In this issue >>>

Recap of Brain Injury Awareness Month Brain Matters Golf Tournament Annual General Meeting Bike Safety Festival

Summer 2013 Issue 3

Cognosco Knowing What We Do!
Mismanagement of Sports Concussion in Youth: A Case and Future Directions >>> pg. 6 Changing Homecare Provision - AHS Latest Cuts >>> pg. 8

Sisters Helping Brain Care Centre Take its Show on the Road!
Sue Johnstone has often biked by the Brain Care Centre. Until a year ago, she never had reason to stop in. Now, she and her sister Jill, are launching a fundraising campaign to provide a mobile technology package for BCC’s educational and training programs. Learn more about Jill and Sue and their quest to raise $10,000 that will go to Brain Care Centre’s mobile technology package! Read about our hero’s on page 12!

Profile >>> pg. 12 BCC Calendar >>> pg. 14 & 15 BIAM Wrap Up >>> pg. 20 & 21 Edson News>>> pg. 22 Advertise with us! >>> pg. 25 Acknowledgements>>>pg. 26

Get Connected!
Like us on facebook! www.facebook.com Follow us on Twitter @BrainCareCentre Check out our Website: www.braincarecentre.com

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Board of Directors>>>
President Past President Secretary Chief Financial Officer Treasurer Member at Large Member at Large Director Director Stephanie Boldt Lydia Kawun Tracy DesLaurier Kaitlin Cluff Ryan Barry Bruce Hirsche, Q.C. Quentin Ranson Nancy E. Cumming Frances Zinger

Brain Care Centre Staff Directory >>>
Executive Director Operations Manager Office Coordinator Manager of Client Services & Contracts Acting Manager of Service Coordination/Education Intake Coordinator/ Service Coordinator Service Coordinator Service Coordinator Service Coordinator Occupational Therapist Lead Support Facilitator/Counsellor Support Facilitator/Counsellor Community Living Coordinator Rehabilitation Therapy Assistant Volunteer Coordinator Dr. Garnet Cummings Louise Jensen Shamim Khanbhai Mike Ryan Ashley Brosda Madison Steele Heidi Mast Julie Hanson Mitchell Tokarek Stephanie Silva Teresa LaRocque-Walker Lisa Baranieski Jean Roy Larissa Patrick Janine Tremblay Ext 30 Ext 12 Ext 10 Ext 24 Ext 16 Ext. 14 Ext 22 Ext 29 Ext 13 Ext 28 Ext 23 Ext 19 Ext 26 Ext 25 Ext 33 Ext 11
(780)712-3241 (780)712-9789

gcummings@braincarecentre.com admin@braincarecentre.com Shamim@braincarecentre.com mike@braincarecentre.com ashley@braincarecentre.com madison@braincarecentre.com heidi@braincarecentre.com julie@braincarecentre.com mitchell@braincarecentre.com stephanie@braincarecentre.com teresa@braincarecentre.com lisa@braincarecentre.com jean@braincarecentre.com larissa@braincarecentre.com Janine@braincarecentre.com events@braincarecentre.com tannis@braincarecentre.com laura@braincarecentre.com

Community Engagement Coordinator—Signature Events Andrea Carroll Papirny Service/Support Coordinator. CAPCC - Edson Service Coordinator - Edson Tannis Arsenault Laura See

#229 Royal Alex Place

10106 – 111 Ave Edmonton AB T5G 0B4

Phone: 780-477-7575 Toll Free: 1-800-425-5552 Fax: 780-474-4415

Mailing address Box 30105 Edson, AB T7E 1Y2

Street address 524-50 Street Edson, AB

Phone: 780-712-7560 Toll free: 1-866-712-7560 Fax: 780-712-7567
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Message from BCC’s Executive Director
Lately, BCC has seen staffing changes; some permanent and some short term. Carolyn Biron is taking a 1 year leave of absence but will address BCC projects via her laptop from California until her return to BCC in July 2014. For that duration, Ashley Brosda has become the acting Manager of Service Coordination, Education and Research. Larissa Patrick has joined BCC as the Rehabilitation Therapy Assistant, and BCC has also hired Heidi Mast in a term position as Service Coordinator. Finally, Madison Steele is handling the intake of new clients for a one year term. Congratulations everyone on your new roles! BCC celebrated Barb Baer Pillay’s retirement at the Annual General Meeting on June 26, 2013. Louise Jensen provided a very moving speech about Barb and read just a few of the letters from many well –wishers. This was followed by an impressive speech by Barb; a “historical perspective” of her time at NABIS and Brain Care Centre. Barb joined in 1998, served NABIS as

Dr. Garnet Cummings Executive Director

Volunteer and Fund Development Coordinator and Manager and then as Service Coordinator at Brain Care Centre. She will definitely be missed. On behalf of all at BCC – the Board, the staff, clients, volunteers and members, I wish Barb a happy and funfilled retirement. The Homeward Trust funded research project on homelessness that the Brain Care Centre is undertaking in conjunction with the University of Alberta Hospital’s Dr. Brian Rowe, is progressing well. A targeted review of the literature is under way and Dr. Rowe, with my input, has completed the survey and passed through ethics. It is our hope that data collection will commence in August with analysis to follow. The aim of this project is to determine the incidence of acquired brain injury among homeless persons in Edmonton. This project will also survey the literature to determine systems other countries are using to address the issue of housing for those homeless who are impacted by acquired brain injury. Finally, a very different looking Annual Report was prepared for this year’s AGM. It was developed to tell 2012-13 year in review showcasing activities at BCC. I would like to thank all the staff for their efforts in completing this report for the AGM. If you would like to receive a copy, please contact the BCC office.

Barb’s Retirement Address >>>
Ladies and Gentleman, Thank you for this honour; I was hoping to go quickly and quietly but since I am up here anyway, I am taking this opportunity to reflect on my almost 15 years working for the former NABIS and now of course, the expanded and blended Brain Care Centre. And true to form, I am not going to talk about me but about the incredible changes that have taken place over those 15 years because that is the important thing. And Yes, I am talking HISTORY! For those of you who don’t know, I want you to know that when I started in September 1998, we had an Executive Director, the late Nancy Brine, we had an office Coordinator, Louise Jensen, I was hired to work two days per week as the Volunteer Coordinator and then we had 1.6 people to do, as I always said, the ‘actual work’. 1.6 people who did service coordination, ran groups, offered counseling, did presentations and helped with events. We also had dedicated volunteers with vision and energy like Board Presidents over the years, Mufty Mathewson, Bob Warren, Patrick Hirschi, Craig DeCecco, Lydia Kawun and now Stephanie Boldt. Before Nancy Brine retired, she pushed the Brain Injury Interagency into opening up a new social and recreation centre, called Networks Activity Centre, which is still alive and thriving in the Bonnie Doon mall. Nancy also pushed for a dedicated Information Line to be housed at our agency so that people who needed to know where to go, who to talk to could phone our info line and talk to a real live person no matter where they were calling from. And professionals could call when they needed to know what supports were available when they sent their patients home to Manning or St. Paul or Westlock. These days, all Service Coordinators perform this function as we each take a turn being Info person for the day and we still get calls from all over the province and all over Canada and we know where to send them.
Continued on Page 5...
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In the year 2000, Ginny Gillen became our Executive Director and I had the privilege of working for her and along side her till 2008 when she left us for a position that included a pension. Ginny, like Nancy before her, saw opportunities and pounced, I mean, considered them carefully and pushed for them if it meant an increase in services to those living with brain injury. Soooo when the province started talking about dedicating some actual dollars to a province wide Brain Injury Network, bureaucrats came to us to ask us for our advice. Pretty soon, we had a committee of survivors, our clients, who helped write the Brain Injury Survival Guide and when the province put out a request for proposals for agencies to provide the services that we had been doing all along but right across the province, Ginny and Louise got together and said, well, let’s put in a proposal for the Edmonton region, the North West region and the North East region of the province.

