You are on page 1of 15

S GD & T NINH BNH TRNG THPT CHUYN LNG VN TY

THI CHN HC SINH GII KHU VC DUYN HI V NG BNG BC B LN VI ( xut) MN TING ANH- LP 11 ( gm 4 phn, 12 trang)

PART I: LISTENING (15pts) The listening test consists of three sections. Section 1: you will hear the recording once only . Section 2,3: you will hear the recording twice and answer the questions as you listen. SECTION 1 Questions 1- 10 Complete the form below. (5pts) Write ONE WORD AND/OR A NUMBER for each answer. CAR INSURANCE Example Answer Name: Patrick Jones Address: 1Park Road, Greendale Contact number: 730453 Occupation: 2. Size of car engine: 1200cc Type of car: Manufacturer: Hewton Model: 3 Year: 1997 Previous insurance company: 4Star Insurance claims in the last five years: Car was 5. in 1999 Name(s) of other driver(s): Simon 6 Relationship to main driver: 7. Uses of car : - social - 8 Recommended Insurance arrangement Name of company: 9 Red Annual cost: 10 $............................................... SECTION 2 Questions 1-5 (5pts) You will hear part of a radio programme about penguins birds which live in Antarctica. For questions 1-5. Complete the sentences with NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS

Amanda Newark has been studying penguins as part of a project run by the (1) Scientists have found some evidence of what is known as (2) ... amongst penguins in Antarctica. Amanda explains that the relationship between heart rate and stress level is similar in penguins and humans. In the experiment she describes, Amanda placed a (3)..containing a sensor in a penguins nest. Amanda explains that, for this experiment, it wasnt necessary to capture the penguins. To identify the penguin she had approached, Amanda put (4) . on its front. Amanda found that the penguins heart rate increased when groups of more than 15 humans approached it. Larger groups of people did not upset the penguin as long as they remained still when they were close to it. Amanda feels that the arrangements made by (5)... have been very good so far. SECTION 3 Questions 1-5 (5pts) You will hear the owner of a very unusual house, and his architect, talking to a visitor to the house. For questions 1-5, choose the answer ( A,B,C or D) which fits best according to what you hear. 1. The owner feels that contemporary architecture A. has been impressive in London. B. is better than it used to be. C. has provided beautiful things to look at. D. produces work of lasting value. 2. For the owner, one problem of living in the house is A. the position of the kitchen. B. the state of the walls. C. the number of storeys. D. the size of the rooms. 3.The architect thinks the original builders were economical because they A. used readily available materials. B. dug extensive foundations. C. chose a soft piece of ground. D. built on a flat piece of land. 4.The present kitchen was originally used for A. keeping provisions. B. storing arms and weapons. C. dinning and entertaining. D. holding prisoners. 5. The architect feels he has A. improved on the original design B. preserved the original function. C. left a puzzle for future generations. D. given the house a viable future. PART II: GRAMMAR AND VOCABULARY 1. Choose the word or phrase (A, B, C 0r D) which best completes each sentence. (5pts) 1. All courses at the college are offered on a full-time basis unless.. indicated. A. further B. otherwise C. below D. differently 2. Your argument. that Britain is still a great power, but this no longer the case. A. outlines B. presupposes C. concerns D. presents 3. The construction of the new road is .. winning the support of local residents. A. thanks to B. reliant on C. dependent on D. responsible to

4. Although he didnt actually say he wanted a radio for his birthday he did .. pretty strongly. A. imply B. suggest C. mention D. hint 5. Because of cutbacks in council spending, plans for the new swimming pool had to be .. A. stockpiled B. overthrown C. shelved D. disrupted 6. He was very upset when the boss passed him and promoted a newcomer to the assistants job. A. by B. up C. over D. aside 7. Six novels a year, you say? Hes certainly a .. writer. A. fruitful B. fertile C. virile D. prolific 8. They are happily married although, of course, they argue. A. most times B. from day to day C. every now and then D. on the occasion 9. During the evening football match the stadium was illuminated by . A. spotlights B. flashlights C. highlights D. floodlights 10. Owning to the fog, his flight from Karachi was . A. belated B. overdue C. unscheduled D. unpunctual 1. 6. 2. 7. 3. 8. 4. 9. 5. 10.

