour did the same in the ninth
for his 26th save. Balfour has
converted his last 44 chances dat-
ing to last season, an Oakland
record.
Chris Carter drove in a run for
Houston and shortstop Jonathan
Villar singled, scored and had a
stolen base in his major league
debut.
Oakland starter Tommy Milone
allowed five hits and three runs —
two earned — in six innings.
Dallas Keuchel yielded five hits
and a run with five strikeouts in six
innings for Houston.
Justin Maxwell doubled to start
the Houston second and stole sec-
ond base. Maxwell scored and J.D.
Martinez reached on an error by
shortstop Jed Lowrie to make it 1-
0.
Villar got his first major league
hit with a bunt single in the third.
Villar, who stole 31 bases in
Triple-A this season, quickly
swiped second. Carter’s single to
center scored Villar to extend the
lead to 2-0.
Carter scored on an error by sec-
ond baseman Grant Green when he
couldn’t make the catch on a rou-
tine fly.
Josh Donaldson got to second
on a two-base error by Astros third
baseman Matt Dominguez in the
fourth and advanced to third on a
groundout. Keuchel then walked
Derek Norris, but retired the next
two batters to end the threat.
Keuchel struck out the first two
batters of the fifth inning before a
triple by Chris Young. He left
Young stranded when he fanned
Lowrie to end the inning.
Donaldson singled to start the
sixth before a double down the
right-field line by Nate Freiman.
Reddick drew a walk with one out
to load the bases, and a sacrifice fly
by Green got Oakland within 3-1.
Keuchel escaped the inning
when he struck out Seth Smith.
NOTES:
The series continues Tuesday
when Houston’s top pitching
prospect, Jarred Cosart (1-0), will
be recalled from Triple-A
Oklahoma City to make his sec-
ond major league start against
Jarrod Parker (6-6).
The 23-year-old Cosart took a
no-hitter into the seventh inning
and got the win in his debut
against Tampa Bay just before the
break, allowing two hits and no
runs in eight-plus innings. ...
Home Run Derby winner Yoenis
Cespedes was out for the fourth
straight game because of a sore
left wrist but is feeling better.
Oakland manager Bob Melvin said
Cespedes did a lot of work in the
cage and will take batting practice
Tuesday if he doesn’t feel any sore-
ness. Melvin isn’t sure if
Cespedes could play Tuesday. ...
A’s LHPBrett Anderson, who has
been on the disabled list since
May 1 with a stress fracture in his
right foot, threw 35 pitches in a
bullpen session.
Reddick’s 2-run homer lifts A’s
SPORTS 14
Tuesday • July 23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Absolutely. When you prepay, your funds are kept in an
account you can access from anywhere at your time of
need. The funds are protected and availability is
assured.We gladly honor arrangements made at other
funeral homes.
Please contact us if we can be of
assistance to you.
Justbeage62+andownyourownhome:
✓ Turn home equity into cash
✓ Pay off bills & credit cards
✓ No more monthy mortgage payments
✓ Remain in your home as long as you live
✓ You retain ownership (title) to your home
✓ FHA insured program
Calltodayforafree,easytoreadquote
650-453-3244
R
EVERSE
MORTGAGE
CALL FOR A FREE BROCHURE OR QUOTE
SERVING THE ENTIRE BAY AREA
CarolBertocchini,CPA
NMLS ID #455078
Reverse Mortgage
Specialist and a CPA
with over 25 years
experience as a
financial professional
Homeowner must maintain property as primary residence and remain current on
property taxes and insurance
Security 1 Lending.
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opinion: Part of it is Woods is get-
ting older and has battled a number of
leg/knee/Achilles injuries over the
last several years, preceded by the
Thanksgiving Night incident with his
then wife, an SUV and a fire hydrant.
Then there is the simple fact the
rest of the PGATour is no longer in
awe of Woods. It’s almost as when his
personal life was crumbling around
him, the rest of the players on tour
thought, OK, this guy is human after
all.
Add in the number of young guns
coming up and were influenced by
Woods and it equals a lot more guys in
contention who truly believe they can
win — much like Tiger in his heyday.
Tiger Woods set the bar so high that
now that he is just a good golfer and
no longer extraordinary, people look
at it as a failure.
Take Mickelson, for example.
Sunday’s win was the fifth major of a
hall of fame career, all of them won
since 2004. If Woods never came
along, Mickelson would be the golfer
of his generation, the one lauded and
scrutinized as the best player in the
game.
Woods? He’s won six majors since
2004, although none since that epic
2008 showdown with Rocco Mediate.
So while Lefty will bask in the glory
of winning another major, Woods will
wonder when his next one will come.
All eyes will be on him come PGA
Championship. And once again, he
will be among the favorites to win.
Unlike most of the competition, if
there is anyone expected to win, it’s
Woods — even when he doesn’t .
Unless it truly is what mom thinks
it is: golf karma.
***
Scott Kalush hit his first profes-
sional home run Friday night for the
Aberdeen IronBirds of the New York-
Penn League. The IronBirds are the
Low-Aaffiliate of the Baltimore
Orioles.
It took Kalush — the Aragon and
UC Davis graduate who was a 39th-
round draft choice of the Orioles in
2012 — until his 50th game, in his
123rd professional at-bat to make the
traditional jog around the bases in a
regular-season game.
Kalush’s drive to left in the top of
the sixth inning was the IronBirds
only run in a 5-1 loss to Vermont
Friday. It was the first of only two
hits the IronBirds managed. After get-
ting the day off Saturday, Kalush, a
catcher, was back in the squat during
Sunday’s 8-3 win over Jamestown.
Although he officially went 0 for 2
from the plate, he did manage to drive
in a pair of runs. With the bases
loaded in the top of the fifth, Kalush
was hit by a pitch to pick up an RBI.
In the top of the sixth, Kalush drove
in his second run of the game with a
sacrifice fly.
His three RBIs over the weekend
gives Kalush five for the season,
which is the same number he had last
year in 36 games.
Kalush is essentially platooning
behind the plate for Aberdeen, along
with Austin Wynns, who has made 20
starts in 35 games. Kalush has made
14 starts for the IronBirds this sea-
son.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by email:
nathan@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
344-5200 ext. 117. He can also be followed
on Twitter @CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
Biogenesis of America, a now-closed
anti-aging clinic.
MLB Commissioner Bud Selig
announced the penalty Monday, citing
Braun for multiple unspecified “viola-
tions” of baseball’s drug program and
labor contract. Braun will miss the
Milwaukee Brewers’ final 65 games
without pay, costing him about $3 mil-
lion of his $8.5 million salary.
Under the agreement reached by MLB
and the players’ association the
specifics of Braun’s admission won’t
be made public. The sides also would-
n’t say whether this counted as a single
violation or more under baseball’s drug
agreement.
“We commend Ryan Braun for taking
responsibility for his past actions,”
said Rob Manfred, MLB’s executive
vice president for economics and
league affairs. “We all agree that it is in
the best interests of the game to
resolve this matter. When Ryan
returns, we look forward to him mak-
ing positive contributions to Major
League Baseball, both on and off the
field.”
Union head Michael Weiner said in a
statement: “I am deeply gratified to see
Ryan taking this bold step. It vindi-
cates the rights of all players under the
joint drug program. It is good for the
game that Ryan will return soon to
continue his great work both on and off
the field.”
Braun’s acceptance of a suspension
marks a 180-degree turnaround from
his defiant spring training news con-
ference in Phoenix last year, after his
50-game ban was overturned.
“We won,” he said then, “because the
truth is on my side. The truth is always
relevant, and at the end of the day, the
truth prevailed.”
Braun became the latest star tripped
up by baseball’s drug rules.
The sport was criticized for allowing
bulked up sluggers to set power records
in the 1990s and only started testing
in 2003. Since then, testing and penal-
ties have become more stringent and
last year San Francisco’s Melky
Cabrera was suspended for 50 games,
just weeks after he was voted MVP of
the All-Star game.
Four All-Stars this year have been
linked in media reports to Biogenesis:
Texas outfielder Nelson Cruz, San
Diego shortstop Everth Cabrera,
Oakland pitcher Bartolo Colon and
Detroit shortstop Jhonny Peralta.
Continued from page 11
BRAUN
Timeline of events around
RyanBraun’s drugsuspension
———
October 2011 — Braun tests positive for elevated
testosterone levels. The result is not made public.
November 2011 — Braun wins National League
MVP award after hitting 33 homers, stealing 33 bases
and hitting .332.
December 2011 — ESPN reveals Braun’s positive
test from two months ago. The Brewers slugger faces
a 50-game suspension, but is appealing it. His repre-
sentatives say “there are highly unusual circum-
stances surrounding this case which will support
Ryan’s complete innocence.”
February 2012 — Braun’s suspension is overturned
by baseball arbitrator Shyam Das, the first time a
baseball player successfully challenges a drug-relat-
ed penalty in a grievance. During the hearings, ques-
tions are raised about the chain of custody for
Braun’s urine sample. It was collected on Saturday,
Oct. 1, but not sent to the lab until Monday. Braun
reports to spring training.
March2012 — After the sample collector releases a
statement defending his actions and saying that he
never tampered with the sample, Braun’s lawyer criti-
cizes the statement by Dino Laurenzi Jr., saying that
Braun was “properly vindicated.”
September 2012 — Braun finishes the season after
leading the NL with 41 homers. He hits .319 and
drives in 112 runs.
February 2013 — Braun’s name appears in records
from the Biogenesis of America LLC clinic, a defunct
business near Miami that allegedly provided per-
formance-enhancing substances to several players.
The original report about the clinic was published by
Miami New Times, and Braun’s tie to the clinic was
first reported by Yahoo Sports.
June 2013 — Braun goes on the disabled list
because of a persistent sore right thumb.
July 2013 — After missing 26 games, Braun returns,
but is ineffective in three games before accepting a
suspension for the rest of the season. He finishes his
2013 year with nine homers, four steals and a .298
average in 61 games.
Sports briefs
Krzyzewski begins quest for third straight gold
LAS VEGAS — Mike Krzyzewski thought he was done
with USABasketball. He said he was done, too.
After helping Team USAwin two straight Olympic gold
medals, there appeared little left for him to accomplish.
After the team won in London last summer, Krzyzewski
prepared to walk away.
It didn’t take long for Jerry Colangelo to know that
Krzyzewski wasn’t as resolute in his stance as he made it
seem. Just a couple of weeks after their triumph in
London, the two reconvened in Springfield, Mass., for the
Hall of Fame induction ceremony. And that’s when
Colangelo, the managing director for USA Basketball,
knew there was still a chance.
“He was having withdrawal already,” Colangelo said.
“He started talking about the future. No commitments, but
it was there.
“I didn’t have to plan it, but it was there. My attitude
was, I know what he said. I know what he’s also said to me
privately. I’m going to give him all the time he needs and
when the timing is right, we’ll have that sit-down again.
Usually when I sit down with him, there’s a good result.
And it happened again and it was a positive result and I’m
thankful for that.”
Ten months after Colangelo first saw that gleam return
to Krzyzewski’s eye, and two months after the coach made
his return official, the two men are back to work at a four-
day camp that began Monday.
SPORTS 15
Tuesday • July 23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE –
Have you ever
attended a funeral
or memorial service
and felt ill-at-ease,
uncomfortable or
awkward when
talking to the family
of the deceased? Have you ever stumbled
through your words and condolences
because you just didn’t know what to say or
how to say it? Have you even decided to not
approach the family for fear of saying the
wrong thing or making a fool of yourself? If
so you are not alone. Many people in this
situation want to provide some kind of
comfort to the immediate family, but just
don’t have the verbal tools to do so in an
assuring manner.
Learning “Funeral Etiquette” can be
useful. Using the right words at the right
time is an appropriate way to show that you
care, and in situations like this can be of
great help when provided correctly.