more service and pounce. Dr. Cummings has taken on the prevention piece, the concussion piece and the public education piece and made these all important priorities which can no longer be ignored. And of course, he has brought to us, along with Andrea, our first ever Golf Tournament, Thursday, August Provincial priorities changed as 29. Andrea would be happy to they do, and we adjusted, as take your registrations right always. After a few years, the here tonight! North West region’s Service Coordination contract was So from 1.6 service staff in given to an agency already 1998 to 7 Service Coordinators, working in the geographical 2 Counsellors, 2 computer and area but we still continued and device trainers, and one still continue to offer groups, Occupational Therapist, today, counseling, info to anyone things certainly have changed! who asks regardless of Those are impressive numbers, geography. but what does it mean in the real world? The next priority, voiced by the powers that be, wanted to Most of us who come to work see NABIS and EBIRS come at Brain Care Centre don’t together as one community really know much about brain agency and it was under the injury at the beginning. I guidance of EBIRS ED, Cheryl certainly didn’t and then I Bauer and NABIS ED, Wendy remembered my auntie Rose. Williams and both Agency You see, when she was in her Boards who worked countless late 50’s, in 1967, she was hours, weeks, months to see injured in a car collision and that process to a full and while in hospital suffered a fruitful conclusion with the series of strokes. I was nine Ginny and Louise wanted to birth of Brain Care Centre in years old. In those days, there make good on the Northern 2011, just two short years ago. was a Glenrose Rehabilitation Alberta part of our name. It was another huge leap of faith Dr. Garnet Cummings has been Hospital but it was a smelly, our Executive Director for stinky old hospital; at least and while we didn’t get all coming on to two years and in those were my memories and three regions, we did get two that short time, has continued after months of being there, and all of a sudden, where the tradition of ED’s to seek Auntie Rose was discharged there had been 1.6 staff to home to her four children and actually serve people affected out opportunities to provide

by brain injury, we now had 8 or more service coordinators serving out of Edmonton, Edson, Grande Prairie and LaCrete Alberta. And we still had our info line, our support facilitators offering groups and counseling and we had Networks Activity Centre, right down the hall.

husband. She had a brace on her leg and used a walker and tried to talk and cried when she didn’t want to. She hated her new life of dependency and even though I was just a kid, I knew that she wanted to die and she did, 5 years later. You see, there was No NABIS, No EBIRS, No women’s group on Friday mornings, No Club Connect on Wednesday afternoons, No counseling, No education for the family, No Networks Activity Centre where she could at least sew again and No community that supported her and helped her see that her life was worth living, that she could even have a life. But now, there is and I have been privileged to work with and for that community for the past 15 years. I thank all of you who are a part of this community, past, present and future for this honour and I know that we will all, in our own way, continue the legacy that is Brain Care Centre. Thank you. -Barb Baer Pillay

Brain Basics
Tuesday September 3rd, 2013 6:30 - 9 pm Glenrose Hospital
For more information or to RSVP, please contact Shamim @ (780)477-7575.
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Mismanagement of Sports Concussion in Youth: A Case and Future Directions >>>
By Tristan Hynes, Online Volunteer hospitalized. SF was sent home from the emergency room with little more post-mortem brain analyses of former than the suggestion he get some rest. football players have shown clear To a child, “some rest” can mean a lot anatomical signs of brain trauma, and of things. SF took a short nap and was the various atrophies found have been back on the ice the same day. Then on correlated with a pre-mortem history from 12 to 17, SF received a regular of psychiatric disorder. Most recently, barrage of blows to the head. SF’s a UCLA research group used functional concussive symptoms became chronic. MRI technologies to detect the Like many players do, SF normalized anatomical signs associated with brain the feelings and legitimized his injuries trauma and correlate them with as just part of playing hockey. diagnosed psychiatric disorders in living athletes. Hard scientific data is rapidly accumulating, and there exists “I always assumed the a clear relationship between repeated issues would resolve over brain trauma and the emergence of time,” SF told me. The psychopathologies. Professional prevalent social stigma leagues are rapidly implementing associated with mental illneuropsychological assessment tools, ness was the major boundary and former players are coaxing them for SF in seeking help. along with lawsuits. We are advancing to an era of early detection, diagnosis, SF finally sustained the injury and treatment. If you ask me, the that put him out of hockey at 17, when professional sports leagues are a concussion initiated a year’s worth of behaving quite progressively. debilitating symptoms. During the It’s not only the professionals severely symptomatic period, SF began that play these high-risk sports and to notice psychological abnormalities sustain these severe brain injuries, such as amotivation, weight loss, though. Off the television and without insomnia, and depression; all of which the big league money, amateur he treated with the same opiates leagues who grow future athletes have prescribed to treat his physical pain. a far less progressive culture “I always assumed the issues would surrounding brain injury. Despite the resolve over time,” SF told me. The promising advances and increased prevalent social stigma associated with awareness, there still exists an mental illness was the major boundary unsettling plight of ignorance. Our for SF in seeking help. It was only vulnerable, invaluable youth are when SF began having suicidal presently being put to unnecessary ideations and noticed publicised risk. stories about TBI-induced I recently developed a psychopathologies that he developed conviction toward safety in amateur a clear self-awareness of his affliction. sports when I sat audience to a painful A wonderful school guidance recollection from young man we’ll call counselor helped empower SF to SF -- he is presently battling the disregard the meritless stigma and to psychological and physical aftermath seek psychiatric treatment. SF’s of repeated and mistreated psychiatrist diagnosed him with clinical concussions acquired through amateur depression and performance anxiety, hockey: attributing the conditions to SF’s SF sustained his first history of concussions. The concussion at the age of 12 where he psychiatrist implemented a was knocked unconscious and

In the past decade, numerous

pharmaceutical and psychological treatment plan and SF is currently experiencing steady, marked resolution of his symptoms. The story has a happy ending, but SF’s suffering was completely preventable and still not 100% repairable. It is clear that the mismanagement of SFs first concussion that set a precedent to negate those to follow. It was not until SF was rendered physically incapable of playing hockey that he withdrew from the toxic environment. With estimates as high as 3.8 million concussions from youth sports in North America each year, we can be sure other aspiring athletes could testify to similar experiences as SF. Alarmed by the high rates, the Canadian Medical Association published a set of recommendations for the management of head injury in amateur sport. The document outlines best practices for parents, coaches, and physicians regarding return-to-play and treatment guidelines. Interestingly, the CMA recommends standardized training and certification of coaches. At the front line, coaches are the first to witness injuries and the ones best poised to intervene and ensure the young athlete is properly cared for. There exist rudimentary coaching education programs, but curricula rarely have an injury focus, and participation is far from requisite. Considering the worth of our children, it is negligent to exercise anything but the highest degree of diligence toward their mental preservation. I strongly advocate the legislative requirement of coach certification in amateur leagues in a nationally standardized program. Amateur sports, indeed, play a vital role in the positive psychological development of children, so it needn’t be tainted with morbidity and regret.

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There is an APP for That!!! >>>
By Jean Roy, Assistive Technology Coordinator and Larissa Patrick, Rehabilitation Therapy Assistant

Keeping track of where your money is going each month can be a challenge. Budgeting apps make it easier to track your expenses, income and bills. Some of the more popular budgeting apps include Mint, YNAB, Toshi, HomeBudget and PocketExpense. With so many apps out there, how do you know which one is right for you? You want the app to be user friendly. Do you want an app that accesses your bank account and also can be backed up on the iCloud? Make sure to research all the different options and it is important to note that some of these budgeting apps can be complicated and difficult to use. The majority of these apps have a “lite” version which means no cost associated, however a lite version will not have all the features of an app you purchase. Before you purchase an app, try out the lite version first. One to one training is available at Brain Care Centre if you would like assistance.