2. The following passage contains ten errors. Find and correct them (5pts) In the last twenty years, the country has made great technological progress, culminating in our entering the space age earlier that year with the launch of our first telecommunication satellite. From a health perspective, there has been a major modern programme in public hospitals. This has involved the purchase of the latest scanning and diagnosis equipment, as well as the refurbishment of major operating theatres with state-ofthe-art surgical equipment. As far as the superstructure of the country is concerned, several major projects are on progress, included the construction of three major motorways, a hydroelectric power station and a new international airport. All of these public works are being carried out using the latest technology. With the increasing use of computer technology, the future of our country looks very bright indeed. It anticipates that, in the very near future, all government offices will be computered and networked to central mainframe computers in the capital. In the terms of economical development, it seems probable that
LINES MISTAKES CORRECTIONS LINES MISTAKES CORRECTIONS

3. Put one suitable preposition or particle in the blank of each sentence (5 pts) 1. He escaped by passing himself as a guard. 2. Her sense of fun has rubbed on her children. 3. Embarrassment rooted her ..the spot. 4. The school ran .financial trouble when eighty percent of the staff went on strike. 5. The husband has been apprised . the good news about his son. 6. The beast was baulked.his prey at the last moment. 7. Dont waste time brooding .your past failures. 8. Money doesnt always conduce .happiness. 9. I wont concede .your demand. 10. Dont dally ..a womans affections. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 4. Use the correct form of each of the words given to fill in the blank in each sentence. (5pts) Just how readable should a popular science book be? This may seem an old question, but there is an important issue at stake here, as was made clear at the recent Aventis Science Book Awards, when jury chairman Lewis Wolpert (1).. (passion) espoused the cause for making the genre more demanding of readers. The biologist believes too many science writers are now running scared of (2) . (complex). As he pointed out, the public does not expect James Joyce or T.S. Eliot to be easy follow. Indeed, readers positively relish these authors intricacies, (3). (labyrinth) excesses and abstruse metaphors. So why then do we exclude science writers from such (4) ( expect), Wolpert asked, why do we presume that they and only they - adopt the approach of the lowest common literary denominator and grind down the (5).(FINITE) subtleties of the universe to an easy - to digest pap? In sort, science books should be written to produce as much cerebral sweat as do Ulysses and The Wasteland, a point (6) (exemplary) by his jurys choice of winner Brian Greenes long, dense and extremely technical The Elegant Universe, an (7).. ( compromise ) treatise on cosmology. And it is here that we reach the nub of the issue for, although (8)( ELEGANCE) written, the book is one of such density and opacity it pushes the notion of popular science writing close to the precipice of (9) ( comprehend) and leaves one fearful that it will only daunt, rather than attract, the (10). (initiate). 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 5. Fill each of the numbered blanks in the passage with one suitable word.(5pts)
4

WATER ON THE MOON As a result of the recent discovery of lunar water, the moon has suddenly become a far more interesting place for investors, who must now view the long-term prospects with optimism. The last manned mission to the moon drew (1).................a close in 1973, when two astronauts from Apollo 17 climbed back into their lunar module, (2)............... collected a lot of moon-rock, but bereft(3)............... any future plans. Now the moon shines brighter for astronauts and scientists alike, (4)................ to the existence of (5)................. might be billions of tones of water at its poles. There is (6)................. high-tech substitute for water in space exploration. To support the international space station, it has cost at least $100,000 a day to send water (7)............... orbit. Not only would lunar water cut these costs, but it would additionally be used for rocket fuel, (8).................two components, liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, are the elements found in water. Scientists are particularly excited (9).............., given the absence of an atmosphere, lunar water has never been recycled and they believe, therefore, that it may very well hold (10). to the formation of the solar system itself. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

PART III: READING 1. Read the text below and decide which answer (A, B, C or D) best fits each gap.(10pts) THE EARLY RAILWAY IN BRITAIN In 1830, there were under 100 miles of public railway in Britain. Yet within 20 years, this figure had grown to more than 5000 miles. By the end of the century, almost enough rail track to(1).. the world covered this small island, (2).. the nature of travel for ever and contributing to the industrial revolution that changed the (3).. of history in many parts of the world. Wherever railways were introduced, economic and social progress quickly (4).. In a single day, rail passengers could travel hundreds of miles, (5).. previous journey times by huge margins and bringing rapid travel within the (6) .. of ordinary people. Previously, many people had never ventured beyond the outskirts of their town and villages. The railway brought them greater freedom and enlightenment. In the 19th century, the railway in Britain (7).. something more than just the business of carrying goods and passengers. Trains were associated with romance, adventure and, frequently, (8) .. luxury. But the railways did more than revolutionize travel; they also (9) .. a distinctive and permanent mark on the British landscape. Whole towns and industrial centres(10). up around major rail junctions, monumental bridges