Standard condolences such as “I am sorry
for your loss” have become routine and
generic. A personalized phrase can be
welcomed such as “John touched many
lives” or “I will miss John”. DO NOT ask
the cause of death, offer advice or make
comments that would diminish the
importance of the loss such as “Oh, you’re
young and can marry again”.
Other ways to demonstrate your support
include: 1. Listening. The family may feel
the need to express their anxiety, and giving
them that opportunity can be therapeutic; 2.
An embrace. This can show that you care
without the need for words; 3. Offering your
services. This shows the family that you are
willing to give extra time for them: “Please
let me know if there is anything I can do to
help” (be prepared to act if needed).
Even if you don’t feel confident in
approaching the family there are other ways
to show that you care: 1. Attending the
funeral and signing the Memorial Book will
show the family that you took the time to be
there in support; 2. Dressing appropriately
for the funeral will demonstrate your efforts
to prepare for this special occasion (dark
colors are no longer a requisite for funerals,
but dressing in a coat, tie, dress or other
attire that you’d wear to any special event
are considered a way of showing you care);
3. In certain cases friends are invited to
stand up and offer BRIEF personal feelings.
Prior to the funeral write a few key notes
and reflections which will help you organize
your thoughts. Even if there is no
opportunity to speak before a group you
may have a chance to offer your thoughts to
the family following the ceremony; 4. A
personalized card or note will help you
arrange your words better and can be kept
by the family. If you don’t have their
mailing address you can send your envelope
to the funeral home and they will forward it
to the next of kin; 5. Providing flowers is a
long time tradition, or making a charitable
donation in the deceased’s memory will give
the family a strong sense of your regards; 6.
If appropriate a brief phone call can show
your immediate concern, but generally this
should be avoided to give the family the
privacy they may need.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Funeral Etiquette Advice:
Show Up, Be Brief, Listen
advertisement
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE –
Have you ever
attended a funeral
or memorial service
and felt ill-at-ease,
uncomfortable or
awkward when
talking to the family
of the deceased? Have you ever stumbled
through your words and condolences
because you just didn’t know what to say or
how to say it? Have you even decided to not
approach the family for fear of saying the
wrong thing or making a fool of yourself? If
so you are not alone. Many people in this
situation want to provide some kind of
comfort to the immediate family, but just
don’t have the verbal tools to do so in an
assuring manner.
Learning “Funeral Etiquette” can be
useful. Using the right words at the right
time is an appropriate way to show that you
care, and in situations like this can be of
great help when provided correctly.
Standard condolences such as “I am sorry
for your loss” have become routine and
generic. A personalized phrase can be
welcomed such as “John touched many
lives” or “I will miss John”. DO NOT ask
the cause of death, offer advice or make
comments that would diminish the
importance of the loss such as “Oh, you’re
young and can marry again”.
Other ways to demonstrate your support
include: 1. Listening. The family may feel
the need to express their anxiety, and giving
them that opportunity can be therapeutic; 2.
An embrace. This can show that you care
without the need for words; 3. Offering your
services. This shows the family that you are
willing to give extra time for them: “Please
let me know if there is anything I can do to
help” (be prepared to act if needed).
Even if you don’t feel confident in
approaching the family there are other ways
to show that you care: 1. Attending the
funeral and signing the Memorial Book will
show the family that you took the time to be
there in support; 2. Dressing appropriately
for the funeral will demonstrate your efforts
to prepare for this special occasion (dark
colors are no longer a requisite for funerals,
but dressing in a coat, tie, dress or other
attire that you’d wear to any special event
are considered a way of showing you care);
3. In certain cases friends are invited to
stand up and offer BRIEF personal feelings.
Prior to the funeral write a few key notes
and reflections which will help you organize
your thoughts. Even if there is no
opportunity to speak before a group you
may have a chance to offer your thoughts to
the family following the ceremony; 4. A
personalized card or note will help you
arrange your words better and can be kept
by the family. If you don’t have their
mailing address you can send your envelope
to the funeral home and they will forward it
to the next of kin; 5. Providing flowers is a
long time tradition, or making a charitable
donation in the deceased’s memory will give
the family a strong sense of your regards; 6.
If appropriate a brief phone call can show
your immediate concern, but generally this
should be avoided to give the family the
privacy they may need.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Funeral Etiquette Advice:
Show Up, Be Brief, Listen
advertisement
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 56 43 .566 —
Philadelphia 49 50 .495 7
Washington 48 51 .485 8
New York 43 52 .453 11
Miami 36 61 .371 19
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 59 37 .615 —
Pittsburgh 58 39 .598 1 1/2
Cincinnati 56 43 .566 4 1/2
Chicago 44 53 .454 15 1/2
Milwaukee 41 57 .418 19
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 51 47 .520 —
Arizona 51 48 .515 1/2
Colorado 48 52 .480 4
San Francisco 45 53 .459 6
San Diego 44 56 .440 8
Monday’s Games
Pittsburgh 6, Washington 5
L.A. Dodgers 14, Toronto 5
Atlanta 2, N.Y. Mets 1
San Diego 5, Milwaukee 3
Miami 3, Colorado 1
Chicago Cubs 4, Arizona 2
Cincinnati 11, San Francisco 0
Tuesday’s Games
Cincinnati (Cingrani 3-1) at San Francisco
(Surkamp 0-0), 4:05 p.m., 1st game
Pittsburgh (Cole 4-3) at Washington (Jordan 0-
2), 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 3-6) at Toronto
(Redmond 1-1), 4:07 p.m.
Atlanta (Medlen 6-9) at N.Y. Mets (C.Torres 0-1),
4:10 p.m.
San Diego (T.Ross 0-4) at Milwaukee (D.Hand 0-
1), 5:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Pettibone 5-3) at St. Louis (S.Miller
9-6), 5:15 p.m.
Miami (Fernandez 5-5) at Colorado (Chacin 9-4),
5:40 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 6-6) at Arizona (Corbin
11-1), 6:40 p.m.
San Francisco (Zito 4-7) at Cincinnati
(G.Reynolds 0-0), 7:15 p.m., 2nd game
Wednesday’s Games
Pittsburgh at Washington, 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Toronto, 4:07 p.m.
Atlanta at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m.
San Diego at Milwaukee, 5:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at St. Louis, 5:15 p.m.
Miami at Colorado, 5:40 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Arizona, 6:40 p.m.
Cincinnati at San Francisco, 7:15 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 60 41 .594 —
Tampa Bay 59 41 .590 1/2
Baltimore 57 43 .570 2 1/2
New York 52 47 .525 7
Toronto 45 53 .459 13 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 54 44 .551 —
Cleveland 52 47 .525 2 1/2
Kansas City 45 51 .469 8
Minnesota 41 54 .432 11 1/2
Chicago 39 57 .406 14
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 58 41 .586 —
Texas 55 44 .556 3
Los Angeles 46 50 .479 10 1/2
Seattle 47 52 .475 11
Houston 33 65 .337 24 1/2
Monday’sGames
Texas 3, N.Y.Yankees 0
L.A. Dodgers 14,Toronto 5
Tampa Bay 3, Boston 0
Baltimore 9, Kansas City 2
Detroit 7, Chicago White Sox 3
Oakland 4, Houston 3
Minnesota at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Seattle 2, Cleveland 1
Tuesday’sGames
L.A.Dodgers (Capuano 3-6) at Toronto (Redmond
1-1), 4:07 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Ro.Hernandez 5-10) at Boston (Lester
8-6), 4:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (P.Hughes 4-9) at Texas (Ogando 4-2),
5:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Hammel 7-6) at Kansas City (B.Chen 3-
0), 5:10 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 6-6) at Chicago White Sox (H.San-
tiago 3-5), 5:10 p.m.
Oakland (J.Parker 6-6) at Houston (Cosart 1-0),5:10
p.m.
Minnesota (Gibson 2-2) at L.A. Angels (Hanson 4-
2), 7:05 p.m.
Cleveland (McAllister 4-5) at Seattle (E.Ramirez 0-
0), 7:10 p.m.
Wednesday’sGames
Oakland at Houston,11:10 a.m.
Minnesota at L.A. Angels, 12:35 p.m.
Cleveland at Seattle, 12:40 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Toronto, 4:07 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Boston, 4:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Texas, 5:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Kansas City, 5:10 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 5:10 p.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Kansas City 10 5 6 36 31 20
Montreal 9 5 5 32 31 29
New York 9 7 5 32 29 24
Philadelphia 8 6 7 31 32 30
Houston 8 6 5 29 22 19
New England 7 7 6 27 25 18
Chicago 7 9 3 24 24 29
Columbus 6 9 5 23 23 25
Toronto FC 2 10 8 14 17 28
D.C. 2 14 4 10 9 33
WESTERNCONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake 11 6 4 37 33 20
Portland 8 2 10 34 30 18
Los Angeles 10 8 3 33 32 25
Vancouver 9 6 5 32 33 28
FC Dallas 8 5 8 32 27 27
Colorado 8 7 7 31 26 24
Seattle 7 7 4 25 22 21
San Jose 6 9 6 24 21 32
Chivas USA 4 11 5 17 18 35
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
———
Wednesday’s Games
Colorado 2, New England 1
Chivas USA 1, Toronto FC 0
Saturday’s Games
Toronto FC 0, New York 0, tie
Seattle FC 1, Colorado 1, tie
Montreal 0, FC Dallas 0, tie
Philadelphia 0, Portland 0, tie
New England 2, Columbus 0
Chicago 4, D.C. United 1
Sporting Kansas City 2, Real Salt Lake 1
Los Angeles 2, Vancouver 1
Saturday, July 27
Columbus at Toronto FC, 11 a.m.
Sporting Kansas City at Montreal, 4 p.m.
Philadelphia at Vancouver, 4 p.m.
Real Salt Lake at New York, 4 p.m.
Los Angeles at Colorado, 4 p.m.
New England at D.C. United, 4 p.m.
Chicago at Houston, 6 p.m.
Portland at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, July 28
Chivas USA at Seattle FC, 8 p.m.
MLS GLANCE
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MIAMI — Alawsuit seeking $12
million from Los Angeles Dodgers
outfielder Yasiel Puig says he and
his mother lied to Cuban authori-
ties about a plan to smuggle the
player out of the country.
The suit filed in Miami by
Miguel Angel Corbacho Daudinot
lists Puig and his mother Maritza
Valdes Gonzalez as defendants.
Corbacho Daudinot is serving a
seven-year sentence of “prolonged
detention and torture,” which he
alleges was caused by Puig and
Gonzalez saying he was trying to
hatch a plan to smuggle Puig out
of Cuba.
Corbacho Daudinot was convict-
ed in 2010.
Puig attempted to defect several
times before signing with the
Dodgers last year. The $12 million
Corbacho Daudinot seeks is equal
to the signing bonus Puig received
in his $42 million, seven-year
deal.
The suit was filed in Miami in
large part because Puig and his
mother maintain their permanent
residence there, according to court
documents.
The Dodgers have said the team
will have no comment about the
allegations.
Corbacho Daudinot said Puig
and his mother “conspired with ...
the Cuban government” to “tor-
tiously, intentionally, willfully,
wantonly, maliciously, knowing-
l y, recklessly and negligently”
cause his prison sentence, some of
which was served under what he
described as inhumane conditions.
He’s serving the remainder of his
sentence at home with many
restrictions including limited trav-
el and monthly reports with peni-
tentiary officers.
Corbacho Daudinot said he once
lent an associate $100 in Cuban
convertible pesos, which that
associate gave to Puig. Corbacho
Daudinot said he never spoke with
Puig, and never heard of him again
until his arrest on human traffick-
ing charge.
Corbacho Daudinot said Puig
and his mother testified that he
offered to take the ballplayer out
of Cuba and to the Dominican
Republic. After he was convicted,
Corbacho Daudinot appealed to no
avail.