Networks News >>>
Thank you to everyone on behalf of Networks and Stroke Recovery Association for attending and supporting the fabulous picnic held June 28th at Kenilworth Community Hall. Also we will be closed July 15th through to our reopening July 29th. The Centre will be undergoing renovations during this time and reopen brand new Monday July 29th. YAY!

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Changing Homecare Provision - AHS Latest Cuts >>>
By Gurneet Chahal Recently Alberta Health Services (AHS) has been no stranger in the news as it works at restructuring its continuing care, home care, and palliative care programs. AHS revealed it was reducing the number of home care providers from 72 facilities to 13 in the Calgary and Edmonton area. Having such a large number of home care providers was not proving to be as cost effective or efficient as it could possibly be, and making the jump down to only 13 home care providers is expected to save $18 million. Some would argue that having even 72 home care providers, uniquely tailored to match the needs of their specific clients, doesn’t always seem like enough, and having more types of care providers could be the best sort of provision. It allows for each worker to focus on their client and form a relationship with them. In a world of only 13 providers, caregivers will find positive impact it has on many of the clients we serve. Having more care many people they serve. Concerns givers available and care facilities for about the reduction in the number of our clients to go to is nothing but providers arose from the client positive and gives them more of a developed care cooperatives who guarantee that they will be cared for. expressed fears that when they are cut, Dr. Chris Eagle was also quoted saying, the personalized 24 hour care they “I think what we’ll do in the future is usually provide would be lost. Their make sure than when we’re doing these clients who they have been working large system changes that we also with for a long time will now be losing allow for the voices of families and patients to be heard a little earlier in the them and will have to adjust to a new process.” Although one would hope face, new care, and the disruption of that such steps would have been taken tailored support. in the first case, it is comforting to know that the decision is undergoing a However, shortly after this reversal and that there was a realization decision was made by AHS, a reversal was issued. This reversal was applied to of the importance of these many home care providers. I hope that other three specific cooperatives; Abbey that their client is just one of the very Road cooperative, Artspace housing cooperative, and Creekside Support Housing, which reinstated their homecare contracts. Many were relieved upon hearing about the reversal and benefitted from it as well. AHS said it had “misjudged” the unique and specialized care that these three facilities and their aid workers provide. “[Dr. Chris] Eagle admitted AHS should have paid more attention to the needs of those Albertans who expressed concerns over the proposed changes to homecare administration.” This reversal was of particular interest to us here at Brain Care Centre because of the “Eagle admitted AHS should have paid more attention to the needs of those Albertans who expressed concerns over the proposed changes to homecare administration.”

homecare facilities and employees who are being affected by this initial decision are heard out and looked into before their contracts are cancelled. With the steps AHS has taken so far, it seems like they don’t have much to worry about. The clients at Brain Care Centre who are in need or currently using such services will hopefully not have anything to worry about either. In its entirety, AHS’ initial decision to reducing the number of home, palliative and continuing care providers, can clearly be seen to have come from a good place, but was as beneficial to those being served by these care providers as I’m sure it was intended to be. AHS seems to have realised the implications however, and is taking steps in the right direction to make sure the people are taken care of. Time will tell if more reversals are made for other cooperatives as well.

REFRENCES: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ calgary/story/2013/06/18/edmonton-ahsreversals.html http://www.edmontonjournal.com/ health/ cancels+controversial+decisions+home +care+continuing/8543394/story.html http://www.calgaryherald.com/health/ cancels+controversial+decisions+home +care+continuing+care/8543563/ story.html

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Brain Injuries in the Workplace >>>
By Christine Gertz, Online Volunteer a role: for example, brain trauma is more likely to occur in construction According to the Workers’ than it is in manufacturing. They did Compensation Board of Alberta’s 2012 not state if workplace health and safety Summary of Claims Administered, there rules and the enforcement of those were 10, 780 new head injury claims in rules were a factor in the injuries. 2012, down from 2011’s claim of 10, 870. Head injuries are at about the mid-point of the list of workplace traumas, but it “...94,000 persons is also possible that new head injuries experienced a are also being recorded in the “Multiple Parts” injuries categories, which listed concussion or other 7,096 new injuries in 2012. It is apparent brain injury. Out of the that though the number of injuries may go down in one year, there can be an 94,000, 62% of the increase the following year, which may indicate that safety in the work place is injured were men.” not improving overall. Are workplaces failing to promote safe practices? This question is difficult, if not impossible, to answer for Canadians, since there seems to be no examination—outside of a legal prosecution—to determine if the workplace environment was to blame for an accident. Making the connection between workplace policies and the injury may be difficult for many reasons—the persons who are injured may not remember the circumstances leading up to the injury and there is no standard reporting mechanism. In addition, the databases which store workplace information and health information do not intersect; for example, there is no single database— or database filter—that you can employ, which would allow you to search by industry or specific employer, as well as the nature of the injury— back, eye or brain—and the cause of the injury, such as workplace, home or sports-related.

public agency. The raw data from the WCB is not open for public examination. At this time, Alberta’s Open Data Portal does not appear to include any datasets for workplace injuries, let alone brain trauma, and there has been some criticism that the Workplace Injury and Fatality Records database that is offered by the provincial government is an inadequate reporting mechanism. Currently, the public health campaigns of the provincial government, the federal government and the Alberta Federation of Labour emphasize the role of the employee in accident reduction. These are positive steps to educate an individual to reduce or eliminate injury. However, more work could be done to examine the collective or community role in injury, by exploring the role of the workplace, both employers and employees as a group, and the injuries by inflicted by industry and labour that is specific to that industry, to reduce injuries.
1 At this time, if you wanted to look at Alberta’s Trauma Registry to investigate the same factors as explored by the researchers in Ontario, you need to place an information request to access the data set.

The third most likely place to receive an injury is at the workplace, according to Statistic’s Canada’s Injuries in Canada: Insights from the Canadian Community Health Survey. For people between the ages of 20 and 64, 532,000 were injured at the workplace. A male is also far more likely to be injured in the workplace, with 414,000 injuries reported by males in all age categories. Of those reporting an injury, not only workplace injuries, 94,000 persons experienced a concussion or other brain injury. Out of the 94,000, 62% of the injured were men. How are people who experience brain trauma injured in the workplace? Researchers from the University of Toronto, writing for the journal NeuroRehabilitation, used data from Ontario’s Trauma Registry to determine what factors might account for a brain injury inflicted in the workplace. According to their study, persons were more likely to be injured in a fall, which accounted for 45% of the injuries in their data set, or in a vehicle collision, which explained 20% of the workplace injuries they investigated. The researchers also suggested that the industry might play

Bibliography

Hwan K, Colantonio A, Chipman M. Traumatic brain injury occurring at If the data is being captured, it may not work. Neurorehabilitation [serial be open to public examination. We may online]. December 2006;21(4):269-278. Available from: Academic Search be able to get some of these answers when researchers or programmers are Complete, Ipswich, MA. Accessed July able to access data made open by a 15, 2013.
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Book Review>>>
Don’t Worry Mom, I’ll be Home for Christmas! By Daniel E. Wein, Laurie P. Wein, Eleanor E. Wein and Ross W. Wein. By Margaret Russell, BCC Volunteer

The Wein family members are not strangers at the Brain Care Centre. In 1998 their 22-year-old son Dan survived a devastating motorcycle crash in rush hour traffic in Bogotà, Columbia. This family was pushed headlong into a new existence centered on trauma and recovery. It is now almost 15 years since his accident; at 36 Dan is always ready to participate in events like the Alberta Parks Push-to-Open where disabled adults are pushed and pulled over mountain trails in a TrailRider, and tandem kayaks are used to paddle across lakes.

mudslides have killed thousands and many bridges and roads have been washed out. November 21 is the date Ross takes over the diary, starting with the phone call from The Canadian Embassy in Ottawa, advising that Dan had been critically injured in a highway accident in Bogotà. Ross pays tribute to the medical personnel, friends, family, and neighbours whose efforts have seen such tremendous results. Each person has played a role, their nursing care over a long evening shift, their patient explanation of medical procedures, their little visit, or their ideas for equipment improvements. This book is also a call for continued support to enrich the lives of those who are isolated by their disability.

