Wine Service Provision

Advanced Technical Skills – FBA 11 In Food & Beverage Service (Theory) Mr J. Zahra

Roderick Zammit

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January 2006

ADVANCED TECHNICAL SKILLS THEORY – FBA 11

CONTENTS Page No 2 3 4 6 12

10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4 10.5

Factors to be taken into account when dealing with Customers Key Features and Functions of a Wine List Basic Types and Range of Available Wines Appropriate Storage, Serving and Pouring of Wines Factors to take into Account when organising the service of wines Bibliography

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10.1

Factors to be taken into account when dealing with Customers

Types of Customers Examples: 1. Function Customers 2. Restaurant Customers 3. Bar Customers 4. Regular Customers 5. Family type of Customers 6. Couple Type of Customers 7. Teenager and Young Type of Customers 8. Customers with Special Needs 9. Elderly Customers Customer Requirements How to Identify: 1. Customers’ Facial Expressions 2. Customers’ Body Language 3. Asking for Feedback on Satisfaction 4. According to Menu Items, Example by offering Accompaniments Unexpected Situations Procedures: 1. Examples of Procedures Drunk Stop Serving Alcoholic Beverages Intoxicated Do not serve Alcoholic Beverages, if need be get authorities such as: Police Force Suspecting Under Age Ask for Identification Customers that bring their own Beverages Charge for Corkage Items on menu out of Stock Offer Alternatives

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ADVANCED TECHNICAL SKILLS THEORY – FBA 11

Establishment Procedures Taking a Wine Order: 1. Offer Wine List 2. Provide Suggestions 3. Listen Carefully to Customer 4. Write down Order 5. Confirm Order by repeating to Customer 6. Present the Bottle to Customer 7. Open Bottle in front of Guest 8. Serve Host enough for Tasting 9. Serve his Guests ‘Ladies First’ and ‘Age Before Beauty’ 10. Go Back to serve Host 11. Leave the bottle together with its cork on customers Table on a Lined Plate if it’s red or in an Ice Bucket if its White, Rose or Sparkling 10.2 Key Features and Functions of a Wine List Types Wine Lists: 1. Bar Wine List 2. Functions Wine List 3. Room Service Wine List 4. Restaurant Wine List Layout Examples: 1. Attached to Menu 2. Separate Wine List to Menu 3. Wine List left on Table 4. Tent Card Wine List 5. Scroll Wine List Selling Wine List Function: 1. Similar to a Menu a Wine list is a Selling Aid 2. Makes the Customer aware of the i. Availability of Wine ii. Variety of Wine iii. Wine Contents and Attributes iv. Wine Grape Variety Promotion: 1. Marketing Tool 2. Helps the Customer in the Selection of Wine 3. Enhances the Probability of Customers acquiring wine.

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ADVANCED TECHNICAL SKILLS THEORY – FBA 11

Harmonisation Wines/Foods: 1. Examples Sea Bass Beef Pork Goat Cheese Bisque Asparagus

Riesling / Chardonnay Cabernet Sauvignon Gamay / Merlot Pinot Grigio / Sauvignon Blanc Viognior Sauvignon Blanc

10.3

Basic Types and Range of Available Wines

Types Basic Range: 1. Red 2. Rose 3. White 4. Fortified 5. Still 6. Sparkling 7. Vintage Characteristics Range: 1. Dry 2. Medium-Dry 3. Sweet 4. Fruity 5. Full-Bodied 6. Medium Bodied 7. Oak-Aged Country of Origin France: 1. Bordeaux 2. Burgundy 3. Alsace 4. Beaujolais 5. Champagne 6. Cognac
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ADVANCED TECHNICAL SKILLS THEORY – FBA 11

7. Provance 8. Rhone 9. Armagnac New World: 1. Canada 2. Australia 3. South Africa 4. Japan 5. Chile 6. United States 7. New Zealand

Bottle and Label Information Examples: 1. Amount in “cl” 2. Alcoholic Percentage 3. Country of Origin 4. Grape Type 5. Information and/or History of that Particular Wine 6. Name and/or Label of Winery

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ADVANCED TECHNICAL SKILLS THEORY – FBA 11

10.4

Appropriate Storage, Serving and Pouring of Wines

Equipment 1. 2. Buckets normally made of Shiny Stainless Steel, which are usually mounted on Stands made on Purpose. Used to keep Wine or Champagne at Ideal Cold Temperature

Coolers: 1. Cupboards used to store red wine to keep them at the best temperature

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ADVANCED TECHNICAL SKILLS THEORY – FBA 11

Carafes: 1. Bottle Shaped Jugs but with wider Necks 2. Normally used for serving House Wine

Decanters: 1. Special Shaped Bottles normally made of Crystal Glass 2. Normally used for Port or Sherry

Cradles: 1. A Stand to hold bottles of wine 2. Normally used for Red Bottles of Wine

Corkscrews
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ADVANCED TECHNICAL SKILLS THEORY – FBA 11

1. Waiters’ Friend 2. Used for Opening Wine Bottles plus any other bottles such as Soft Drinks

Glassware: 1. Glasses 2. Bottles 3. Decanters 4. Carafes

Service Cloths: 1. Waiters’ Cloths 2. Service Cloths used for serving wine to wipe the rim of the neck to prevent Spilling.