Corbacho Daudinot “is para-
noid, he cannot sleep and he does
not enjoy life. He lives with the
constant awareness that he has no
rights, that anything he does can
be construed as evidence of a
crime, and that his very life can be
taken from him at any time,”
according to the lawsuit.
Before his defection, Puig rarely
played outside Cuba, but he
excelled with the Cuban team
Cienfuegos during the 2010-11
season, batting .330 with 17
homers, 47 RBIs and a .430 on-
base percentage in just 327 at-bats
while mostly playing center field.
The 6-foot-3 slugger sat out a
year for disciplinary reasons pos-
sibly related to his attempts to
defect.
Suit alleges that Puig
lied about smuggling
16
Tuesday • July 23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WORLD
S.A.M S A M
1940 Lesl i e St. , San Mateo, CA 94403
Sam
Tsang
Grand Opening!
92
101
Hillsdale
Shopping
Center
Hillsdale
Caltrain
Station
We are Here!
S El Camino Real
West
East
South North
Peninsula Television
Serving San Mateo County since 1999
Need In-Studio or Field Video Work?
Please check out our
website for more info
on our wide range of
professional video
services:
www.pentv.tv
Watch PenTV: Comcast 26 · Astound 27 · AT&T U-verse 99
Streaming Online at www.pentv.tv
Peninsula Television is a registered 501c3 organization.
S.A.M S A M
1940 Lesl i e St. , San Mateo, CA 94403
Sam
Tsang
Grand Opening!
92
101
Hillsdale
Shopping
Center
Hillsdale
Caltrain
Station
We are Here!
S El Camino Real
West
East
South North
Peninsula Television
Serving San Mateo County since 1999
Need In-Studio or Field Video Work?
Please check out our
website for more info
on our wide range of
professional video
services:
www.pentv.tv
Watch PenTV: Comcast 26 · Astound 27 · AT&T U-verse 99
Streaming Online at www.pentv.tv
Peninsula Television is a registered 501c3 organization.
By Nicole Winfield
and Bradley Brooks
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
RIO DE JANEIRO — A wrong
turn sent a humble Fiat carrying
Pope Francis into the thick of a
frenzied Rio crowd Monday, in his
first minutes back in South
America since becoming pontiff.
It was a nightmare for security
officials, but for the clearly
delighted pope just another
opportunity to connect.
Ecstatic throngs forced his
motorcade to repeatedly come to a
standstill, weeks after violent
protests against the government
paralyzed parts of Brazil. Francis’
driver had turned into the wrong
side of a boulevard at one point,
missing lanes that had been
cleared. Other parts of the pope’s
route to the city center weren’t
lined with fencing, giving the
throngs more chances to get
close, with uniformed police
nowhere in sight to act as crowd
control.
The three dozen visible Vatican
and Brazilian plainclothes securi-
ty officials struggled to keep the
crowds at bay. Francis, however,
not only looked calm but got
even closer to the people. He
rolled down his back-seat win-
dow, waved to the crowd and
touched those who reached inside.
He kissed a baby a woman handed
to him.
“His secretary was afraid,”
papal spokesman the Rev.
Federico Lombardi said. “But the
pope was happy. ”
Pope delights Brazilian crowds, frustrate security
By Maggie Michael
and Tony Gabriel
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO — The family of ousted
President Mohammed Morsi furi-
ously denounced the military
Monday, accusing it of “kidnap-
ping” him, and European diplo-
mats urged that Egypt’s first freely
elected leader be released after
being held incommunicado for
nearly three weeks since being
deposed by the army.
The fate of Morsi, who has been
held without charge, has become a
focus of the political battle
between his Muslim Brotherhood
and the new military-backed gov-
ernment.
The Brotherhood has tried to use
Morsi’s detention to rally the
country to its side, hoping to
restore its badly damaged popular-
i t y. The interim government, in
turn, appears in part to be using it
to pressure his supporters into
backing down from their protests
demanding his reinstatement.
Those protests again turned
violent Monday, with clashes
breaking out between Morsi sup-
porters and opponents near
Cairo’s Tahrir Square, and between
pro-Morsi demonstrators and
police in a city on the capital’s
northern edge. At least four peo-
ple were killed.
So far, however, the outcry over
Morsi’s detention seems to have
gained little traction beyond the
president’s supporters, without
bringing significantly greater
numbers to its ongoing rallies
around the country.
Millions of Egyptians filled the
streets starting June 30, demand-
ing the president’s removal after a
year in office and leading to the
coup that ousted him. Anti-
Brotherhood sentiment remains
strong, further fueled by protests
that block traffic in congested
city centers and by media that
have kept a staunchly anti-Morsi
line.
Ousted Egyptian leader’s family denounces military
Death toll in northwest
China quake rises to 89
BEIJING — Rescuers with shov-
els and sniffer dogs combed
through collapsed hillsides
Tuesday as the death toll rose to 89
from a strong earthquake in a farm-
ing region of northwest China.
Another five people were listed
as missing and 628 injured in
Monday morning’s quake near the
city of Dingxi in Gansu province.
About 123,000 people were
affected by the quake, with 31,600
moved to temporary shelters, the
provincial earthquake administra-
tion said on its website. Almost
2,000 homes were completely
destroyed, and about 22,500 dam-
aged, the administration said.
The government’s earthquake
monitoring center said the quake
was magnitude-6.6, while the U.S.
Geological Survey said it was 5.9.
Israel premier fast-tracking
peace referendum bill
JERUSALEM — Israel’s premier
announced Monday he is fast-
tracking legislation that would
allow him to put any peace deal
with the Palestinians to a national
referendum — an apparent attempt
to silence hard-liners in his party
and coalition government.
Benjamin Netanyahu spoke
three days after U.S. Secretary of
State John Kerry said progress has
been made toward a resumption of
Israeli-Palestinian negotiations,
stalled for five years.
Around the world
REUTERS
Pope Francis kisses a baby while greeting a crowd of the faithful from his
Popemobile in downtown Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
HEALTH 17
Tuesday • July 23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Lauran Neergaard
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Hair loss is one of
chemotherapy’s most despised side effects,
not because of vanity but because it fuels
stigma — revealing to the world an illness
that many would rather keep private.
Now U.S. researchers are about to put an
experimental hair-preserving treatment to
a rigorous test: To see if strapping on a cap
so cold it numbs the scalp during
chemotherapy really works well enough to
be used widely in this country, as it is in
Europe and Canada.
The first time Miriam Lipton had breast
cancer, her thick locks fell out two weeks
after starting chemotherapy. But when the
disease struck again, she used a cold cap
during treatment and kept much of her hair,
making her fight for survival seem a bit
easier.
“I didn’t necessarily want to walk around
the grocery store answering questions
about my cancer,” recalled Lipton, 45, of
San Francisco. “If you look OK on the out-
side, it can help you feel, ‘OK, this is man-
ageable, I can get through this.”’
Near-freezing temperatures are supposed
to reduce blood flow in the scalp, making it
harder for cancer-fighting drugs to reach
and harm hair follicles. But while several
types of cold caps are sold around the
world, the Food and Drug Administration
hasn’t approved their use in the U.S.
Scalp cooling is an idea that’s been
around for decades, but it never caught on
here in part because of a concern: Could the
cold prevent chemotherapy from reaching
any stray cancer cells lurking in the scalp?
“Do they work and are they safe? Those
are the two big holes. We just don’t know, ”
said American Cancer Society spokes-
woman Kimberly Stump-Sutliff, an oncolo-
gy nurse who said studies abroad haven’t
settled those questions. “We need to know. ”
To Dr. Hope Rugo of the University of
California, San Francisco, the impact of
hair loss has been overlooked, even belit-
tled, by health providers. She’s had
patients delay crucial treatment to avoid it,
and others whose businesses suffered when
clients saw they were sick and shied away.
With more people surviving cancer, “we
need to make this experience as tolerable as
possible, so there’s the least baggage at
the end,” Rugo said.
“Quite frankly, it’s the first or second
question out of most patients’ mouths when
I tell them I recommend chemotherapy. It’s
not, ‘Is this going to cure me? It’s, ‘Am I
going to lose my hair?”’ adds Dr. Susan
Melin of North Carolina’s Wake Forest
Baptist Medical Center.
Later this summer, Rugo and Melin,
along with researchers at a few other hospi-
tals in New York and California, will begin
enrolling 110 early stage breast cancer
patients in a study of the DigniCap brand of
scalp cooling. The tight-fitting, insulated
cap is attached to a cooling machine to stay
around a shivery 41 degrees as patients
undergo chemo. Participants’ hair will be
photographed for experts to assess, and
they’ll be compared with a small group of
similarly ill patients who get chemo alone.
Lipton was among 20 U.S. patients who
pilot-tested the DigniCap in 2011, most of
whom kept more than half of their hair.
Lipton’s thinned quite a bit at the crown,
where the cap didn’t fit snugly. But because
her bangs and surrounding hair remained,
the mother of two covered the thinning
with a headband, not a wig. The side effect:
Pain and a headache as the cold set in.
“It wasn’t perfect, but it was easier,” said
Lipton, who’s healthy today.
“I felt normal much more
quickly. ”
If the larger study is suc-
cessful, Sweden’s Dignitana
AB plans to seek FDA
approval to market the med-
ical device in the U.S. The
move could open the way for
other brands and insurance
coverage.
Clearly there’s demand: Despite the lack
of FDAapproval, a growing number of U.S.
patients are renting a similar product,
called Penguin Cold Caps, from a British
company for $455 a month. Patients haul a
collection of caps to chemo sessions on
dry ice, or store them in special freezers
provided by about 50 hospitals. It’s delib-
erately separate from doctors’ and nurses’
care — typically, patients bring a friend
to help them switch caps every 20 to 30
minutes when one loses its chill.
“I know I’m sick, but I don’t want to
look it,” said Vanessa Thomas, 57, of
Baltimore, who is using the Penguin caps
at the recommendation of her doctor at
MedStar Harbor Hospital. Halfway
through her breast cancer treatment,
Thomas says her hair feels only a little
thinner.
The FDA declined comment on the
Penguin caps.
Beyond breast cancer, advocates say the
caps may be useful with other solid tumors
as well.
What’s the evidence behind scalp cool-
ing? Arecent review by oncologists in the
Netherlands found numerous overseas
studies conclude scalp cooling can work
— but it’s far from clear which patients are
most likely to benefit, even how cold the
scalp should be. That’s because most of
the research so far has been from observa-
tional studies that can’t provide proof. But
it seems harder to save hair with higher
doses and certain types of chemo.
Researchers at New York’s Weill Cornell
Breast Center reported at a recent meeting
of the American Society for Clinical
Oncology that among just over a dozen
Penguin cap users tracked so far, one lost
enough hair to use a wig.
Cold caps tested to prevent hair loss during chemo
While several types of cold caps are sold around the world,the Food and Drug Administration
hasn’t approved their use in the U.S.
18
Tuesday • July 23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
HEALTH
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diets, no exercise programs and best of all-
no downtime. Developed by Harvard scientists to
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is FDA-cleared, safe
and clinically proven.
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Avenue, Downtown San Mateo 94401
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Obama enrolling star
power to promote health care
WASHINGTON — President
Barack Obama is enrolling some
star power to promote health care.
Obama stopped by a private
White House meeting Monday with
celebrities including singer
Jennifer Hudson and actors Amy
Poehler, Michael Cera and Kal
Penn.
The White House says the artists
expressed interest in helping spread
the word about the health insurance
marketplaces opening Oct. 1.
The White House says Obama told
the artists they could help reach
young uninsured Americans who
will be vital to his signature law’s
success. Insurers need healthy
young customers to help offset the
costs of older, sicker consumers.
‘Alarming’ rise in children
injured by falling TVs
CHICAGO — Falling televisions
sent nearly 200,000 U.S. children
to the emergency room over 20
years and the injury rate has climbed
substantially for these sometimes
deadly accidents, a study found.