This book would make a fine gift for anyone interested in adventure or for those caregivers who are sometimes discouraged with overwhelming circumstances. For people in the medical profession, they will be grateful to see how they made a big difference in someone’s recovery and rehabilitation. Contact the Brain Care Centre or the Canadian Paraplegic Association regarding the book’s availability.

Ross and Eleanor, Dan’s parents, received the Northern Alberta Brain Injury Society’s (former name of the Brain Care Centre) GINNY Award in 2009. They were recognized for their determination and love along Dan’s journey to recovery as well as for their advocacy work to improve the lives of others who survive brain injury. They continue to dream that a William Watson Lodge North can be opened in central Alberta “so that caregivers and survivors have the opportunity for the restful and healing powers of spending time in nature.” The book starts with Dan’s personal diary, day by day reports about the first two months of his motorcycle trip of a lifetime from Vancouver to Chile. Hurricane Mitch devastates Central America between October 26 and November 4 but Dan and his friend Jeff decide to carry on, although floods and

The book concludes with a section on the therapeutic value of the outdoors. Like many young people who suffer debilitating injuries, Dan was an avid outdoorsman before the accident. Nature has been an important part of his recovery, and times spent outdoors are enjoyed long after the event is over. Nature is healing. An appendix annotates a few movies about disabilities; important sources are listed about designing for accessibility. Kudos to the authors and Spotted Cow Press for adding more than 100 colour photographs to richly enhance the short diary entries.
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Profile >> Sisters Helping the Brain Care Centre Take its Show on the Road
Sue Johnstone has often biked by the Brain Care Centre. Until a year ago, she never had reason to stop in. Now, she and her sister Jill, are launching a fundraising campaign to provide a mobile technology package for BCC’s educational and training programs. Now that I’ve been there for a few months, our friendships are developing and I am learning more about the people. I am encouraging them, too. I am working on a latch hook craft and creative writing.” want to thank all of the staff and volunteers that work at Networks and the Brain Care Centre.”

“The first thing I noticed about the Brain Care Centre,” says “Jill was looking for Sue “is that they are action oriented. something different. She is an If something needs to be done, it’s “When I extremely bright and active person, done. Practical support with practical approached and motivated to offer her many ideas. It’s common sense, but in my Brain Care Centre, they immediately talents,” says Sue. “I thought about experience, this is unique.” started researching possibilities. all of the professionals who’ve told They found similar technology in a me she is an anomaly and promised Sue and Jill also felt they were portable format.” This means that myself I would find a fit.” This treated as people first. “The Brain the Centre can provide the Brain motivated the sisters to research Care Centre’s philosophy is that Basics program and electronic device resources to meet the family where people can try things out—Jill was training in remote locations— they’re at. welcome at the programs including rural Alberta. immediately with no obligation.” “We first contacted the Brain “I am thrilled about the Care Centre through a cold call. The possibility to reach people in rural “The first thing I noticed person on the phone actually got it,” areas,” says Sue. “Where we grew about the Brain Care says Sue. “It was a relief to talk to up, programs like the Brain Care Centre,” says Sue “is that someone who saw possibilities and Centre could be an eight hour drive they are action oriented. If had concrete ideas about what to do away. Anything that makes life easier something needs to be done, next.” for people who already have barriers it’s done. Practical support to resources? Sign me up.” with practical ideas. It’s After being connected with common sense, but in my Brain Care Centre, Jill was directed to Sue and Jill hope to raise experience, this is unique.” resources which led to her receiving a $10,000 for the technology package. diagnosis – 38 years after her brain “We have a lot to learn but I know we injury. “We grew up in rural Jill’s experience inspired the can make a difference. The Centre is Saskatchewan—there are limited sisters to give back. “Jill brought offering great support and advice. I opportunities for comprehensive home the Christmas newsletter. On am excited to raise awareness of the diagnoses to provide resources. And the “wish list” was a SmartBoard. I Centre and am continually impressed the hard fact is,” adds Sue, have never done a fundraising by its mix of expertise and humanity. I “sometimes a diagnosis is a key to campaign before, but here was a think a lot about our experiences unlock those doors.” concrete need. The Brain Care Centre with the health care system. The philosophy to ‘try things out’ was also model and culture of the Brain Care Jill was then encouraged to a factor. I pitched the idea to Jill, and Centre fits an organization that I can explore Networks Activity Centre. she was willing to help me.” actively support.” She arrived to “check it out” and hasn’t looked back since. “I am inspired by what Contact Andrea, Community happened with Telemiracle in Engagement Coordinator to find out “The first day at Networks I Saskatchewan, where people with how you can support Jill & Sue’s went to the library. We had women’s disabilities are involved.” says Jill, fundraising efforts! time and a movie. We also had “People would give what they felt chocolate cupcakes.” says Jill. “I felt comfortable with and it added up to a encouraged by the people making an lot. I want to give back to the people effort to engage me in friendship. who have given so much to me. I
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(Edmonton)

August 2013
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

YAG : Young Adult Group SUBI: Brain Injury and Addictions Group UBI: Understanding Brain Injury 5 Civic Holiday 6
7

1

2 Women’s Group 10-11:30am 9

8 Caregiver’s Support
Group 7-9pm YAG 7-9pm

OFFICE CLOSED

12 Moving for Brain Health 13
12:45-1:15 PM Men’s Group 1:30-3:00 PM

14 Moving for Brain Health 15
12:45-1:15 PM Club Connect 1:30-3:00 PM

16 Women’s Group
10-11:30 AM Moving for Brain Health 12:45-1:15 PM

19
Moving for Brain Health 12:45-1:15 PM

20

21
Moving for Brain Health 12:45-1:15 PM

22
YAG 7-9pm

23
Moving for Brain Health 12:45-1:15 PM Budget Booster’s 1:30- 3:00 PM

26
Moving for Brain Health 12:45-1:15 PM Men’s Group 1:30-3:00 PM

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28
Moving for Brain Health 12:45-1:15 PM Club Connect 1:30-3:00 PM

29 BCC Brain Matter’s Charity Golf Tournament 7am-2pm

30
Moving for Brain Health 12:45-1:15 PM

September 2013
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

LABOR DAY OFFICE CLOSED
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3

4
Moving for Brain Health 12:45-1:15 PM

5 SUBI 3:15-4:30pm
YAG 7-9pm

Brain Basics 630pm-9pm

6 Moving for Brain Health 12:45-1:15 PM

9
Moving for Brain Health 12:45-1:15 PM Men’s Group 1:30-3:00 PM

10
Identity Theft 1:30-3:00 PM

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12 Identity Theft Moving for Brain Health 12:45 1:30-3:00 PM -1:15 PM SUBI 3:15-4:30pm YAG 7-9pm Club Connect Caregiver’s Support Group 1:30-3:00 PM 7-9pm 18
Moving for Brain Health 12:45-1:15 PM

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Women’s Group 10-11:30 AM Moving for Brain Health 12:45-1:15 PM Budget Booster’s check in (optional) 1:30-3:00 PM

16
Moving for Brain Health 12:45-1:15 PM

17
Identity Theft 1:30-3:00 PM

19
Identity Theft 1:30-3:00 PM SUBI 3:15-4:30pm YAG 7-9pm

20 PD DAY

OFFICE CLOSED

23 Moving for Brain
Health 12:45-1:15 PM 30 Men’s Group 1:30-3:00 PM Moving Budget for Booster’s 1:30Brain 3:00 PM Health 12:45-1:15 PM

24
Identity Theft 1:30-3:00 PM

25
Moving for Brain Health 12:45-1:15 PM Club Connect 1:30-3:00 PM

26

27

Identity Theft 1:30-3:00 PM Women’s Group YAG 7-9pm 10-11:30 AM Caregiver’s Support Group Moving for Brain Health 7-9pm 12:45-1:15 PM