Storage and Service Temperatures

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ADVANCED TECHNICAL SKILLS THEORY – FBA 11

Red: 15.5 – 18oC Rose: 12.5 – 15.5oC White: 10 – 12.5oC Dessert Wines, Champagne and Sparkling: 4.5 – 10oC

Presenting In the Bottle: 1. Present the Bottle to the Host, Label Facing Towards Him 2. Serve Wine from the Right, Having the Label Facing the Guest 3. Pour a Little wine into the Hosts Glass for tasting. 4. Serve the rest of the customers on the table, leaving the Host for last 5. Ladies are to be served first, Age before Beauty

By the Glass: 1. Present the Glass to who ever ordered if 2. Serve Beverages always from the right of the Guest Cradle: 1. A Stand to hold bottles of wine 2. Normally used for Red Bottles of Wine Decanter: 1. Present the Bottle to the Host 2. Serve Wine from the Right, Having the Label Facing the Guest 3. Pour a Little wine into the Hosts Glass for tasting. 4. Serve the rest of the customers on the table, leaving the Host for last 5. Ladies are to be served first, Age before Beauty Host:

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ADVANCED TECHNICAL SKILLS THEORY – FBA 11

1. 2. 3. 4.

Wine List is to be given to the Host Present the Bottle to the Host Pour a Little wine into the Hosts Glass for tasting. Serve the rest of the customers on the table, leaving the Host for last

Using Corkscrew: 1. Present the Bottle to the Host 2. Remove the Foil 3. Insert the twirl into the cork 4. Pull using the Rim of Bottle without using too much force 5. Wipe Rim of Bottle for any Leftovers of the cork

Champagne and other Sparking Wines: 1. Present the Bottle to the Host 2. Remove the Metal Part keeping hold of the Cork 3. Remove the cork slowly, not to allow the overflow to occur 4. Wipe Rim of Bottle for any Leftovers of the cork

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ADVANCED TECHNICAL SKILLS THEORY – FBA 11

Identification of Host/taster: 1. Host can be Identified by either asking the Head waiter 2. Anticipating by asking the surname of the person who booked the table, then asking the party who is Mr/Mrs Host Method of Pouring: 1. Present the Bottle to the Host with the label facing the Guest 2. Open and Wipe the inside neck of the bottle with a serviette 3. Hold the bottle for pouring in such a way that the label may be seen 4. Use the waiter’s cloth, folded to catch any drips

Remainder of Party: 1. Give a taste to the host, pouring from the right 2. Serve the rest of the Party, Ladies First, Age before Beauty. Starting from the Host’s Right 3. Finish by serving the Host

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ADVANCED TECHNICAL SKILLS THEORY – FBA 11

Amount: 1. Normally a 25cl glass is used in which case a maximum of 15cl is filled up. 10.4.6 Key Points for Pouring Right hand Side: 1. Wine as per any other beverage is presented, offered and poured from the right hand side of each guest 2. Glasses are positioned on the top right hand side of the place setting, for them to be easily reached when wine is poured by the waiter Label Visible: 1. Label should be left clearly visible when wine is being poured, for the guest to be able to see. Range of Skills: 1. On Finishing Pouring a glass of wine, twist the neck of the bottle and raise it at the same time 2. This prevents drips from falling on the table cloths, but if drips fall anyway, use the Waiters cloth to wipe the rim of the Bottle’s Neck 3. When opening a Wine Bottle care needs to be taken to open the bottle slowly to prevent it from popping, as this can ruin the wine. Refilling Glass Procedure: 1. A Wine Glass would normally be of 25cl capacity, but should be filled up to 15cl. 2. As soon as a wine glass is near to empty, the wine waiter should ask the guest if a re-fill is desired. 3. Glasses should be refilled to a maximum of 15cl in a 25cl glass. Procedure for Empty Bottle: 1. If bottle is finished, the wine waiter should ask if another bottle is desired 2. If another bottle is ordered by the customer, fresh glasses are to be offered 3. Once again the host or who ever ordered the wine is to taste the wine

10.5

Factors to take into Account when organising the service of wines

Mise en Place Examples: 1. Wine List 2. Service Plates 3. Silver Salvers 4. Ice Buckets and Stands 5. Corkscrews 6. Bottle Under Plates

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ADVANCED TECHNICAL SKILLS THEORY – FBA 11

7. Champagne Stoppers Temperature Correct Temperature of Wines: 1. Red 15.5 – 18oC 2. Rose 12.5 – 15.5oC 3. White 10 – 12.5oC 4. Dessert Wines, Champagne and Sparkling 4.5 – 10oC Chilling and Warming Establishment Procedures: 1. Wine is stored in fridges or cabinets in accordance to the temperature it is required to be served in 2. If white wine is not cold enough, it can be chilled by placing in an ice-bucket full of ice 3. If red wine is not cool enough, then it needs to be opened as early as possible in order for it to attain room temperature naturally Orders Priorities: 1. First Come First Serve 2. Regular Customers Alternatives Offering: 1. Same Type of Wine 2. Same Grape 3. Same Variety 4. Different Tastes 5. Wine of the Day 6. Special Offers

Situations: 1. Wine Finished 2. Wine out of Stock 3. Bin Ends 4. Better Vintage 5. Corked Wine 6. Wine not to Customers Satisfaction Rejects Procedures for Unacceptable wine:

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ADVANCED TECHNICAL SKILLS THEORY – FBA 11

1. Replace 2. Offer Alternatives

Bibliography
Authors Year Tom Powers Clayton W. Barrows 2003 Ricky W. Griffin 2002 Richard L. Daft 2000 H.L Cracknell, 2000 Richard Kotas 1999 Kinton, Ceserani 1999 Dennis R Lillicrap 1997 Book Publisher Name Introduction to Management in the Hospitality Industry . Management Houghton Mifflin Company Management Harcourt Collage Publishers Practical Professional Catering Management Macmillan Press Food and Beverage Management Hodder & Stoughton Publishers Theory Of Catering Hodder & Stoughton Food and Beverage Service Hodder & Stoughton Publishers Seventh Edition Edition

Seventh Edition Fifth Edition Fifth Edition Sixth Edition Ninth Edition

Third Edition

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