Doctors and safety experts say
better awareness is needed about the
dangers — especially the risks of
putting heavier, older model TVsets
on top of dressers and other furni-
ture young children may try to
climb on.
Most injuries are in kids under 5;
head and neck injuries including
concussions are the most common.
“This is a problem that is increas-
ing at an alarming rate,” said lead
author Dr. Gary Smith, a pediatric
emergency specialist and president
of the Child Injury Prevention
Alliance in Columbus, Ohio.
Health briefs
about how the implementation of
the new act requirements will affect
their businesses. The forum, she
said, was a great way to assist these
businesses with a smooth transi-
tion.
Kate Comfort Harr, HIP
Housing’s executive director, was
pleased to learn at the forum her
San Mateo nonprofit of less than
20 employees will be eligible for a
tax credit. According to the non-
profit Small Business Majority’s
research, there are more than
300,000 Californian businesses
eligible for tax credits for offering
health insurance.
“There’s so much misinforma-
tion and it was tremendously help-
ful,” Harr said. “I have lots of
friends with really small business-
es, so I took notes for them. I’m
left with a curiosity for how
exchanges will work and want to
get online because there seems to
be a log of stuff available to learn
about.”
On Oct. 1, enrollment for
Covered California will be avail-
able and the program will serve the
largest population of insured citi-
zens in the country. Those without
health insurance will be able to buy
it through Covered California.
Michael Lujan is the director of
sales and marketing for Covered
California and said he sees many
benefits to the implementation for
the uninsured.
“It’s a great experiment to get
everyone covered,” Lujan said at
the forum. “People take better care
of themselves when they go to the
doctor.”
Rhea Aguinaldo, the North
California Outreach Manager for
Small Business Majority, said cost
is the number one issue as to why
small businesses haven’t offered
health insurance. She said it’s
important that Covered California
try to control costs.
Jimmy Sigona of the family-
owned produce store Sigona’s
Farmers Market in Redwood City
and Palo Alto said he attended to
learn the impact of the changes on
business. His company employs
80 people.
“We don’t know the exact costs,”
Sigona said. “It could be $70,000
in expenses and this [forum] was
helpful. We’re still trying to under-
stand what the actual costs will be.”
Hal Anjo, Lyngso Garden
Materials human resources director,
came to the event to stay up to
speed on the latest health care
information since it’s important to
his field. His company has fewer
than 50 employees and has a quali-
ty health care program.
Others brought up concerns
about physician shortages because
of the additional Americans added
to the health care system.
Solutions included video confer-
encing appointments and expand-
ing the roles of nurse practitioners.
“Entrepreneurs are leveraging
technology,” Barbara A. Vohryzek,
deputy director for Small Business
at the Governor’s Office of
Business and Economic
Development, said at the forum.
“We’re always on the cutting edge
of innovation in California.”
The Affordable Health Care Act
passed its way through Congress in
2010. Rates for Covered California
will be announced on Aug. 1. In
2014, the penalty for not enrolling
in health insurance will be 1 per-
cent of annual income or $95,
whichever is greater.
The Redwood City-San Mateo
County Chamber of Commerce co-
hosted the event.
Continued from page 1
HEALTH
Horsley said he “resents” the
jury’s statement that the county did-
n’t paint an accurate picture of its
finances for voters faced with meas-
ures T, U and X in the June 5, 2012
election and Measure Ain the Nov.
6, 2012 election.
“It is casting aspersions that are
unfair and unfounded,” Horsley said.
The crux of the jury’s report enti-
tled “An inconvenient truth about
the county’s so-called ‘structural
deficit’” is ERAF, the money left
after schools meet their funding
requirements. San Mateo County is
one of only three counties statewide
that have extra funds and, while the
money has come every fiscal year
since 2004, Maltbie said it cannot
be considered anything beyond one-
time amounts.
For instance, Maltbie said, the
governor’s new school funding for-
mula may mean the county loses
$20 million to $30 million in
ERAF.
The jury, though, said ERAF
should be included because it is
about 5 percent of the total budget,
was used to balance the budget for
five fiscal years between 2009 and
2013 and paid for routine items like
adding positions and maintaining
the property tax system.
If the county actually counted
ERAF in its budget calculations,
there would be no actual deficit
because the extra amount is actually
more than the structural deficit, the
jury reported. The decrease in unre-
stricted funds from year to year is
not because of the structural deficit
but “extraordinary” expenditures
like $57 million to buy the Circle
Star office buildings and new jail
land, the jury report states.
The jury recommends the Board of
Supervisors report all anticipated
revenue, including ERAF, and
inform the public the most current
assessment of it deficit or surplus
when giving voters revenue meas-
ures. Had those procedures been in
place previously, voters would have
learned of the county’s $26 million
surplus in fiscal 2012 prior to pass-
ing measures T and A, according to
the report.
Measure T placed a 2.5 percent
rental car tax in the unincorporated
areas. Measure Aincreased the coun-
ty’s sales tax by a half-cent for the
next 10 years. The Board of
Supervisors is currently in the midst
of tentatively allocating the $64
million annually and on Tuesday
will consider multi-million dollar
requests by private Seton Medical
Center in Daly City and SamTrans.
The report released yesterday is
the latest aimed at the county and its
finances; the last questioned the
county’s unfunded pension liability
and concluded the debt is much
greater than presented. Horsley
thinks the focus on government
spending is a sign of the distrustful
times and that, while the criticism
keeps the county on its toes, it must
also be taken with a grain of salt.
Maltbie, who said he is not bash-
ful about questioning the grand
jury’s methods, takes the skepti-
cism future in calling its report
“completely untrue.” Maltbie said
the county and public cannot know
what information the jury uses
because its proceedings are done in
secret and their members unvetted
publicly.
Regardless, the grand jury reports
carry no legal weight but recipients
are required to respond in writing
within 90 days.
Continued from page 1
DEFICIT
HEALTH 19
Tuesday • July 23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Mike Stobbe
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATLANTA — Another reason to eat
breakfast: Skipping it may increase your
chances of a heart attack.
A study of older men found those who
regularly skipped breakfast had a 27 per-
cent higher risk of a heart attack than
those who ate a morning meal. There’s no
reason why the results wouldn’t apply to
other people, too, the Harvard researchers
said.
Other studies have suggested a link
between breakfast and obesity, high blood
pressure, diabetes and other health prob-
lems seen as precursors to heart problems.
“But no studies looked at long-term risk
of heart attack,” said Eric Rimm, one of
the study authors at the Harvard School of
Public Health.
Why would skipping breakfast be a
heart attack risk?
Experts aren’t certain, but here’s what
they think: People who don’t eat breakfast
are more likely to be hungrier later in the
day and eat larger meals. Those meals
mean the body must process a larger
amount of calories in a shorter amount of
time. That can spike sugar levels in the
blood and perhaps lead to clogged arteries.
But is a stack of syrupy pancakes,
greasy
eggs and
lots of
bacon really
better than eating
nothing?
The researchers did not ask
what the study participants ate for break-
fast, and were not prepared to pass judg-
ment on whether a fatty, sugary breakfast
is better than no breakfast at all.
Other experts agreed that it’s hard to
say.
“We
d o n ’ t
k n o w
w h e t h e r
it’s the tim-
ing or content of
breakfast that’s
important. It’s probably
both,” said Andrew Odegaard, a University
of Minnesota researcher who has studied a
link between skipping breakfast and
health problems like obesity and high
blood pressure.
“Generally, people who eat breakfast
tend to eat a healthier diet,” he added.
The new research was released Monday
by the journal Circulation. It was an
observational study, so it’s not designed
to prove a cause and effect. But when done
well, such studies can reveal important
health risks.
The researchers surveyed nearly 27,000
men about their eating habits in 1992.
About 13 percent of them said they regu-
larly skipped breakfast. They all were
educated health professionals - like den-
tists and veterinarians - and were at least
45.
Over the next 16 years, 1,527 suffered
fatal or non-fatal heart attacks, including
171 who had said they regularly skipped
breakfast.
In other words, over 7 percent of the
men who skipped breakfast had heart
attacks, compared to nearly 6 percent of
those who ate breakfast.
The researchers calculated the increased
risk at 27 percent, taking into account
other factors like smoking, drinking,
diet and health problems like high blood
pressure and obesity.
As many as 18 percent of U.S. adults
regularly skip breakfast, according to
federal estimates. So the study could be
important news for many, Rimm said.
“It’s a really simple message,” he said.
“Breakfast is an important meal.”
Skipping breakfast may increase heart attack risk
DATEBOOK 20
Tuesday • July 23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
TUESDAY, JULY 23
Senior Health: Keeping a Healthy
Mind. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Half Moon
Bay Library, 620 Correas St., Half Moon
Bay. Free. For more information call
726-3110.
Green talk. 7:15 p.m., 144 W. 25th
Ave., San Mateo. This month features
Gladwyn D’Souza, who is running for
Belmont City Council, and watch the
movie ‘Tapped.’ Free. For more
information go to
cagreens.org/sanmateo.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 24
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon to
1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E. Fourth
Ave. San Mateo. $17. For more
information call 430-6500 or go to
sanmateoprofessionalalliance.com.
Music in the Park — Madison Blues
Band. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Stafford Park,
corner of King Street and Hopkins
Avenue, Redwood City. Free.
Clubhouse — A Source of Hope for
Mental Health. 7 p.m. Hendrickson
Room in Mills Health Center, 100 S.
San Mateo Drive. Clubhouse is a
membership-based community
where people living with mental
illness come to rebuild their lives. Free.
For more information call 638-0800.
In the Moment, Japanese Art from
the Larry Ellison Collection Docent
Program. 7 p.m. Millbrae Library, 1
Library Ave. Art in traditional settings
and Ellison’s displays of art in his
Japanese-style home. Free. For more
information call 697-7607.
An Evening with Author Hallie
Ephron in Conversation with Cara
Black. 7 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Hallie
Ephron is an American novelist, book
reviewer, journalist and writing
teacher. Free. For more information
email conrad@smcl.org.
Little Johnny and the Giants (Club
Fox Blues Jam). 7 p.m. Club Fox, 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. $5. For more
information call (877) 435-9849 or go
to www.clubfoxrwc.com.
Free Badminton Clinic
Demonstration taught by U.S.
Olympians, Howard Bach and Ben
Lee. 7 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. Dan Cook
Gymnasium, PJCC, 800 Foster City
Blvd., Foster City. Open to the public.
Free. For more information call 212-
7522 or go to www.pjcc.org.
THURSDAY, JULY 25
Designing Strategic Initiatives —
HR Business Partner Series. 7:30
a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Sequoia, 1850
Gateway Drive, Suite 600, San Mateo.
Examine the new rules of
engagement and discover how
designing strategic initiatives will
create a one-of-a-kind organizational
culture. General: $35; NCHRA
Members: Free. For more information
call (415) 291-1992 or go to
www.nchra.org.
New Leaf Community Day. 8 a.m. to
9 p.m. New Leaf Community Markets,
150 San Mateo Road, Half Moon Bay.
Five percent of the day’s sales will be
given to the Boys and Girls Club. Free.
For more information go to
www.newleaf.com.
What’s the buzz? 3 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.
San Mateo Public Library, 55 W. Third
Ave., San Mateo. Learn all about
honeybees and beekeeping from
beekeeper Kendal Sager. Free. For
more information call 522-7838.
Devils Slide Concept Plan. 7 p.m. to
9 p.m. Cypress Meadows Conference
Center, 343 Cypress Ave., Moss Beach.
The San Mateo County Parks
Department will be holding a public
meeting to present the conceptual
plans for the Devils Slide Trail and
receive public comments on the
plans. The project involves the
conversion of the segment of
Highway 1 south of the city of Pacifica
that was closed after the opening of
the Devils Slide Bypass Tunnels into a
public multi-use non-motorized trail.
Free. For more information email
ParksandRecreation@smcgov.org.