and viaducts crossed rivers and valleys and the railway stations themselves became desirable places to spend time between journeys. 1. A. revolve B. enclose C. encircle D. orbit 2. A. altering B. amending C. adapting D. adjusting 3. A. route B. way C. line D. course 4. A. pursued B. followed C. succeeded D. chased 5. A. cancelling B. subtracting C. cutting D. abolishing 6. A. reach B. capacity C. facility D. hold 7. A. served B. functioned C. represented D. performed 8. A. considerable B. generous C. plentiful D. sizeable 9. A. laid B. set C. settled D. left 10. A. jumped B. stood C. burst D. sprang 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

2. Read the passage and answer the questions which follow by choosing the best answer. (10pts) Even with his diverse experience as an elected official at the state level, Andrew Johnson was the first president of the United States ever to be impeached, primarily because of his violent temper and unyielding stubbornness. His career started in 1828 with his collection to the city council of Greenville, Tennessee, and after two years as an alderman, he took office as mayor. His advancements followed in rapid succession when he was elected to the Tennessee state senate, then as the state governor, and later to the U.S. House of Representatives for five consecutive terms. In 1864, Johnson ran for the office of vice-president on the Lincoln- Johnson ticket and was inaugurated in 1865. After Lincolns assassination six weeks into his term, Johnson found himself president at a time when southern leaders were concerned about their forced alliance with the northern states and feared retaliation for their support of the secession. Instead, however, with the diplomatic skill he had learned from Lincoln, Johnson offered full pardon to almost all Confederates on the condition that they take an oath of allegiance. He further reorganized the former Confederate states and set up legislative elections. Congressional opposition to his peace- making policies resulted in gridlock between the House and Johnson, and the stalemate grew into an open conflict on the issue of the emancipation of slaves. While Johnson held the view that newly freed slaves lacked understanding and knowledge of civil liberties to vote intelligently, Congress overrode Johnsons veto of the Civil Rights Bill, which awarded them citizenship and ratified the Fourteenth Amendment. In the years that followed, Congress passed bills depriving the president of the power to pardon political criminals, stripping away his status of commander-in-chief, and taking away Johnsons right to dismiss civil and executive officers from their duties. Johnson vetoed each bill, and each veto was overridden. When Johnson dismissed the secretary of war, Edwin Stanton, Stanton refused to step down and

was supported by the House of Representatives, which voted to impeach Johnson. At the trial, the Senate came one vote short of the two-thirds majority necessary to remove him from office. After Johnsons term expired, he returned to his home state, but in 1875 he was elected senator and went back to Washington to take his seat. 1. What does the passage mainly discuss? A. Andrew Johnsons personal characteristics B. Andrew Johnsons career as a politician C. Congressional decisions in the late 1800s D. Congressional decisions and procedures in the late 1800s 2. In line 4, the phrase took office is closest in meaning to A. moved into an office B. became an official C. began a government job D. rearranged the office 3. What can be inferred from the first paragraph about Andrew Johnsons work in Tennessee? A. His personality precluded him from important positions. B. His work became known to the governor. C. He was elected to several important posts. D. He was represented to the posts five times. 4. According to the passage, what led to Johnsons downfall? A. The state of the nations economy B. His liberal position on slavery C. His personal characteristics D. His waffling and hesitation 5. The author of the passage implies that when Johnson became president he A. was a dedicated supporter of civil rights B. was a soft-spoken and careful diplomat C. had an extensive background in politics D. had already experienced political turmoil 6. According to the passage, at the beginning of Johnsons term as president southerners were A. expected to secede from the union B. apprehensive about their future C. singled out as scapegoats D. afraid of his violent temper 7. According to the passage, Congresss disapproval of Andrew Johnsons policies was A. short-lived and groundless B. detrimental to his presidency C. directed at his civic duties D. stopped as soon as it emerged 8. In line 21, the word pardon is closest in meaning to A. parade B. patronize C. exonerate D. extricate 9. The author of the passage implies that the Stanton affair proved the presidents A. lack of stamina B. lack of electoral vote C. loss of willpower D. loss of authority 10. According to the passage, the attempt to impeach Andrew Johnson A. succeeded as expected by the House B. failed by a minimal margin C. put an end to his political career D. overwhelmed his supporters in Tennessee
7