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October 2013
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

YAG : Young Adult Group SUBI: Brain Injury and Addictions Group

1
Identity Theft 1:30-3:00 PM

2
Moving for Brain Health 12:45-1:15 PM

3 Identity Theft
1:30-3:00 PM SUBI 3:15-4:30pm YAG 7-9pm

4 Moving for Brain Health
12:45-1:15 PM

7
Moving for Brain Health 12:45-1:15 PM Men’s Group 1:30-3:00 PM

8

9
Moving for Brain Health 12:45-1:15 PM Club Connect 1:30-3:00 PM

10
SUBI 3:15-4:30pm YAG 7-9pm Caregiver’s Support Group 7-9pm

11 Women’s Group
10-11:30 AM Moving for Brain Health 12:45-1:15 PM Budget Booster’s check in (optional) 1:30-3:00 PM

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15
2UBI 31:30-3:00 PM

16
1Moving for Brain Health 12:45-1:15 PM

17 UBI 1:30-3:00 PM
Identity Theft 1:30-3:00 PM YAG 7-9pm

18 Moving for Brain Health
12:45-1:15 PM

Thanksgiving OFFICE CLOSED
21
Men’s Group 1:30-3:00 PM

22
UBI 1:30-3:00 PM

23

24
UBI 1:30-3:00 PM SUBI 3:15-4:30pm YAG 7-9pm Caregiver’s Support Group 7-9pm

25 Women’s Group
10-11:30 AM Budget Booster’s 1:30- 3:00 PM

28

29
UBI 1:30-3:00 PM

30
Club Connect 1:30-3:00 PM

31 UBI 1:30-3:00 PM
SUBI 3:15-4:30pm YAG 7-9pm

November 2013
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

YAG : Young Adult Group SUBI: Brain Injury and Addictions Group UBI: Understanding Brain Injury 4
Men’s Group 1:30-3:00 PM

1

5

6

7 SUBI 3:15-4:30pm
YAG 7-9pm Caregiver’s Support Group 7-9pm

8 Women’s Group
10-11:30 AM Budget Booster’s check in (optional) 1:30-3:00 PM

11 Remembrance

12
Assertiveness Training 1:30-3:00 PM

13
Club Connect 1:30-3:00 PM

14 Assertiveness Training 15
1:30-3:00 PM SUBI 3:15-4:30pm YAG 7-9pm

Day OFFICE CLOSED
18
Men’s Group 1:30-3:00 PM

19
Assertiveness Training 1:30-3:00 PM

20

21 Assertiveness Training 22 Women’s Group
1:30-3:00 PM SUBI 3:15-4:30pm YAG 7-9pm Caregiver’s Support Group 7-9pm 10-11:30 AM Budget Booster’s 1:30- 3:00 PM

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16
Assertiveness Training 1:30-3:00 PM

27
Club Connect 1:30-3:00 PM

28 Assertiveness Training 29
1:30-3:00 PM SUBI 3:15-4:30pm YAG 7-9pm

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BCC Services >>>
Service Coordination: Brain Care Centre coordinates services for individuals (aged 18 or older) and families who are affected by brain injury. Our service area not only includes the greater Edmonton region but also communities west of the city including Drayton Valley, Edson, Hinton and Jasper. During the intake meeting, the Service Coordinator and the client identify areas of need in which service provision will be required. The outcome of the intake meeting is to formulate an Individual Service Plan (ISP) which serves to assist people with injury to connect with community resources and services. Some common goal areas include:  Housing  Financial  Education  Health  Vocation  Cognitive strategies  Physical health  Adjustment support  Social skills training  Co-existing diagnoses Support Facilitation: To further enhance and support an ISP, Brain Care Centre offers a Support Facilitation program. This service includes one to one counselling sessions designed to assist individuals, couples and families with discovering and utilizing resources and strategies for maximizing wellness after brain injury. This process may include a review of intake information, identifying personal strengths and needs for support, goal setting, and information about brain injury, introduction to coping strategies and educational resources, and/or referral to community resources. For those needing additional support in building new skills in the community, Service Coordinators can refer individuals to the Supports for Community Living Service (SCLS). Occupational Therapy: Occupational therapy (OT) supports BCC service plans by enabling clients and families to manage cognitive and physical changes after brain injury. Occupational therapists have the skills to assess the cognitive and physical aspects of daily functional activities (i.e.: Understanding Brain Injury: This class is one of Brain Care Centre’s most popular sessions! Any and all are welcome! Learn about all of the possible changes one might experience after an acquired brain injury. Participants will gain understanding and insight, will feel connected to a larger meal preparation, transportation management, managing appointments and schedules etc.). Typical goal areas for occupational therapy services include activities and tasks related to self-care, productivity and/or leisure. All goal areas and interventions are client centred and based on the wants or needs of the client and as such, clients must be active participants in the occupational therapy process. Intervention plans are created within the context of an individual’s daily life. The focus is on enabling optimal levels of participation in their own home and community and fostering increased levels of independence with their daily tasks. This is achieved through skill building as well as through adaptation of the environment or the activity. Referrals to occupational therapy can be made through a Brain Care Centre Service Coordinator. Information & Education: Brain Care Centre offers comprehensive, up-to-date information related to the effect of brain injury on individuals, families and the community. Please contact the office for information on how to arrange an education session. Brain Basics: An Evening of Education and Understanding is a course offered once per month to parents, spouses, caregivers, siblings, friends of people affected by brain injury, community members, volunteers and professionals who would like to learn more about brain injury and its effects. The session runs Tuesday evenings. Please contact Brain Care Centre’s Office Coordinator for information and registration. Life Skill Classes community of survivors, and will have goals for where their journey will take them. Topics included are:  The Journey of Recovery  Physical Challenges & Fatigue  Cognition & Memory  Changing Roles & Relationships  Exploring Emotions  Goal Setting & Motivation Self-Esteem: This course uses proven cognitive techniques to help individuals learn how to control the self-critical inner voice and build up a healthy sense of self worth. You will leave this four session course with useful skills that can easily be applied to your day to day life and strategies to use when you face situations in which your sense of self worth is challenged. Memory & Attention: Does your memory need a boost? Do you find it hard to pay attention or concentrate? This two day workshop provides practical suggestions for how to manage changes in memory and attention after brain injury or stroke. Open to new and returning clients. Assertiveness Training : Assertiveness is often linked with self-esteem. It is a skill which can be practiced and grown! Being assertive means you can confidently communicate your thoughts, opinions, and beliefs without being perceived as aggressive by others. You will learn that it is not okay for others to ignore you, to deny your rights to be heard or to have a different point of view. This group is a great chance to learn new communication skills and then to practice these skills in a safe environment. Topics included are: · What is communication? What are social skills? How might a brain injury affect these? · Difference between passive, assertive, and aggressive communication. · Engaged listening. · What are you saying with your body language? · What is empathy? How do I look at something from another person’s perspective? · Conflicts: How to deal with them and make your relationships stronger. · How to: meet new people, strike up conversations, and how to turn acquaintances into friends. · Self-disclosure: How much should I share about myself?
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Groups mood disturbances. By sharing life Women’s Group: This psychosocial support experiences group members learn to group is for women living with acquired recognize triggers and behavior, strategies brain injury. Areas of focus include information on the brain and brain injury, health and wellness, coping, and accessing supports. This group provides a safe environment in which group members can explore the many successes and challenges Club CONNECT Communication Group: This twice monthly group promotes peer that are inherent in life with a brain injury. connection, healthy living and provides Through peer support, group members have opportunities for discussion. Come and join the opportunity to normalize their us for a lively hour and a half of learning and experiences and learn from others’ discussion! experiences. Budget Boosters: Do you have difficulty Men’s Group: A psychosocial support group keeping track of your money? Is it hard to for males with brain injuries. In addition to keep your bills straight? Do your spending peer support, the group will provide habits reflect your priorities and values? Is your spending intentional and mindful? Do educational topics and activities for you hate budgeting, but like having money? members wishing to learn more about Budget Boosters is a new group at Brain coping strategies for life post injury. This Care Centre! Excitedly presented and run by group runs on a bi weekly basis. our occupational therapist, Stephanie Sylva, and our provisional psychologist, Lisa Young Adult Groups: The Young Adult Groups (YAG) are for young adults between Baranieski, this group will strive to help the ages of 18 and 30. These groups focus on people make better financial decisions with support, healthy coping strategies, personal confidence and find peace with money. The monthly group will provide financial advice, growth and community inclusion. In guidance and coaching and will include collaboration with Networks Activity Centre, presentations on a variety of topics. There is these groups include a recreational also an optional mid-month Budget Booster component. drop-in space where you can come and ask one of the group facilitators about your Care Givers’ Group: This group is designed personal financial goals. for familial caregivers who are providing Topics include: support to someone who has sustained a · What is a budget? What are the different brain injury. Peer support is encouraged to ways to budget? assist caregivers in developing a stronger · What is the difference between variable sense of their ability to cope and feel and fixed expenses? connected with others experiencing similar · Using cash jars, smartphone apps, and challenges. This group meets on a bi weekly other ways to track your money. · Good debt vs. bad debt. basis. · Bad habits: Emotional spending. Substance Use and Brain Injury Group · The importance of saving. (SUBI): This support group for is for · Grocery shopping on a budget. individuals struggling with addiction and Once-a-month group starts on Friday, brain injury. SUBI is a safe place for clients August 23, 2013 from 1:30-3:00 pm. Budget to recognize their symptoms common to Boosters takes place 3-4 days before AISH brain injury and substance use, e.g. shortterm memory loss, diminished judgment and payments are distributed, with an optional mid-month drop-in session. for coping, how to build healthy relationships and how to access community resources. This group runs weekly at Brain Care Centre.