FRIDAY, JULY 26
PS Performers Variety Show. Noon.
Twin Pines Senior and Community
Center.The PS Performers will perform
a musical variety show and ice cream
will be served afterward. Free. For
reservations call 595-7444.
Affordable Books at the Book
Nook. Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage Lane,
Twin Pines Park, Belmont. All proceeds
benefit the Belmont Library. Prices
vary. For more information call 592-
5650 or go to www.thefobl.org.
Art on the Square and The West
Coast Soul/Blues Review: Pam
Hawkins, Roman Carter and Jackie
Payne. 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Courthouse
Square, 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City. Music will begin at 6 p.m. Free.
For more information call 780-7311.
Summer Concert: E-Ticket Band. 6
p.m. to 8 pm. Burton Park, 1070 Cedar
St., San Carlos. Free. For more
information go to
www.cityofsancarlos.org.
South San Francisco Open Mic. 7
p.m. to 11 p.m. 116 El Campo Drive,
South San Francisco. Free. For more
information call 451-2450.
Waltz, Polka, Tango, Charleston and
other dancing. 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Veterans Memorial Senior Center,
1455 Madison Ave., Redwood City.
There will be light refreshments, water
and coffee. $5 per person, $7 for non-
members.
Outdoor Movie Night. 8 p.m. Orange
Memorial Park, 781 Tennis Drive,
South San Francisco. Bring blankets
or chairs for a showing of the movie,
Brave. Free. For more information call
829-3800.
Coastal Rep Presents ‘HAIR.’ 8 p.m.
Coastal Repertory Theatre, 1167 Main
St., Half Moon Bay. $27. For more
information call 569-3266 or go to
www.coastalrep.com.
Movies on the Square: ‘Rise of the
Guardians.’ 8:45 p.m. Courthouse
Square, 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City. Free. For more information call
780-7311 or go to
www.redwoodcity.org/events/movies
.html.
Live Salsa, Bachata, Merengue and
Cha Cha Cha with Candela. 9 p.m.
Club Fox, 2209 Broadway, Redwood
City. $15. For more information call
(877) 435-9849 or go to
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
SATURDAY, JULY 27
Burlingame walking tour. Meet at
Burlingame’s historic train station for
a three-block walking tour of
downtown. Free. For more
information call 348-2614 or email
MsJGarrison@aol.com.
San Bruno American Legion Post
No. 409 Community Breakfast. 8:30
a.m. to 11 a.m. The American Legion
San Bruno Post No. 409, 757 San
Mateo Ave., San Bruno. Scrambled
eggs, pancakes, bacon, ham or
sausage and French toast will be
served. There will also be juice, coffee
or tea. $8 for adults and $5 for children
under 10. For more information call
583-1740.
Art on the Square. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Courthouse Square, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Free. For more
information call 780-7311 or go to
http://www.redwoodcity.org.
Affordable Books at the Book
Nook. Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage Lane,
Twin Pines Park, Belmont. All proceeds
benefit the Belmont Library. Prices
vary. For more information call 592-
5650 or go to www.thefobl.org.
Millbrae LibraryChinese BookClub.
1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Millbrae Library, 1
Library Ave., Millbrae. Lecture on the
second Sino-Japanese War and how
it started with Ruan Da-ren, historian,
in Mandarin Chinese. For more
information call 697-7607.
Sculpture by Helen Morrison and
‘Meditations’ by Sim Van der Ryn
Reception. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Peninsula
Museum of Art, 1777 California Drive,
Burlingame. The exhibitions will be
open through Oct. 6 during museum
hours. Free. For more information call
692-2101 or go to
peninsulamuseum.org.
Eric Van James Trio. 1:30 p.m. to 4:30
p.m. Sam’s Chowder House, 4210 N.
Cabrillo Highway, Half Moon Bay. No
cover charge. For more information
call 712-0245.
Wild Things, Inc. 2 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Experience live wild animals
at the library. For more information
call 591-8286.
Financial Workshops by the
Salvation Army and Wells Fargo. 2
p.m. to 3 p.m. 409 S. Spruce Ave., South
San Francisco. Free. For more
information contact
laine.hendricks@usw.salvationarmy.or
g.
Elvis Show and Dance Party with
‘Manny.’ 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. San Bruno
Senior Center, 1555 Crystal Springs
Road, San Bruno. Includes light snacks
and cash bar. $12 in advance, $15 at
the door. For more information call
616-7150.
Legally Blonde the Musical. 7:30
p.m. Mountain View Center for the
Performing Arts, 500 Castro St.,
Mountain View. Tickets are available
at pytnet.org and may also be
ordered through the Mountain View
Center ticket office. $20 for adults,
$16 for seniors and children under
12, $7 per person for groups of 10 or
more. For more information and for
tickets call 903-6000.
Benefit for the Fisher House with
Mick & The Big Dawg Patriots. 8
p.m. Club Fox, 2209 Broadway,
Redwood City. $17. For more
information call (877) 435-9849 or go
to www.clubfoxrwc.com.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
governance to elected officials.
Back in 2005, then-Belmont mayor
Dave Warden sent a letter to each
mayor of the cities on the JPA that
urged them to consider putting only
elected officials on the board so that
they could make decisions regarding
policy and the naming of the executive
director.
The SBWMA is also known as
RethinkWaste and its members include
Atherton, Belmont, Burlingame, East
Palo Alto, Foster City, Hillsborough,
Menlo Park, Redwood City, San
Carlos, San Mateo, San Mateo County
and the West Bay Sanitary District.
“Only three cities at that time
responded positively, some were even
negative,” Belmont Councilwoman
Coralin Feierbach wrote the Daily
Journal in an email yesterday. “Most
of the other mayors didn’t even
respond. Finally now it’s coming to
pass and I’m very glad it is.”
Feierbach said the SBWMA should
be governed like the South Bayside
Systems Authority is with elected offi-
cials. The SBSAis a JPAthat deals with
sewer issues for its south San Mateo
County members.
Overseeing taxpayer money should
be the job of elected officials, the
Belmont City Council urged years ago.
“The ability of the SBWMA to com-
mit public funds should be the respon-
sibility of those of us who are elected
to represent the citizens of our respec-
tive communities, not appointed staff
as is the current structure,” Warden
wrote to mayors back in 2005.
Today, both the county Board of
Supervisors and Belmont City Council
are expected to vote in favor of amend-
ing the JPAas Warden requested nearly
eight years ago. If they do, that would
be the sixth and seventh agencies to
agree to change the board’s makeup.
San Carlos officials have offered
their own slightly different amend-
ment.
To change the joint powers agree-
ment, eight of the 12 agencies must
agree, which they are expected to do
considering the Blue Ribbon Task
Force recommendation for the change.
But switching the county’s solid
waste board from senior city staff
members to elected officials has no
demonstrable advantage, according to
a civil grand jury report released just
last month.
The SBWMA negotiates waste rates
for its member agencies and oversees
the Shoreway Environmental Center in
San Carlos, which provides recycling.
The civil grand jury concluded the
SBWMAwould not benefit significant-
ly by doing so and that elected officials
already have sufficient influence on
major decisions such as contracts and
rate increases.
Last year, RethinkWaste suffered a
bit of a hiccup when one of its former
employees accused its executive direc-
tor of playing favoritism when award-
ing some contracts. The allegation
prompted an internal investigation
that also caused current state Sen. Jerry
Hill, D-San Mateo, to bring back the
idea of changing the board’s makeup.
He said last year that elected officials
would be more accountable to the pub-
lic.
The Belmont City Council meets
7:30 p.m. tonight, City Hall, 1 Twin
Pines Lane, Belmont.
Continued from page 1
BOARD
ment period, many parents and students
brought up a desire to seek legal action
against ETS to release the scores.
Mills parent Paul Seto, a former
Millbrae councilman, said he thinks
ETS will not take the students’ appeals
seriously until a lawsuit is filed. Seto
hopes the district decides to file a suit as
soon as today.
Otherwise, Seto and other parents will
likely seek legal action on their own.
Parent Ken Wong said parents and stu-
dents should have been able to get
involved back in May.
“What are you going to do?” Wong
said. “ETS seems to hold all the cards.”
One parent cited the 2011 Oakland’s
Skyline High School case against ETS
that included testing irregularities. The
ETS conducted the statistical evaluation
and determined that only 30 students had
to retest, and not the entire school.
“The only difference I can see between
our school and Skyline’s is a socioeco-
nomic difference,” the parent said.
The crowd erupted in applause and
cheers when recent graduate Grant
Murphy said the test is more than just
the $90 fee.
“It’s not about the money, it’s about
our futures,” Murphy said. “It seems like
a rip-off.”
Recent graduate Jessica Liang, who
will attend Yale University in the fall,
said signing up for a retake could hurt
their case if they took it to court. Liang
cited a 2008 case of AP score invalida-
tions at Trabuco Hills High School in
Southern California, in which all of the
students decided to sign up for retests
and the decision to invalidate the previ-
ous scores held.
Elizabeth McManus, deputy superin-
tendent of business services, represent-
ed the district at the meeting, as other
district officials were away at a confer-
ence.
McManus said the district became
aware of situation about seating irregu-
larities mid-May. The invalidations
were not warranted and the district didn’t
expect such a harsh penalty, she said.
McManus recommended students
retake the test, but take an alternate
track as well that involves legal action.
The district legal counsel Lozano
Smith Attorneys said the district had a
teleconference with College Board on
Friday and yesterday.
“College Board is resolute so far in
their decision,” their counsel said at the
meeting. “They believe a thorough
investigation was done and consider the
original test to be totally invalid. We
suggested statistical analysis to see if
seating irregularities made a difference
and they said they don’t do statistical
analysis.”
The College Board has identified 44
colleges for all students whose scores
were invalidated, the district stated. The
district’s lawyers said the College Board
is offering to work with students to
expedite the retest and a write a letter to
any college students apply to that the
retest is not the fault of the student.
State Sen. Leland Yee, D-San
Mateo/San Francisco spoke at the meet-
ing and said his office has contacted
ETS. He is interested in this particular
issue and there is something to be said
about fairness, he said.
“Students were taking the exam under
rules they were given,” Yee said. “Right
now we are at a point where I don’t have
anything more we can say. It seems as if
the College Board has had different
results and conclusions depending on
what area.”
Anew Change.org petition has a little
more than 1,000 signatures from sup-
porters asking the Board of Trustees of
the College Board to reconsider the can-
cellation of the school’s AP scores.
Students, teachers and parents have con-
tinued posting on whyweneedourscores-
back.com to explain their reasons for
needing the test scores.
Overall, more than 4 million AP
Exams were administered in May 2013,
with fewer than 6,000 exams invalidat-
ed due to issues such testing irregulari-
ties, security problems and lost/miss-
ing answer sheets, ETS stated.
For now, the College Board is still
saying APtest takers need to sign up for
Aug. 5-12 retests by tomorrow, July 24.
There are no alternate retesting dates. A
refund is another option. The scores
were supposed to be released July 5.
Another community meeting is set for
tomorrow night at Mills, the location is
to be determined.