3. Read the following passage and do the exercises (8pts) HOW DOES THE BIOLOGICAL CLOCL TICK? Our life span is restricted. Everyone accepts this as biologically obvious. Nothing lives for ever! However, in this statement we think of artificially produced, technical objects, products which are subjected to natural wear and tear during use. This leads to the result that at some time or other the object stops working and is unusable (death in the biological sense). But are the wear and the tear and loss of function of technical objects and the death of living organisms really similar or comparable? Our dead products are static, closed systems. It is always the basic material which constitutes the object and which, in the natural course of things, is worn down and becomes older. Ageing in this case must occur according to the laws of physical chemistry and of thermodynamics. Although the same law holds for a living organism, the result of this law is not inexorable in the same way. At least as long as a biological system has the ability to renew itself it could actually become older without ageing; an organism is an open, dynamic system through which new material continuously flows. Destruction of old material and formation of new material are thus in permanent dynamic equilibrium. The material of which the organism is formed changes continuously. Thus our bodies continuously exchange old substance for new, just like a spring which more or less maintains its form and movement, but in which the water molecules are always different. Thus ageing and death should not be seen as inevitable, particular as the organism possesses many mechanisms for repair. It is not, in principle, necessary for a biological system to age and die. Nevertheless, a restricted life span, ageing, and then death are basic characteristics of life. The reason for this is easy to recognize: in nature, the existent organisms either adapt or are regularly replaced by new types. Because of changes in the genetic material (mutations) these have new characteristics and in the course of their individual lives they are tested for optimal or better adaptation to the environmental conditions. Immortality would disturb this system it needs room for new and better life. This is the basic problem of evolution. Every organism has a life span which is highly characteristic. There are striking differences in life span between different species, but within one species the parameter is relatively constant. For example, the average duration of human life has hardly changed in thousands of years. Although more and more people attain an advanced age as result of developments in medical care and better nutrition, the characteristic upper limit for most remains 80 years. A further argument against the simple wear and tear theory is the observation that the time within which organisms age lies between a few days (even a few hours for unicellular organisms) and several thousand years, as with mammoth trees. If a life span is a genetically determined biological characteristic, it is logically necessary to propose the existence of an internal clock, which in some way measures and controls the ageing process and which finally determines death as the last step in a fixed programme.
8

Like the life span, the metabolic rate has for different organisms ad fixed mathematical relationship to the body mass. In comparison to the life span this relationship is inverted: the larger the organism the lower its metabolic rate. Again this relationship is valid not only for birds, but also, similarly on average within the systematic unit, for all other organisms (plants, animals, unicellular organisms). Animals which behave frugally with energy become particularly old, for example, crocodiles and tortoises. Parrots and birds of prey are often held chained up. Thus they are not able to experience life and show they attain a high life span in captivity. Animals which save energy by hibernation and lethargy (e.g. bats or hedgehogs) live much longer than those which are always active. The metabolic rate of mice can be reduced by a very low consumption of food (hunger diet). They then may live twice as long as their well fed comrades. Women become distinctly (about ten percent) older than men. If you examine the metabolic rate of the two sexes, you establish that the higher male metabolic rate roughly accounts for the lower male life span. That means that they live life energetically more intensively, but not for as long. It follows the above that sparing use of energy reserves should tend to extend life. Extreme high performance sports may lead to optimal cardiovascular performance, but they quite certainly do not prolong life. Relaxation lowers metabolic rate, as does adequate sleep and in general an equable and balanced personality. Each of us can develop his or her own energy saving programme with a little self-observation, critical self-control and, above all, logical consistency. Experience will show that to live in this way not only increases the life span but is also very healthy. This final aspect should not be forgotten. Question 1-5 Do the following statements agree with the views of the writer in Reading Passage 3? Yes if the statement agrees with the views of the writer No if the statement contradicts the views of the writer Not given if it is impossible to say what the writer thinks about this 1. The wear and tear theory applies to both artificial objects and biological systems. 2. In principle, it is possible for a biological system to become older without ageing. 3. Within seven years, about 90 percent of human body is replaced as new. 4. Conserving energy may help to extend a humans life. 5. The average human life span has remained nearly unchanged in thousands of years Question 6-8 Complete the summary below. Choose NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS from the passage for each answer. Objects age in accordance with principles of (6). and of (7) Through mutations, organisms can adapt better to the environment. (8). would pose a serious problems for the theory of evolution.