Workshops Time Management: Participants whose time management skills have been affected by a brain injury will learn new strategies and techniques to improve their current time management systems as well as new systems as needed. Expressive Art Therapy: This group uses art, music and photography as mediums to help clients work through issues surrounding grief and loss. Stress and Worry: This group offers strategies to help clients develop more effective coping skills. Caregiver Skills Training Workshop: This four week interactive workshop is designed to educate caregivers on how to help their loved one to become more independent in functional activities. The methods you will learn are researched based and widely used and trusted by professionals. Electronic Devices Assistance Community Living Program Computer training and 1-1 assistance with iPhone, iPad, and most other personal electronic devices. Group classes include Facebook, Skype, Internet Safety and Identity Theft. Please contact Jean, Community Living Coordinator at 780-477-7575 ext. 26 for more information. Classes and Support Groups are offered to individuals with brain injury. (Brain Basics and Caregivers’ Group are offered to caregivers of people living with Brain Injury.) PRE-REGISTRATION and/ or an ASSESSMENT IS REQUIRED for all groups and classes offered at Brain Care Centre. Space is limited so please register early. Dates may be subject to change. Please see the calendar for specific dates.

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Message From The President >>>
First of all, I want to thank everyone who came out to Brain Care Centre’s Annual General Meeting (“AGM”) on June 26; we appreciate the support! It is always motivating to look back over the year and see the growth of the organization and we just can’t wait to see what our future as an organization holds. There were also a number of events held in June for Brain Injury Awareness Month (“BIAM”), including the BIAM Breakfast on May 31. It was wonderful to see so many people out for the Breakfast and we are especially grateful to Valerie Oczkowski for inspiring those around her by sharing her story. Thanks to the Brain Care Centre staff for all their hard work and the extra hours put in to make these Lastly, I want to thank all the members who are continuing to serve on the events a success. One of the motions at the AGM was to adopt changes as proposed by the Board to Brain Care Centre’s By-Laws. The changes to the By-Laws related to the different committees currently in place on the board. We slimmed down from five board committees to four: the Executive Committee, the Finance Committee, the Fund Development Committee, and the Governance Committee. Given the size of our board, we want to make sure we are efficient as well as effective and we think this committee model will help us achieve both of these goals. Board for another year. I look forward to working with you through the rewards and challenges of the upcoming Board of Directors year. I would also President Stephanie Boldt like to thank Hana Razga for her service with the Brain Care Centre Board of Directors. We greatly appreciate all her help and support throughout her years of service to the Board, especially in the area of Human Resources.

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Brain Injury Awareness Month: Building Capabilities after Brain Injury/Stroke >>>
Thank you to everyone who participated in the 2013 Brain Injury Awareness Month Activities! We were extremely excited to take part in the planning of this great month! Activities included: the Brain Care Centre 22nd Annual Kick-Off Breakfast, AABIS Artists Art Exhibit & Reception, the Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital Education Day, Networks Activity Centre & Stroke Recovery Association of Edmonton’s 5th Annual Community Picnic and new this year the launch of our social media campaign on Twitter & You Tube.

Upcoming Events >>>
REGIS TER August 29 2013 TODA Y! the Inaugural BRAIN MATTERS Charity Golf Tournament! 6:30am—2:00pm Lewis Estates Golf Course, Edmonton, AB $175.00 per person Get Involved! Find out how by calling Andrea 780-477-7575 Ext. 11
November 9th, 2013 - SAVE THE DATE! Defy Limitations Gala & Auction Ramada Inn & Conference Centre Sponsorship opportunities & Auction Item donations are being excepted at this time
For more details on upcoming events contact Andrea, Community Engagement Coordinator at 780-477-7575 Ext 11 or via email at events@braincarecnetre.com

Dr. Gabor Mate >>>
By Andrea Carroll Papirny, Community Engagement Coordinator

On June 18th 2013, Brain Care Centre was honoured to partner with the MS Society of Hinton to bring in Dr. Gabor Mate who spoke on his book When the Body Says No. The evening featured two hours with Dr. Mate including a question and answer period, a silent auction, food and beverage provided by Tim Hortons, and a book signing opportunity. We are excited to announce that through our efforts we were able to raise $3500.00 for Brain Care Centre dedicated to programming and service coordination in the west of BCC’s region!

Brain Injury Awareness Month Video “Stop the Stigma” >>>
By Andrea Carroll Papirny, Community Engagement Coordinator

For the 2013 Brain Injury Awareness Month campaign the Brain Injury/Stroke Interagency of Edmonton decided to put together a video to promote BIAM and tackle the issue of brain injury in a visual manner. The result was a powerful video entitled “Stop the Stigma” produced by Andrea Carroll Papirny of Brain Care Centre with assistance by Kris Grue, Akira Peters, and Chelsea Nelson of Networks Activity Centre, and 14 clients with varying injuries from various organizations based in Edmonton. The video received 530 hits on You Tube alone and was viewed by hundreds of Edmontonian’s throughout the month of June at various events held to support those impacted by acquired brain injury. If you haven’t watched the video we encourage you to go to https://www.youtube.com/user/ braincarecentreyeg and watch it today!
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Brain Injury Awareness Month Kick-Off Breakfast >>>
On May 31, 2013 Brain Care Centre hosted the 22nd BIAM Kick-off Breakfast featuring guest speaker Valerie Oczkowski, former news reporter from CTV. Our emcee for the morning was CTV’s own Marni Kuhlmann. The morning also featured a welcome by Dr. Raj Sherman and Ginny Awards going to Susan Wirtanen for Community Support and Glenna Lesko for Outstanding Caregiver. Thank you to our sponsors James H. Brown & Associates and CTV News. Brain Care Centre raised $24,000 to enhance programming and service coordination in the Edmonton region! We are so thankful to everyone that attended the event and gave generously to our organization; the support will provide great resources for our clients impacted by acquired brain injury.