Continued from page 1
MILLS
COMICS/GAMES
7-23-13
monday’s PUZZLE soLVEd
PrEVioUs
sUdokU
answErs
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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1 Refrain syllables
4 Travel on powder
7 Flower holder
11 Yuck!
12 Type size
14 Plato’s vowel
15 Combined (2 wds.)
17 Horse’s gait
18 Swirled
19 Climb
21 Commotion
22 Dove sound
23 Viscous
26 Titleholders
29 LP player (hyph.)
30 Dutch colonist
31 Sailor’s assent
33 USN rank
34 Mineral deposits
35 Baby-sit
36 Spurred on
38 Cowboy competition
39 Happy shout
40 Like cool cats
41 Concert bonus
44 Puts up
48 Spineless
49 Weathers (2 wds.)
51 Leisure
52 Meditation method
53 “Big Blue”
54 Ollie’s partner
55 Composer — Rorem
56 “Mona Lisa” crooner
down
1 Minstrel’s instrument
2 Mellowed
3 Large herring
4 Really fast
5 Buster
6 RN posting
7 Funny TV show
8 Split
9 James Bond’s school
10 Marshal Dillon
13 Army helicopters
16 Orange Bowl city
20 Fly high
23 Yon maiden
24 Ding-a- — (airhead)
25 In that case (2 wds.)
26 Woman on campus (hyph.)
27 Forked over
28 New Year’s Eve word
30 Where ale is made
32 Shoguns’ capital
34 Smell
35 Broods
37 Roused from sleep
38 Go over again
40 Waffe
41 Wool givers
42 Not cluttered
43 Home, to Jose
45 Pocket change
46 Brass instrument
47 Bill, briefy
50 Charged particle
diLBErT® Crossword PUZZLE
fUTUrE sHoCk®
PEarLs BEforE swinE®
GET fUZZy®
TUEsday, JULy 23, 2013
LEo (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Although you usually
fare better when you have lots of time to ponder a
decision, a snap judgment will turn out quite well
today. Don’t second-guess yourself.
VirGo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- You are in a brief,
favorable cycle where your fnancial affairs are
concerned. Be alert and ready to move quickly
should an unexpected, potentially proftable
development come your way.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- You might be more inclined
to think about pleasure than work. Fortunately, you
should be able to enjoy yourself without it interfering
with or distracting you from your job.
sCorPio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- A number of little
things that you failed to fnish will demand some
attention. However, you’ll enjoy sweeping the deck
clean. Sometimes, it’s nice to have a clean slate.
saGiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Something quite
fortuitous could develop through a friend you run
into by chance. You and this person have always
been able to help each other quite well.
CaPriCorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Although you’re
usually exceptionally lucky where your material
interests are concerned, you’re not always necessarily
so in other areas. So, keep your mind on making
money, and don’t worry about other things, today.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Don’t be reluctant
to discard any old, unworkable methods in favor
of newer and better procedures. This might be
one of those days when it pays to switch horses in
midstream.
PisCEs (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Someone you treated
very considerately in the past has been very eager
to repay you, and today might bring that chance.
Accept this person’s attempt at reciprocation with a
glad heart and open arms.
ariEs (March 21-April 19) -- It would behoove you
to socialize with some progressive thinkers today.
You’ll easily recognize clever ideas when you hear
them, and you’ll know exactly how to put them to use.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) -- Be on the lookout for
some innovative ideas, especially some that may apply
to an area that has been causing you concern. Make
your move quickly, however; time may not be your ally.
GEmini (May 21-June 20) -- A person of foreign
heritage or one born in a distant place is likely to
play a constructive role in your affairs. Be alert, so
you can take full advantage of this person’s help.
CanCEr (June 21-July 22) -- This could be an
exciting day, especially regarding a joint endeavor
of some kind. An extraordinary happening might
develop that you’ll want to be a part of.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Tuesday • July 23, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Tuesday • July 23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
IRISH HELP AT HOME
HIRING NOW
Caregivers wanted for a variety of posts
in the South Bay area
Transportation preferred
Work one-on-one in the client’s home
Competitive rates of pay
Call (650) 347-6903
Website: irishhelpathome.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
Employment Services
110 Employment
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
EXPERIENCED PIZZA Maker, Eve-
nings, Avanti Pizza, (650)508-1000 2040
Ralston Ave. Belmont
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
Hourly and Live In
Sign on bonus
650-458-0356
recruiter@homecarecal.com
CARLMONT GARDENS
NURSING CENTER
2140 Carlmont Drive, Bel-
mont, CA 94002
Immediate openings: CNAs
- experience preferred. Must
be able to work 4-on, 2-off
schedule. Apply in person.
We hire nice people!
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
CUSTOMER SERVICE/
SEAMSTRESS -
YOU ARE INVITED
Are you:
Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have:
Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for emplployment benefits
Sewiing skills
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available for
Customer Service/Seamstress.
Call for appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo CA, 94402
GREAT CLIPS
@ Sequoia Station
Redwood City
Now Hiring
Stylists & Managers.
Call Flo/Randy
408 247-8364 or 408 921-9994
Grand Opening Soon!
HIRING LINE COOKS - Evenings, Avan-
ti Pizza. . 3536 Alameda, MENLO PARK,
CA (650)854-1222.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RESTAURANT -
Now hiring for Quick Service / Counter
Service positions. Apply in person at
753 Laurel Street, San Carlos
SALESFORCE.COM, INC. has the fol-
lowing positions open in San Mateo.
Senior Member of Technical Staff,
Software Engineering: Responsible for
designing, implementing, developing,
coding, unit testing, and Functional Test-
ing of Software Systems and Features.
Member of Technical Staff, Software
Engineering: Analyze, architect, and
design highly scalable and high perform-
ance components, and data
processing/analysis infrastructure/tools.
Technical Support (Tier 2) Associate
Engineer: Answer technical questions,
solve technical problems, and suggest
appropriate workarounds related to sup-
ported applications.
Data Analyst: Develop and perform on-
going data quality measurement, verifica-
tion, and enhancement processes.
To apply or for more information, please
go to http://www.salesforce.com/compa-
ny/careers/
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. All shifts
available. Call (650)703-8654
UBER AND Limo and Taxi Driver
Wanted, Living in south bay making $600
to $900 a week, Fulltime, (650)766-9878
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256575
The following person is doing business
as: Clinoso, 1305 Morse Blvd., SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Philip Jeffrey
Marquis, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Philip J. Marquis /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/02/13, 07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256503
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: 1) California Auto Center, 2)
California Auto Center, Millbrae 316 El
Camino Real, Millbrae, CA 94030 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: 1) Andrew Lam, 751 California Dr.,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010, 2) Zhi Ren Li
1200 E. Hillsdale Blvd., #220, Foster
City, CA 94404, 3) Powai Leung, 125 El
Camino Real, San Bruno, CA 94066, 4)
Feng Wang Zhao, 16 Via Ambra, New-
port Coast, CA 92657. The business is
conducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 08/02/2013.
/s/ Andrew Lam /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/24/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/02/13, 07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13.)
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 522104
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Natalie Nickole Brauckmiller
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Natalie Nickole Brauckmiller
filed a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Natalie Nickole Brauck-
miller, Natalie Nickole Maxon, Natalie
Nickole Abrams
Proposed name: Natalie Nickole Abrams
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on August 27,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 07/15/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 07/05/2013
(Published, 07/23/13, 07/30/2013,
08/06/2013, 08/13/2013)
23 Tuesday • July 23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256338
The following person is doing business
as: California Auto Center, Burlingame,
751 California Dr., BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Lam, Andrew, Inc, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 06/18/2013.
/s/ Andrew Lam /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/02/13, 07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256244
The following person is doing business
as: Aquarius Water Filtration, 742 Dart-
mouth Ave., SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Bradford Nickel, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Bradford Nickel /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/02/13, 07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256193
The following person is doing business
as: Tony’s Tree Trimming Service’s, 485
Huntington Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA
94066 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Maveve Tony Latu and Mafi-
leo Eleanor Latu. same address. The
business is conducted by a Married Cou-
ple. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Mafileo E. Taumoepeau /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/02/13, 07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256216
The following person is doing business
as: 2020venture, 3345 Marisma Street,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Musa
Sayyed, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 06/03/2013.
/s/ Musa Sayyed /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/02/13, 07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256348
The following person is doing business
as: Populus Energy, LLC, 951 Mariners
Island Blvd., #384, SAN MATEO, CA
94404 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Populus, LLC, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Limited Liability.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 02/06/2013.
/s/ Seth Portner /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/02/13, 07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256654
The following person is doing business
as: 1) The Learning Lab, 2) Learning
Lab, 1050 Chestnut St., Ste 201, MEN-
LO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Amanda
Sparr, 20 Willow Rd., #24, MENLO
PARK, CA 94025. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 07/08/2013.
/s/ Amanda J. Sparr /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256658
The following person is doing business
as: Lai Lai Restaurant, 334 Broadway,
MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Jimmy Lai
Lai & Company, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 10/31/1983.
/s/ Vincent Lin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256414
The following person is doing business
as: QBeFiT, 1072 Shell Blvd., Ste. 1,
FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Andrew F.
Stebbins, 351 Stanchion Lane, Foster
City, CA 94404. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 05/01/2012.
/s/ Andrew F. Stebbins /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256565
The following person is doing business
as: Maggie’s Medical, 1075 Annapolis
Street, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Maggie LaBarbera, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 06/23/2013.
/s/ Margaret LaBarbera /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256314
The following person is doing business
as: Avenue Lesage, 1208 Admiralty
Lane, FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Celine Hakoun, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Celine Hakoun /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256470
The following person is doing business
as: Pendragon Studios, 871 Newport Cir-
cle, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94065 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Debra Elaine Fowler, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Debra E. Fowler /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256476
The following person is doing business
as: The Law Offices of Francoise Espino-
za, 430 Peninsula Ave., Suite 3, San Ma-
teo, CA 94401 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Francoise Caroline
Espinoza, 16 West Barrymore St., Stock-
ton, CA 95204. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 03/25/2013.
/s/ Francoise Espinoza /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256584
The following person is doing business
as: C U Members Mortgage, a Division of
Colonial Savings, F.A., 4100 Newport
Place, Suite 280, NEWPORT BEACH,
CA 92660 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Colonial Savings, F.A.,
TX. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
05/01/1994.
/s/ Kenneth Majka /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256585
The following person is doing business
as: Colonial National Mortgage, a Divi-
sion of Colonial Savings, F.A., 4100
Newport Place, Suite 280, NEWPORT
BEACH, CA 92660 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Colonial Savings,
F.A., TX. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
05/01/1994.
/s/ Kenneth Majka /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256667
The following person is doing business
as: Lauren Clayton Inc., 1308 Bayshore
Hwy., #101, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Lauren Clayton Inc., CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 10/26/2012.
/s/ Donald Gibson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256691
The following person is doing business
as: Green Collar Limo, 1308 Bayshore
Hwy., #101, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Green Collar Limo, Inc., CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 02/05/2013.
/s/ Patrick Richard Deschamps /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256668
The following person is doing business
as: Coldwell Banker Optima Realty, 1435
Huntington Ave., #310, SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: BEZ Group,
Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
06/26/2013.
/s/ Edward Wong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256442
The following person is doing business
as: Law Office of Dolores Gonzalez, 11
Airport Blvd., Ste. 209, SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Dolores
Gonzalez, 1069 Grand Ave., South San
Francisco, CA 94080. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 06/03/2013.
/s/ Dolores Gonzalez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256635
The following person is doing business
as: Alexander Property Care Services,
200 East 39th Avenue, SAN MATEO, CA
94403 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Karen M. Alexander, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Karen M. Alexander /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256765
The following person is doing business
as: Julie’s Hair and Nail Salon, 755 Ber-
muda Drive, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Thanh Ngoc Tran, 1992 Tobago Ave.,
San Jose, CA 95122. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Thanh Ngoc Tran /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256711
The following person is doing business
as: 1)Bay Capital Real Estate, 2) Bay
Capital, 3) Bay Capital Realty, 36 W. Bel-
levue Avenue, SAN MATEO, CA 94402
is hereby registered by the following
owner: David Howarth, 795 Burnette
Ave., #5, San Francisco, CA 94131. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ David Howarth/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13, 08/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256851
The following person is doing business
as: The Paradise Gardener, 973 Daisy
St., San Mateo, CA 94401 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Elie Ta-
baa, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Elie Tabaa /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13, 08/13/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256846
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: 1)Mamata Day Care, 2)PK
Software Services, 1529 Beach Park
Blvd., FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is here-
by registered by the following owners:
Pradip Kumar Banerjee & Mamata Bane-
rjee, same address. The business is con-
ducted by a Married Couple. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Pradip Kumar Banerjee /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13, 08/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256745
The following person is doing business
as: Dogland Rescue, 633 O’Neill Street,
BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Michael
Tuck, 502 Edgewood Road, Redwood
City, CA 94062. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Michael Tuck /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13, 08/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256859
The following person is doing business
as: Redwood Mobile Estates, 2053 East
Bayshore Road, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94063 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Redwood Mobile Estates,
Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
07/01/1964.