4. You are going to read an article about the power of nature. Eight sentences have been removed from the article. Choose from the sentences A- H the one which fits each gap (1- 7). There is one extra sentence which do you do not need to use.(7pts) GONE WITH THE WIND As hurricane- force winds hit Britains coasts, John Leavey takes a look at the amazing power of nature. Now that human race has made great technological and scientific progress and is about to clone whatever or whowever it wants, it is very easy to forget about the forces of nature, 1..Although the images of destruction which we have seen on our television screens are horrific, they are, in fact, just the tip of the iceberg compared to what nature can really do. Tornadoes, which are the fastest and most violent winds on the earth, can reach speeds of over 200 kph. 2Roofs of houses, cars, animals, buses and people have been lifted into the air in this way. Those people whose lives have been put at risk by twisters have described how helpless they felt in the face of such power. A tornado is violently spinning column of air that can start to form during a thunderstorm, of which there are about 45.000 a day worldwide. Of course, not all thunderstorms bring about tornadoes and not all tornadoes bring about total destruction. The most destructive ones occur in India, Bangladesh and Tornado Alley in the USA. The worst ever twister hit this area in March 1925, when a huge tornado travelled across Missouri, Illinois and Indiana, killing 695 people and injuring a further 2,027. 3.. A blizzard is another natural phenomenon which affects North America. It is a deadly mixture of wind, snow and freezing temperatures. 4..Muscle and internal organs then fail to work when body temperature falls below 30 0C. In the USA, blizzards are quite common, with winds travelling at up to 65 kph. It is believed that global warming, which is causing ice caps to melt, will be the cause of more blizzards in the future. Even Britain may experience blizzards as violent as the one which hit New York, Washington, Boston and Philadelphia in January, 1996. These cities became completely paralysed when snow up to 78 cm deep and weighing a total of five billion tons covered an area 800 km long. 5 Apart from causing death and injury directly, tornadoes and blizzards can also cause floods. Naturally, floods are usually caused by heavy rainfall, but whichever way they are created, they can be very destructive. The most dangerous and dramatic ones are known as flash floods. In June 1976, hot air blew north from the Gulf of Mexico, bringing huge thunderstorms to the Big Thomson Gorge, where they released 25 cm of rain in six hours. All the mountains streams filled up and met at the Big Thomson Gorge. 6.The water then flowed through the canyon, removing everything in its path, killing 139 people and causing damage worth $36 million. Other floods on record have developed more slowly but have been equally destructive. 7.If we choose to ignore it and believe we are the supreme rulers of the planet, we may be in for a big surprise. Remember, lighting can strike twice in the same place. A. Anything in their path can be picked up off the ground and dropped hundreds of meters away.
10

B. Scientists who explore the Antarctic have learnt a great deal about the earths weather systems. C. Of these, the wind is the most life- threatening part because it removes the heat from its victims bodies. D. This week, however, we have been reminded of what nature can do as hurricane winds continue to cause chaos across the south coast. E. Wherever we look, we can witness the power of nature in action. F. As a result, emergency services could not operate properly, however hard they tried, and more than 300 people died in the safety of those cities. G. Here, the water level rose from two to seven meters within minutes. H. It moved along the ground for an incredible 352 km, bringing total destruction wherever it went. PART IV: WRITING I. sentence transformation 1. Finish each of the following sentences in such a way that it is as similar as possible meaning to the sentence printed before it. (5pts) 1. Ann paints her landscapes with great pleasure. Ann takes. 2. The climber nearly died when they found him. The climber was on 3. Im not a fool to believe that. Im not so.. 4. The best way to make them work hard is to promise them a reward. Promise 5. She had the impression that someone was dropping her steps. She was. 2. For each of the following sentences, write a new sentence as similar as possible in meaning to the origin sentence, but using the word given in capital letters. These words must not be altered in any way. (5pts) 1. Martin cannot go any higher in her career. PINNACLE . 2. Being her only niece, Ann is very precious to her. APPLE . 3. I can recommend you to the manager, Im a friend of his. WORD . 4. She loves animals and tends to become very angry when she sees one being badly treated. RED
11