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Edson News >>>
Tannis and Laura welcome Felicia Boychuk to the Edson office team. Felicia is the new summer student at the Edson office; she is 17 years old and recently graduated from Parkland Composite High School. Her future goals are to study at Grant McEwan University taking public relations and to work in Australia for 6 months. She has been riding horses for 7 years, been to several youth national dart competitions and participated in numerous plays and musicals. BCC would like to welcome Felicia to the team!! Brain Care Centre, along with Edson’s Reflections presented the Inaugural BIG Brunch in Edson June 7, 2013! The lunch hour event included a keynote by our very own Dr. Garnet Cummings, as well as our fabulous emcee and local radio legend Patty Shea of the Eagle 97.3 FM Edson. Thank you to Conoco Phillips for sponsoring the event, to VIA Rail for the ticket vouchers to travel anywhere VIA Rail goes and to Barb Eckert for the beautiful painting donated to our auction, as well as the other supporters: Edson Golf Club, Pat’s Safety Consulting LTD, Fountain tire, Medico Instructional Upgrading, Fineline Stationery and Jensen’s Lifestyle Clothing. Brain Care Centre and Reflections were able to raise over $5000.00 for their important services in Edson!

Brain Care Center Edson Support Group
Location: BCC Office- Edson Meetings are held every first and third Wednesday of the month from 1pm to 3pm; the group does not meet during the summer months of July and August. The group supports individuals and families affected by a brain injury. September 4TH 2013 September 18th2013 October 2nd 2013 October 16th 2013 November 6th 2013 November 20th 2013

Drayton Valley BI Group First and Third Monday of each month at Mitch’s #102 4341 50 Street, Drayton Valley 1:00pm- 3:00pm Edson Support Group First and third Wednesday of each month at Brain Care Centre Edson office 524- 50 Street, Edson 1:00pm – 3:00pm For more information on these groups or

If there are any concerns or questions please contact Laura at the Edson Brain Center Office. Phone- 780-712-7560 Email- laura@braincarecentre.com

services provided in Edson and Drayton Valley please contact Brain Care Centre Toll Free at 1-866-712-7560.
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Become a Sponsor of BCC>>>
Partnering with Brain Care Centre will give you a chance to be a part of creating something new and
innovative. Brain Care Centre has several signature events: The Brain Care Centre breakfast that kicks off Brain Injury Awareness Month in June, The Brain Matters Charity Golf Tournament, The Edson BIG Brunch, and the Defy Limitations Charity Gala & Auction. Along with our Signature Events we have several community “ancillary” events spread throughout the year that provide education and awareness about the issues of brain injury and what Brain Care Centre is doing to help. Brain Care Centre accepts sponsorship by means of in-kind donations or cash donations. To find out more about the opportunities to give and the recognition received please contact us today.

Help us empower others to Defy Limitations TODAY!
Corporate Platinum Sponsorship $40,000 + Gold Sponsorship $15,000—$39,999 Silver Sponsorship $5,000—$14,999 Bronze Sponsorship $1500—$4,999 Friends of BCC—$100—$1499 To find out more about event specific sponsorship for any of our signature events contact Andrea, Community Engagement Coordinator by phone 780-477-7575 Ext. 11 by email events@braincarecentre.com donate online: www.braincarecentre.com

Brain Awareness Movement “BAM” UPDATE >>>
By Connie Luu, Summer Intern/ BAM Member

BAM has had a very eventful year, including numerous presentations to elementary and junior high school classes, popular “Bacon & Bake Sales,” and bar nights just to name a few. Special shout-out to two long-time BAM Executive members who will be moving on. Former president, Justin Quedado, will be pursuing medicine in the fall at the University of Alberta, and VP Internal Hanhmi Huynh will be doing a nursing after degree. Both Justin and Hanhmi have been with BAM since its inception; without them, BAM would not be as successful as it is today. We wish them both the best of luck and are confident they will go on to do great things! Classes may be out for the summer, but the members of BAM have been

busy bees, preparing for the year to come. Welcome to Bharti Gupta, who will be serving as the president of BAM for the 2013-14 school year. Bharti is entering her 4th year of a BSc degree, and has been a part of BAM for two years now, first as a general member and then as an Education Program Director. She has been a part of many different organizations, but was particularly attracted to BAM by the community within the group, and how through education and advocacy, there is much potential to reduce the occurrence of brain injury. Her main goals are to maintain and expand the three committees (Education, Advocacy, and Support), increase general member and volunteer base, and continue to build the sense of community that drew her to BAM.

Bharti also hopes to increase education within the group, to both the executive and general members, so members are better equipped to raise awareness of brain injury in a more effective manner. BAM would like to invite you to their 3rd annual “Big BAM”, an evening of performances, hors d’oeuvres, a silent auction, and a keynote speech by Ian Young (http://ianyoung.ca). The event will be held on October 4, 2013 at the Dinwoodie Lounge in the Students’ Union Building on the University of Alberta campus. Tickets are $15 for students, $20 for the general public and can be purchased by contacting Brittany Hope at bhope@ualberta.ca. Hope to see you there!
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Volunteers Rock!!
Let’s be realistic—volunteering?! I mean, There are so many areas in which you can Not to mention, Brain Care Centre offers one-on-one, personalized support with we’re busy people! Between juggling help an organization like Brain Care the volunteer coordinator if needed for work, school, families, friends and trying Centre by just logging on to your extra training. to have a personal life, often the last computer. Here are some examples: Online volunteering can also give your thing on your mind is volunteering. Most  researching subjects career a little boost. It’s a really great people wouldn’t be able to find the time  creating web pages way to gain experience in a field you are to volunteer on a regular basis even if  editing or writing proposals, press interested in pursuing. It also helps releases, newsletter articles, etc. they wanted to! But thankfully there is broaden your experience. Employers are  developing material for a curriculum this handy dandy new tool called “the always looking for volunteer experience, internet” that has opened up a myriad of  designing a database especially from new graduates. What an  designing graphics opportunities for those who want to give easy way to get ahead of the pack!  providing legal, business, medical, Online volunteering is like networking… back to their communities but find agricultural or any other expertise but on a global scale. Depending on the themselves in a time crunch.  editing a video or photos type of online volunteering you want to  monitoring the news for current do, you can be connected with other The term “online volunteering” or research and headlines online volunteers to work together on “virtual volunteering” means exactly projects, as well as work in conjunction what you think it means: committing Still not sure it’s that easy? Just ask the with BCC staff, clients, volunteers, and/or your time and skills (free of charge) from 20+ BCC online volunteers who have our networks of colleagues and the comfort of your own home for the contributed over 100 hours of time and professionals. It never hurts to “know betterment of society. Seems pretty skill last year! someone who knows someone,” you simple, doesn’t it? The possibilities are endless. And while volunteering your time and skills feels I know what you’re thinking, “Really? I can volunteer for your organization in my pretty good… there are actually some really great benefits for you, too! pyjamas while watching Saturday morning cartoons? This is too good to be First of all, you won’t just contribute your skills, you’ll build them! There is a lot of true!” The fact of the matter is, BCC opportunity for building on existing skills couldn’t be happier to have you on our and learning new ones through these team. programs. Because the program is so diverse and flexible, you have the opportunity to be creative in your work. know?! Not to mention, all of this will help you with your interpersonal skills. Sounds like a pretty sweet deal to me. I guess all that is left to do is to get started… How do you do that? It’s pretty simple. Contact Janine, our volunteer coordinator for more information. Boy, giving back has never been easier!

Brain Care Centre would like to thank the amazing online volunteers who contributed to this issue of Cognosco. We would also like to extend our gratitude to our talented volunteer photographers who have captured so many memories for Brain Care Centre throughout the past few months. You guys rock!!