/s/ Rick DeBenedetti /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13, 08/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256462
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: RMV Registration Motor Vehi-
cles, 21 S. San Mateo Dr., SAN MATEO,
CA 94401 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owners: Salvador Costillo Cue-
vas, 556 Mangels Ave., San Francisco,
CA 94127 and William David Mena,
1169 Adams St., Redwood City, CA
94061. The business is conducted by a
General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Salvador Costillo Cuevas /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13, 08/13/13).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #M-247712
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Cali-
fornia Auto Center, 751 California Dr.,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 The fictitious
business name referred to above was
filed in County on 11/21/11 The business
was conducted by: Lam, Andrew, Inc.
/s/ Andrew Lam /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 06/24/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 07/02/13,
07/09/13, 07/16/2013, 07/23/2013).
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, SOLD!
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIER 5200 BTU window air conditioner
- never used, in box, SOLD!
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WEBER BRAND Patio Refrigerator,
round top load, for beer, soda, and wa-
ter. $30 obo SOLD!
298 Collectibles
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $75.,
(650)596-0513
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo SOLD!
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
84 USED European (34) and U.S. (50)
Postage Stamps. Most issued before
World War II. All different and all detach-
ed from envelopes. $4.00, 650-787-
8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BARBIE BLUE CONVERTIBLE plus ac-
ccessories, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)344-6565
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MENORAH - Antique Jewish tree of life,
10”W x 30”H, $100., (650)348-6428
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo, SOLD!
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $35 (650)341-8342
24
Tuesday • July 23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 West African
amulet
5 Repelled a
mugger, in a way
10 Study at the last
minute
14 Loads (of)
15 Garlic mayonnaise
16 Principle
governing play,
as in golf
17 Feint on the ice
18 Best kind of
wrinkles to have,
arguably
20 Afore
21 Either “Fargo”
director
22 Prepares, as
salad
23 Infield shape
25 Kilt wearer
26 Flag maker Betsy
27 Skipped the
subway and bus
31 Sparkly stone
33 Prepare for
vacation
34 Olympic pool
division
35 Tempe sch.
36 What the starts of
18- and 57-
Across and 3-
and 28-Down
can be
39 Caribbean music
40 Telephoned
42 Three-part cookie
43 First-string squad
45 Capital on the
Danube
47 Cornfield bird
48 Passion
49 Home of the
NHL’s
Blackhawks,
familiarly
52 Hitting bottom,
spirits-wise
55 Elvis __ Presley
56 Letter after pi
57 Port in a storm
59 Lose traction
60 Japanese golfer
Aoki
61 Melt glaze from,
as a windshield
62 Soccer immortal
63 Bit of a florist’s
greenery
64 Blunted swords
65 Mars : Rome : :
__ : Greece
DOWN
1 Blasé
2 Where embryos
develop
3 Kid
4 Half of deux
5 Bricks-and-
mortar workers
6 Used a scope
7 Piggy bank
addition
8 Letter-shaped
annex
9 Drink for the
calorie-conscious
10 Pricey brand of
bubbly
11 Seeks an office
12 Away from the
breeze
13 Untidy heap
19 “Over there!”
21 Trig function
24 Chic
25 Deserving of a
standing O
27 “Be quiet,” in
music
28 Social agency
employee
29 “My Way” lyricist
Paul
30 Laser emission
31 Clothing
32 Son of Isaac and
Rebekah
33 Break down
grammatically
37 1973 landmark
court decision
38 “Mack the Knife”
singer Bobby
41 Spanish Main
ship
44 Playground
squealer
46 “The House at __
Corner”
47 Weekly allowance
earners
49 “Time in a Bottle”
singer Jim
50 Vague time
period
51 Bumps on a log
52 “I don’t think
so!”
53 Shock, as a
perp
54 Not near here
55 “__ Baby”: “Hair”
song
58 Exercise unit
59 Massage locale
By Gareth Bain
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
07/23/13
07/23/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
298 Collectibles
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, SOLD!
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500
(650)766-3024
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
HARMON/KANDON SPEAKERS (2)
mint condition, great, for small
office/room or extra speakers, 4 1/2 in.
high, includes cords $8., SOLD!
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1 COFFEE table - 15" high x 24" wide x
50 1/2 " long. Dk walnut with 3 sections
of glass inset. $100.00 (650)726-3568
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center draw locks all comes with
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
2 END tables - 18" x 21" Dk brown wood
with glass tops & open bottoms. $ 75.00
(650)726-3568
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 LAMPS. 25" high. Cream ceramic With
white shades. $60.00 set. (650)726-3568
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3 MEDAL base kitchen cabinets with
drawers and wood doors $99
(650)347-8061
7 FOOT couch with recliners & massag-
ers on ends. Brown. $100.00
(650)726-3568
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
304 Furniture
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR (2), with arms, Italian 1988 Cha-
teau D'Ax, solid, perfect condition. $50
each or $85 for both. (650)591-0063
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet with 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
COPENHAGEN TEAK DINING TABLE
with dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions.
48/88" long x 32" wide x 30" high.
SOLD!
COUCH - reclines, very good condition,
fabric material, San Mateo area, $50
(510)303-0454
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 draw dresser 61" wide,
31" high, & 18" deep $50., (650)592-
2648
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
GLASS DINING Table 41” x 45” Round-
ed rectangle clear glass top and base
$85 (650)888-0129
304 Furniture
GLIDE ROCKER with foot stool. Dk
brown walnut with brown cushions.
$75.00 (650)726-3568
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, SOLD!
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OAK SCHOOL DESK - with ink well,
pencil holder and under seat book shelf,
great for a childs room or office, $48.,
(650)574-4439
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE , UMBRELLA & 6
CHAIRS - metal/vinyl, $35.,
(650)344-6565
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
RECLINER ROCKER - Like new, brown,
vinyl, $99., SOLD!
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR & HASSOCK - light
wood, gold cushions. SOLD!
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR with wood carving,
armrest, rollers, and it swivels $99.,
(650)592-2648
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WICKER ENTERTAINMENT CABINET -
H 78” x 43” x 16”, almost new, $89.,
(650)347-9920
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
3 PIECE fireplace set with screen $25
(650)322-2814
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, (650)578-9208
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
306 Housewares
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
1/2 HORSE power 8" worm drive skill
saw $40 OBO (650)315-5902
10" BAN Saw $75.STOP
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
BLACK & DECKER CORDLESS 18 volt
combo drill, vacuum, saw, sander, two
batteries & charger, brand new, $95.
obo, SOLD!
BLACK AND Decker, 10” trimmer/edger
, rechargeable, brand new, $50 SOLD!
BOB VILLA rolling tool box & organizer -
brand new with misc. tools, $40. obo,
SOLD!
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTMANS PROFESSIONAL car buf-
fer with case $40 OBO (650)315-5902
CRAFTSMAN 14.4 VOLT DRILL - bat-
tery & charger, never used, $35. obo,
SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 3/8” 16.8 volt drill & vac-
uum combo, brand new, with charger,
$45. obo, SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DREMEL HIGH SPEED ROTARY TOOL
- all attachments, never used, $25. obo
SOLD!
ELECTRIC HEDGE trimmer good condi-
tion (Black Decker) $40 (650)342-6345
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 21” Belt Sander with long cord,
$35 (650)315-5902
NEW DRILL DRIVER - 18V + battery &
charger, $30., (650)595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SANDER, MAKITA finishing sander, 4.5
x 4.5"' used once. Complete with dust
bag and hard shell case. $35.00 SOLD!
SMALL ROTETILLER 115 Volt Works
well, SOLD!
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
TORO ELECTRIC POWER SWEEPER
blower - never used, in box, $35. obo,
(650)591-6842
309 Office Equipment
COPIER - Brother BCP7040, Laser(black
& white), printer & fax machine, $35.,
(650)212-7020
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
3 LARGE old brown mixing bowls $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
310 Misc. For Sale
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History,
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
5 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $9. for all
(650)347-5104
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
AIR CONDITIONER - Window mount,
SOLD!
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALOE VERA PLANTS - (30) medicine
plant, $3.00 each, (650)678-1989
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN - (7) Olde Brooklyn
lanterns, battery operated, safe, new in
box, $100. for all, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASTRONOMY BOOKS (2) Hard Cover
Cambridge Encyclopedia of Astronomy,
World of Discovery, $12., (650)578-9208
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14., (650)578-9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BASS PRO SPOTLIGHT - (2) one mil-
lion candlelight, new in box, $100 for
both, (650)726-1037
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, $40,
(650)347-5104
BAY BRIDGE Framed 50th anniversary
poster (by Bechtel corp) $50
(650)873-4030
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection SOLD!
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
COLEMAN ICE CHEST - 80 quart, $20.,
(650)345-3840
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
(650)578-9208
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOOD HEALTH FACT BOOK - un-
used, answers to get/stay healthy, hard
cover, 480 pages, $8., (650)578-9208
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HABACHI BBQ Grill heavy iron 22" high
15" wide $25 SOLD!
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15., (650)345-
3840
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
25 Tuesday • July 23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
310 Misc. For Sale
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model",SOLD!
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide in wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAUNDRY SORTER - on wheels, triple
section, laundry sorter - $19., (650)347-
9920
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12” L x
5”W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, (650)341-1861
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW COWBOY BOOTS - 9D, Unworn,
black, fancy, only $85., (650)595-3933
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., (650)578-9208
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
Ideal for Apartment balconies. 33" wide x
20 inches deep. 64.5 " high. $70.00
SSF, (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS & CD un-
opened, “Calculate with Confidence”, 4th
edition, like new, $25., (650)345-3277
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS - “Human
Physiology Mechanisms of Disease”, 6th
edition, $15., and “Pathphysiology Bio-
logic Basics”, 4th edition, $25., (650)345-
3277
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SAFETY SHOES - Iron Age, Mens steel
toe metatarfal work boots, brown, size 10
1/2, in box, $50., (650)594-1494
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SLIDE PROJECTOR - Airequipt Super-
ba 66A slide projector and screen.
$50.00 for all. (650)345-3840
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STAINED GLASS panels multi colors
beautiful work 35" long 111/2" wide $79
OBO (650)349-6059
STAINED GLASS,
28”x30” Japanese geisha motif, multi
colored, beautiful. $200 (650)520-9366
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, (650)341-1861
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
“UP STAIRS DOWN STAIRS” - first two
years, 14 videos in box, $30 for all,
(650)286-9171
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VHS MOVIES and DVD's. (20) Old to
current releases. $2 per movie. Your
choice. South San Francisco
(650) 871-7200
310 Misc. For Sale
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WEBER GO ANYWHERE GAS BARBE-
QUE - never used, in box, $40., SOLD!
311 Musical Instruments
GUITAR FOR sale. Fender Accoustic,
with case. $89.00 (415)971-7555
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
MARTIN GUITAR 1971 D-18S Great
shape, Great sound. Price reduced to
$1200. SOLD!
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
COAT - Dressy ladies short trench coat,
red, brand new, weather proof, light-
weight, size 6/8, $25.,(650)345-3277
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo, SOLD!
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
IONIC BREEZE quadra, Sharper Image,
3 level silent air purifier. 27”h, energy
saver, original box with video. Excellent
condition. $77. (650)347-5104
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS JACKET - size XXL, Beautiful
cond., med., $35., (650)595-3933
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NEW! OLD NAVY Coat: Boy/Gril, fleece-
lined, hooded $15 (415)585-3622
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
316 Clothes
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
brand new, never worn for $25
(650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, SOLD!