5. Carol has trouble communicating her ideas to others. ACROSS II. Essay writing (15pts) Write an essay of about 400 words on the following topic: Schools should ask students to evaluate their teachers. Do you agree or disagree? Use specific reason and examples to support your answer. ............................................................................................................................................. ............................................................................................................................................. ............................................................................................................................................. ............................................................................................................................................. ............................................................................................................................................. ............................................................................................................................................. ............................................................................................................................................. ............................................................................................................................................. ............................................................................................................................................. ............................................................................................................................................. ............................................................................................................................................. ............................................................................................................................................. ............................................................................................................................................. ............................................................................................................................................. ............................................................................................................................................. ............................................................................................................................................. ............................................................................................................................................. ............................................................................................................................................. ............................................................................................................................................. ............................................................................................................................................. ............................................................................................................................................. ............................................................................................................................................. ............................................................................................................................................. ............................................................................................................................................. ........................................

THE END

12

S GD & T NINH BNH TRNG THPT CHUYN LNG VN TU

HNG DN CHM V P N MN TING ANH LP 11 (p n gm 4 phn, 2 trang)

PART I: LISTENING SECTION 1 Questions 1- 10 (5pts) 1. 27 6. Paynter 2. dentist 7. brother-in-law 3. Sable 8. work 4. Northern 9. flag 5. stolen 10. 450 SECTION 2 Questions 1-5 (5pts) 1. Polar Institute 2. Population disturbance 3. false egg 4. Special paint 5. tour operators SECTION 3 Questions 1-5 (5pts) 1.B 2.C 3. A 4. A 5. D PART II: GRAMMAR AND VOCABULARY 1. Multiple choice : (5 pts) 1B 2D 3C 4D 5C 6C 7D 8C 9D 2. Mistakes correcting( 5 pts)
LINES MISTAKES CORRECTIONS LINES MISTAKES

10B
CORRECTIONS

2 3 3 5 6

this year telecommunication modern diagnosis superstructure

that year telecommunication s modernization diagnostic infrastructure

7 7 1 1 1 2 1 3

on progress included anticipates computered economical

in progress including is anticipated computerized economic

3. Fill in blank with ONE preposition ( 5 pts) 1. off 2. off 3. to 4. into 5. of 6. of 7. over/on 4. Word form (5pts) 1. passionately 6. exemplified

8. to

9. to

10. with

13

2. complexity 3. labyrinthine 4. expectation(s) 5. infinite 5. Gap filling (5pts) 1. to 2.having 6. no 7. into

7. uncompromising 8. elegantly 9. incomprehensibility 10. uninitiated 3. of 8. whose 4. due/thanks/owing 9. because/as/since 5. what 10. clues

PART III: READING 1. Multiple choice cloze : (10 pts) 1C 2A 3D 4B 5C 6A 7C 8A 9D 10D 2. Multiple choice passage: ( 10 pts) 1B 2C 3C 4C 5C 6B 7B 8C 9D 10B 3. Reading passage 1. No 2. Yes 3. Not given 4. Yes 5. Yes 6. physical chemical 7. themodynamics 8. immotality 3. Sentence filling ( 7pts) 1. D 2. A 3. H 4. C 5. F 6. G 7. E PART IV: WRITING I. Sentence transformation (10 points) 1. 1. Ann takes great pleasure in painting her landscapes. 2. The climber was on the point of death when they found him. 3. Im not so foolish as to believe that 4. Promise them a reward and they will work hard. 5. She was under the impression that someone was dropping her steps. 2. 1. Martin has reached the pinnacle of his career. 2. Being her only niece, Ann is the apple of her eye 3. I can put in a good word for you to the manager, Im a friend of his. 4. She loves animals and tends to see red when she sees one being badly treated. 5. Carol has trouble getting her ideas across (to others). II. Essay writing(15 pts) 1. Content: 50% of total mark: a provision of all main ideas and details as appropriate 2. Language: 30% of total mark: a variety of vocabulary and structures appropriate to the level of English language gifted upper-secondary school students

14

3. Presentation: 20% of total mark: coherence, cohesion, and style appropriate to the level of English language gifted upper-secondary school students.

THE END

15