Casino volunteers needed for Our Edson Fundraiser
Wednesday and Thursday - December 5 & 6th, 2013 Apex Casino, St. Albert All shifts For more information please contact janine@braincarecentre.com
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2013 Bike Safety Festival >>>
By Connie Luu, Summer Intern

On May 25, 2013, Brain Care Centre staff and volunteers spent the day at the 2013 Bike Safety Festival teaching nearly 100 inner city children from local Boys and Girls Clubs & Big Brothers Big Sisters groups all about the brain. After receiving new bicycles and helmets, the youth learned about the anatomy of the brain, listened to the story of a brain injury survivor, and played an interactive game that demonstrated how difficult simple tasks can become after sustaining damage to neurons. With their newfound knowledge of brain safety, it is our hope that they will remember to always wear their helmets and protect their brains! This event is made possible through a collaborative effort by the AMA, Edmonton Police Service, Northlands, Alberta Health Services, Brick Sport Central, the Dinner Optimist Club of Edmonton, Alberta Transportation, and the Brain Care Centre.

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Homelessness and Acquired Brain Injury Research Project >>>
By Dr. Garnet Cummings, Executive Director

When BCC staff looked at conducting a survey of Edmonton homeless persons to determine the prevalence of acquired injury, it became obvious that we do not have the resources to do this survey the way it was initially outlined. At that point we set up discussion with Dr. Rowe and to use the Emergency departments to collect our data. Subsequently, Dr. Rowe and I worked together to create survey questions from previously validated survey tools. The surveys are being administered by persons hired and specifically trained to attain the most reliable survey results. Over the summer, the survey is being completed by persons with no fixed address as well as persons with a mailing address who attend the Royal Alexandra Hospital, the University of Alberta Hospital and North East Community Health Centre. To date the enrollment is: UAH=309; NECHC=224; RAH=67 for a total of 600 to date. Once the surveys are completed, analysis of the data will begin. BCC will attain specific data related to the topic of acquired brain injury and homelessness from the much larger data set. We are anxiously awaiting the results!
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Brain Injury Awareness month was AWESOME!! Thanks is extended to all those who purchased and donated tickets, supported the raffles, sponsored and pledged at the BCC Kick-off Breakfast in Edmonton, the BCC and Reflections BIG Brunch in Edson, and the Dr. Gabor Mate speaking event in Hinton.
Kick-off Breakfast Specially noted are: Platinum Sponsor – James H. Brown and Associates Media Sponsor - CTV News Edmonton Edson BIG Brunch Specially noted are: Event Sponsor - ConocoPhillips Canada Ltd. Media Sponsor - 97.3 The Eagle Radio Station

Other donations related to the Kick-off Breakfast were received from: Patricia Moyer Dermody - Communicating Success SLP Services; Marni Kuhlmann – CTV; Cummings, Andrews & Mackay LLP; Frances Zinger - Cummings, Andrews & Mackay; Kathleen Ryan - Davis LLP; Bruce Burke - EMC Corporation; Isabel Henderson - Vice President, Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital; Janet Juneau - James H. Brown & Associates; Colleen Dibden - Kids with Cancer Society; Old Scona Academic School; Earl Shindruk - Optimax Benefits; Dr. Gail Matazow NeruoTrauma Psychology Services; Donna Kuo -Pricewaterhouse Coopers LLP; Lorraine Alfonsi - Realty Executives Devonshire; Dave Christie The Workun Garrick Partnership Architecture & Int. Design; Anonymous Donor; Erin Bampton; Betty Benson; Isabel Bernete; Stephanie Boldt; Elsie Boychuk; Michael & Caroline Clark; Linda J. & Frank Clish; Nancy E. Cumming; Dr. Garnet & Greta Cummings; Dr. William & Judy Dickout; Trevor Dodd; Deborah J. Dover; David Duggan; Frances Elgaard; Bharti Gupta; Gary Gutscher; K. Lynn Hyska; Soren & Louise Jensen; Ronald Jewitt; Scott & Tanya Karpyshyn; D. Jean Lawson; Dr. Drew R. Makinen; Frank MacKay; Wendy Mathewson; Ross Mckay; David Ted Mitchell; Iris Neumann; Mary Ellen Plumite; Justin Quedado; Margaret Ritchie; Valerie Rodriguez; Marion Rosborough; Quentin Ranson; Jacqueline A. Stewart; Marilyn Dumkee; Lacey Peters; Rajpal S. Thiara; Murray Whitby; Janice Wilson Kick-off Breakfast Raffle Items were graciously donated by: DFA Tech. Inc; Comic Strip; FC Edmonton; Brian Hatfield , Jenny Kashkar Thank you to ATCO Blue Flame for donating 300 Atco Blue Flame Kitchen Cookbooks

Brain Care Centre acknowledges the gracious ongoing support from:
Alberta Health Services; Alberta Human Services – Disability Policy and Supports Division, City of Edmonton Community Services, Homeward Trust, Union 52 Benevolent Society; Lorne Ertman; Wanda Despins; Chris & Christine Keamy; Helen Majeed and Family; Wesley Parsons; Donald & Kelly Peacock; Elizabeth Raaflaub; Gertrude Rabinovitz; Michael & Nadine Stack ; Velma Sterenberg; Cassidy Tomma; Don Verbeke; Douglas Vosper; Eleanor, Ross & Daniel Wein

Donations were received to honour of the birthday of:
Alexandra Kramer
The donations in June for BIAM Green Ribbon have been very appreciated!

Supporters and Sponsors of the Edson BIG Brunch are:
Sponsor: Troy Cumberland - Conoco Phillips Inc., Edson Other supporters: Bob & Lis Anderson, Murray Barrass, Norman & Haroldene Holt, Patricia Harrison, Town of Edson Auction & Raffle Items donated by: VIA Rail, Barb Eckert, Edson Golf Club, Edson Location – Fountain Tire, Fineline Stationary, George Mah – Jensen’s Lifestyle Clothing, Medico Instructional, Pat’s Safety Consulting Ltd., and Upgrading

Brain Care Centre Platinum Sponsor

Brain Care Centre Gold Sponsor

Human Services - Disability Policy and Supports Division

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DEFY LIMITATIONS!

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Please help Brain Care Centre grow as a community based organization by becoming a member.

 Quarterly
Newsletter Name: ___________________________________________________________ Address: _________________________________________________________ City/Province/Postal Code: __________________________________________ Phone: Day: ____________ Evening: ______________ Fax: _______________ Resources at Events

 Library

 Voting Privileges  Preferred Seating

 Early Bird Event
Registration

 And Much,
Much More!

 Save the Stamp!
Please have my BCC News delivered to me at my following e-mail address: ___________________________

BCC provides a continuum of services to people affected by acquired brain injury including cognitive rehabilitation, education, support, service coordination, referral, advocacy and volunteer opportunities.

 Person with
Injury

 Professional

 Caregiver

 Family

 Corporate

 Non-profit

I would like to donate $ _______ for my BCC Membership. Membership fees are by donation and do not qualify for a charitable receipt. Payment Methods:

 Cash  Cheque payable to
Brain Care Centre

 Credit Card 
 

Name on Card: _______________________________ VISA MC AMEX Card # _____________________________________ Expiry ______ /_____
mm yy

Brain Care Centre #229 Royal Alex Place 10106 – 111 Ave Edmonton, AB, Canada T5G 0B4 Phone: 780.477-7575 Fax: 780.474.4415 Toll Free: 1.800.425.5552 e-mail:admin@braincarecentre.com www. braincarecentre.com

If you would like to make an additional charitable contribution to further support the work of BCC, please indicate below. For contributions of $ 10 or greater, BCC will issue a charitable receipt.

  $100  Other _____

 $35

 $50

Edson Office 1.780.712.7560 Toll Free: 1.866.712.7560 Edson Fax: 1.780.712.7567 If you need more information about BCC, brain injury or stroke, please phone us.

Contributions are gratefully acknowledged in BCC’s Quarterly Newsletter.
 I would prefer my donation remain anonymous

I would like to learn about Brain Care Centre volunteer opportunities.

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