150 COPPER spades for #6 strand.
Copper wire. $50.00 for all.
(650)345-3840
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
PVC SCHEDULE 80 connectors and
coupling. 100 pieces in all. $30.00 for all
(650)345-3840
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 AIR rifles, shoots .177 pelets. $50 ea
Obo SOLD!
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).SOLD!
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
FOR SALE medium size wet suit $95
call for info (650)851-0878
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
KELTY SUPER TIOGA BACKPACK -
$40., (650)552-9436
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels, $85.
obo, (650)223-7187
ROWING MACHINE - SOLD!
STATIONARY EXERCISE BICYCLE -
Compact, excellent condition, $40. obo,
(650)834-2583
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
TENT - one man packable tent - $20.,
(650)552-9436
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
THULE SKI RACK - holds 3 pairs, $85.,
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL EXERCISE- Pro Form 415
Crosswalk, very good condition $100 call
(650)266-8025
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40.,
(408)764-6142
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWN MOWER - 48 volt Craftman elec-
tric lawn mower, SOLD!
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $65.,
(650)342-8436
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
SLEEP APNEA breathing machine com-
plete in box helps you breathe, costs $$$
sacrifice for $75, (650)995-0012
WALKER - $25., brand new, tag still on,
(650)594-1494
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
FURNISHED ONE BEDROOM APART-
MENT - $1300. month, $800. deposit,
close to Downtown RWC, Call (650)361-
1200
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
1999 AUDI A6 sedan with 116k miles,
Quattro automatic loaded looks and
drives very nice comes with 3000
miles warranty clean Car Fax #4447
priced at $5995.00 plus tax lic,etc.
(650)637-3900
2000 BMW 323CI coupe with 129 k
miles automatic sport two door great
looking drives excellent all power pack-
age #4518 clean Car Fax on sale for on-
ly $7000.00 plus normal fees.s normal
fees. (650)637-3900
2002 PT Criuser limited with 121k miles
she is fully loaded looks and drives great
automatic inexpensive sedan with clean
Car Fax #4515 on sale for $4995.00 plus
normal fees. (650)637-3900
2003 AUDI A6 Quattro with 79k
miles,sports luxury sedan fully optioned
in excellent conditions and 3000 miles
free warranty clean Car Fax #4424 on
sale for $7995 plus fees. (650)637-3900
2003 FORD MUSTANG GT deluxe con-
vertible with 102k miles automatic and
loaded with lots of options comes with
power top and 3000 miles free warranty
clean Car Fax #5031 priced at $7995.00
plus, fees (650)637-3900
2004 CHEVY MALIBU Classic automatic
sedan with 87k low miles clean car fax all
power package and 3 mounths warranty
#4437 on sale for $5850.00 plus fees.
(650)637-3900
2004 FORD Explorer Eddie Bauer SUV
with 146k miles auto all wheel drive with
third row seat room for 7 people looks
and drives like new car clean car and
warranty #4330 at $7995.00 plus fees.
(650)637-3900
2004 HONDA CIVIC LX sedan with 154k
miles 4 door automatic with power pack-
age tilt and cruise new trade in which
comes with warranty #4517 on sale for
$5995.00 plus fees. (650)637-3900
620 Automobiles
2008 HYUNDAI Accent GLS 4 door se-
dan with only 49k miles automatic great
on gas cold air condition and 3000 miles
free warranty #4512 on sale for low price
of $7995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
ACURA ‘97 - 3.0 CL CP, Black, Auto-
matic, $2800., (650)630-3216
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBIL”79Royal Delta 88, 122k
Miles, in excelleny Condition $1,800
(650)342-8510
VOLVO ‘00 - 4 door, excellent condition,
$4200 or best offer, (650)678-5155
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
1997 BMW 540I sedan with 120k miles
automatic powerfull luxury sedan lot of
room for 5 people and a great ride clean
Car Fax #5044 on sale for only $5500.00
plus fees.(650)637-3900
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $50. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35., (650)670-
2888
NEW MOTORCYCLE HELMET - Modu-
lar, dual visor, $69., (650)595-3933
WANTED-HONDA 90 or 350. Any
condition (831) 462-9836
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
670 Auto Service
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $60 for all
(650)588-7005
2 BACKUP light 1953 Buick $40
(650)341-8342
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
EDELBROCK VALVE COVERS - for a
389 engine, new in box, $100., (650)726-
1037
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPEAR tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RADIALS - pair, PT215/60R17, $15. for
pair, (650)344-6565
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Tuesday • July 23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Bath
TUBZ
Over 400 Tubs on display!
World’s Largest “Hands-On, Feet-In”
Showroom
4840 Davenport Place
Fremont, CA 94538
(510)770-8686
www.tubz.net
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Artificial Grass • Gazebos •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Contractors
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Home repairs &
Foundation work
Retaining wall • Decks • Fences
No job too small
Gary Afu
(650)207-2400
Lic# 904960
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
Concrete
CHETNER CONCRETE
Lic #706952
Driveways - Walkways
- Pool Decks - Patios - Stairs
- Exposed Aggregate - Masonry
- Retaining Walls - Drainage
- Foundation/Slabs
Free Estimates
(650)271-1442 Mike
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Cleaning service.
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FERNANDO’S HANDYMAN
Painting - Exterior/Interior,
Stucco, Floors, Demos,
Lawns, Pavers, etc.
Free Estimates
Senior Discounts
Lic.& Bonded
(650)834-4824
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets,
Also, Electrical, Hauling
Carpet, Tile & Stucco
(650)461-0326
Lic# 983312
Plumbing
HAMZEH PLUMBING
5 stars on Yelp!
$25 OFF First Time Customers
All plumbing services
24 hour emergency service
(415)690-6540
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
27 Tuesday • July 23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Coverings
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Cemetery
CRIPPEN & FLYNN FUNERAL
CHAPELS
Family owned & operated
Established 1949
Personalized cremation &
funeral services
Serving all faiths & traditions
Woodside chapel: (650)369-4103
FD 879
Carlmont chapel: (650)595-4103
FD 1825
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)868-0082
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
Insurance
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Open Daily
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
Video
ADULT VIDEOS $99 (415)298-0645
24
Tuesday • July 23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
28
Tuesday • July 23, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DO YOU HAVE KNEE PAIN?
Experience relief with advanced, non-surgical treatments.
Do you wake up with knee
pain?
Does knee pain limit your
level of activity?
Has your doctor
recommended surgery?
Do you have pain when
walking up or down stairs?
Have you run out of options
to relieve your pain?
If you answered yes to
any of these questions,
you are a candidate
for our non-invasive
treatment program.
Meet Dr. Brian Mitchell
Millions of individuals give up their
active lifestyle to knee pain because
they feel they are too young for major
surgery. I am here to tell you there’s an
effective and FDA approved alternative
to surgery. If you suffer from any de-
gree of knee pain, I invite you to regain
control of your life by visiting our state
of the art facility.
How Do We Treat Knee Pain?
We use a non-invasive, multi-disciplin-
ary approach to provide complete care
and dramatically improve patient’s
results. We customize our treatment
programs for every individual. This
may include visco-supplementation to
lubricate the joint, individualized reha-
bilitation to strengthen the muscles
surrounding the injury, or bracing for
stabilization and support.
What Is visco-
supplementation?
Visco-supplementation, also
known as joint therapy, supple-
ments the knee with a natural
occurring substance called hyal-
uronic acid that is often deficient
in arthritic knees. This lubricates
the knee joint to reduce friction
between the bones of the knee to
provide significant pain relief.
Why is individualized reha-
bilitation Important?
The muscles surrounding the
injury can become weak and stiff
making it difficult to do everyday
tasks. Individualized rehabilita-
tion reduces inflammation and
increases range of motion, flex-
ibility and strength.
Will I feel better right away?
Most patients feel relief in a matter
of weeks and can go back to their
daily activities.
Will insurance cover
the cost?
Yes, most insurance providers and
Medicare will cover treatment upon
approval of your benefits.
Are the treatments
successful?
We’ve treated thousands of patients
and over 90% have experienced
significant pain relief and regained
mobility.
How will I know if this
is right for me?
If you’re suffering from knee pain,
your first step is an evaluation with
Dr. Brian Mitchell our Board Certi-
fied Physical Medicine and Rehabili-
tation doctor.
What are patients saying?
I arrived to my first appointment in a wheelchair because I couldn’t bear any weight on my right
leg. The physician and therapists worked together to create a plan specifically for me. I quickly
progressed from a wheelchair, to a walker, to a cane, to full weight on my leg. The treatments and
one-on-one rehabilitation gave me my life back. – Diana V., Huntington Beach, CA
Accredited by: Emere Medical Professional Corporation
Call today to schedule an evaluation
650-458-4248
Dr. Brian Mitchell, D.O.
101 S. San Mateo Dr. #202 º San Mateo
Factors That Cause
Osteroarthritis:
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What To Consider
Before You Have Surgery:
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GRAND
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650-458-4248
DO YOU HAVE KNEE PAIN?
Experience relief with advanced, non-surgical treatments.
Do you wake up with knee
pain?
Does knee pain limit your
level of activity?
Has your doctor
recommended surgery?
Do you have pain when
walking up or down stairs?
Have you run out of options
to relieve your pain?
If you answered yes to
any of these questions,
you are a candidate
for our non-invasive
treatment program.
Meet Dr. Brian Mitchell
Millions of individuals give up their
active lifestyle to knee pain because
they feel they are too young for major
surgery. I am here to tell you there’s an
effective and FDA approved alternative
to surgery. If you suffer from any de-
gree of knee pain, I invite you to regain
control of your life by visiting our state
of the art facility.
How Do We Treat Knee Pain?
We use a non-invasive, multi-disciplin-
ary approach to provide complete care
and dramatically improve patient’s
results. We customize our treatment
programs for every individual. This
may include visco-supplementation to
lubricate the joint, individualized reha-
bilitation to strengthen the muscles
surrounding the injury, or bracing for
stabilization and support.
What Is visco-
supplementation?
Visco-supplementation, also
known as joint therapy, supple-
ments the knee with a natural
occurring substance called hyal-
uronic acid that is often deficient
in arthritic knees. This lubricates
the knee joint to reduce friction
between the bones of the knee to
provide significant pain relief.
Why is individualized reha-
bilitation Important?
The muscles surrounding the
injury can become weak and stiff
making it difficult to do everyday
tasks. Individualized rehabilita-
tion reduces inflammation and
increases range of motion, flex-
ibility and strength.
Will I feel better right away?
Most patients feel relief in a matter
of weeks and can go back to their
daily activities.
Will insurance cover
the cost?
Yes, most insurance providers and
Medicare will cover treatment upon
approval of your benefits.
Are the treatments
successful?
We’ve treated thousands of patients
and over 90% have experienced
significant pain relief and regained
mobility.
How will I know if this
is right for me?
If you’re suffering from knee pain,
your first step is an evaluation with
Dr. Brian Mitchell our Board Certi-
fied Physical Medicine and Rehabili-
tation doctor.
What are patients saying?
I arrived to my first appointment in a wheelchair because I couldn’t bear any weight on my right
leg. The physician and therapists worked together to create a plan specifically for me. I quickly
progressed from a wheelchair, to a walker, to a cane, to full weight on my leg. The treatments and
one-on-one rehabilitation gave me my life back. – Diana V., Huntington Beach, CA
Accredited by: Emere Medical Professional Corporation
Call today to schedule an evaluation
650-458-4248
Dr. Brian Mitchell, D.O.
101 S. San Mateo Dr. #202 º San Mateo
Factors That Cause
Osteroarthritis:
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What To Consider
Before You Have Surgery:
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GRAND
OPENING
$BMMGPSB
BQQPJOUNFOU
650-458-4248

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